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Bother   /bˈɑðər/   Listen
Bother

verb
(past & past part. bothered; pres. part. bothering)
1.
Take the trouble to do something; concern oneself.  Synonyms: inconvenience oneself, trouble, trouble oneself.  "Don't bother, please"
2.
Cause annoyance in; disturb, especially by minor irritations.  Synonyms: annoy, chafe, devil, get at, get to, gravel, irritate, nark, nettle, rag, rile, vex.  "It irritates me that she never closes the door after she leaves"
3.
To cause inconvenience or discomfort to.  Synonyms: discommode, disoblige, incommode, inconvenience, put out, trouble.
4.
Intrude or enter uninvited.
5.
Make nervous or agitated.
6.
Make confused or perplexed or puzzled.






WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








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"Bother" Quotes from Famous Books



... what did he know about Peaslee? If the man had merely shot at a cat, why under the sun should he not have said so at once, and saved all this bother? The more he thought, the more indignant he grew—and the more doubtful. He did not notice at all the look of timid gratitude which Mr. ...
— The Calico Cat • Charles Miner Thompson

... specimen sent him was certainly a sequoia, as named by a German professor some six years before this time. So the tree was called sequoia gigantea and quietly went on growing, unmindful of the four nations who had quarrelled over its christening. Why, indeed, should it bother its lofty head with the chatter of people whose countries were unknown when this mighty tree was full grown? For these sequoias are the oldest of living objects and have probably been growing for four thousand years. ...
— Stories of California • Ella M. Sexton

... happened so far is through our not having the sense to keep quiet—worrying them with guns and such foolery. And losing our heads, and rushing off in crowds to where there wasn't any more safety than where we were. They don't want to bother us yet. They're making their things—making all the things they couldn't bring with them, getting things ready for the rest of their people. Very likely that's why the cylinders have stopped for a bit, for fear of hitting those who are here. And instead of our rushing about blind, on the howl, ...
— The War of the Worlds • H. G. Wells

... every man needing a wife, and I'm afraid I had already decided to take him if he offered, and to put the school-teacher out and have a real parlor again, but to keep Mr. Reynolds, he being tidy and no bother. ...
— The Case of Jennie Brice • Mary Roberts Rinehart

... so numerous that the performers were obliged to withdraw him in self-defence. He was a great deal of trouble to build, but the success he met with and the pleasure he gave more than repaid me for the bother; and I am sure that any one else who tries it will ...
— The Life and Letters of Lewis Carroll • Stuart Dodgson Collingwood

... them in a sleigh drawn by reindeer and should try to enter the houses and fill their stockings. Down there, Santa Claus does not need reindeer or any other kind of steeds, for the children say that he just comes flying through the air like a bird. Neither does he bother himself looking for stockings, for such things are not so plentiful in Porto Rico as they are in cooler climates. Instead of stockings, the children use little boxes, which they make themselves. These they place on the roofs and in the courtyards, and old Santa Claus drops the gifts into ...
— Our Holidays - Their Meaning and Spirit; retold from St. Nicholas • Various

... will say to me that a revolution is an unavoidable thing. Of all things only the facts cannot be undone. Why then should I bother myself especially as my last effort fell on deaf ears. This I realize; but it is not my nature to abandon what is my conviction. Therefore, although aware of the futility of my words, I cannot refrain from uttering them ...
— The Fight For The Republic in China • Bertram Lenox Putnam Weale

... why d'you want to bother me about it? Give me that paper." The regimental sergeant-major jerked the paper out of Andrews's hand and ...
— Three Soldiers • John Dos Passos

... this disturbance was that they agreed to try a tentative sitting. Stepping out into the kitchen, Mrs. Meeker told Lizzie that she needn't bother to ...
— The Best Short Stories of 1919 - and the Yearbook of the American Short Story • Various

... trust you at the shop when you'd no money?" demanded Patch, scornfully. "I paid for it, that's all you need bother yourself about." ...
— Little Folks (November 1884) - A Magazine for the Young • Various

... quiet, and does his central church walk calmly, never thinking of it. But, if owing, somebody should settle the bill, and the sooner it is liquidated, the more respectable will the affairs of the church become. Bother without end has prevailed at St. Thomas's about money, and until people get their own, and see regular annual statements of accounts—things which seem to be scarce in these times—they will continue to be uneasy and, ...
— Our Churches and Chapels • Atticus

... shoot some," observed Tom Draw, who loved to bother Timothy; "the boy can shoot some, though ...
— Warwick Woodlands - Things as they Were There Twenty Years Ago • Henry William Herbert (AKA Frank Forester)

... 'He won't bother any one any more. Never saw a man so astonished in my life. By Jove, I thought he meant to ask a question in the House about it. Fellow-passenger in his ship—dined next him—bowled over by cholera and died ...
— Life's Handicap • Rudyard Kipling

