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A   /ə/  /eɪ/   Listen
A

noun
1.
A metric unit of length equal to one ten billionth of a meter (or 0.0001 micron); used to specify wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation.  Synonyms: angstrom, angstrom unit.
2.
Any of several fat-soluble vitamins essential for normal vision; prevents night blindness or inflammation or dryness of the eyes.  Synonyms: antiophthalmic factor, axerophthol, vitamin A.
3.
One of the four nucleotides used in building DNA; all four nucleotides have a common phosphate group and a sugar (ribose).  Synonym: deoxyadenosine monophosphate.
4.
(biochemistry) purine base found in DNA and RNA; pairs with thymine in DNA and with uracil in RNA.  Synonym: adenine.
5.
The basic unit of electric current adopted under the Systeme International d'Unites.  Synonyms: amp, ampere.
6.
The 1st letter of the Roman alphabet.
7.
The blood group whose red cells carry the A antigen.  Synonyms: group A, type A.



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"A" Quotes from Famous Books



... Azzah, freest with our name and fame! By Allah! would I near her off she flies * At tangent, granting less the more I claim: I dote on Azzah, but when clear I off * My rivals, clears me too that dearest dame; Like wandering wight that chose for shade a cloud * Which, ere siesta ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 2 • Richard F. Burton

... the berries, as their mother pulled the molasses pitcher from the shelf. But there was not a drop in it. ...
— Some Three Hundred Years Ago • Edith Gilman Brewster

... Cleombrotus exclaim'd, Then plung'd from off a height beneath the sea; Stung by pain, of no disgrace ashamed, But ...
— The Academic Questions • M. T. Cicero

... general death-rate is directly affected by the number of children living in a community is shown ...
— Rural Hygiene • Henry N. Ogden

... party shall not marry till six months after; and because many families are compelled to live niggardly, exhaust and undone by great dowers, [668]none shall be given at all, or very little, and that by supervisors rated, they that are foul shall have a greater portion; if fair, none at all, or very little: [669]howsoever not to exceed such a rate as those supervisors shall think fit. And when once they come to those years, poverty shall hinder no man from marriage, or any ...
— The Anatomy of Melancholy • Democritus Junior

... blessed with these types of statesmen to advise him instead of the Castlereaghs, he might not have lost his reason. Napoleon would never have gone to Egypt, and our shores would never have been threatened with invasion. Nor would British and neutral trade have been paralysed in such a way as to bring in its wake ruin, riots, bankruptcies, and every form of devastation in 1811. And as a natural corollary, we were plunged into a war with America which lasted from 1812 to 1814, and which left, as it well might, long years of bitter and vindictive memories in ...
— Drake, Nelson and Napoleon • Walter Runciman

... the prosecution, the evidence 'pinched' James of the Glens was his attempt to raise money on May 14. What could he want with so large a sum as 8l., so suddenly, as he had no bill to meet? Well, as a number of his friends were to be thrown out of their farms, with their cattle, next day, James might need money for their relief, and it seems certain that ...
— Historical Mysteries • Andrew Lang

... were of his bride, who still slumbered in their stateroom amidships. In his bachelor days he never had imagined he could find such contentment as had come with his marriage to Ora. He had fought shy of the fair sex on Earth. Somehow, the women he knew back home had bored him; angling for a man's money and position, most of them, and incapable of giving real love and companionship in return for the luxuries they demanded. He was resigned to his ...
— Creatures of Vibration • Harl Vincent

... 28th January 1806 Drewyer and Baptiest Lapage Set out this morning on a hunting excurtion. about noon Howard & Werner returned with a Supply of Salt; the badness of the weather and the dificuelty of the road had detained them. they informed us that the Salt makers are Still much Stratened for provisions ...
— The Journals of Lewis and Clark • Meriwether Lewis et al

... she married sometime and she had arranged to be one not needing doing that thing, she had arranged to be one and she was that one she had arranged to be one being a ...
— Matisse Picasso and Gertrude Stein - With Two Shorter Stories • Gertrude Stein

... to his room again, in a most unenviable frame of mind; not even the prospect of being delivered from the goddess could reconcile him to the price he must pay for it. He was going to take a plunge into downright crime now; and if his friend the inspector came to hear ...
— The Tinted Venus - A Farcical Romance • F. Anstey

... was inscribed on one side of the card that dangled from it on a silver cord, and on the other was scribbled, "Monte and I will wait for you after the show. ...
— Calvary Alley • Alice Hegan Rice

... was an anxious one for Tom, who was up and down a good deal, and did not get to bed until 5.45 A.M., having hoisted the pilot-flag and left orders for the yacht to jog about until the pilot came on board. It was half-past eight o'clock before we were securely moored in the harbour, ...
— The Last Voyage - to India and Australia, in the 'Sunbeam' • Lady (Annie Allnutt) Brassey

... of an agricultural experiment station also seems to obtain a large measure of respect, to some extent, no doubt, because he occupies a public office. The regard felt for Mr. Yamasaki goes deeper. A few years ago he was sent on a mission abroad and in his absence his local admirers cast about ...
— The Foundations of Japan • J.W. Robertson Scott

... explain that he had owned the store from the beginning and that Deck Jordan was no more than his very capable agent. Indeed Mr. Worth said nothing at all. He even appeared to shrink with becoming modesty though there was the faintest hint of a twinkle in the corners of his eyes—a hint so faint that Horace P. Blanton, from ...
— The Winning of Barbara Worth • Harold B Wright

