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Bush   /bʊʃ/   Listen
Bush

noun
1.
A low woody perennial plant usually having several major stems.  Synonym: shrub.
2.
A large wilderness area.
3.
Dense vegetation consisting of stunted trees or bushes.  Synonyms: chaparral, scrub.
4.
43rd President of the United States; son of George Herbert Walker Bush (born in 1946).  Synonyms: Dubya, Dubyuh, George Bush, George W. Bush, George Walker Bush, President Bush, President George W. Bush.
5.
United States electrical engineer who designed an early analogue computer and who led the scientific program of the United States during World War II (1890-1974).  Synonym: Vannevar Bush.
6.
Vice president under Reagan and 41st President of the United States (born in 1924).  Synonyms: George Bush, George H.W. Bush, George Herbert Walker Bush, President Bush.
7.
Hair growing in the pubic area.  Synonyms: crotch hair, pubic hair.



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"Bush" Quotes from Famous Books



... Indian country, Settlement of Marietta, Of Cincinatti, Fort Washington erected, Settlement of Duck creek, Big Bottom and Wolf creeks—Harmar's campaign, murder of whites on Big Bottom, murder of John Bush—Affair at Hansucker's on Dunkard—murder of Carpenter and others and escape of Jesse Hughes—campaign under Gen. St. Clair—Attack at Merrill's, Heroic conduct of mrs. Merrill, Signal success of ...
— Chronicles of Border Warfare • Alexander Scott Withers

... very well off here. Solitude in this terrestrial paradise is a genial balm to my mind, and the young spring cheers with its bounteous promises my oftentimes misgiving heart. Every tree, every bush, is full of flowers; and one might wish himself transformed into a butterfly, to float about in this ocean of perfume, and find his ...
— The Sorrows of Young Werther • J.W. von Goethe

... according to Bunsen, corresponds to this. This also is the name of Jehovah as given to Moses from the burning bush: "And God said unto Moses, I AM THE I AM. Thus shalt thou say unto the children of Israel, I AM hath sent me unto you." The idea is that God alone really exists, and that the root of all being is in him. This is expressed in another Upanishad: "HE WHO EXISTS is the root of ...
— Ten Great Religions - An Essay in Comparative Theology • James Freeman Clarke

... marked for death when he came into this house, and that he meant what he said when he spoke of coming home to die. Things had gone against him for the last ten years in America. He married and took his wife out to a farm in the Bush, and thought to make a good thing out of farming with the bit of brass he'd saved at heeam. But America isn't Gert Langdale, you see, my lady, and his knowledge stood him in no stead in the Bush; and first he lost his money, and he fashed himself terrible about ...
— Phantom Fortune, A Novel • M. E. Braddon

... Stephen's, Mr. Kissling's School-house.—You know I am to live here when not on the "Southern Cross," or journeying in the Bush; so I must describe, first, the place itself, then my room in it. The house is a large one-storied building of wood, no staircase in it, but only a succession of rooms.... There are at present fourteen or sixteen girls ...
— Life of John Coleridge Patteson • Charlotte M. Yonge

... proves what I assert—that they are a race to be kept under. No race capable of achieving its liberty by its own efforts, would have listened for one moment to the paper threats of all the generals in the world. The negroes listened to McClellan, and they shrank behind the bush. They are bushmen in Africa. They are a dependent race, unwilling—I assert it from the record of history—unwilling to assert their independence at the risk of their lives. By their own efforts they never have attained, and ...
— History of the Thirty-Ninth Congress of the United States • Wiliam H. Barnes

... what moment he might not put in an appearance, and whenever he did show, it was to storm about something. He was like the lion in the Bishop of Oxford's Sunday story—always liable to rush out from behind some bush and devour some one when he was least expected. He called Ernest "an audacious reptile" and said he wondered the earth did not open and swallow him up because he pronounced Thalia with a short i. "And this to me," he thundered, ...
— The Way of All Flesh • Samuel Butler

... every nook and corner? Of course there were Bibles in the bedrooms; and you were not made to pay a franc for every cake of soap. Mrs. Rowe had her tea direct from Twinings'. Twinings' tea she had drunk through her better time, when Rowe had one of the finest houses in all Shepherd's Bush, and come what might, Twinings' tea she would drink while she was permitted to drink tea at all. Brown Windsor—no other soap for Mrs. Rowe, if you please. People who wanted any of the fanciful soaps of Rimmel or Piver must buy them. Brown Windsor ...
— The Cockaynes in Paris - 'Gone abroad' • Blanchard Jerrold

... is a bush with leaves that contain the stimulant used to make cocaine. Coca is not to be confused with cocoa, which comes from cacao seeds and is used in making ...
— The 2000 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency.

... cage, in which the canary spent his involuntarily celibate life, an ancient microphylla rose-bush, with a single imperfect bud blooming ahead of summer amid its glossy foliage, clambered over a green lattice to the gabled pediment of the porch, while the delicate shadows of the leaves rippled like lace-work on the gravel below. In the miniature garden, where the small spring blossoms strayed ...
— Virginia • Ellen Glasgow

... returning from a long excursion which the Huberts allowed her to take twice a year, on Pentecost Monday and on Assumption Day, she took home with her a sweetbriar bush, and then amused herself by replanting it in the narrow garden. She trimmed it and watered it well: it grew and sent out long branches, filled with odour. With her usual intensity, she watched it daily, but was unwilling to have it grafted, as she wished ...
— The Dream • Emile Zola

... of the situation now struck Jane like a blow on the funny bone, and she burst out laughing in the very face of the thorny rose bush. ...
— Jane Allen: Junior • Edith Bancroft

... different route, was unable to reach us, though we could talk to him across a fissure. Many of these breaks could be jumped, but some of them were too wide for safety. The surface was largely barren sandstone, only a patch of sand here and there sustaining sometimes a bush or stunted cedar. It is the Land of Standing Rocks, as the Utes ...
— The Romance of the Colorado River • Frederick S. Dellenbaugh

... the head of the dogs, guiding them down the rough side of the ridge, while Howland steadied the toboggan from behind. For three-quarters of an hour they traversed the low bush of the plain in silence. From every rising snow hummock Jean scanned the white desolation about them, and each time, as nothing that was human came within his vision, he turned toward the engineer with a sinister shrug of his shoulders. Once three moving caribou, ...
— The Danger Trail • James Oliver Curwood

