Free Translator Free Translator
Translators Dictionaries Courses Other
Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




Woo   Listen
verb
Woo  v. t.  (past & past part. wooed; pres. part. wooing)  
1.
To solicit in love; to court. "Each, like the Grecian artist, wooes The image he himself has wrought."
2.
To court solicitously; to invite with importunity. "Thee, chantress, oft the woods among I woo, to hear thy even song." "I woo the wind That still delays his coming."






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"Woo" Quotes from Famous Books



... and troubled, went apart, and rode into a forest, for now he knew that he had done himself an ill turn. The lady he loved and whom he wanted to wife for himself he had now promised to woo ...
— King Arthur's Knights - The Tales Re-told for Boys & Girls • Henry Gilbert

... occasion to tell you so alone, I would not think that such love could meet only loathing and disdain. What! has Nature shaped me so unkindly that where I love no love can reply? What! has the accident of birth shut me out from the right to woo and mate with the high-born? For the last, at least that gentleman in justice should tell you since it has been his care to instil the haughty lesson into me, that my lineage is one that befits lofty hopes and warrants fearless ...
— The Caxtons, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... show me what thou'lt do: Woo't weep? Woo't fight? Woo't fast? Woo't tear thyself? Woo't drink up eisel? Eat a crocodile? I'll do't. Dost thou come here to whine? To outface me with leaping in her grave? Be buried quick with her, and so will I: And, if thou prate of mountains, ...
— The Journal of Arthur Stirling - "The Valley of the Shadow" • Upton Sinclair

... Concerning Siegfried Third Adventure How Siegfried Came to Worms Fourth Adventure How Siegfried Fought with the Saxons Fifth Adventure How Siegfried First Saw Kriemhild Sixth Adventure How Gunther Went to Issland to Woo Brunhild Seventh Adventure How Gunther Won Brunhild Eighth Adventure How Siegfried Journeyed to the Nibelungs Ninth Adventure How Siegfried Was Sent to Worms Tenth Adventure How Brunhild Was Received at Worms Eleventh Adventure ...
— The Fall of the Niebelungs • Unknown

... enshroud; and the Manes' phantom crowd, And the starveling house unbeautiful of Pluto shut thee in; And thou shalt not banish care by the ruddy wine-cup there, Nor woo the gentle Lycidas, whom all ...
— Horace • Theodore Martin

... like her, but could not; they objected to her assumption of superiority, and were in grave doubt as to her opinions on cardinal points of faith and behaviour. Yet, when it appeared a possibility that their brother might woo Miss. Lord and win her for a wife, the girls did their best to see her in a more favourable light. Not for a moment did it occur to them that Nancy could regard a proposal from Samuel as anything but an honour; to them she might behave slightingly, for they were of her own sex, and not clever; ...
— In the Year of Jubilee • George Gissing

... the interior of the country lay an old baronial hall, and in it lived an old proprietor, who had two sons, which two young men thought themselves too clever by half. They wanted to go out and woo the king's daughter; for the maiden in question had publicly announced that she would choose for her husband that youth who could arrange ...
— What the Moon Saw: and Other Tales • Hans Christian Andersen

... enough sweetness in Zura's voice to woo a man to Heaven or lure him to the other place. Page listened till the last note, then softly closed the door and walked beside me. The look on his face held me speechless. It was a glorious something he had gained, yet never to be his; a glimpse into paradise, then the falling of ...
— The House of the Misty Star - A Romance of Youth and Hope and Love in Old Japan • Fannie Caldwell Macaulay

... hip was so inflamed that I could only sleep in a sitting posture. Seated with my back against a tree, the smoke from the fire almost enveloping me in its suffocating folds, I vainly tried, amid the din and uproar of this horrible serenade, to woo the drowsy god. My imagination was instinct with terror. At one moment it seemed as if, in the density of a thicket, I could see the blazing eyes of a formidable forest monster fixed upon me, preparatory to a deadly leap; at another I fancied that I heard the swift approach of a ...
— Thirty-Seven Days of Peril - from Scribner's Monthly Vol III Nov. 1871 • Truman Everts

... set out in a small vessel. Siegfried bade his companions represent him as Gunther's vassal only; but Brunhild, seeing his giant figure and guessing its strength, imagined that he had come to woo her. She was dismayed, therefore, when she heard that he had held the stirrup for Gunther to dismount. When he entered her hall, she advanced to meet him; but he drew aside, saying that honor was due to ...
— Famous Tales of Fact and Fancy - Myths and Legends of the Nations of the World Retold for Boys and Girls • Various