... exquisite than the drive out from Clear Lake to Ukiah by way of the Blue Lakes chain!—every turn bringing into view a picture of breathless beauty; every glance backward revealing some perfect composition in line and colour, the intense blue of the water margined with splendid oaks, green fields, and swaths of orange poppies. But those side glances and backward glances were provocative of trouble. ...
— The Human Drift • Jack London

... Jan. 6th I attended a sub-committee meeting on the minimum of acquirements for B.A. degree, and various meetings of the Senate. On July 14th I intimated to Mr Spring Rice my wish to resign. I had various correspondence, especially with Mr Lubbock, ...
— Autobiography of Sir George Biddell Airy • George Biddell Airy

... say that Prussia's honor has been attacked, and to doubt that the king will hold the offender responsible for such an outrage?" exclaimed the queen, with flashing eyes. "The king, who is the incarnation of honor, will not permit even the shadow of a stain to fall on Prussia's honor; in generous anger he will hurl back the insolent hand that will dare to shake the ...
— LOUISA OF PRUSSIA AND HER TIMES • Louise Muhlbach

... is getting a little short, madam," said Santa Fe, in a hurry. "I've got my sermon to finish this afternoon, and I must be going in a few minutes now." The fact of the matter was he had to call her off quick. It seems the Hen hadn't had anything ...
— Santa Fe's Partner - Being Some Memorials of Events in a New-Mexican Track-end Town • Thomas A. Janvier

... author of a New Novel loses his larger audience, the public are denied the privilege of enjoying his latest work, because of the prohibitive price of 4s. 6d. demanded for the ordinary ...
— Daisy's Aunt • E. F. (Edward Frederic) Benson

... But it is remarkable, and proof that the thought belongs to the age, that, thirty years ago, when the discussion of woman's status was still new in Massachusetts and New York, and only seven years after the first woman-suffrage convention ever held, here—half way across a continent, in a country almost unheard of, and with but scant communication with the older parts of the Republic—this instinctive justice should have ...
— History of Woman Suffrage, Volume III (of III) • Various

... she is still in bed, and suffering a good deal. I am continuing the remedies you gave her. I—I have thought it best to let her suppose that Doctor Namby had attended you, Geoffrey. She is very nervous, and I feared to ...
— Geoffrey Strong • Laura E. Richards

... knowing which way he should go, perhaps to fall down some shaft such as was sure to be in a place like this? No; he could not risk the journey without a light, and he stood waiting and trying to make out the shadowy figures, one of whom looked strangely uncouth beneath his load, while the ...
— Cutlass and Cudgel • George Manville Fenn

... he had discovered that keeping house in New York was the cheapest way to live,—vastly the cheapest, if the amount of convenience and comfort was considered,—and absolutely cheapest in fact. To be sure, being a bachelor, his housekeeping was done in a single room, the back-room of a third-story, in a respectable and convenient house and neighborhood. His rent was ninety-six dollars a year. His expenses of every other kind, (clothing excepted,) one ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Volume 7, Issue 42, April, 1861 • Various

... I had time to look about me a little, and note such of the most prominent characteristics of the ship as were to be seen by the dim light of the stars. She was a noble craft, as big as the generality of our first-class frigates, though not quite so beamy, perhaps, in proportion to her length, not quite so high out of the ...
— The Pirate Slaver - A Story of the West African Coast • Harry Collingwood

... regret that I bade adieu to the amiable Sismondi, his mother and sister; but I hope for a time only, as I have some idea of removing my domicile from Lausanne to ...
— After Waterloo: Reminiscences of European Travel 1815-1819 • Major W. E Frye

... look out?" said Jane. For Clematis had given such a pull that she pulled all the clothes out at the foot of ...
— Clematis • Bertha B. Cobb

... wounded behind them. Later on the British attacked Baltimore and were beaten off with great loss. It was at this time that Francis Scott Key wrote "The Star-Spangled Banner." He was detained on board one of the British warships during the fight. Eagerly he watched through the smoke for a glimpse of the flag over Fort McHenry at the harbor's mouth. In the morning the flag was still there. This defeat closed the British operations ...
— A Short History of the United States • Edward Channing

... Sandford," was the reply—it was uttered in a vulgar nasal tone, that Julia instantly perceived was counterfeited: but Miss Emmerson, with perfect innocency, ...
— Tales for Fifteen: or, Imagination and Heart • James Fenimore Cooper

... whom I owed my life a second time, and who had braved the wrath of the fiends to snatch me from a death, in comparison to which all others pale into insignificance, the tried friend, whose friendship stood as a shield between me and petty persecution ...
— Seven and Nine years Among the Camanches and Apaches - An Autobiography • Edwin Eastman

... senora Gallega," cried her master; "do your work, and don't meddle with the men-servants, or I'll baste you with a stick." ...
— The Exemplary Novels of Cervantes • Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra

... the quiet figure on the bed. She could not even tell if he had heard, yet perhaps he might, and so she gathered them, a little string of wondrous pearls, and let them fall with soft and gentle ...
— Ester Ried • Pansy (aka. Isabella M. Alden)

... her handkerchief to her eyes, and a minute later went out of the room and up the stairs. Mr. Fenelby heard her cross the floor above him, and heard the creaking of the bed as she threw herself upon it. He looked sternly out of the dining room window awhile. Never, never had his wife spoken such words to him ...
— The Cheerful Smugglers • Ellis Parker Butler