... Bolgani, the king gorilla, tore me almost to pieces, while I was still but a little boy, did I have a nice soft bed to lie on? No, only the damp, rotting vegetation of the jungle. Hidden beneath some friendly bush I lay for days and weeks with only Kala to nurse me—poor, faithful Kala, who kept the insects from my wounds and warned off the beasts ...
— The Return of Tarzan • Edgar Rice Burroughs

... seraphic benediction over the uncommonly good cheer of the fellows' table) there are portraits of many most eminent Bonifacians. There is the learned Doctor Griddle, who suffered in Henry VIII.'s time, and Archbishop Bush who roasted him—there is Lord Chief Justice Hicks—the Duke of St. David's, K.G., Chancellor of the University and Member of this College—Sprott the Poet, of whose fame the college is justly proud—Doctor Blogg, the late master, and friend of ...
— The History of Pendennis • William Makepeace Thackeray

... years in the capacity of shepherd on one of the big Australian sheep-runs, and had lived cut off from communion with his kind in the great lone land, absorbing into his blood the spirit of solitude that broods in the Bush and in time robs man ...
— In the Roaring Fifties • Edward Dyson

... we find Urvasi's friend, the Apsare Tschitralekha, watering a rose-bush, into which her ...
— The Standard Operaglass - Detailed Plots of One Hundred and Fifty-one Celebrated Operas • Charles Annesley

... that the man whose fatal and mysterious wound I had myself examined should be there, walking with his wife in lover-like attitude. And yet there was no question that the pair were there. A small bush separated us, so that they passed arm-in-arm within three feet of me. As I have already explained, the moon was so bright that I could see to read; therefore, shining full upon their faces, it was impossible to mistake the features of two persons ...
— The Seven Secrets • William Le Queux

... the bush at the back of the college? It would be little harm for you to speak to me ...
— What Necessity Knows • Lily Dougall

... the bishop, after beating around the bush some more, comes out with his idea. Whether he expected there would be any Messiah come or not, of course he knowed the doctor wasn't him. But he is willing to boost the doctor's game as long as it boosts HIS game. He wants to be in on the deal. He wants part of the graft. ...
— Danny's Own Story • Don Marquis

... I had seen and thought took place in a mere fraction of time, and even before Master Freake had pulled up, I was creeping like a ferret from bush to bush to get nearer. Then, just as in his quiet, measured tones he was asking what they wanted, I burst out into the wood, shouting, "Forward, my men, here the villains are!" With the words, I fired my handful of swan-shot clean into the ...
— The Yeoman Adventurer • George W. Gough

... over in a large boat to Samar. Out of eleven strong baggage porters whom the governor's representative had selected for me, four took possession of some trifling articles and sped away with them, three others hid themselves in the bush, and four had previously decamped at Lauang. The baggage was divided and distributed amongst the four porters who were detained, and the little boys who had accompanied us for their own pleasure. We followed the ...
— The Former Philippines thru Foreign Eyes • Fedor Jagor; Tomas de Comyn; Chas. Wilkes; Rudolf Virchow.

... to the need of beating out the fire and trampling down a place to isolate it, as in the bush-fires of her experience; and Rosamond related the achievements of the regiment in quenching many a ...
— The Three Brides • Charlotte M. Yonge

... stones in it numbered eight hundred and seventy-two. Each stone represented a body. The row of stones might have been longer, had not Ra Undreundre unfortunately received a spear in the small of his back in a bush skirmish on Somo Somo and been served up on the table of Naungavuli, whose mediocre string of stones numbered ...
— South Sea Tales • Jack London

... January, 1794, he wrote to the Committee of Public Safety of the National Convention: "Citizen Representatives!—A country of sixty leagues extent, I have the happiness to inform you, is now a perfect desert; not a dwelling, not a bush, but is reduced to ashes; and of one hundred and eighty thousand worthless inhabitants, not a soul breathes any longer. Men and women, old men and children, have all experienced the national vengeance, and are no more. It was a pleasure to ...
— The Memoirs of Napoleon Bonaparte • Bourrienne, Constant, and Stewarton

... entrance to this ravine, bathing with a flood of light crags and caves and bush-encompassed hollows, that at other times were shrouded in gloom. As the Irishman stood gazing in awe and admiration at the wild, beautiful scene, beyond which were seen the snowy peaks of the Sierra Nevada, ...
— The Golden Dream - Adventures in the Far West • R.M. Ballantyne

... solitary thicket we would make our camp for the night. Hours passed away, and yet the solitary clump seemed as distant as ever—nay, more, it even appeared to grow smaller as I approached it. At last, just at dusk, I drew near the wished for camping-place; but lo! it was nothing but a single bush. My clump had vanished, my camping-place had gone, the mirage had been playing tricks with the little bush and magnifying it into a grove of aspens. When night fell there was no trace of camp or companions, but the snow marks showed that I was still upon ...
— The Great Lone Land - A Narrative of Travel and Adventure in the North-West of America • W. F. Butler

... knowledge that the rock was rough and she was sure-footed, she lowered herself over the side of the ravine and reached for a foothold. Presently she found it, and then another. Slowly, with cut and bleeding hands, she made her way down. Half way, perhaps, she grasped a little bush which seemed to spring securely from the cliff and held tightly to this until she could grasp another jutting point of rock and then another bush, until at last, with a great sobbing sigh, she found her feet planted ...
— The Black Pearl • Mrs. Wilson Woodrow

... corner of the grounds was a fairly large patch, innocent of bush and offering no cover at all. He made a casual survey of this, sweeping his light across the ordered rows of growing vegetables, and was going away when he saw a black bulk which had the appearance, even in the darkness, of a gardener's house. He swept this possible cover with ...
— The Daffodil Mystery • Edgar Wallace

... the garden; I have searched under every bush and tree. She is not asleep in the summer-house, or in the old barn. She is not feeding the speckled chickens, or gathering buttercups in the meadows. Her little dog Fidele is weary waiting for her, and her sweet-voiced canary ...
— Little Ferns For Fanny's Little Friends • Fanny Fern

... things that he faked from Rogers Brothers' great-grandfather. Bill Watson works there, too. Me and Bill have to stand for them chestnuts day after day. Why do we do it? Well, jobs ain't to be picked off every Anheuser bush...
— Strictly Business • O. Henry