... said he, "for patching me up so well. I'm a lot better, now. And I've a long way to go. So, I'll be starting. Thanks, again, both of you. I'm sorry to have put you to so much bother." He reeled, cleverly, caught at the couch-head again, and took an uncertain step toward the door. But now, not only Claire but ...
— Black Caesar's Clan • Albert Payson Terhune

... during the period under discussion. Yet their conclusions, based on modern sociological techniques, clearly reveal the pain and turmoil suffered by black soldiers because of racial separation. Rarely did the Army staff bother to delve into these matters in the years before Korea, (p. 232) although the facts on which the scientists based their conclusions were collected by the War Department itself. This indifference is the more curious because the Army had always been aware of what the War Department Policies ...
— Integration of the Armed Forces, 1940-1965 • Morris J. MacGregor Jr.

... about it without examination, and are so cock sure that it isn't suicide, why bother with such trifles as the weapon and the bullet. You might have sat down and written a thesis about it without ...
— Death Points a Finger • Will Levinrew

... Miss Karoline broke up and went back to Virginia. My grandma got her feather bed and died on it. Bout two years after that the Yankees sot fire to the house and burned it down. We all had good log houses down close together. They didn't bother us. ...
— Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves: Volume II, Arkansas Narratives, Part 2 • Works Projects Administration

... think he will dare to bother us again," said Andy. "He is too much afraid to have his ...
— Young Auctioneers - The Polishing of a Rolling Stone • Edward Stratemeyer

... cried Mr. Finch, impatiently conceding to me one precious moment of his attention. "Don't bother about Grosse! Grosse is ill in London. There is a note for you from Grosse.—Take care of the door-step, dear Oscar," he went on, in his deepest and gravest bass notes. "Mrs. Finch is so anxious to see you. We have both looked forward ...
— Poor Miss Finch • Wilkie Collins

... impossible to say by what obscure means, that the child was probably a bastard, and that the mother could not acknowledge it, exacted fifteen francs a month, saying that "the creature" was growing and "eating," and threatening to send her away. "Let her not bother me," he exclaimed, "or I'll fire her brat right into the middle of her secrets. I must have an increase." The mother paid the ...
— Les Miserables - Complete in Five Volumes • Victor Hugo

... wilderness to interview Indians, trappers, guides, woodsmen, and thus seek to confirm your observations, if you have all the while been "struggling against fact and law," and do not want or need confirmation? If nature study is only to exploit your own individuality, why bother about what other people have or have not seen or heard? Why, in fact, go to the woods at all? Why not sit in your study and invent your ...
— Ways of Nature • John Burroughs

... to sea motion, the slight roll of the "Farnum" did not bother the young skipper much. He soon reached the bottom of the short spiral stairway leading up into the conning tower. Up there, in the helmsman's seat, he espied Hal Hastings with his hands employed at t he steering apparatus. Hal was looking out over ...
— The Submarine Boys and the Middies - The Prize Detail at Annapolis • Victor G. Durham

... (in a shawl). She was a prettier byby in the fice than any o' the others—sech a lydylike byby she was—we never 'ad no bother with her! and never, as long as I live, shall I forgit her Grandpa's words when he saw her settin' up in her 'igh cheer at tea, with her little cheeks a marsk o' marmalade. "LOUISER JYNE," he sez, "you mark my ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 103, August 20, 1892 • Various

... well, my lass, till the teeth began to come,—oh, them teeth, what a nuisance they are! I've lost mine, my dear, all but two, and I'm sure it's a good job to have done with 'em—they're nothing but bother, always aching and breaking and worrying you. Well, the teething went very hard with the babies; his child was the worst, though, and one day little Jacky had a convulsion fit, and didn't my master send off for the doctor in a hurry; and all that night he sat up watching his ...
— Poppy's Presents • Mrs O. F. Walton

... Jan Paasma, and then, if we liked, take up our quarters on our own boat until we could engage some one to "work it" for our tour. Luckily, we'd had coffee and rolls on board the "Batavier"; so we needn't bother about breakfast, as I said ...
— The Chauffeur and the Chaperon • C. N. Williamson

... "Oh, bother your 'want-to-knows.' It's not against the law—just outside it, you understand. I'll tell you more of it when we get to my room. Give me that valise. Come along now." And as the boat entered the slip we found ourselves at the front of the pressing crowd that is always surging in and out of San Francisco ...
— Blindfolded • Earle Ashley Walcott

... clothes, made him as comfortable as he could. "This won't do, you know," he urged presently, alarmed by Will's difficult breathing. "You are in for a jolly little spell, and I must get you home. Your grandfather will never bother you while you're sick." ...
— The Deliverance; A Romance of the Virginia Tobacco Fields • Ellen Glasgow