... revolution now became a subject of general discussion. Government, at last convinced that England, in the words of Mr. Burke, "abounded in factious men, who would readily plunge the country into blood and confusion for the sake of establishing the fanciful Systems they were enamored of," determined to act with ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. IV, No. 26, December, 1859 • Various

... gave a ball. They borrowed a seven-pounder from the Gunners, and wreathed it with laurels, and made the dancing-floor plate-glass and provided a supper, the like of which had never been eaten before, and set two sentries at the door of the room to hold the trays of programme-cards. My ...
— Indian Tales • Rudyard Kipling

... up yonder tall people. Old massa die soon and us have missy to say what we do. All her overseers have to be good. She punish de slaves iffen day bad, but not whip 'em. She have de jail builded undergroun' like de stormcave and it have a drop door with de weight on it, so dey couldn't git up from de bottom. It sho' was dark in ...
— Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves. - Texas Narratives, Part 2 • Works Projects Administration

... extraordinary that so little should have been accurately known and recorded of a dog which at one time must have been a familiar figure in the halls of the Irish kings. It was no mere mythical animal like the heraldic griffin, but an actual sporting dog which was accepted as a national emblem of the Emerald Isle, associated ...
— Dogs and All About Them • Robert Leighton

... joy; he remembered poor Whittington and his cat and told the king he had a creature on board the ship that would dispatch all these vermin immediately. The king's heart heaved so high at the joy which this news gave him that his turban dropped off his head. "Bring this creature to me," says he; "vermin are dreadful in a court, and if she will perform what you say, ...
— Children's Literature - A Textbook of Sources for Teachers and Teacher-Training Classes • Charles Madison Curry

... unconsciously strengthening his hands for worthier toils: the applause which selfish divines bestowed on his witty, but graceless effusions, could not be enough for one who knew how fleeting the fame was which came from the heat of party disputes; nor was he insensible that songs of a beauty unknown for a century to national poesy, had been unregarded in the hue and cry which arose on account of "Holy Willie's Prayer" and "The Holy Tulzie." He hesitated to drink longer out of the agitated puddle of Calvinistic controversy, ...
— The Complete Works of Robert Burns: Containing his Poems, Songs, and Correspondence. • Robert Burns and Allan Cunningham

... looking at Hugh," said Fleda, and her eye went back to the window. Mrs. Rossitur's followed it. The window gave them a view of the ground behind the house; and there was Hugh, just coming in with a large armful of heavy wood which ...
— Queechy • Susan Warner

... to the surface to obtain air. But the condition of the Dipnoi, which possess lungs but do not walk on land, does not support this supposition, for they possess fins which are either filamentous or fin-like, having a central axis with rays on each side. There can be little doubt that the digits of the terrestrial limb are homologous with endoskeletal fin-rays, but the evolution of the axis of the limb is not to be ascertained either from development or palaeontology. ...
— Hormones and Heredity • J. T. Cunningham

... and saw a large gold-coloured fan, most beautifully painted with birds of all the hues of the rainbow, from over which those tawny eyes were glancing at me; and for one moment I wished that hating people were ...
— Out in the Forty-Five - Duncan Keith's Vow • Emily Sarah Holt

... his astonishment. His bulging eyes sank back gradually into their orbits. His psychology, taking it all round, was really very creditable for an average sailor. He had been spared the humiliation of laying his ship to with a fair wind; and at once that man, of an open and truthful nature, spoke up in perfect good faith, rubbing together his brown, hairy hands— the hands of a master-craftsman ...
— The Mirror of the Sea • Joseph Conrad

... light horse, amounting, in the aggregate, to upwards of twenty-five thousand men. Barrington, at the same time, frankly acknowledged to the House that these figures showed well only on paper, as none of the regiments for America were complete, and, what was a still more unwelcome admission, that great difficulty was experienced in enlisting new recruits. Nothing, he said, had been left untried to secure them. The bounty had been raised and the standard lowered, and yet men were not forthcoming. ...
— The Campaign of 1776 around New York and Brooklyn • Henry P. Johnston

... And there is an evil old story of how a treasure ship, the St. Andrew of Portugal, went ashore at Gunwalloe in January 1526. There were thousands of cakes of copper and silver on board, plate, pearls, jewels, chains, brooches, arras, satins, velvets, sets of armour for the ...
— Escape and Other Essays • Arthur Christopher Benson

... imprisonment in irons and on bread and water, but the roll of the bastinado, extracted from the official Gazzetta di Milano may be left to speak for all the rest, and to tell, with a laconicism more eloquent than the finest rhetoric, what the Austrian yoke ...
— The Liberation of Italy • Countess Evelyn Martinengo-Cesaresco

... him jolly well too—when he was about twelve, so that I really get a pull over the rest of you there, for it adds of course immensely to the interest and if ever child was Father of the Man, Peter was. You know how we both funked that marriage of his for him—you because you knew Clare so well, I ...
— Fortitude • Hugh Walpole

... ninety-eight, the president and auditors of the royal Audiencia of the Philipinas Islands declared that, whereas the king our sovereign, in one of his royal ordinances, ordains and commands that the said president and auditors shall take a residencia every two months of the faithful administrators of the city in which this his royal Audiencia shall reside: therefore, in order that the said royal ordinance may be exactly enforced, and his Majesty's royal will observed and enforced in everything, ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898 - Volume X, 1597-1599 • E. H. Blair

... coming of the sun next morning, the follower of the Death Trail was minded to count his remaining store of matches. There were just a score of them. It seemed, then, that, after all, the end would come not from starvation, but from freezing, for against the deadly cold he could summon his ally of fire only twenty times, and without that ally his surrender must be swift. Therefore, as he went forward ...
— The Wilderness Trail • Frank Williams