... There was, indeed, a kind of venom in his antipathies; nor would he suffer his ears to be assailed, or his heat to relent, in favour of those against whom he entertained animosities, however capricious and unfounded. In one pursuit only was he consistent: one object only did he woo with an inflexible attachment; and that ...
— Bibliomania; or Book-Madness - A Bibliographical Romance • Thomas Frognall Dibdin

... mother, who said, "The hawk, my daughter, is a noble knight who shall be thy husband, but, alas, unless God defend him from his foes, thou shalt lose him ere he has long been thine." Kriemhild replied, "O lady mother, I wish no knight to woo me from thy side." "Nay," said the Queen, "Speak not thus, for God will send to thee a ...
— Young Folks Treasury, Volume 2 (of 12) • Various

... longer directs. If God vouchsafes to grant me a few more years of life, I must then see you once more, my dear, most dear friend, for the voice within, to which I always listen, demands this. Spirits may love one another, and I shall ever woo yours. Your approval is dearer to me than all else in the world. I told Goethe my sentiments as to the influence praise has over men like us, and that we desire our equals to listen to us with their understanding. Emotion suits women only; (forgive me!) music ought to strike ...
— Beethoven's Letters 1790-1826, Volume 1 of 2 • Lady Wallace

... necessity of having good men in office. The officials of his day excited his contempt, and reciprocally scorned his teachings. It was in contrast to these officials that he painted the ideal times of Kings Wan and Woo. The two motive-powers of government, according to Confucius, are righteousness and the observance of ceremonies. Righteousness is the law of the world, as ceremonies form a rule to the heart. What he meant by ceremonies was rules of propriety, intended to keep all unruly ...
— Beacon Lights of History, Volume I • John Lord

... unto a puritan, to woo her, And roughly did salute her with a kiss: Away! quoth she, and rudely push'd me from her; Brother, by yea and nay, I like not this: And still with amorous talk she was saluted, My artless speech with ...
— A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. IX • Various

... up a set speech and forgotten it. He was shy, but he was also resolute. Drawing himself up suddenly he said, with an earnest, honest look, "Mr Ravenshaw, I love your daughter," (there was only one daughter in Ian's estimation!) "and I come to ask leave to woo her. If, ...
— The Red Man's Revenge - A Tale of The Red River Flood • R.M. Ballantyne

... you down an hundred wild plots, all impossible things, which you must be ruled by perforce, and he delivers them with a serious and counselling forehead; and there is a great deal more wisdom in this forehead than his head. He will woo for you, solicit for you, and woo you to suffer him; and scarce any thing done, wherein his letter, or his journey, or at least himself is not seen; if he have no task in it else, he will rail yet on some side, and is often beaten ...
— Microcosmography - or, a Piece of the World Discovered; in Essays and Characters • John Earle

... deemed, as they wandered through the arbour-walks of this enchanting wilderness, that its beauty had been enhanced even by this very neglect. It seemed like a forest in a beautiful romance; a green and bowery wilderness where Boccaccio would have loved to woo, and Watteau to paint. So artfully had the walks been planned, that they seemed interminable, nor was there a single point in the whole pleasaunce where the keenest eye could have detected a limit. Sometimes you wandered in those arched and winding walks dear to pensive spirits; sometimes ...
— Henrietta Temple - A Love Story • Benjamin Disraeli

... creaked out of the room, she shut her eyes tight and tried in despair to woo herself back to the moment of half-consciousness when Eric drew her cloak across her chest and she roused to ask him sleepily "Am I ...
— The Education of Eric Lane • Stephen McKenna

... skill, and the courage of the Yankee sailor, who has borne our flag far as the ocean bears its foam, and caused the name and the character of the United States to be known and respected wherever there is wealth enough to woo commerce, and intelligence enough to honor merit? So long as we preserve, and appreciate the achievements of Jefferson and Adams, of Franklin and Madison, of Hamilton, of Hancock, and of Rutledge, men who labored for the whole country, and lived for ...
— Speeches of the Honorable Jefferson Davis 1858 • Hon. Jefferson Davis

... whey to drink, which will fatten his limbs. But work does not suit such a fellow. He would rather ramble idly about and beg for food to fill his empty stomach. Let him once come to the palace of Odysseus and the guests that woo the queen will fling footstools at him." With that Melanthios kicked him in the thigh. Odysseus hesitated a moment and considered whether it were better to slay the goatherd with a blow from his staff, ...
— Odysseus, the Hero of Ithaca - Adapted from the Third Book of the Primary Schools of Athens, Greece • Homer