... least what f?s?? or Nature is. We love justice and generosity, and hate injustice and meanness, but the origin of virtue, the life of the soul, is as much beyond me as the origin of life in a plant or animal, and I do not bother myself with trying to find it out. I do feel, however, that justice and generosity have somehow a higher authority than I or any human being can give them, and if I had children of my own this is what I should ...
— Pages from a Journal with Other Papers • Mark Rutherford

... the tenants and servants would have to be fed on the occasion of a marriage. She believed it was their one idea of enjoying themselves; but she begged her steward not to bother her with details when he had gone into the question of roasting an ox whole. Having dismissed him with a few brief orders Mrs. Ogilvie went to her writing-table. 'I may as well get over all the disagreeable ...
— Peter and Jane - or The Missing Heir • S. (Sarah) Macnaughtan

... and very busy, he did not bother his head with too much thinking. He was exceedingly sorry for his mother, and often longed to see her and above all to tell her of this wonderful new life, and how brilliantly he was acquitting himself in it. Otherwise he preferred not to wonder too ...
— "Captains Courageous" • Rudyard Kipling

... you naval officers?" exclaimed the captain, eyeing us attentively. "I thought so from the way you spoke. However, come in. You can tell me all about yourselves afterwards; it doesn't come up to my notions of hospitality to bother strangers with questions before they have eaten, and drunken, and rested themselves after ...
— Twice Lost • W.H.G. Kingston

... it was the opposite. He used his mind unceasingly, his body as little as possible. I remember one day going to see them when he had a sprained ankle and learning from Frances how happy it made him because nobody could bother him to take exercise. The whole of practical life he left to her. But joining the Church was not only something to be thought about, it was something really practical that had to be done, and here ...
— Gilbert Keith Chesterton • Maisie Ward

... the moon with the teeth"—prendre la lune avec les dents!" Bracciolini, who, in his letters to Niccoli puts me in mind of Dean Swift in his letters to Dr. Arbuthnot, (as far as using words and inventing terms to bother and perplex his friend,) has here fairly put his editors at a non plus from the first in Basle to the last in Florence; he is up in a balloon—clean out of their sight,—so they all print Aries in the accusative ...
— Tacitus and Bracciolini - The Annals Forged in the XVth Century • John Wilson Ross

... aught I know, every day in the year. It was Fred ——'s and my daily amusement to watch him, and we never seemed to catch him coming on deck twice in the same head-gear. He took quite a fancy to me, because I did not bother him when busy, and because I liked to listen to his talk. So, handing him a cigar, as a prefatory to conversation, I asked him our whereabouts. "Four hundred miles to the heast'ard of Georges we were this noon, and we've made nothink to speak of since, Sir. This last ...
— The Atlantic Monthly , Volume 2, No. 14, December 1858 • Various

... her day, she is, an' she can answer a book note des as true as any pianner a pusson ever listened at—ef anybody know how ter tackle 'er. Of co'se, ef you des tackle 'er p'omiskyus she ain't gwine bother 'erse'f ter ...
— Solomon Crow's Christmas Pockets and Other Tales • Ruth McEnery Stuart

... more success and less bother growing perennials from seed sown in the open ground than from any other way. Prepare a bed in a nice, warm, sheltered spot in the garden, preferably not very sunny. Let the surface of the bed be raised four or five inches above ...
— Manual of Gardening (Second Edition) • L. H. Bailey

... "That won't bother Janet." Miss Carter smiled at the memory of her independent little niece who, for all her quiet ways, was thoroughly able to take ...
— Phyllis - A Twin • Dorothy Whitehill

... generated by the deliberate public opinion of the country. Already the Democratic party, anxious to profit by any chance at resuscitation,—for it is extremely inconvenient to be dead so long,—is more than hinting that the right of veto was given to the President that he might bother and baffle a refractory Congress into concession, not to his reasons, but to his whim. There seemed to be a plan, at one time of forming a President's party, with no principle but that of general opposition to the policy of that great majority which carried him into power. Such ...
— The Writings of James Russell Lowell in Prose and Poetry, Volume V - Political Essays • James Russell Lowell

... Man with an Owl, Who continued to bother and howl; He sat on a rail, and imbibed bitter ale, Which refreshed that Old ...
— Nonsense Books • Edward Lear

... he had his way, I'd look like a frump. He thinks everything is too much. Papa, help me out of this difficulty, it's only two thousand pesetas. With that I can get on my feet and then I won't bother you with any more loans. Come, that's a dear papa. I need them right away, because I waited till the last minute, so as ...
— Woman Triumphant - (La Maja Desnuda) • Vicente Blasco Ibanez