... Bush, marries Thomas Lincoln, 10; improves the condition of his household, 10; tells ...
— A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln - Condensed from Nicolay & Hay's Abraham Lincoln: A History • John G. Nicolay

... sneered Barthorpe. "Confound it, man, what do you beat about the bush so much for? Hang it, I've a pretty good notion of you, and I daresay you've your own of me. Why can't ...
— The Herapath Property • J. S. Fletcher

... warriors were wroth, and my father could not restrain them. They called out their men, and I called out my men, and I had a large body, for my name was terrible. But the force raised against me was twice that of mine, and I retreated to the bush—after awhile we met and fought, and I killed many, but my men were too few, and were overpowered—the fetish had been sent out against me, and their hearts melted; at last I sank down with my wounds, for I bled at every pore, and I told my men who ...
— Mr. Midshipman Easy • Frederick Marryat

... intoxicated with its own performance. Finishing the last notes perfectly, the bird gave a hop, glanced around as if he were saying: "Now any one who thinks he can surpass that, has my permission to try." From a bush a small gray bird meouwed in derision and accepted the challenge. The watchers could not see him, but he came so close singing the same song that he deceived Mr. Dovesky, for he said: "He's going to do it ...
— Michael O'Halloran • Gene Stratton-Porter

... quite out of place unless he has, for the best reason and spirit of man, some significance. "Well, but," says Mr. Hepworth Dixon, [116] "a theory which has been accepted by men like Judge Edmonds, Dr. Hare, Elder Frederick, and Professor Bush!" And again: "Such are, in brief, the bases of what Newman Weeks, Sarah Horton, Deborah Butler, and the associated brethren, proclaimed in Rolt's Hall as the new covenant!" If he was summing up an account of the teaching of Plato or St. Paul, Mr. Hepworth Dixon could ...
— Culture and Anarchy • Matthew Arnold

... apace about the clearing, so that we could not get a sight of the spot till we were close by, when Morgan softly parted the bush-like growth, peered out, drew back, and signed to me to advance, moving aside the while, so that I could pass him, ...
— Mass' George - A Boy's Adventures in the Old Savannah • George Manville Fenn

... friend from the bush!" he exclaimed; "are you in town to buy imitation coal, or is it to get a derrick and hoist your home affairs away from my property? Why don't you take a tumble, John, and ...
— Back to the Woods • Hugh McHugh

... eyes flamed over him, but casually, in making a swift circuit of the shores of the lake and the black fringe of the firs; but for all the interest which their owner vouchsafed him, Kane might as well have been a juniper bush. ...
— Kings in Exile • Sir Charles George Douglas Roberts

... pine-trees I love swaying and rocking against the blue, blue sky; I could catch the low-hummed tune they crooned to themselves and the winds; I could sniff a thousand woodsy odors. Spears of sunlight made bright blobs on the brown grass; and every littlest bush and shrub wore a shimmering halo, as you see the blessed ones backgrounded in old pictures. There was a bird twittering somewhere; occasionally a twig snapped with a quick, secret sharpness; and once a thin brown rabbit took to his heels, ...
— A Woman Named Smith • Marie Conway Oemler

... expedition—he and his comrades had been obliged to slink on board at night, to escape from their wives, by Jove—and how the poor devils put out in their canoes when they saw the ship under sail, and paddled madly after her: how he had been lost in the bush once for three months in New South Wales, when he was there once on a trading speculation: how he had seen Boney at Saint Helena, and been presented to him with the rest of the officers of the Indiaman of which he was a mate—to all these tales ...
— The History of Pendennis • William Makepeace Thackeray

... young people travel unencumbered and light, without being fatigued by the journey. When come to the hunting-spot, they encamp near a brook, where there is always wood; the horses they tie by one of their fore-feet with a string to a stake or bush. ...
— History of Louisisana • Le Page Du Pratz

... countless shapes of things that are to be are taking stealthy counsel of how to grow up without letting their gown of mystery fall. They rustle, whisper, shriek suddenly, and as suddenly fall into a delicious silence. From the first hazel-bush to the last may-tree it is an unending meeting-place of young solemn things eager to find out what they are, eager to rush forth to greet the kisses of the wind and sun, and for ever trembling back and hiding their faces. The spirit of that ...
— Forsyte Saga • John Galsworthy

... plume themselves upon being crows of the world. They always fold their wings three times after alighting, to be sure that it is neatly done. They know how to worry a fox into giving up half his dinner, and also that when the kingbird or the purple martin assails them they must dash into a bush, for it is as impossible to fight the little pests as it is for the fat apple-woman to catch the small boys who have raided her basket. All these things do the young crows know; but they have taken no ...
— Wild Animals I Have Known • Ernest Thompson Seton

... not seem to be an exhaustive process to the trees, as the trees of a sugar-bush appear to be as thrifty and as long-lived as other trees. They come to have a maternal, large-waisted look, from the wounds of the axe or the auger, and that ...
— In the Catskills • John Burroughs

... powerful a hold on Janina that there was no room in her consciousness for anything else. In her hours of ecstasy it appeared to her like a mystic altar suspended high above the gray vale of everyday life and glowing with flames like a second burning bush of Moses; it seemed to her like a miracle that ...
— The Comedienne • Wladyslaw Reymont

... five when Cleek, answering an urgent message from headquarters, strolled into the bar parlour of "The Fiddle and Horseshoe," which, as you may possibly know, stands near to the Green in a somewhat picturesque by-path between Shepherd's Bush and Acton, and found Narkom in the very act of hanging up his hat and withdrawing his gloves ...
— Cleek, the Master Detective • Thomas W. Hanshew

... next day such certain signs of land were seen that the most faint-hearted took courage. The men had already noticed great flocks of land-birds flying toward the west, as if to guide them. Now some of the men on one vessel saw a branch of a thorn-bush float by. It was plain that it had not long been broken off from the bush, and it ...
— The Beginner's American History • D. H. Montgomery

... living, and, at last, perfectly authoritative ideal of righteousness, but more than all a gradual growth of such moral power as would be commanding in the redeeming self-sacrifice and love of Jesus Christ. Every page of the Old Testament was only preparatory, as the thorny bush is preparatory for the rose. Christ is the end of the long, weary human history that leads to Him. If the laws of Sinai had been enough, there never would have been a Calvary. No one for a moment dreams that the God of nature could have brought forth such a fruit as the life and ideas of Jesus without ...
— The World's Great Sermons, Volume 10 (of 10) • Various