... thy look Averted till I woo thee turn again And thou shalt stand to all posterity, The eternal game and laughter, with thy neck Writh'd to thy tail, like a ridiculous cat. Avoid these fumes, these superstitious lights, And all these cozening ceremonies: you, Your pure and spiced conscience! ...
— Sejanus: His Fall • Ben Jonson

... you do if I should die?" He paused a moment, some bright thought to woo, And then, in solemn tone, made this reply: "This thing, by Allah's help, I'll ...
— Gleams of Sunshine - Optimistic Poems • Joseph Horatio Chant

... her own control and deliberately abolished slavery. Mr. Lincoln now announced the State as "secure to liberty and union for all the future. The genius of rebellion will no longer claim Maryland. Like another foul spirit being driven out, it may seek to tear her, but it will woo her no more." There was no reason why the other Border States should not follow her example—and there was the strongest argument against compensating another State for doing what Maryland had done of her own free will and from an instinct of patriotism, as the one act ...
— Twenty Years of Congress, Vol. 1 (of 2) • James Gillespie Blaine

... only pity, and—love. He knew now that all he had hoped and longed for was to be his. Kate cared for him. She had loved him from the start. His were the arms that would shelter her. His were the caresses that must woo that warm, palpitating spirit back ...
— The Law-Breakers • Ridgwell Cullum

... soft anthems to the ears of men To woo them from their beds, still murmuring That men can sleep while they their matins sing. Most divine service, whose so early lay Prevents the eyelids of ...
— Nancy - A Novel • Rhoda Broughton

... your cloak for a certain gallant adventure, which a new love affair has furnished him. His custom is not new to you, I believe: often does he neglect the heavens for the earth; and you are not ignorant that this master of the Gods loves to take upon himself the guise of man to woo earthly beauties. He knows a hundred ingenious tricks to entrap the most obdurate. He has felt the darts of Alcmene's eyes; and, whilst Amphitryon, her husband, commands the Theban troops on the plains of Boeotia, Jupiter has taken his form, and assuaged his ...
— Amphitryon • Moliere

... was the draught of air that now impelled us, that, although every cloth was quickly spread to woo it, the ship was a full hour and a half reaching as far as Boolambemba Point, where we met the full strength of the river current; and when we bore away on our course up the river, our patience was severely taxed by the discovery that, ...
— The Pirate Slaver - A Story of the West African Coast • Harry Collingwood

... Evelyn, so madly loved,—Evelyn might still be his! No law—from the violation of which, even in thought, Human Nature recoils appalled and horror-stricken—forbade him to reclaim her hand, to snatch her from the grasp of Vargrave, to woo again, and again to win her! But did Maltravers welcome, did he embrace that thought? Let us do him justice: he did not. He felt that Alice's resolution, in the first hour of mortified affection, was not ...
— Alice, or The Mysteries, Book X • Edward Bulwer Lytton

... hand. But if you are to die, live first! Come forth With me into the glory of God's earth! Soon, soon the gilded cage will claim its prize. The Lady thrives there, but the Woman dies, And I love nothing but the Woman in you. There, if they will, let others woo and win you, But here, my spring of life began to shoot, Here my Song-tree put forth its firstling fruit; Here I found wings and flight:—Svanhild, I know it, Only be mine,—here I shall grow ...
— Love's Comedy • Henrik Ibsen

... following verbs in the indicative mood, present tense, third person singular: leave, seem, search, impeach, fear, redress, comply, bestow, do, woo, sue, view, allure, rely, beset, release, be, bias, compel, ...
— The Grammar of English Grammars • Goold Brown

... to woo a maid: she was dressing supper with a drop at her nose. She asked him if he would stay all night; he answered, 'Just as it falls:' meaning, if the drop fell among the meat, he would be off; if it fell by, ...
— The Proverbs of Scotland • Alexander Hislop

... he drains and he shakes his reins, And rides his rake-helly way-O! She was sweet to woo and most comely, too, But that was all ...
— The Tavern Knight • Rafael Sabatini

... Stephen Lorimer would never forget her first inspection of him. Nursemaids had done their worst on the subject of stepfathers; fairy tales had presented the pattern. He knew exactly what was going on in her mind, and—quite as earnestly beneath his persiflage as he had set himself to woo the widow—he set himself to win her daughter. It was a matter of moments only before he saw the color coming back into her square little face and the horror seeping out of her eyes. It was a matter of days only ...
— Play the Game! • Ruth Comfort Mitchell

... looked up from her pew (Why she did, Heaven knows); But I smiled; wouldn't you? 'T was the right thing to do; And, pshaw, nobody knew. Then I tried hard to pose, But a look of hers froze All my blood. And I woo Her in future, old chappie, ...
— When hearts are trumps • Thomas Winthrop Hall