... away on the eleven o'clock train to-morrow, sir," stated Algy, as he rose to go. "I won't bother about the few things in my room until I go to Denver and engage a man. Then I'll send my man here to pack up whatever of my ...
— Uncle Sam's Boys as Sergeants - or, Handling Their First Real Commands • H. Irving Hancock

... palace—the one under the coachman, and the other under the gardener. But Boots, he set off too, and took with him a great kneading-trough, which was the only thing his parents left behind them, but which the other two would not bother themselves with. It was heavy to carry, but he did not like to leave it behind, and so, after he had trudged a bit, he too came to the palace, and asked for a place. So they told him they did not want him, but he begged so prettily ...
— Popular Tales from the Norse • Sir George Webbe Dasent

... bother any one no more," said this man, with a satisfied chuckle, as he leaned on his gun, the butt of which he dropped to the ground. "I got him right in ...
— The Moving Picture Girls Under the Palms - Or Lost in the Wilds of Florida • Laura Lee Hope

... 'Don't bother me,' cried Slimak, thrusting him aside, 'the fellow offers me his wages and his box when the horses were ...
— Selected Polish Tales • Various

... speak to her, they sent a servant to call her, and if she was not there, they did not bother about her, never thought of her, never thought of troubling themselves so much as to say: "Why, I have not seen ...
— Une Vie, A Piece of String and Other Stories • Guy de Maupassant

... "Bother you all," replied the Secretary, who was secretly pleased to be quizzed for his peculiarities—"tell us what this ...
— Ginx's Baby • Edward Jenkins

... "Bother!" exclaimed the Duchessa, under her breath. Then, to Peter, "It will have to be for another time—unless I ...
— The Cardinal's Snuff-Box • Henry Harland

... now, it isn't as bad as that," responded Ned. "Don't you bother. I'll get you elected before Class Day, Jerry. Grab your skates and come on down to ...
— The New Boy at Hilltop • Ralph Henry Barbour

... "Why should I bother?" argued Maitland sulkily. "It's a good, strong safe, and—and there are plenty of servants around," ...
— The Brass Bowl • Louis Joseph Vance

... gentlemen, is not permissible. On this point opinions will, I think, differ; they will, however, not differ with regard to the vulgarity of using leave in the sense of let; thus, "Leave me be"; "Leave it alone"; "Leave her be—don't bother her"; ...
— The Verbalist • Thomas Embly Osmun, (AKA Alfred Ayres)

... What a frightful face he had, all smeared over with blood and powder—and I really jealoused, that if he died in that room it would be haunted for evermair, he being in a manner a murdered man; so that, even should I be acquitted of art and part, his ghost might still come to bother us, making our house a hell upon earth, and frighting us out of our seven senses. But in the midst of my dreadful surmises, when all was still, so that you might have heard a pin fall, a knock-knock-knock, came to the door, ...
— The Life of Mansie Wauch - Tailor in Dalkeith, written by himself • David Macbeth Moir

... get up," said Betty. "Don't you dare let go, Amy. I don't see why I'm so foolish as to wear this tight skirt. We didn't bother with such style when we were ...
— The Outdoor Girls at Rainbow Lake • Laura Lee Hope

... her head. "Such things never lose their bitterness," she said, "and that is why I don't let them cling to me right into the summer. When May comes, I give myself up to jollity with all the rest of the world, and am too busy being happy to bother about anything I may have resolved when the days were cold ...
— Elizabeth and her German Garden • "Elizabeth", AKA Marie Annette Beauchamp

... telln' you!" said Freddy, spreading his feet apart, thrusting his hands in his pockets. "I ain't got no use for men a-tall! An' you take my advice—don't bother ...
— O. Henry Memorial Award Prize Stories of 1921 • Various

... his Bible in Spain," which he had read with delight, but there was "hardly a word of REVIEW, and no extract giving the least notion of the peculiar merits and style especially, of the Hand-Book." "He is unwell," continued Lockhart, "I should be very sorry to bother him more at present; and, moreover, from the little he has said of your STYLE, I am forced to infer that a REVIEW of your book by him would never be what I could feel authorised to publish in the Q. R." The letter concludes with a word of condolence that the Hand-Book will ...
— The Life of George Borrow • Herbert Jenkins

... of Senator Mikhail Kerotski, head of the Senate Committee on Space Exploration. It was an unlisted, visionless phone, and the number was known only to a very few important officials in the United States Government, so the senator didn't bother to identify himself; he simply said: "Hello." He listened for a moment, said, "O.K., fine," in a quiet voice, and ...
— Fifty Per Cent Prophet • Gordon Randall Garrett

... boys that have got notions. Deliver me from notions. Your father had notions. If it hadn't been for that, we might all of us have been rich to-day. But notions kept us down. That's what I like about Mr. Plausaby. He hasn't a single notion to bother a body with. But, I think, notions run in the blood, and, I suppose, you'll always be putting some fool notion or other in your own way. I meant you to be a lawyer, but I s'pose you've got something against that, though it was your ...
— The Mystery of Metropolisville • Edward Eggleston