... the rivers in continuous streams in the fall, as large as a man's hand. The old ones so weak, that if they were forced by the current against a rock they got off with difficulty. Six miles north of Charlottesville three hundred were caught in one night with a bush seine. A negro told me he had caught seventeen in a trap at one time. I recollect the negroes bringing them to my mother continually. An entry of land near Charlottesville about 1735 crossed the Rivanna for two or three acres as a fishing ...
— The Bounty of the Chesapeake - Fishing in Colonial Virginia • James Wharton

... beautiful!" he went on. "She walk the groun' as sof' and proud and pretty as fine yong horse! She sit her horse like a flower on its stem. Me and her good frens too. She say she lak me for cause I am simple. Often in the winter she ride out wit' my team and hunt in the bush while I am ...
— The Fur Bringers - A Story of the Canadian Northwest • Hulbert Footner

... lost; and if faithful to my pledge I might have remained lost for days, for weeks, have left perhaps my bones to be discovered bleaching in some blind alley of the Whitechapel district, as it had happened to lonely travellers lost in the bush. But I walked on to my destination without hesitation or mistake, showing there, for the first time, some of that faculty to absorb and make my own the imaged topography of a chart, which in later years was to help me in regions of ...
— Notes on Life and Letters • Joseph Conrad

... of he coat, an' he fight an' struggle an' cry out: "Dey ain't no ghosts. Dey ain't no ghosts." An' dat ain't nuffin' but de wild brier whut grab him, an' dat ain't nuffin' but de leaf ob a tree whut brush he cheek, an' dat ain't nuffin' but de branch ob a hazel-bush whut brush he arm. But he downright scared jes de same, an' he ain't lost no time, 'ca'se de wind an' de owls an' de rain-doves dey signerfy whut ain't no good. So he scoot past dat buryin'-ground whut on de hill, ...
— The Boy Scouts Book of Campfire Stories • Various

... readily acknowledge favor and help, so I will say that for the diagram of the squaw hitch and of the diamond hitch I am indebted to an article by Mr. Stewart Edward White in Outing of 1907, and one by Mr. I. J. Bush in Recreation of 1911; for the "medicine song" and several of the star legends, to that Blackfeet epic, "The Old North Trail," by Walter McClintock; for medical and surgical hints, to Dr. Charles Moody's "Backwoods Surgery and Medicine" and to the American ...
— Pluck on the Long Trail - Boy Scouts in the Rockies • Edwin L. Sabin

... innumerable aquatic birds; at others they passed around wooded islands in midflood; and otherwhiles, again, their course lay through the vast plains of Illinois and Iowa, covered with magnificent woods or dotted with clumps of bush scattered about ...
— The Great Events by Famous Historians, Volume 12 • Editor-In-Chief Rossiter Johnson

... where I disclosed everything that had happened to my confidant and humble servant, Strap, who did not relish the accident so well as I expected; and observed, that a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush. "But, however," said he, "you know best—you know best." Next day, as, I went to the Pump Room, in hopes of seeing or hearing some tidings of my fair enslaver, I was met by a gentlewoman, who, having looked ...
— The Adventures of Roderick Random • Tobias Smollett

... begins to cut up the game when his brother's spirit appears. He feeds it, but food comes out of its anus as fast as it eats. He flees and is pursued by the spirit until, by chance, he runs among alangtin bushes. The spirit dislikes the bush ...
— Traditions of the Tinguian: A Study in Philippine Folk-Lore • Fay-Cooper Cole

... is a ceiba tree, a cypress tree, there stands a mezquite bush, strong as a cavern of stone, known as the ...
— Ancient Nahuatl Poetry - Brinton's Library of Aboriginal American Literature Number VII. • Daniel G. Brinton

... evergreens about, tall cedars, a bit of bushy foreland, and a stretch of snow. And across this open space of snow a young girl was moving, followed by a white wolf-hound. Once she paused, hesitated, looked cautiously around her. Ruthven, hiding behind a bush, saw her thrust her arm into a low evergreen shrub and draw out a shining object that glittered like glass. Then she started toward the ...
— The Younger Set • Robert W. Chambers

... out of the way; he had on a crimson velvet cape that came no lower than his elbows; on his head he had a tall felt thing like a thimble, with a feather it its jeweled band that stuck up like a pen from an inkhorn, and from under that thimble his bush of stiff hair stuck down to his shoulders, curving outward at the bottom, so that the cap and the hair together made the head like a shuttlecock. All the materials of his dress were rich, and all the colors brilliant. In his lap he cuddled a miniature ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... for centuries to come. As I was coming up to it, a cloud passed over the moon: it was very dark under its thick branches. At first I noticed nothing special; but I glanced on one side, and my heart fairly failed me—a white figure was standing motionless beside a tall bush between the oak and the forest. My hair stood upright on my head, but I plucked up my courage and went ...
— Dream Tales and Prose Poems • Ivan Turgenev

... (Gen. 18. 12.) in a dream; that is to say (as are the words of the text) "Jacob dreamed that he saw a ladder, &c." And (Gen. 32. 1.) in a Vision of Angels: And to Moses (Exod. 3.2.) in the apparition of a flame of fire out of the midst of a bush: And after the time of Moses, (where the manner how God spake immediately to man in the Old Testament, is expressed) hee spake alwaies by a Vision, or by a Dream; as to Gideon, Samuel, Eliah, Elisha, Isaiah, ...
— Leviathan • Thomas Hobbes

... repaired occasionally, and at the end they were sold for two dollars and a half.' Petticoats for women were also made of deer-skin. 'My grandmother,' says one descendant, 'made all sorts of useful dresses with these skins, which were most comfortable for a country life, and for going through the bush [since they] could not be torn by the branches.' There were of course, some articles of clothing which could not readily be made of leather; and very early the settlers commenced growing flax and raising ...
— The United Empire Loyalists - A Chronicle of the Great Migration - Volume 13 (of 32) in the series Chronicles of Canada • W. Stewart Wallace

... passed. And then, all at once, came the shock. It was tremendous. The trickery of sound on the Barren had played an unexpected prank with his senses, and while he strained his eyes to pierce the hazy starlight of the plain far out, Bram himself loomed up suddenly along the edge of the bush not twenty paces away. ...
— The Golden Snare • James Oliver Curwood