... clean, and both men and women proceed cheerily to their already hoed gardens, and sow the seed. The large animals in the country leave the spots where they had been compelled to congregate for the sake of water, and become much wilder. Occasionally a herd of buffaloes or antelopes smell rain from afar, and set off in a straight line toward the place. Sometimes they make mistakes, and are obliged to return to ...
— Missionary Travels and Researches in South Africa - Journeys and Researches in South Africa • David Livingstone

... hurrying passengers, including an old lady, tripped over his prone form. The sensation of being kicked and sat upon appealed to Jock's sense of humour. The more people avalanched across him the more comic he thought it. And in a moment there was quite a pile of wriggling bodies on top of him. For though the public managed on the whole to leap over, or circumvent, the obstacle presented by Jock's extremely large body, none of ...
— Observations of an Orderly - Some Glimpses of Life and Work in an English War Hospital • Ward Muir

... the other Experiment around, yesterday afternoon, at a distance, to see what it might be for, if I could. But I was not able to make out. I think it is a man. I had never seen a man, but it looked like one, and I feel sure that that is what it is. I realize that I feel more curiosity about it than about ...
— The $30,000 Bequest and Other Stories • Mark Twain

... pushed back his chair, satisfied as only a trained raconteur can be by the silence of a difficult audience, and had busied himself with a cigar, ...
— Murder in Any Degree • Owen Johnson

... the infirmity of all earthly things. It is hard when, not dreaming, but trying our best, we fail. It is hard to bear the burden and heat of the day, through all life's prime, and yet, with all our toil, to earn no repose for its evening hours. It is hard to accumulate a little gain, baptizing every dollar with our honest sweat, and then have it stricken from our grasp by the band of calamity or of fraud. It is hard, when we have placed our confidence in man's honor, or his friendship, to find that we are fools, and that ...
— The Crown of Thorns - A Token for the Sorrowing • E. H. Chapin

... O'Hara's later and more popular transformation of Tom Thumb into a light opera, the song put into the mouth of the dying Grizzle by the first adapters was retained with ...
— The Life and Romances of Mrs. Eliza Haywood • George Frisbie Whicher

... crude bud ever anticipated blooming out into a society blossom was a conundrum. Perhaps he had some secret method buried in the same box with his hoarded coin. His long evenings were passed reading the Family Herald and Weekly Star and the Ashcroft Journal by candle-light; ...
— Skookum Chuck Fables - Bits of History, Through the Microscope • Skookum Chuck (pseud for R.D. Cumming)

... they are starv'd too yet they will not die here, They will not earth: a good stout plague amongst 'em, Or half a dozen new fantastical Fevers That would turn up their heels by whole-sale (Master) And take the Doctors too, in their grave Counsels, That there might be no natural help for mony: How merrily would my Bells goe then? Lop. Peace ...
— The Spanish Curate - A Comedy • Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher

... of Lois busied him constantly. It was such a lovely image. But he had seen hundreds of handsomer women, he told himself. Had he? Yes, he thought so. Yet not one, not one of them all, had made as much impression upon him. It was inconvenient; and why was it inconvenient? Something ...
— Nobody • Susan Warner

... "No—a Doucet. Isn't it absurd that I should array myself in these gorgeous gowns to compete with that Indian in her few flimsy calicoes and silks? The contrast is out of all proportion. It's the sublime and the ridiculous. And yet she looks well in anything! Dress her in ...
— When Dreams Come True • Ritter Brown

... strong cloth, but thin and very open at the sides, are filled with these cakes, and pressed very strongly down on each other; the leaves would be broken if this were not attended to. When the bags are filled, they are placed separately in a drying house, and turned daily. If the leaves were so dry that there would be a risk of their breaking during the operation of packing, a very slight sprinkling of water is given them to enable them to withstand it without injury. The leaf is valued ...
— The Commercial Products of the Vegetable Kingdom • P. L. Simmonds

... authority on psychic development has well said: "Occasional flashes of clairvoyance sometimes come to the highly cultured and spiritual-minded man, even though he may never have heard of the possibility of training such a faculty. In his case such glimpses usually signify that he is approaching that stage in his evolution when these powers will naturally begin to manifest themselves. Their appearance should serve as an additional stimulus to him to strive to maintain that high standard ...
— Clairvoyance and Occult Powers • Swami Panchadasi

... him," she told herself, meaning Captain Winstanley; "but I will begin a career of Christianlike hypocrisy, and try to make other people believe that I like him. No, Argus," as the big paw tugged her arm pleadingly, "no; now really this is sheer ...
— Vixen, Volume II. • M. E. Braddon

... was a double one. There was the life of high thinking, of disinterested aims, of genuine enthusiasm, of genuine desire to delight and benefit mankind, by opening new paths to wonder and knowledge and power. And there was the put on and worldly life, the ...
— Bacon - English Men Of Letters, Edited By John Morley • Richard William Church

... was no job for a chamber of commerce; it had become a simple matter for the police. The civic purity league had a special meeting at which the rind was peeled off Vernabelle's moral character, and the following Sabbath one of the ministers gave a ...
— Ma Pettengill • Harry Leon Wilson

... must go, and rose up with an endeavour to retract. 'Well, it is a relief to Mr. Bevan and me to find your son not consciously in fault, for it would have been a most serious thing. And in such a matter as this, of course you ...
— The Pillars of the House, V1 • Charlotte M. Yonge