... it all about?" exclaimed Greyle, obviously upset and afraid. "Chatfield, what have you been saying? Go away, you men—go away, all of you, at once. Mr. Copplestone, don't hit him. Audrey, what is it? Hang it all!—I seem to have nothing but bother—it's most annoying. ...
— Scarhaven Keep • J. S. Fletcher

... He didn't bother with a spacesuit—not now, when he knew that the air was perfectly harmless outside. He opened the inner door, closed it, and opened the ...
— The Judas Valley • Gerald Vance

... like to bother you, Herb," he said, "but there's something I want to check. Maybe you can ...
— Project Mastodon • Clifford Donald Simak

... a bother, of course," said Harry; "but, after all, a letter is the only substitute one can have for ...
— A Castle in Spain - A Novel • James De Mille

... was to be put into the pound until all the fencing was done and the gates set up. I at once completed my fencing, but the grumblers had no time to work; they were too busy finding fault. The whole thing was a subterfuge, and was meant to bother me. There was no need of a pound, as our cattle were herded in daytime and corralled at night. But I submitted, for I knew I could live by their laws as well ...
— The Mormon Menace - The Confessions of John Doyle Lee, Danite • John Doyle Lee

... explaining my position in the best way to my wife; but I know that there is no lack of wisdom in you. If only you had my meekness you would have all virtues. Thank you also for all the good you have done me, if only you would not bother me about the rings! If they don't please you, break their heads off and pitch them out on to the dunghill as Peter Weisweber says. What do you mean by setting me to such dirty work? I have become a gentleman ...
— Albert Durer • T. Sturge Moore

... edged the sidling King closer to the wagon. The driver watched him with apprehension. Whether he guessed Drew's intention or whether he dreaded the near approach of the stallion was a question which did not bother the scout. ...
— Ride Proud, Rebel! • Andre Alice Norton

... everything he wanted, naturally. Any other condition would have been wholly impossible to him, and would have seemed painfully out of place, and foreign to the scheme of the world, to those who knew him. But he never appeared to bother about any means for obtaining things, and Lady Locke thought him the last boy in the universe to lay a plot for the obtaining of a fortune. Had he, then, conceived a light passing fancy for her? She thought this possible, though a little unlikely. ...
— The Green Carnation • Robert Smythe Hichens

... strings of his lyre out by striking too hard, And cracked half the notes of a truly fine voice, Because song drew less instant attention than noise. Ah, men do not know how much strength is in poise, That he goes the farthest who goes far enough, And that all beyond that is just bother and stuff. No vain man matures, he makes too much new wood; His blooms are too thick for the fruit to be good; 'Tis the modest man ripens, 'tis he that achieves, 980 Just what's needed of sunshine and shade he receives; Grapes, to mellow, require the cool dark of their leaves; Neal wants balance; ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of James Russell Lowell • James Lowell

... said, with gentle dignity. "I am sorry if I have distressed you this evening. Please don't think too harshly of me when I say that I just had to find out how we stand, you and I. Now that I know, I can only promise not to bother you again, and you may rely on my promises. I never break them. Good-night, ...
— West Wind Drift • George Barr McCutcheon

... longer, you are perfectly free to leave us, I repeat it, but don't leave us in the lurch just at this moment! This paper is of the very greatest importance ... be nice—take it, and give it to Belfort—I will not bother you again ...
— A Nest of Spies • Pierre Souvestre

... apparently had given his whole life to productive toil, but now feeble and half-starved in appearance, approached and appealed to him for a few cents with which to buy something to eat. The big fellow roughly told him to go along and not bother him, and the old man, not doing as he was ordered, the young man deliberately swung his fist and struck the poor beggar between the eyes, knocking him senseless to the pavement. For a moment I was dumbfounded by this ...
— Born Again • Alfred Lawson

... minutes gang, wee Rab Cries oot, frae 'neath the claes, "Mither, mak' Tam gie ower at once— He's kittlin' wi' his taes." The mischief's in that Tam for tricks, He'd bother half the toon; But aye I hap them up an' ...
— The Home Book of Verse, Vol. 1 (of 4) • Various

... and are better looking. But some one has said of the Manchu, "he knows not, neither does he learn." They say that he only bathes once a year and does not care who owns the ground as long as he can till it, and that it does not bother him in the least to see his wife and daughter sit on the stone fence for hours picking the lice from each other's head. The women folks are largely slaves of fashion and still persist in trying to stunt the growth of their feet. Even while they do ...
— Birdseye Views of Far Lands • James T. Nichols