... current, strengthened by the additional stream, grew more rapid. The vessel kept in mid-channel. He might have gained nothing had she verged on either side, unless he could have got near enough to catch hold of a stout branch of some mangrove bush, where he might have hung on to it till the boat came by, when, should anybody see him, he might be rescued, otherwise a lingering and painful death would be his lot, instead of the speedy one he had every reason to expect. The roar of the breakers on ...
— The Three Midshipmen • W.H.G. Kingston

... of a doctor's work is handing out death blows to hope," he said. "But you two are big enough to take a hard knock without flinching, and I won't need to beat around the bush. ...
— Sunny Slopes • Ethel Hueston

... spot. The beaters were all ready and impatient, no doubt, owing to being kept waiting so long, and as I did not wish to delay them, and had no ladder, and there was no suitable tree, I took a seat on the ground behind a bush which lay on one side of, and about twenty yards from, a depression in the land through the bottom of which, by all the laws of tigers, the tiger ought to have passed to the main forest beyond. I had no ...
— Gold, Sport, And Coffee Planting In Mysore • Robert H. Elliot

... long before he is again making himself heard, by an exclamation, telling of some discovery—a joyful one, as evinced by the tone of his voice. The two youths hasten to his side, and find him bending over a small heath-like bush, from which he has torn a handful ...
— The Land of Fire - A Tale of Adventure • Mayne Reid

... preference was for work in the open air, because he still at times felt the effect of that brain-fever which had so nearly ended his existence at San Stefano; but his physique was not exactly of the kind which was most suited to bush-clearing and sheep-farming. This he was told, and informed, moreover, that so large a number of clerks arrived yearly in Australia and America, that the market in that sort of labour was over-stocked, and that, if he was ...
— Under False Pretences - A Novel • Adeline Sergeant

... make a Woodpecker come out of that hole," said Sapwood, one day as the three Red-men proceeded, bow in hand, through a far corner of Burns's Bush. He pointed to a hole in the top of a tall dead stub, then going near he struck the stub a couple of heavy blows with a pole. To the surprise of all there flew out, not a Woodpecker, but a Flying Squirrel. ...
— Two Little Savages • Ernest Thompson Seton

... to the bush, and, after careful deliberation, selected a perfect half-open bud and brought it to him—a white bud with a faint, sunrise flush ...
— Kilmeny of the Orchard • Lucy Maud Montgomery

... hiding, in the thicket lay: Because the Master said, 'If thou but maim One of these plants, yen, pluck a branch away, Then shall thy judgment be more just than now.' Therefore my hand I slightly forward reached; And while I wrenched away a little bough From a huge bush, 'Why mangle me?' it screeched. Then, as the dingy drops began to start, 'Why dost thou tear me?' shrieked the trunk again, 'Hast thou no touch of pity in thy heart? We that now here are planted, once were men; But, were we serpents' souls, thy hand might shame To ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 20, No. 122, December, 1867 • Various

... not require to ask what she saw, for the child's finger directed their eyes to a spot on the bank of the river, where, under the shadow of a spreading bush with gigantic leaves, stood a lovely little gazelle. The graceful creature had trotted down to the stream to drink, and did not observe the canoe, which had been on the point of rounding a bank that jutted out into the river where its progress was checked. The gazelle paused a moment, ...
— The Red Eric • R.M. Ballantyne

... the big iron gates leading to the road; and she wondered for a moment whether a tramp had found his way into the grounds on some nefarious errand. She stood still, thinking as she did so that she heard a rustle in a bush close at hand, and then Jock growled again, a fierce, low rumbling in his throat, which frightened Toni almost out of ...
— The Making of a Soul • Kathlyn Rhodes

... Master Langdon to Pigwacket Centre created a much more lively sensation than had attended that of either of his predecessors. Looks go a good way all the world over, and though there were several good-looking people in the place, and Major Bush was what the natives of the town called a "hahnsome mahn," that is, big, fat, and red, yet the sight of a really elegant young fellow, with the natural air which grows up with carefully-bred young persons, was a novelty. The Brahmin blood which came from his grandfather ...
— The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (The Physician and Poet not the Jurist)

... delivered in a Mediator's hand, even Jesus Christ, Gal. iii. 19, 20. Who was he that spake out of the cloud, and fire, and came and set down his throne on Sinai, accompanied with innumerable angels? Deut. xxxiii. 2, Acts vii. 53. It was Jesus Christ that spoke to Moses in the mount, and in the bush also, Acts vii. 35, 38. Is it then the Mediator's law, whose office it is to preach glad tidings, and the day of salvation? Sure then it needs be dreadful to no man. For if he wound, he shall heal, and he comes to bind up the broken ...
— The Works of the Rev. Hugh Binning • Hugh Binning

... a roving people and have no country, but a peasant is like a stone by the wayside. I know everything here by heart. I have moved every clod of earth with my own hands; now you say: sell and go elsewhere. Wherever I went I should be dazed and lost; when I looked at a bush I should say: that did not grow at home; the soil would be different and even the sun would not set in the same place. And what should I tell my father if he were to come looking for me when it gets too hot for him in Purgatory? ...
— Selected Polish Tales • Various

... nails in the floor were polished to steel. Ellen sat a while listening to the soothing chirrup of the cricket, and the pleasant crackling of the flames. It was a fine, cold winter's day. The two little windows at the far end of the kitchen looked out upon an expanse of snow; and the large lilac-bush that grew close by the wall, moved lightly by the wind, drew its icy fingers over the panes of glass. Wintry it was without, but that made the warmth and comfort within seem all the more. Ellen would have enjoyed it very much if she had had any one to talk to; ...
— The Wide, Wide World • Elizabeth Wetherell

... other since Alfred, contributed to bring the internal condition of England into a state of security for life and limb. Robberies and murders had become frightfully common; so much so, that the Statute of Winton, in 1285, enacted that no ditch, bush, or tree, capable of hiding a man, should be left within two hundred feet of any highway. If anything like this had been previously in force, it was no wonder that Davydd of Wales objected to having a ...
— Cameos from English History, from Rollo to Edward II • Charlotte Mary Yonge

... honeysuckle and the rose-trees...! Bush, plant, leaf, stem, rimed from end to end. The garden ...
— A Diary Without Dates • Enid Bagnold