... a Gentle Man. He was the greatest naturalist of his time, and a more perfect gentleman never lived. His son Francis said: "I can not remember ever hearing my father utter an unkind or hasty word. If in his presence some one was being harshly criticized, he always thought of something ...
— Little Journeys to the Homes of the Great - Volume 12 - Little Journeys to the Homes of Great Scientists • Elbert Hubbard

... father!" and Richard bounded away, taking the path he had so often trod in his boyhood. Larry stood and looked after him a moment. He was pleased to hear how readily the word, father, fell from the young man's lips. Yes, Richard was facile and ready. ...
— The Eye of Dread • Payne Erskine

... Felisberto, "to Spain nothing is denied. You speak of proceeding to the North, where the day never dawns, in search of a husband. You need but look at me to behold one to whom night and day, extreme ugliness and transcendent beauty, are alike; and since all are so bashful that they will not marry you, allow me, fair princess, to ...
— Tales from the Lands of Nuts and Grapes - Spanish and Portuguese Folklore • Charles Sellers and Others

... tell you," said Romayne. "That damned German has got her. I have seen them together too often. I have seen in her eyes the look that women get when they are ready to give themselves body and soul to a man. She loves that man. She loves him, I tell you. She has known him for years. I have come too late to have a chance. Too late, my God, too late!" He pulled himself up with an effort, then with a laugh said, "Do you recognise me, Tom? I confess I do not recognise ...
— The Major • Ralph Connor

... truth enlightened his soul, he would have discovered what we are taught in the Scriptures, that "because of unrighteous dealings, injuries, and riches got by deceit, a kingdom is translated from one people to another."(906) Carthage is destroyed, because its avarice, perfidiousness, and cruelty, have attained their utmost height. The like fate will attend Rome, when its luxury, ...
— The Ancient History of the Egyptians, Carthaginians, Assyrians, • Charles Rollin

... succeeded, as is well known, after a voyage the natural difficulties of which had been much augmented by the distrust and mutinous spirit of his followers, in descrying land on Friday, the 12th of October, 1492. After some months spent in exploring the delightful ...
— The History of the Reign of Ferdinand and Isabella The Catholic, V2 • William H. Prescott

... embroidery as a national art was probably at a later period, for its previous practice would be but a continuation of old-world occupations or diversions ...
— The Development of Embroidery in America • Candace Wheeler

... Sita marvelled much, and while Played o'er her lips a gentle smile, "All has been done, O Saint," she cried, "And ...
— The Ramayana • VALMIKI

... which goeth to Mecca, it is to be vnderstoode, that the Mahometans obserue a kinde of lent continuing one whole moone, and being a moueable ceremonie, which sometimes falleth high, sometimes lowe in the yeere called in their tongue Ramazan, and their feast is called Bairam. During this time of lent all they which intende ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, - and Discoveries of The English Nation, Volume 9 - Asia, Part 2 • Richard Hakluyt

... was a desperate undertaking; the Germans then had the Canadians in the open and added heavily to the Canadian's death roll. On the other side of Stony Mountain the British had met with no better success than the Canadians. Having started their enemies back, the ...
— The Story of the Great War, Volume III (of VIII) - History of the European War from Official Sources • Various

... Time and of Place are considered by some quite a subordinate matter, while others lay the greatest stress upon them, and affirm that out of the pale of them there is no safety for the dramatic poet. In France this zeal is not confined merely to the learned world, but seems ...
— Lectures on Dramatic Art - and Literature • August Wilhelm Schlegel trans John Black

... been made to discover a northwest passage to the Pacific as early as 1527, and another nine years later; but these were feeble attempts, which ended in failure and disaster, and discovered nothing worthy of record. It ...
— Historic Tales, Vol. 1 (of 15) - The Romance of Reality • Charles Morris

... surrounded by a cedilla such as this signifies that the word is bolded in the text. A word surrounded by underscores like this signifies the word is italics in the text. Greek letters are translated into English and are ...
— The Handbook of Soap Manufacture • W. H. Simmons

... folly of Cuesta, the Spanish Commander-in-Chief, who was always proposing impracticable schemes to Wellington, and, inflated with Spanish pride and obstinacy, believed that his own worthless troops were fully a match for the French, and was jealous in the highest degree of the ...
— The Young Buglers • G.A. Henty

... from all this breathes in Christianity! In Christianity the world is good as far as it goes, but it does not go far enough. Something of the revelation of the Divine may be discovered within it, but this is only a segment of a greater whole which comes to realisation within the soul. Here, the world is not cast away, despite all its limitations, but [p.177] is perceived as the only sphere where spiritual experience may exercise itself and draw out its own hidden potencies. Tribulation is ...
— An Interpretation of Rudolf Eucken's Philosophy • W. Tudor Jones

... Henry has by this time reached you. I think you ought to pay your respects to him in the Morning Chronicle. If you would only transcribe his jests, it would make him perfectly ridiculous. See, for example, what he says of St. Dunstan. A word to ...
— Calamities and Quarrels of Authors • Isaac D'Israeli

... directions for fear it will not grow in proper shape, do not hold the tree accountable for its distortion. There is no danger that from acorns planted last year, pine trees will grow, if you do not take some special care to prevent it. There is no danger that from an apple will grow an oak, or, from a peach-stone an elm; leave nature to work out her own results, or, in other words, leave God to work out His own purpose, and be not so anxious to intrude yourselves upon Him and to help Him govern the Universe He has made. Some of us have too high an estimation of His goodness ...
— History of Woman Suffrage, Volume I • Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Matilda Joslyn Gage