... that should be, and the deeds that were of old. And he stood before her and said: "I have spoken a word, time was, That thy will should rule thy wedding; and now hath it come to pass That again two kings of the people will woo thy body to bed." So she rose to her feet and hearkened: "And which be ...
— The Story of Sigurd the Volsung and the Fall of the Niblungs • William Morris

... Civil Servant woo the panegyrics of Society, And hanker after posthumous applause, It MAY happen that possession of a prodigal variety Of talents will invalidate his cause. He must learn to put a tether on his cerebral agility, And focus all his energies of aim On ONE isolated idol, ...
— The Days Before Yesterday • Lord Frederick Hamilton

... success is the only goal I have within me; The meanest man with the smallest soul May woo ...
— The Man from Snowy River • Andrew Barton 'Banjo' Paterson

... behaved, Killing Poets by dozens, With their uncles and cousins, Of whom not one in fifty had ever been shaved— Of the Court Ball, at which, by a lucky mishap, Owen Tudor fell into Queen Katherine's lap; And how Mr. Tudor, Successfully woo'd her, Till the Dowager put on a new wedding ring, And so made him Father-in law to ...
— The Humourous Poetry of the English Language • James Parton

... a pleasant, vibrant voice, whose metallic ring was softened and muted by the Irish accent which in all his wanderings he had never lost. It was a voice that could woo seductively and caressingly, or command in such a way as to compel obedience. Indeed, the man's whole nature was in that voice of his. For the rest of him, he was tall and spare, swarthy of tint as a gipsy, with eyes that were startlingly blue in that dark face and under those ...
— Captain Blood • Rafael Sabatini

... gushing blood the shuddering plain; 50 And, slow-descending to the Elysian shade, A while with PROSERPINE reluctant stray'd; Soon from the yawning grave the bursting clay Restor'd the Beauty to delighted day; Array'd in youth's resuscitated charms, And young DIONE woo'd him to her arms.— Pleased for a while the assurgent youth above Relights the golden lamp of life and love; Ah, soon again to leave the cheerful light, And sink alternate to the realms ...
— The Temple of Nature; or, the Origin of Society - A Poem, with Philosophical Notes • Erasmus Darwin

... dare pursue thee, None come near thy hallowed side: Nile's thou art, and he shall woo thee,— ...
— Fringilla: Some Tales In Verse • Richard Doddridge Blackmore

... himself he could be mortal known. The meanest wretch, if Heaven should give him line, Would never stop till he were thought divine. All might within discern the serpent's pride, If from ourselves nothing ourselves did hide. Let the proud peacock his gay feathers spread, And woo the female to his painted bed; Let winds and seas together rage and swell— This Nature teaches, and becomes them well. 'Pride was not made for men;'[3] a conscious sense Of guilt, and folly, and their consequence, Destroys the claim, and to beholders tells, Here nothing ...
— Poetical Works of Edmund Waller and Sir John Denham • Edmund Waller; John Denham

... "here at the edge of the forest is your rightful home and not in this grim castle, and here will I woo thee again, being ...
— The Strong Arm • Robert Barr

... where the Master-maid dwelt. He saw how brightly the hut shone and gleamed through the wood, and he too went into it to see who lived there, and when he entered and saw the beautiful young maiden he fell even more in love with her than the sheriff had done, and began to woo her at once. So the Master-maid asked him, as she had asked the sheriff, if he had a great deal of money, and the attorney said he was not ill off for that, and would at once go home to get it; and at night he came with a great ...
— The Blue Fairy Book • Various

... nothing to Sir Max; I warn you! Unless you would see no more of me, bear this warning in mind. Yolanda is a burgher girl. Treat her accordingly, and impress the fact on Sir Max. Were I as great as the ill-tempered Princess of Burgundy, whose estates you came to woo, I should still despise adulation. Bah! I hate it all," she continued, stamping her foot. "I hate princes and princesses, and do not understand how they can endure to have men kneel and grovel before ...
— Yolanda: Maid of Burgundy • Charles Major

... brother. His brother's passion being reciprocated, Macumer sacrificed himself for their happiness. Under the simple name of Henarez, Macumer was the instructor of Armande-Marie-Louise de Chaulieu, whom he did not woo in vain. He married her, March, 1825. At various times the baron occupied or owned Chantepleurs, a chateau Nivernais, a house on rue du Bac, and La Crampade, Louis de l'Estorate's residence in Provence. The foolish, annoying jealousy of Madame de ...
— Repertory Of The Comedie Humaine, Complete, A — Z • Anatole Cerfberr and Jules Franois Christophe

