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Bill of Rights   /bɪl əv raɪts/   Listen
Bill of Rights

noun
1.
A statement of fundamental rights and privileges (especially the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution).






WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








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"Bill of Rights" Quotes from Famous Books



... original documents of the Universal Bill of Rights and the Solar Constitution, which guaranteed basic freedoms of speech, press, religion, peaceful assembly and representative government. And even brash, irrepressible Roger Manning was awestruck as they tiptoed ...
— Stand by for Mars! • Carey Rockwell

... represented by modern Tory historians, or by the parasitic sycophants of a militant Proletariat. I mean true Whig principles—the principles of Halifax, of Somers, of Locke, of Addison, and of Steele—the principles of the Bill of Rights and of "the Glorious Revolution of 1688";—the Whiggism which had its origin in the party of Cromwell and of the Independents, of John Milton and of Richard Baxter, the party which even in its decadence flowered in England in Chatham and William Pitt, and in America ...
— The Adventure of Living • John St. Loe Strachey

... institutions. The antique document was simplified by an orderly arrangement and division into sections; the obsolete jargon of incorporation was eliminated, which had come down from the mediaeval guilds; in the dispute with England the want of a bill of rights had been severely felt, so one was prefixed; and then the convention, probably out of regard to symmetry, blotted their otherwise admirable work by creating an unnecessary senate. But viewed as a whole, the grand original ...
— The Emancipation of Massachusetts • Brooks Adams

... me is, that the great principle "that man cannot be justly bound by laws, in making which they have no share," consecrated as it is by our Revolution and the Bill of Rights, and sanctioned by examples around us, is so engraven on the public mind here, that it ought to have a preponderating influence in all questions involved in the mode of forming a convention, and in discharging the trust committed ...
— The Journal of Negro History, Volume 6, 1921 • Various

... of Western ideas she introduced the conception of class rights. She wished, as we have seen, to have in her Empire a Noblesse and tiers-etat like those which existed in France, and for this purpose she granted, first to the Dvoryanstvo and afterwards to the towns, an Imperial Charter, or Bill of Rights. Succeeding sovereigns have acted in the same spirit, and the Code now confers on each class numerous privileges as well ...
— Russia • Donald Mackenzie Wallace

... party carried out the principle of the preamble of the bill of rights; a principle eternal as right, but nevertheless hitherto only partially realized. The Republican party has borne the brunt, and accomplished the appointed evolutions of progress; and the Republican party has deserved well of the American people, of history and of ...
— Diary from November 12, 1862, to October 18, 1863 • Adam Gurowski



Words linked to "Bill of Rights" :   law, the States, U.S. Constitution, United States Constitution, jurisprudence, First Amendment, America, U.S., U.S.A., United States, US Constitution, Constitution of the United States, USA, US, United States of America, Fifth Amendment, statement, constitution



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