... the horsemen clattered in their iron sheaths as the order was obeyed, and the old man expected to be immediately discovered; but one of the thorn bushes was directly between him and the troopers, and effectually concealed him. At last Jacob ventured to raise his head and peep through the bush; and he perceived that the men were loosening the girths of their black horses, or wiping away the perspiration from their sides with handfuls ...
— The Children of the New Forest • Captain Marryat

... however, was presently captured by a larger vessel, and imprisoned on board. Being carelessly watched, he escaped on two earthen jars (for he could not swim), reached the woods in Campechy, and walked for a hundred and twenty miles through the bush. His only food was a few shell-fish, and by way of a knife he had a large nail, which he whetted to an edge on a stone. Having made a kind of raft, he struck a river, and paddled to Golpho Triste, where he found congenial ...
— Essays in Little • Andrew Lang

... sophism with whiskers on it. You quote Marx and Hyndman and Kautsky—what are they?—shines! Tolstoi?—his garret is full of rats. I put it to you over the home-plate that the idea of a cooperative commonwealth and an abolishment of competitive systems simply takes the rag off the bush and gives me hyperesthesia of the roopteetoop! ...
— Whirligigs • O. Henry

... about me, stupid. I heard it all over town. Policemen talk. For me, they jump through hoops. Everybody knows. You'd be smart to lie low before someone jumps out of a sung-bush and says boo! at you. If you expected the cops to do anything, you're naive. Or stupid. About those Martian workings, is ...
— Master of the Moondog • Stanley Mullen

... in front, whence they kept up a scattering fire. As to Wyeth, and his little band of "down easters," they were perfectly astounded by this second specimen of life in the wilderness; the men, being especially unused to bush-fighting and the use of the rifle, were at a loss how to act. Wyeth, however, acted as a skilful commander. He got all the horses into camp and secured them; then, making a breastwork of his packs of goods, he charged his men to remain in the garrison, and ...
— The Great Salt Lake Trail • Colonel Henry Inman

... after that memorable parting Ethelberta came from the little door by the bush of yew, well and thickly wrapped up from head to heels. She skimmed across the park and under the boughs like a shade, mounting then the stone steps for pedestrians which were fixed beside the park gates here as at all the lodges. Outside and below her she saw an oblong shape—it ...
— The Hand of Ethelberta • Thomas Hardy

... not uncommon, forming a low thorny bush, with Aegle marmelos and Feronia elephantum. Having rested the tired elephant, we pushed on in the evening to the next stage, Baghoda, arriving there at 3 a.m., and after a few hours' rest, I walked to the bungalow of Lieutenant ...
— Himalayan Journals (Complete) • J. D. Hooker

... fist—so small, too, if he chose. Why, once, in his spare hours, he wrote out all the Psalms, with the headings, on one side of a folio sheet, and had it framed and hung up in his parlour, out at Shepherd's Bush. He died in the night—oh yes, quite easily. He was down at the office all yesterday, and spoke to me as brisk as a bird. They found him dead in ...
— Stories By English Authors: London • Various

... Butterfly with quivering wing! Hovering, in thy transient hour, Over every bush and flower, Feasting upon flowers and dew, Thyself a ...
— The Pedler of Dust Sticks • Eliza Lee Follen

... Sir, if you will take my advice, you will look to some other way of settling this business. You know what a law-suit means in this country, and you'll find yourself in the midst of a strange bush of thorns. ...
— The Impostures of Scapin • Moliere (Poquelin)

... other, as seem'd, impatient of delay Exclaiming, "Lano! not so bent for speed Thy sinews, in the lists of Toppo's field." And then, for that perchance no longer breath Suffic'd him, of himself and of a bush One group he made. Behind them was the wood Full of black female mastiffs, gaunt and fleet, As greyhounds that have newly slipp'd the leash. On him, who squatted down, they stuck their fangs, And having rent him piecemeal bore away The tortur'd limbs. My guide then seiz'd my hand, And led me to the ...
— The Divine Comedy • Dante

... preservation of Jengis Khan, the founder of their empire; and they pay it on that account almost divine honours. The prince, with a small army, happened to be surprised and put to flight by his enemies. Forced to seek concealment in a coppice, an owl settled on the bush under which he was hid. At the sight of this animal the prince's pursuers never thought of searching the spot, conceiving it impossible that such a bird would perch where any human being was concealed. Jengis escaped, and ever after his countrymen held the white owl sacred, and every one wore ...
— A Hundred Anecdotes of Animals • Percy J. Billinghurst

... snowball bush over there," said Miss Ainslie, "and all that corner of the garden will be full of roses in June. They're old-fashioned roses, that I expect you wouldn't care for-blush and cinnamon and sweet briar—but I love them all. That long row is half peonies and half bleeding-hearts, and I have a ...
— Lavender and Old Lace • Myrtle Reed

... as she was standing looking at me as I was pruning a rose-bush, she made a remark which startled me. I perfectly remember her words. 'It seems to me,' she said, 'that one who is so constantly engaged in observing and encouraging the growth and development of plants should himself grow and develop. Roses of one ...
— The Vizier of the Two-Horned Alexander • Frank R. Stockton

... was not always to be found in his favorite nook among the trees in Farmer Green's front yard. Quite often he went skipping about from tree to tree or from bush to bush, sometimes flying and sometimes leaping. It really made little difference to him which mode of travel he used. And he never stopped to think how lucky he was to be able to move so spryly with the help of either his legs or his wings. ...
— The Tale of Kiddie Katydid • Arthur Scott Bailey

... idea and began to trudge sturdily off in the direction of Mother Lemon's cottage, Topaz following close. The memory of the latter's recent mishaps was too clear in his doggish mind to make him willing that a single bush should come between him ...
— Jewel's Story Book • Clara Louise Burnham

... open space, and entering a thick bush beyond the cat house, dug a deep hole; then he went into the house. Although having no belief whatever in the sacredness of one animal more than another, he had yet been long enough among the Egyptians to feel a sensation ...
— The Cat of Bubastes - A Tale of Ancient Egypt • G. A. Henty

... flirting chewink calls his dear Behind the bush; and very near, Where water flows, where green grass grows, Song-sparrows gently ...
— The Poems of Henry Van Dyke • Henry Van Dyke