... inhumanly patient that he could continue to forgive Carol's heresies, to woo her as he had on the venture to California. She tried to be inconspicuous, but she was betrayed by her failure to glow over the boosting. Kennicott believed in it; demanded that she say patriotic things about the White Way and the new factory. He snorted, ...
— Main Street • Sinclair Lewis

... counsel of her chamberlain, and made reply, "If only I knew that he desired my love! Did ever maiden woo her knight before, by asking whether he loved or hated her? What if he make of me a mock and a jest in the ears of his friends! Ah, if the secrets of the heart were but written on the face! But get you ready, for go you ...
— French Mediaeval Romances from the Lays of Marie de France • Marie de France

... say a good Maid Servant ought especially to have three Qualifications; to be honest, ugly, and high-spirited, which the Vulgar call evil. An honest Servant won't waste, an ugly one Sweet-Hearts won't woo, and one that is high-spirited will defend her Master's Right; for sometimes there is Occasion for Hands as well as a Tongue. This Maid of mine has two of these Qualifications, she's as ugly as she's surly; as to her Honesty I can't tell ...
— Colloquies of Erasmus, Volume I. • Erasmus

... to me the wish to woo thee— Still, lip to lip, to cling for aye unto thee? Who made thy glances to my soul the link— Who bade me burn thy very breath to drink— My life in thine to sink? As from the conqueror's unresisted ...
— The Works of Frederich Schiller in English • Frederich Schiller

... my health there, and my love too. Helena was now further removed from me than ever. She was a great heiress. Mr. Harringford had left her all his money absolutely, and already Miss Blake was considering which of the suitors, who now came rushing to woo, it would be best ...
— The Uninhabited House • Mrs. J. H. Riddell

... Two, three ombu-trees grow near; but I have seen de great tiger sleep in one. My brother cacique have seen him too. When de big moon rise, and all is bright like de day, and no sound make itself heard but de woo-hoo-woo of de pampa owl, I get quietly up and go to de ombu-tree. I think myself much more brave as my brother cacique. Ha! ha! he think himself more brave as me. When I come near de ombu-trees I shout. Ugh! ...
— Our Home in the Silver West - A Story of Struggle and Adventure • Gordon Stables

... condition (not according to usual customs in Austria) on which the Count held the forfeited domains. He knew not that they had been granted merely on pleasure; but he was too well aware of Peschiera's nature to suppose that he would woo a bride without a dower, or be moved by remorse in any overture of reconciliation. He felt assured, too—and this increased all his fears—that Peschiera would never venture to seek an interview himself; all the Count's ...
— The International Monthly Magazine - Volume V - No II • Various

... dimply nurse met them at the Hospital. She heard their tale of woo sympathetically, and the boys, with a wisdom beyond their ...
— The Boy Scouts on a Submarine • Captain John Blaine

... up. . . . Yes, why should he not take a turn in the garden to compose his mind? In his present agitation he was not likely to woo slumber with success. . . . He slipped on his coat again and descended the stairs, latchkey in hand. A lamp burned in the hall, and by the light of it he read the hour on the dial of a grandfather's clock that stood sentry beside the dining-room door— five-and-twenty minutes past ...
— The Mayor of Troy • Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... the grey Doves coo, Little green, talkative Parrots woo, And small grey Squirrels, with fear askance, At alien me, in their furtive glance, Come shyly, with quivering fur, to see The stranger under their Tamarind tree. Daylight dies, The Camp fires redden like angry eyes, The Tents show white, In the glimmering light, Spirals of tremulous ...
— India's Love Lyrics • Adela Florence Cory Nicolson (AKA Laurence Hope), et al.

... fragment of the Parthenon; from Brazil and Switzerland, Turkey and Japan, Siam and India beyond the Ganges. On that sent by China we read: "In devising plans, Washington was more decided than Ching Shing or Woo Kwang; in winning a country he was braver than Tsau Tsau or Ling Pi. Wielding his four-footed falchion, he extended the frontiers and refused to accept the Royal Dignity. The sentiments of the Three Dynasties have reappeared in him. Can any man of ancient or modern ...
— George Washington, Vol. I • Henry Cabot Lodge

... barren upon the surface to the eye, the dreary region in which we now find ourselves, is very far from wanting in resources, such as not only woo the eyes, but win the very soul of civilization. We are upon the very threshold of the gold country, so famous for its prolific promise of the precious metal; far exceeding, in the contemplation of the knowing, ...
— Guy Rivers: A Tale of Georgia • William Gilmore Simms