... You'll do nothing of the sort! What right have we to bother her? She'd probably send you about your business, anyway. She's got a heart—something that diplomats know nothing about and never take ...
— Affairs of State • Burton E. Stevenson

... He made it for us. Look about you, and see how He has stocked it with game. The elk, the buffalo, and deer are our meat, and He put them here for us to feed upon. Your homes are in the East, and you have beef cattle to eat. Why, then, do you come here to bother us? What have you your soldiers here for, unless it is to fight and kill us? If you will go away to your homes and leave us, we will be at peace, but if you stay we will fight. We do not go to your homes, then why come to ours? You say we steal your cattle and horses; well, do ...
— Three Years on the Plains - Observations of Indians, 1867-1870 • Edmund B. Tuttle

... Leigh replied in a low voice. "There are some things I must do for Uncle Jim and when you are doing for people you can't tell them nor depend on their advice. When Pryor is gone, may I ask you sometimes what to do? I won't bother ...
— Winning the Wilderness • Margaret Hill McCarter

... as a new penny," he chuckled. "But it's early yet for you to be astir. I'll put Queenie in her stable and show you where the feed is. Aunt Prue will like to have her back. She sets great store by the old mare. She won't be much bother to you, ...
— Sheila of Big Wreck Cove - A Story of Cape Cod • James A. Cooper

... to. Come, let us make an estimate. Did you give her a round sum, or did you pay for everything separately? However, I know you are not a man to bother over details, so I conclude that you gave her ...
— A Comedy of Marriage & Other Tales • Guy De Maupassant

... before. Unboiled water from shallow wells is not necessarily free from germs. I said nothing, however. After the daughter had finished scrubbing the cucumbers, the mother got a knife and carefully peeled two big ones. Then she handed them to us. Her own she did not bother to peel. ...
— Have We No Rights? - A frank discussion of the "rights" of missionaries • Mabel Williamson

... the German enthusiasts, which carried them beyond the bounds of reasonable safety in the United States, did not bother Uncle Sam much in the prosecution of his war plans. Within a short period after the declaration of war the country had written a chapter in national achievement unrivalled in the ...
— Kelly Miller's History of the World War for Human Rights • Kelly Miller

... is," she whispered back, without stirring. "Only—will you ever forgive me? I've saddled you with two women now, as if one wasn't bother enough!" ...
— The Great Amulet • Maud Diver

... the Boldsides struck his fist on the table. "Bother the letter! I insist on knowing what ...
— Blind Love • Wilkie Collins

... pooty sure to fail, Ez long 'z the head keeps turnin' back for counsel to the tail: Th' advantiges of our consarn for bein' prompt air gret, While, 'long o' Congress, you can't strike, 'f you git an iron het; They bother roun' with argooin', an' var'ous sorts o' foolin', To make sure ef it's leg'lly het, an' all the while it's coolin', So 's 't when you come to strike, it ain't no gret to wish ye j'y on, An' hurts ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. IX., March, 1862., No. LIII. - A Magazine Of Literature, Art, And Politics, • Various

... terrible night, in which he feared his brain was really giving way, he went down to the theatre and dismissed the company, for he had resolved to return to Ashwood and spend another autumn and another winter re-writing The Gipsy. If it did not come right then, he would bother no more about it. Why should he? There was so much else in life besides literature. He had plenty of money, and was determined in any case to enjoy himself. So did his thoughts run as he leaned back on the cushions of a first-class carriage, glancing casually through ...
— Vain Fortune • George Moore

... plying, no cakes she is dressing, No babe of her bosom in fondness caressing; Be up she, or down she, she 's ever distressing The core of my heart with her bother. For a groat, for a groat with goodwill I would sell her, As the bark of the oak is the tan of her leather, And a bushel of coals would avail but to chill her, For a hag can ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volumes I-VI. - The Songs of Scotland of the Past Half Century • Various

... great deal better next year, Uncle Joe," said Bob, "as we won't have the buildings to bother with and I can devote all my time to the work; then we ought to be able to do a great deal more work, too, on account of the saving of time, due to having modern buildings and all our power installed, which we didn't have for the full ...
— Hidden Treasure • John Thomas Simpson

... this very often, any more," Kalvar Dard told them, "but we might as well, tonight. Don't bother rubbing sticks for fire; I'll ...
— Genesis • H. Beam Piper

... as she lay down. "What a lot of bother there'll be for the servants, getting the house straight, tomorrow; and they so late to bed! The drawing-room carpet to put down again, and all the furniture to move into place. And it only seems the other day since we went through the same ...
— Mrs. Day's Daughters • Mary E. Mann

... Amy. She's the wise old bird," declared Amy. "I always did like those overalls. If I climb a ladder I don't want any skirt to bother me. If the ladder begins to slip I want a chance to slide down like a man. Do the 'Fireman, save my ...
— The Campfire Girls of Roselawn - A Strange Message from the Air • Margaret Penrose