... better than hers. He gained on her step by step. Nearer and nearer he came. He was behind her; he was abreast of her before she had ridden a quartet of a mile. The tower of the village church was already in sight, when suddenly a strong hand was laid ...
— The Living Link • James De Mille

... days were more than full. All the arrangements for mademoiselle's comfort on the boat my captain had intrusted to me, and I was determined that nothing should be left undone to make her voyage on the Great River as comfortable as possible. The cabin, a rough affair at its best, was partitioned into two, and the larger one made as clean as six blacks scrubbing hard on hands and knees could make it. Then I got from Pierre Chouteau a small stove such as he often used ...
— The Rose of Old St. Louis • Mary Dillon

... flushed and ruffled as he and his guest returned towards the Dower House. He criticised England himself unmercifully, but he hated to think that in any respect she fell short of perfection; even her defects he liked to imagine were just a subtler kind of power and wisdom. And Lady Frensham had stuck her voice and her gestures through all these amiable illusions. He was like a lover who calls his lady a foolish rogue, and is startled to find that facts and strangers do literally ...
— Mr. Britling Sees It Through • H. G. Wells

... the spirit of the little choristers of his hidden valley, she heard him singing softly in rather a pleasing baritone voice: ...
— The Pride of Palomar • Peter B. Kyne

... however, to which I am now referring, each party felt the most intense interest in the struggle, and the most eager desire for success. Every Repealer, and every Anti-Repealer in Dublin felt that it was a contest, in which he himself was, to a certain extent, individually engaged. All the tactics of the opposed armies, down to the minutest legal details, were eagerly and passionately canvassed in every circle. Ladies, who had before probably never heard of "panels" in forensic ...
— The Kellys and the O'Kellys • Anthony Trollope

... the proposed change, hence there would be no occasion for the change. The fact that this assumption is not true furnishes the basis for the alleged inequality in representation, and the apparent necessity for the change proposed. In addition to this it is a well-known fact that in several of the Southern States,—my own, Mississippi, among the number,—the Fifteenth Amendment to the National Constitution has been practically nullified, and that the colored men in such States have been as effectually disfranchised as if the Fifteenth ...
— The Facts of Reconstruction • John R. Lynch

... pause ensued. The majestic Baron von Waltz looked silently at the ceiling, while the black, piercing eyes of the little Councillor Zetto examined the countenance of Weingarten with a ...
— Frederick The Great and His Family • L. Muhlbach

... Chancellor Wolfgang SCHUESSEL (OeVP)(since 4 February 2000); Vice Chancellor Hubert GORBACH (since 21 October 2003) cabinet: Council of Ministers chosen by the president on the advice of the chancellor elections: president elected by direct popular vote for a six-year term; presidential election last held 25 April 2004 (next to be held NA April 2010); chancellor traditionally chosen by the president from the plurality party in the National Council; vice chancellor chosen by the president on the advice of the chancellor note: government ...
— The 2004 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency

... loved," said Mrs. Raymond thoughtfully. "There's such a heap to be done about the house that she won't find time for much else. Besides, if she has children, she'll be planning ...
— The Ship of Stars • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... He was a true lover; anxious to vindicate his lady's perfections before all the world, and perhaps to convince himself that his estimate was not exaggerated. The proof was so easy, the statue's left hand hung temptingly within his reach; he accepted the challenge, ...
— The Tinted Venus - A Farcical Romance • F. Anstey

... with a shocked cry. Ann was up instantly; while Fledra got to her feet with effort. She remembered how carefully Ann had instructed her never to mention Lon Cronk or any of the episodes in their early days at Ithaca; but Flukey had never ...
— From the Valley of the Missing • Grace Miller White

... him an entirely spiritual existence. I agreed with my mother that such an one, however to be revered, was no substitute for the flesh and blood father possessed by luckier folk—the big, strong, masculine thing that would carry a fellow pig-a-back round the garden, or take a chap to ...
— Paul Kelver • Jerome Klapka, AKA Jerome K. Jerome

... "Just a second, dearie-child, until I find dry things for you. Son, stop fussing around the lamb ...
— Every Soul Hath Its Song • Fannie Hurst

... in whom these calamities originated was Mr. Falkland's nearest neighbour, a man of estate equal to his own, by name Barnabas Tyrrel. This man one might at first have supposed of all others least qualified from instruction, or inclined by the habits of his life, to disturb the enjoyments of a mind so richly endowed as that of Mr. Falkland. Mr. Tyrrel ...
— Caleb Williams - Things As They Are • William Godwin

... ran back to the palace, as he had done before; but he went first on board the Ogre's ship, and took a whole heap of gold, silver, and precious stones, and out of them he gave the kitchen-maid another great armful ...
— Popular Tales from the Norse • Sir George Webbe Dasent

... knocked upon the door and it opened. And they went inside and all was quiet and black as night. And they groped their way till they heard a low mumbling sound, and, pulling aside a curtain, they saw an old man with a long white beard, sitting in a room with black furniture ...
— Kernel Cob And Little Miss Sweetclover • George Mitchel

... course could not allow one of his subjects to outdo him in such a matter. He was the most powerful man of all Egypt who lived in the biggest house and therefore he was entitled to the ...
— Ancient Man - The Beginning of Civilizations • Hendrik Willem Van Loon

... it opened, and Lady Castleton and Julia turned their heads as May glided into the room. Both instinctively rose from their seats as Miss Jane introduced her as "a friend who is ...
— Won from the Waves • W.H.G. Kingston