... heart preoccupied! What thorn is like a loathing bride? Mark ye the shrubs how they turn from the sea, The sea's rough whispers shun? But like the sun of heaven be, And every flower will open wide. Woo with the shining patience ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... care her beauties rare From lovers warm and true,— For her heart was cold to all but gold, And the rich came not to woo,— But honored well are charms to sell ...
— Harvard Classics Volume 28 - Essays English and American • Various

... placid exterior. She always welcomed the opportunity of being left alone of an evening, because she realized the very serious drawback that the persistent presence of a pretty, well-grown daughter might be if a wooer would wish to woo. She knew perfectly well that if Dr. Ellridge called, Lily would wonder why he called, and would sit all the evening in the same room with her fancy-work, entirely unsuspicious. Lily might even think he came to see her. Mrs. Merrill had a measure of slyness and secrecy which her ...
— By the Light of the Soul - A Novel • Mary E. Wilkins Freeman

... threshold, where the cypress bough Supplants the rose that should adorn thy home, On the last pilgrimage on earth that now Awaits thee, wanderer to Cocytus, come! Darkly we woo, and weeping we invite— Death is thy host—his banquet asks thy soul, Thy garlands hang within the House of Night, And the black stream alone ...
— The Last Days of Pompeii • Edward George Bulwer-Lytton

... took the cross of St. John. Chance threw us again together. I learned that her love was undecayed. Poor child!—she was even then, sir, but a child! I, wild,—reckless—and not unskilled, perhaps, in the arts that woo and win. She could not resist my suit or her own affection!—We fled. In those words you see the thread of my after history. My sword and my Adeline were all my fortune. Society frowned on us. The Church threatened my soul. The ...
— Rienzi • Edward Bulwer Lytton

... little native vale Doubt thou the stars are fire Drink to me only with thine eyes Duncan Gray came here to woo ...
— English Songs and Ballads • Various

... child. He liked to be with people of his own age, whatever their condition; he also liked old people because they were old, and children because they were young. In travelling by rail, he would woo crying babies out of their mothers' arms, and still them; it was always his back that Irishwomen thumped, to ask if they must get out at the next station; and he might be seen handing out decrepit paupers, as if they were of royal blood and bore concealed sceptres in their ...
— Malbone - An Oldport Romance • Thomas Wentworth Higginson

... moisture are the elements which enable one of the most succulent of plants to bear a bunch of fruit luscious and refreshing, and when heat alone prevails, the wonder is that the whole patch of luxuriant greenness does not collapse and wither. But the broad leaves woo the cool night airs, and while the thin, harsh, tough foliage of the wattles becomes languid and droops and falls, the banana grove retains its verdancy, each plant a ...
— Tropic Days • E. J. Banfield

... heart, who share my sighs! Go seek the turf where Mano lies, And woo the dewy clouds of spring, To sweep it ...
— Oriental Literature - The Literature of Arabia • Anonymous

... routes from Falmouth to the Lizard—the regular route through Helston, and the other, a trifle longer, by way of the woods of Trelowarren, the seat of the Cornish Vyvyans. The most enjoyable way, however, of viewing this well-known promontory is to sail from Falmouth. Those who would woo the charms of the Cornish coast from the water should remember that even on the calmest day sailing along this exposed seaboard is no child's play, but a serious business. As a matter of fact no one who is not ...
— The Cornish Riviera • Sidney Heath

... replied Cleo, swishing her reservoir hat around to empty its contents. "Let us woo the wooseys undisturbed. I should like to dump the ...
— The Girl Scouts at Bellaire - Or Maid Mary's Awakening • Lilian C. McNamara Garis

... beautiful, as intelligent, as honest, as proud, and, unfortunately, she was, like you, as obdurate, which reminds me of the unfortunate gentleman whose emissary I now am. In his madness he requested me—yes, Miss Mathews, me a poor tinker—to woo you for him—to say to you all that he would have said had he been admitted to your presence—to plead for him—to kneel for him at your feet, and entreat you to have some compassion for one whose only misfortune was to love—whose only fault was to ...
— The Poacher - Joseph Rushbrook • Frederick Marryat

... honour'st Verse, and Verse must lend her wing To honour thee, the priest of Phoebus' quire, That tun'st their happiest lines in hymn, or story. Dante shall give Fame leave to set thee higher Than his Casella, who he woo'd to sing, Met in the milder ...
— Milton's Comus • John Milton

... the blackness and the justice of thy fate! Who setteth his whole soul upon a flower, and findeth its fragrance at last to be a deadly poison, if he escape from its contact, placeth no more flowers in his bosom. In vain they woo him with their beauteous eyes and breath of perfume. He heeds them not, or, at best, plucks them disdainfully, to gaze upon in listless indifference for a moment, and then cast them behind him, to be crushed beneath the ...
— Graham's Magazine Vol XXXII. No. 5. May 1848 • Various