... the flutter of drapery on a little porch. My heart beat quickly, my eyes were fixed upon the spot; but nothing appeared except a maid who brought out some towels, which she hung on a bush to dry. Then again I ...
— The House of Martha • Frank R. Stockton

... best to use this means of life. People who don't want to live, people who would sooner hibernate than feel intensely, will be wise to eschew literature. They had better, to quote from the finest passage in a fine poem, "sit around and eat blackberries." The sight of a "common bush afire with ...
— Literary Taste: How to Form It • Arnold Bennett

... me, too, that the filbert is one of the best nut producing plants for use here in the North. Usually it is grown in bush form. It is very hearty and begins to bear early and abundantly under proper care. In view of the exceptionally wide range of climates and soils it seems to be one of the good nut producing plants for this association. Now it can be consistently considered that I have ...
— Northern Nut Growers Association Report of the Proceedings at the Sixth Annual Meeting. Rochester, New York, September 1 and 2, 1915 • Various

... dread, begged them not to do this thing. And he said they might cut him to pieces, or burn him, as they would, but not to throw him into the water. [Footnote: This in the original is extremely like Brer Rabbit's prayer not to be thrown into the brier-bush. As this legend is one of the oldest of the Algonquin, and certainly antedating the coming of the whites, I give it the priority over the negro.] Therefore they resolved to do so, and dragged him on. Then he screamed horribly and fought lustily, ...
— The Algonquin Legends of New England • Charles Godfrey Leland

... certainly know its situation, nor was he acquainted with its appearance, but conjectured it might be thirty leagues from where they then were at the utmost. When the general was on shore, he overtook one of the natives, who was going to gather honey at the foot of a bush, where it is deposited by the bees without any hive. With this person, he returned to the ship, thinking to have got an interpreter, but no one on board the squadron could understand his language. The general commanded ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. II • Robert Kerr

... direction he pointed. Each bush was sending a phenomenally long shadow from its intersection with the ground. There was no butte or hummock to break the expanse between them and the faint, far silhouette of mountains. Her heart sank, a sinking that fatigue and dread of ...
— The Emigrant Trail • Geraldine Bonner

... nostrils were smooth and calm with the lovely sappy scent of rabbit-nibbled maple bark and mud-wet arbutus buds. The White Linen Nurse's mind was full of sumptuous, succulent marsh marigolds, and fluffy white shad-bush blossoms. ...
— The White Linen Nurse • Eleanor Hallowell Abbott

... out, and the Rat took the sculls, paddling with caution. Out in mid-stream, there was a clear, narrow track that faintly reflected the sky; but wherever shadows fell on the water from bank, bush, or tree, they were as solid to all appearance as the banks themselves, and the Mole had to steer with judgment accordingly. Dark and deserted as it was, the night was full of small noises, song and chatter and rustling, ...
— The Wind in the Willows • Kenneth Grahame

... lieutenant governor Legislative branch: bicameral Legislative Assembly (Fono) consists of an upper house or Senate and a lower house or House of Representatives Judicial branch: High Court, district courts, and village courts Leaders: Chief of State: President George BUSH (since 20 January 1989); Vice President Dan QUAYLE (since 20 January 1989) Head of Government: Governor Peter Tali COLEMAN (since 20 January 1989); Lieutenant Governor Galea'i POUMELE (since NA 1989) Suffrage: universal at age 18; indigenous inhabitants are US nationals, not ...
— The 1992 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency.

... had the good fortune to discover a poultry yard, well supplied but ill watched, he carries away as many fowls as he can before dawn and hides them in the neighbourhood of his burrow. He places each by itself, one at the foot of a hedge, another beneath a bush, a third in a hole rapidly hollowed out and closed up again. It is said that he thus scatters his treasures to avoid the risk of losing all at one stroke, although this prudence complicates his task when he needs to utilise his provisions. The fox, however, loses nothing, and knows very well ...
— The Industries of Animals • Frederic Houssay

... on his way home saw one of his bees caught in a brier bush, he immediately stood still and wished—as some people wish today when they go under a ladder. It was the Church, too, which taught Bodo to add 'So be it, Lord', to the end of his charm against pain. Now, his ancestors for generations behind him had ...
— Medieval People • Eileen Edna Power

... magnolia trees made a gorgeous canopy of glossy green and russet, and the sunshine filtering through the leaves embroidered the old road with an intricate pattern of light and shadow. Now and then a holly tree, or bush, bright with berries, made a lovely dash of color, and glowed all over with suggestions of ...
— Princess • Mary Greenway McClelland

... bushes, a black currant tree or two (the leaves to be used in heightening the flavour of tea, the fruit as medicinal for colds and sore throats), a potato ground (and this was not so common at the close of the last century as it is now), a cabbage bed, a bush of sage, and balm, and thyme, and marjoram, with possibly a rose tree, and 'old man' growing in the midst; a little plot of small strong coarse onions, and perhaps some marigolds, the petals of which flavoured the salt-beef broth; such plants made ...
— Sylvia's Lovers, Vol. I • Elizabeth Gaskell

... large numbers and strong fortifications. There wasn't a man in the company that didn't resent the fact, constantly obtruding itself on the ranks as they marched eagerly onward by every knoll, every bush in the landscape, that Union soldiers had been there before them! that their devouring eyes were not the first to mark ...
— The Iron Game - A Tale of the War • Henry Francis Keenan

... Bush,[48] in a series of tests on each of 15 men in several different psychic fields found the following conditions among smoking students immediately after the period of ...
— How to Live - Rules for Healthful Living Based on Modern Science • Irving Fisher and Eugene Fisk

... will in a short time become a tree of good size, and the bush that seems hardly worth considering at present will develop into a shrub three, four, perhaps six feet across. If we plant closely, as we are all inclined to because of the small size of the material we use at planting time, we will ...
— Amateur Gardencraft - A Book for the Home-Maker and Garden Lover • Eben E. Rexford