... I'd come and see you about my leaving. I want to know what you mean by promising me one thing when I was here, and doing something different a ...
— Of Human Bondage • W. Somerset Maugham

... club preside; So poor, so paltry is their pride! Nay, even with fools whole nights will sit, In hopes to be supreme in wit. 10 If these can read, to these I write, To set their worth in truest light. A lion-cub, of sordid mind, Avoided all the lion kind; Fond of applause, he sought the feasts Of vulgar and ignoble beasts; With asses all his time he spent, Their club's perpetual president. He caught their manners, looks, ...
— The Poetical Works of Addison; Gay's Fables; and Somerville's Chase • Joseph Addison, John Gay, William Sommerville

... consisted of four books, of which but two remain.[206] In the first of these he considers rhetorical invention generally, supplies commonplaces for the six parts of an oration promiscuously, and gives a full analysis of the two forms of argument, syllogism and induction. In the second book he applies these rules particularly to the three subject-matters of rhetoric, the deliberative, the judicial, and the descriptive, dwelling principally on the judicial, as affording ...
— Historical Sketches, Volume I (of 3) • John Henry Newman

... is not a coward," resumed Jack, ignoring the query. "As for Feversham yonder, I can tell why he would ...
— Clare Avery - A Story of the Spanish Armada • Emily Sarah Holt

... that Buckingham stood within a pace of us and was an interested listener appeared not to temper her expressions ...
— The Lost Continent • Edgar Rice Burroughs

... youngest Miss Halleck. "It's a perfect chamber of horrors. But I like it, because everything's so ...
— A Modern Instance • William Dean Howells

... that art is like light, which acquires color and brightness from the objects it touches. Goya had passed through a stormy period; he had been a spectator of the resurrection of the soul of the people and his painting contained the tumultuous life, the heroic fury that you look for in vain in the canvases of that other genius, tied as he was to the monotonous existence of the palace, unbroken ...
— Woman Triumphant - (La Maja Desnuda) • Vicente Blasco Ibanez

... of my rather meagre breakfast, I got out the tool chest, and, using the plank which I had retrieved, made a cleat for the reception of a rowlock. This I firmly fixed to the boat's transom, so that, when necessary, we could use one of the oars to steer with; or for sculling purposes. The job occupied me for the best part of an hour; ...
— The First Mate - The Story of a Strange Cruise • Harry Collingwood

... waiting on her yourself," supplied Kendrick, hanging up a shabby overcoat on the ...
— Stories from Everybody's Magazine • 1910 issues of Everybody's Magazine

... at hand, and, as usual, they were quick to come to the aid of the distressed. The sun was hardly up before the howitzers were throwing lyddite at 4000 yards, the three field batteries (18th, 62nd, 75th) were working with shrapnel at a mile, and the troop of Horse Artillery was up at the right front trying to enfilade the trenches. The guns kept down the rifle-fire, and gave the wearied Highlanders some respite from their troubles. The whole ...
— The Great Boer War • Arthur Conan Doyle

... that we rode to the East Shore, and found on the beach a fair-haired man, half frozen, bound to some broken planks. Turning him over, we saw by his belt-buckle that he was a Goth of an Eastern Legion. Suddenly he opened his eyes and cried loudly: "He is dead! The letters were with me, but the Winged Hats sunk the ship." So ...
— Puck of Pook's Hill • Rudyard Kipling

... cried Corinne, when she heard the discussion—"do take me! It is so hard to be a girl, and see nothing! I will not be in your way. I will not scream and cry, or do anything like that. I only want to watch and see. I shall not be afraid. And I want so much to see something! I know I could slip away ...
— French and English - A Story of the Struggle in America • Evelyn Everett-Green

... face, caused less by sympathy than by sheer weariness and heat. The small receiving room of St. Isidore's was close and stuffy, surcharged with odors of iodoform and ether. The Chicago spring, so long delayed, had blazed with a sudden fury the last week in March, and now at ten o'clock not a capful of air strayed into the room, even through the open windows that faced ...
— The Web of Life • Robert Herrick

... a welcome task that had been assigned to these troops. Soldiers like to hold the ground they have won in any fight; and to retire after partial victory was not to their liking. But it was part of the game and they were content. So far as his section was concerned ...
— The Flag • Homer Greene

... cannot believe me! for I do not even know. I have taken and exchanged letters—whose contents I never saw—between the Confederates and a spy who comes to this house, but who is far away by this time. I did it because I thought you hated and despised me because I thought it was my duty to help my cause—because you said it was 'war' between us—but I never spied on ...
— Clarence • Bret Harte

... You're a Prime, Jim's an Operator; so, now that we can handle the heap, you'll have to be second-in-command whether you like it or not. Any time you can out-Gunther me we'll trade places. And you won't have to take the job away from ...
— The Galaxy Primes • Edward Elmer Smith

... thoroughgoing supporter of the 'do-nothing' doctrine. He approved of a national system of education, and of the early factory acts, though only as applied to infant labour. So, as we shall see, did all the Utilitarians. The 'individualism,' however, is not less decided; and leads him to speak as though the elasticity of population were ...
— The English Utilitarians, Volume II (of 3) - James Mill • Leslie Stephen