... and the pebbly streams Sweeten and make soft your dreams: The purling springs, groves, birds, and well-weav'd bowers, With fields enamelled with flowers, Present their shapes; while fantasy discloses Millions of lilies mix'd with roses. Then dream ye hear the lamb by many a bleat Woo'd to come suck the milky teat: While Faunus in the vision comes to keep From rav'ning wolves the fleecy sheep. With thousand such enchanting dreams, that meet To make sleep not so sound as sweet: Nor can these figures so thy rest ...
— The Hesperides & Noble Numbers: Vol. 1 and 2 • Robert Herrick

... as a lover For her, the one; As a brother for a sister Long dead and gone. I have called thee over and over Names sweet to hear; With words than music trister, And thrice as dear. How long must my sad heart woo thee, Yet fail? How long must my soul pursue ...
— Myth and Romance - Being a Book of Verses • Madison Cawein

... will hardly take the chair again when the company is so miscellaneous; though they all behaved perfectly well. Meadowbank taxed me with the novels, and to end that farce at once I pleaded guilty, so that splore is ended. As to the collection, it was much cry and little woo', as the deil said when he shore the sow. Only L280 from 300 people, but many were to send money to-morrow. They did not open books, which was impolitic, but circulated a box, where people might put in what they pleased—and some gave shillings, ...
— The Journal of Sir Walter Scott - From the Original Manuscript at Abbotsford • Walter Scott

... tingled from this more or less uncomfortable experience and wounds ached and burned. Sleep was almost out of the question, and in the darkened ward I soon noticed the red glow of cigarette after cigarette from bed to bed as the men sought to woo relief ...
— "And they thought we wouldn't fight" • Floyd Gibbons

... can my barbarous barbarous father do, But with his cruel rage pursue me? My lover's blood is on thy spear, How canst thou, barbarous man, then woo me? ...
— Specimens with Memoirs of the Less-known British Poets, Complete • George Gilfillan

... best woo the bride well; for there are heretics who lay claim to her good will. I met a rover of strange rig and miraculous fleetness, in rounding the headlands of Otranto, who seemed to have half a mind to follow the felucca in her path ...
— The Bravo • J. Fenimore Cooper

... of Fate! Cunning master of debate, Cunning soother of all sorrow, Ruthless robber of to-morrow; Tyrant to our dallying feet, Though patron of a life complete; Like Puck upon a rosy cloud, He rides to distance while we woo him,— Like pale Remorse wrapped in a shroud, He brings the world in sackcloth to him! O dimly seen, and often met As shadowings of a wild regret! O king of us, yet feebly served; Dispenser of the dooms reserved; ...
— Along the Shore • Rose Hawthorne Lathrop

... come away from the jungle for, if you don't like it in this circus?" asked Woo-Uff, the big yellow lion, who lay on his back in his cage, his legs stuck up in the air, for he was cooler that way. "Why did you come from the ...
— Umboo, the Elephant • Howard R. Garis

... and Deor's Lament, v. 21. He was a king of the Goths. After his death, about 375 A.D., he came to be known as the typical bad king, covetous, fierce, and cruel. According to the Scandinavian form of the story, the king sends his son and a treacherous councillor, Bikki (the Becca of v. 19) to woo and bring to the court the maiden Swanhild. Bikki urges the son to woo her for himself and then betrays him to his father, who has him hanged and causes Swanhild to be trampled to death by horses. Her brothers revenge her death and wound the king. At this juncture the Huns ...
— Old English Poems - Translated into the Original Meter Together with Short Selections from Old English Prose • Various

... maiden. She smiled on them all and they called her Smiling Moon. Now there lived on the Great Lake a Wyandot chief. He was young and bold. No warrior was as great as Tarhe. Smiling Moon cast a spell on his heart. He came many times to woo her and make her his wife. But Smiling Moon said: 'Go, do great deeds, an ...
— Betty Zane • Zane Grey

... employed Mrs. Jasher as gooseberry. Sometimes Donna Inez came with the widow, while her father was hunting for the mummy in Pierside, and then Sir Frank Random would be sure to put in an appearance to woo his Dulcinea in admiring silence. Mrs. Jasher declared that the two must have made love by telepathy, for they rarely exchanged a word. But this was all the better, as Archie and Lucy chattered a great ...
— The Green Mummy • Fergus Hume