Words linked to "Bush" :   groundsel tree, buckler mustard, groundsel bush, chalice vine, coronilla, cushion flower, Leucothoe racemosa, hawthorn, Codariocalyx motorius, Adenium obesum, honey bell, guinea gold vine, Dovyalis caffra, Griselinia lucida, hemp, Eryngium maritimum, Geoffroea decorticans, Datura sanguinea, greasewood, honeysuckle, Chilean nut, leatherleaf, bean trefoil, angel's trumpet, maikoa, bridal-wreath, burning bush, casava, German tamarisk, Chile nut, crepe gardenia, Chilean hazelnut, hediondilla, Argyroxiphium sandwicense, Brassaia actinophylla, crystal tea, leadwort, bitter pea, Caesalpinia decapetala, crepe jasmine, batoko palm, Chiococca alba, cupflower, geebung, staggerbush, Flacourtia indica, Acalypha virginica, gooseberry, coca, Chinese holly, calliandra, maleberry, alpine azalea, barbasco, leucothoe, Cytisus ramentaceus, castor-oil plant, governor's plum, blueberry root, frangipanni, Chamaedaphne calyculata, fever tree, andromeda, haw, stagger bush, crape myrtle, furnish, furze, joint fir, Caulophyllum thalictroides, dhal, Leiophyllum buxifolium, cherry laurel, coca plant, Japanese allspice, coville, Bauhinia monandra, blackthorn, Lagerstroemia indica, castor bean plant, Aralia stipulata, Georgia bark, Guevina heterophylla, devil's walking stick, Diervilla lonicera, fool's huckleberry, laurel cherry, gorse, Chile hazel, Labrador tea, Baccharis pilularis, Lyonia mariana, catjang pea, Christmas bush, Kolkwitzia amabilis, Irish gorse, fothergilla, bush hibiscus, Aristotelia serrata, barilla, Madagascar plum, daisy-bush, Japanese andromeda, Erythroxylon truxiuense, Aspalathus cedcarbergensis, Lambertia formosa, Jacquinia armillaris, chaparral broom, cinquefoil, day jessamine, Codiaeum variegatum, Hazardia cana, derris, Anthyllis barba-jovis, Canella winterana, male berry, butterfly flower, blueberry, currant, Brazilian potato tree, belvedere, Croton tiglium, Euonymus americanus, Francoa ramosa, American cranberry bush, honey-flower, Cycloloma atriplicifolium, blolly, cranberry, clianthus, Halimodendron halodendron, caragana, gastrolobium, barberry, lilac, crampbark, capsicum, desert willow, flame pea, Japan allspice, Eriodictyon californicum, Brunfelsia americana, Lindera benzoin, Dacridium laxifolius, Chrysolepis sempervirens, honeybells, hydrangea, dusty miller, Leycesteria formosa, Combretum bracteosum, Indian rhododendron, forsythia, forestiera, lotus tree, kudu lily, Ledum groenlandicum, candlewood, alpine totara, Brugmansia sanguinea, Christmas berry, caricature plant, abelia, arrow wood, carissa, he-huckleberry, black greasewood, Indigofera tinctoria, corkwood, Dalea spinosa, Chimonanthus praecox, false azalea, mallow, Ledum palustre, Diervilla sessilifolia, lavender, chanal, Desmodium motorium, Jacquinia keyensis, amorpha, supply, Acocanthera oblongifolia, governor plum, lady-of-the-night, chaparral pea, common flat pea, Lupinus arboreus, hollygrape, flame bush, boxwood, buckthorn, Anagyris foetida, five-finger, joewood, boxthorn, Bassia scoparia, leatherwood, Canella-alba, indigo plant, black bead, Heteromeles arbutifolia, buddleia, Apalachicola rosemary, arbutus, George W. Bush, ephedra, kapuka, corkwood tree, oriental bush cherry, juneberry, Brugmansia arborea, Comptonia peregrina, bladder senna, hiccough nut, Baccharis halimifolia, Aspalathus linearis, Datura arborea, gardenia, daphne, bush pea, desert rose, cotton-seed tree, African hemp, black-fronted bush shrike, Adam's apple, Cineraria maritima, cranberry tree, huckleberry oak, kali, cajan pea, provide, Genista raetam, Leucothoe editorum, Himalaya honeysuckle, Gaultheria shallon, laurel sumac, mimosa bush, false tamarisk, Christmasberry, Clethra alnifolia, artemisia, dombeya, saltbush, columnea, bean caper, box, kidney wort, Embothrium coccineum, glory pea, Cestrum diurnum, render, East Indian rosebay, bearberry, Cercis occidentalis, firethorn, coffee rose, jasmine, Loiseleuria procumbens, climbing hydrangea, George H.W. Bush, cotton, Cytesis proliferus, helianthemum, Lycium carolinianum, Brugmansia suaveolens, Mahonia nervosa, Mahernia verticillata, camellia, American spicebush, Chilean rimu, Ardisia escallonoides, Caulophyllum thalictrioides, Hibiscus farragei, Hakea leucoptera, cassava, Hakea laurina, Malosma laurina, Halimodendron argenteum, Dirca palustris, dwarf golden chinkapin, ground-berry, cat's-claw, Lyonia ligustrina, bushy, lily-of-the-valley tree, capsicum pepper plant, makomako, squaw-bush, Lyonia lucida, Biscutalla laevigata, Chinese angelica, ligneous plant, kei apple, caper, grevillea, frangipani, Ardisia crenata, Chilopsis linearis, impala lily, crowberry, dahl, Acocanthera venenata, Leitneria floridana, Lepidothamnus laxifolius, hamelia, flowering quince, Guevina avellana, lentisk, strawberry bush, Epigaea repens, California beauty, glasswort, Graptophyllum pictum, Japanese angelica tree, kelpwort, Grewia asiatica, Australian heath, chanar, Cordyline terminalis, Chilean flameflower, lomatia, Jupiter's beard, elder, bracelet wood, Christ's-thorn, camelia, coyote brush, indigo, flowering hazel, heath, fire thorn, Desmodium gyrans, bridal wreath, woody plant, eggplant bush, Colutea arborescens, Lepidothamnus fonkii, jujube, Griselinia littoralis, cranberry heath, American angelica tree, bush poppy, Aralia spinosa, boysenberry bush, holly-leaves barberry, Ardisia paniculata, Cyrilla racemiflora, juniper, Larrea tridentata, guinea flower, black haw, Chinese angelica tree, hovea, Euonymus atropurpureus, Kiggelaria africana, Indian currant, hiccup nut, flowering shrub, Datura suaveolens, crape jasmine, Comptonia asplenifolia, blue cohosh, butcher's broom, bryanthus, allspice, dog laurel, Catha edulis, Camellia sinensis, Aralia elata, feijoa, Batis maritima, glandular Labrador tea, crepe flower, Cajanus cajan



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