... of that month was in charge of the artillery which assisted in defeating Colonel Broadwood's column at Sannaspost. Two days later, in the fight between General Christian De Wet and McQueenies' Irish Fusiliers, Lossberg was severely wounded in the head, but a month later he was again at the front. With him continually was Baron Ernst von Wrangel, a grandson of the famous Marshal Wrangle [Transcriber's note: sic], and who was a corporal in the American army ...
— With the Boer Forces • Howard C. Hillegas

... unbecoming, as I acknowledge that for the most part it is, to speak disrespectfully of Works that have enjoyed for a length of time a widely-spread reputation, without at the same time producing irrefragable proofs of their unworthiness, let me be forgiven upon this occasion.—Having had the good fortune to be born and reared in a mountainous country, from my very childhood I ...
— Prefaces and Prologues to Famous Books - with Introductions, Notes and Illustrations • Charles W. Eliot

... death, he would punish them in some other way. Scarcely had the giant uttered these words before their faces began to sting, their pores opened, and when the duennas put their hands to their faces, they felt themselves punished in a ...
— The Story of Don Quixote • Arvid Paulson, Clayton Edwards, and Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra

... state we lived, until the year 1810, when the government laid its merciless fangs upon me, dragged me from these delights, and crammed me into a jail amongst felons; of which I shall have to speak more fully, when, in the last Number, I come to speak of the duties of THE CITIZEN. This added to the difficulties of my task of teaching; for now I was snatched away from ...
— Advice to Young Men • William Cobbett

... scene is but a stage, Where various images appear; In different parts of youth and age, Alike the prince ...
— The Poems of Jonathan Swift, D.D., Volume I (of 2) • Jonathan Swift

... a place for her in that wagon with the square top," went on Pan. "She's been sick. Rustle, Dad. Fetch me ...
— Valley of Wild Horses • Zane Grey

... neighbourhood there lived a very famous Dervish who was esteemed the best philosopher in all Turkey, and they went to consult him. Pangloss was ...
— Candide • Voltaire

... that the illegitimate bantling is a very little one. Its parents may think themselves hardly treated when they are called lineal successors of Tony Fire-the-faggot: {263} but, degenerate though they be, such is their ancestry. Let every allowance be made for them: but their unholy fire must be trodden out; so long as a ...
— A Budget of Paradoxes, Volume II (of II) • Augustus de Morgan

... of studying,—a most annoying one to a nervous person!—and, as the noise around him increases or decreases, so he raises or lowers his voice. As may be easily understood, there are times ...
— We Ten - Or, The Story of the Roses • Lyda Farrington Kraus

... ships on the whole as fast; that they were conscious of this superiority and therefore eager to attack, while the French, equally conscious of inferiority, or for other reasons, were averse to decisive engagements. With these dispositions the latter, feeling they could rely on a blindly furious attack by the English, had evolved a crafty plan by which, while seeming to fight, they really avoided doing so, and at the same time did the enemy much harm. This plan was to take the lee-gage, the characteristic of which, as has before been pointed out, is that ...
— The Influence of Sea Power Upon History, 1660-1783 • A. T. Mahan

... nowhar round the mountings. But I 'lowed 't war toler'ble sassy in Birt ter stand thar peerin' at me through the chinkin'. I never let on, though, ez I viewed him. An' then, them eyes jes' set up sech a outdacious winkin' an' wallin', an' squinchin', ez I knowed he war makin' faces at me. So I jes' riz up—an' the eyes slipped away from thar in a hurry. I war aimin' ter larrup Birt fur his sass, but I stopped ter hang up a skin ez I hed knocked down. It never tuk me long, much, but when ...
— Down the Ravine • Charles Egbert Craddock (real name: Murfree, Mary Noailles)

... cocking his laurels too jauntily over his ear. I was his conscience, and stood on the splash-board of his triumph-car, whispering, "Hominem memento te." As we rolled along the way, and passed the weathercocks on the temples, I saluted the symbol of the goddess Fortune with a reverent awe. "We have done our little endeavor," I said, bowing my head, "and mortals can do no more. But we might have fought bravely and not won. We might have cast the coin, calling, 'Head,' and lo! Tail might have come uppermost." ...
— Roundabout Papers • William Makepeace Thackeray

... Frankish chief. [Vol, vii. p. 11, ET SEQ. Gibbon's remark, that if the Saracen conquest had not then been checked, "Perhaps the interpretation of the Koran would now be taught in the schools of Oxford, and her pulpits might demonstrate to a circumcised people the sanctity and truth of the revelation of Mahomat," has almost an air of regret.] Schlegel speaks of this "mighty victory" in terms of fervent gratitude; and tells how "the arms of Charles Martel saved and delivered the Christian nations of the West ...
— The Fifteen Decisive Battles of The World From Marathon to Waterloo • Sir Edward Creasy, M.A.

... first a mere matter of chance that a balance was struck between the two losses of States. While Virginia remained a slave State, it was natural that slavery should extend into Kentucky, which had been a part of Virginia. Likewise Tennessee, being a part of North ...
— The Anti-Slavery Crusade - Volume 28 In The Chronicles Of America Series • Jesse Macy

... [A] Since these words were written one hears of demobilization schemes ready to the last buttons. Let us hope the buttons ...
— Another Sheaf • John Galsworthy

... five days in which to face a rather ugly and bald fact before Northrup again saw Mary-Clare. He had employed the time, he tried to ...
— At the Crossroads • Harriet T. Comstock



Words linked to "A" :   picometer, current unit, micromillimetre, purine, letter, blood type, haemophilia A, picometre, biochemistry, nm, dehydroretinol, millimicron, micromicron, nucleotide, blood group, retinol, micromillimeter



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