... grunted. "There's no room now, and, come to think of it, you needn't bother to get around next week. I can't break ...
— Laughing Bill Hyde and Other Stories • Rex Beach

... Countess-Duchess of Sutherland's magnificent memoir of her Duke, bound in morocco, with a beautiful engraving of him, reached me yesterday, but I have been in such a bother of tenants and business, I have had time only to look at the engraving and the kind ...
— The Life and Letters of Maria Edgeworth, Vol. 2 • Maria Edgeworth

... said the King to the Princess Royal, as soon as the shouts of joy had quieted down, "you've got the Council's decision. Give the Prince your hand, and let's have no more bother about it." ...
— In Brief Authority • F. Anstey

... "Bother Shakespeare," said Jane, impetuously, "—old fool that expects credit for saying things that everybody knows! But if you complain of not being considered, Gertrude, how would you like to be me, whom everybody sets down as a fool? But I am not ...
— An Unsocial Socialist • George Bernard Shaw

... acme of their art, and took little interest in gunnery. All the battles of the past had been won by dash and seamanship and dogged persistence. Ships had always fought close alongside each other. No science had ever won any naval battle of the past, so why should they bother with science now—and why should they bother with target practice, except just enough to insure that the battery was in order, and that the men were not afraid of their guns? Besides, target practice dirtied the ship—a sacrilege to ...
— The Navy as a Fighting Machine • Bradley A. Fiske

... their horses with trappings. If the horse is a screw, cover him thick with saddle-cloths, girths, cruppers, breast-bands, and as much brass and tinsel as your pay will enable you to buy; but if not a screw, let his fair proportions be seen as much as may be, and don't bother a lover of good horseflesh to eliminate so much uniform before he ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Volume 8, Issue 45, July, 1861 • Various

... stammer uneasily. "You see, the Echo office is such a darn busy place. My father is driven most to death. Besides, we couldn't pay much. It wouldn't be worth the bother to ...
— Paul and the Printing Press • Sara Ware Bassett

... brain: "What can you do?" and "How old are you?" The latter question came as a revelation. It seems that from a business point of view I was considered an old man. My good strong body counted for nothing; my willingness to undertake any task counted for nothing. I was too old. No one wanted to bother with a beginner over eighteen or twenty. The market demanded youth—youth with the years ahead that I had already sold. Wherever I stumbled by chance upon a vacant position I found waiting there half a dozen stalwart youngsters. They looked as I had looked when ...
— One Way Out - A Middle-class New-Englander Emigrates to America • William Carleton

... coolness of head such as General Grant had and hotness of heart such as he had, too. The ideal combination is a cool head and a hot heart. The head should resemble a refrigerator, and the heart a flaming furnace. There is one bother, however, among many people. Either the coolness of the head works down too much and affects the heart, and that is bad, or, else the heat of the heart gets up into the head, and a hot head ...
— Quiet Talks on Service • S. D. Gordon

... "Do not bother yourself about that at present. It shall so be managed that the burden shall fall ultimately on yourself—not on any one else. But I am sure it must be a comfort to you to know that your wife need not be driven out of ...
— Framley Parsonage • Anthony Trollope

... 'Of course it's all right for girls to bother about being pretty.' He lures her away from the subject. 'I can tell you a funny thing about that. We had theatricals at Osborne one night, and we played a thing called "The ...
— Alice Sit-By-The-Fire • J. M. Barrie

... and one's fore-legs had not so annoying a trick of doubling up; and then—— What was that rascally fawn pup rushing for? The Mistress, with the four little dishes and the big basin? Another meal? Here goes! Bother! I should certainly have reached her first, if I hadn't turned that ...
— Finn The Wolfhound • A. J. Dawson

... prosecuted those men for stealing the money, they would simply have pleaded not guilty, and the case would have been tried without any bother, and the defendants have been acquitted or convicted according to the wisdom of the judge, the skill of the counsel, and the common sense of the jury. But now suppose instead thereof, Joseph had brought an action for the ...
— The Humourous Story of Farmer Bumpkin's Lawsuit • Richard Harris

... you much to read it; but I say this, believing that you will not do so, if, as I believe to be the case, you are extra busy. On my honour, I shall not be mortified, and I earnestly beg you not to do it, if it will bother you. I want it, because I here feel especially unsafe, and errors may have crept in. Also, I should much like to know what parts you will MOST VEHEMENTLY object to. I know we do, and must, differ widely on several heads. Lastly, I should like particularly ...
— The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin, Volume I • Francis Darwin

... an unchangeable bottom I would rather be without Home Rule. Some say that even if our rents are reduced by one-half, the increased taxes we must pay would make us nearly as poor as ever, and that all this bother and disturbance would not really save us a penny piece. And I think this might be true. So that if something could be done by the English Parliament I should prefer it to come that way. And so would we all, a hundred times. ...
— Ireland as It Is - And as It Would be Under Home Rule • Robert John Buckley (AKA R.J.B.)

... "This is something that concerns my honor as a gentleman. While it remains in its present state, I can't bother with these property ...
— Double Trouble - Or, Every Hero His Own Villain • Herbert Quick

... "Bother him and his bullyings and threats," cried Aleck. "Such insolence! But, there, I must see about my paper ...
— The Lost Middy - Being the Secret of the Smugglers' Gap • George Manville Fenn

... that, Mr. Lauriston," assented Mrs. Flitwick, "and I wouldn't bother you if I wasn't right pressed, myself. But there's the landlord at me—he wants money tonight. And—you'll excuse me for mentioning it—but, till you get your cheques, Mr. Lauriston, why don't you raise a ...
— The Orange-Yellow Diamond • J. S. Fletcher

... felt that he could have crushed her with evidence to the contrary but that he was restraining himself—it was not worthwhile to bother with such a girl seriously. "Things have fallen into a tangle since I left, old Satan Macon is on the spot and your rat of a father has let Landis get away. What have you been doing, Nelly, while all this was going on? Sitting ...
— Gunman's Reckoning • Max Brand

... "It's no use to bother," said Josh, when the state of affairs was being canvassed. "Father says there's only ...
— Will of the Mill • George Manville Fenn

... Bob, you take the contract and try to find him. I'll be too busy loading the furniture to bother with it." ...
— Hidden Treasure • John Thomas Simpson

... to go out quickly and fetch his fur overcoat before he can talk in comfort. Or he may be playing, like Sherlock Holmes, on his violin, and say, "Just wait till I've finished this sonata." And by the time it's finished the bother about Persia or Free Trade is quite forgotten. Or, again, Mr. BALFOUR may be closeted with Professor VARDON, Doctor RAY or Vice-Chancellor MITCHELL at the very moment when the Nicaraguan envoy is clamouring at ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 159, December 8, 1920 • Various

... "Oh, bother Miss Joe Hill! You don't have to tell her anything about it! You can pretend you are going to your brother's and meet me some place on ...
— Miss Mink's Soldier and Other Stories • Alice Hegan Rice

... bother about the Willards, and then rose to get a chair for Claire Morris. "Peyton is simply fascinated," Claire asserted lightly. "This Mina ought to have something handsome for giving him such a splendid time. She ...
— Cytherea • Joseph Hergesheimer

... because he saw him stagger a little in the road one night with the rheumatism. It was a lie that he was drunk. And suppose he was? The parson had his wine, he reckoned. They should not have his boy. He rather hoped he would grow up a bad one, and bother them well. He minded when that sharp old Miss —— was always coming round with tracts and blankets, like taking some straw to a lot of pigs, and lecturing his "missis" about economy. What a fuss she made, and scolded his wife as if she was a thief for having that fifteenth ...
— The Toilers of the Field • Richard Jefferies

... raw recuits hev got thair suits, Thay brag to one another, To th' first campaign thay'l tak th' train Without the slightest bother. ...
— Th' History o' Haworth Railway - fra' th' beginnin' to th' end, wi' an ackaant o' th' oppnin' serrimony • Bill o'th' Hoylus End

... husband and say: "I have an idea that it might injure his hand—the hand, you know, used in connection with horses' mouths...." And poor Ashburnham would blush and mutter and would say: "That's all right. Don't you bother ...
— The Good Soldier • Ford Madox Ford

... stream which came from a lake, and here we encountered our first mosquitoes. Big, black fellows they were, with a lazy, droning sound quite different from any I had ever heard. However, they froze up early and did not bother ...
— The Trail of the Goldseekers - A Record of Travel in Prose and Verse • Hamlin Garland

... like," he exclaimed, joyously. "I can't imagine anything better than this. Here we are all to ourselves with no one to bother us, with no chaperone, or chaperone's husband either, which is generally worse. Why is it, my dear," he asked gayly, in a tone that he considered affectionate and husbandly, "that the attractive chaperones are always handicapped ...
— Cinderella - And Other Stories • Richard Harding Davis



Words linked to "Bother" :   commove, provoke, impact, charge, gravel, botheration, excite, bear on, beset, thorn, affect, perturbation, rouse, intrude, touch on, antagonize, distress, nuisance, disconcert, get, agitate, harass, chevy, flurry, straiten, antagonise, touch, ruffle, irrupt, rankle, irritant, put off, bear upon, strive, get under one's skin, reach, eat into, displease, fret, chevvy, chivy, negative stimulus, grate, charge up, peeve, molest, plague, confuse, harry, turn on, strain, disturbance, chivvy



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