... from the embarrassments buzzing about the head of an operatic manager. She was glad to undertake tasks, and slow to show professional jealousy. She lived in seclusion with her mother, and received no visits. Even the young noblemen could not woo her at the stage door, though the Brunetti advised her to accept the advances of a certain banker, saying: "He is worth the trouble, for he ...
— The Love Affairs of Great Musicians, Volume 1 • Rupert Hughes

... the tree on its imaginary voyage, but his memory lagging behind some twenty years or more in point of time saw a young and slim Almayer, clad all in white and modest-looking, landing from the Dutch mail-boat on the dusty jetty of Macassar, coming to woo fortune in the godowns of old Hudig. It was an important epoch in his life, the beginning of a new existence for him. His father, a subordinate official employed in the Botanical Gardens of Buitenzorg, was no doubt ...
— Almayer's Folly - A Story of an Eastern River • Joseph Conrad

... my good Armand—not of that anyway. Only think of the woman for whose sake you committed a crime—if she is pure and good, woo her and win her—not just now, for it were foolish to go back to Paris after her, but anon, when she comes to England and all these past days are forgotten—then love her as much as you can, Armand. Learn your lesson of love better than ...
— El Dorado • Baroness Orczy

... woo'd your daughter, my suit you denied;— Love swells like the Solway, but ebbs like its tide— And now am I come, with this lost love of mine, To lead but one measure, drink one cup of wine. There are maidens in Scotland more ...
— Graded Poetry: Seventh Year • Various

... may, a while, defy heart-cares, And woo faint smiles from pain; Jesting, a while, may keep down tears— ...
— The Baron's Yule Feast: A Christmas Rhyme • Thomas Cooper

... father's roof, be banishment, Then call me banish'd, I will ne'er refuse A name expressive of the lot I chuse. 20 I would that exiled to the Pontic shore, Rome's hapless bard7 had suffer'd nothing more! He then had equall'd even Homer's lays, And, Virgil! thou hadst won but second praise. For here I woo the Muse with no control, And here my books—my life—absorb me whole. Here too I visit, or to smile, or weep, The winding theatre's majestic sweep; The grave or gay colloquial scene recruits My spirits spent in Learning's long ...
— Poemata (William Cowper, trans.) • John Milton

... to decide. Yet I should be a strange man if I let you go without being sure I understood your motives. If you go because you wish to be free from me,—that is all that need be said. But if I have failed to woo you as a man should—— You sealed my lips. Will you let me ...
— Montlivet • Alice Prescott Smith

... Architect, I dismiss all modes of conveyance, and with well-nailed shoes, rough clothes, a staff, and a lunch, I take the kingdom by force. When once in, I am royally entertained; for though coy and apparently hard to woo, Nature is a most delightful companion when ...
— Trail Tales • James David Gillilan

... harmony; Whose eye should speak a language to his soul, More eloquent than aught which Greece or Rome Could boast of in its best and happiest days; Whose smile should be his rich reward for toil; Whose pure transparent cheek, when press'd to his, Should calm the fever of his troubled thoughts, And woo his spirit to those fields Elysian— The ...
— My Schools and Schoolmasters - or The Story of my Education. • Hugh Miller

... you, Tony, is to make ardent love to Myra, to woo her as if she had not already promised to marry you," Lady Fermanagh responded. "It is just possible, my dear Tony, if you will forgive my suggesting it, that you have not been playing the part ...
— Bandit Love • Juanita Savage

... many leave the few to choose; They scorn not him who turns aside To woo alone a milder Muse, If shielded ...
— Ionica • William Cory (AKA William Johnson)

... me to reverse thy Husband's Doom, And I woo thee for Mercy on my self, Why shoud'st thou sue to him for Life and Liberty, For any other, who himself lies dying, Imploring from thy ...
— The Works of Aphra Behn, Vol. II • Aphra Behn

... 1830.—The holy moon and merry-toned wind of this night woo to a vigil at the open window; a half-satisfied interest urges me to live, love and perish! in the noble, wronged heart of Basil;[D] my Journal, which lies before me, tempts to follow out and interpret ...
— Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Vol. I • Margaret Fuller Ossoli

... called by their countrymen "Imitation Foreign Devils." When the Ever-Victorious Army regained its right to its title, the men became proud of their uniform, and would not have exchanged it for their old costume. Dr. Wilson in his interesting account of this period tells us that Woo, the Tautai of Shanghai, even went so far as to purchase thousands of boots of European make, such as were worn by Gordon's men, that their footprints might be seen about, as the rebels were so impressed with fear of the disciplined Chinese ...
— General Gordon - A Christian Hero • Seton Churchill

... lover, comes to woo; With airy step he hastes the pastures through, And steals a kiss from Luna as she ...
— Pan and Aeolus: Poems • Charles Hamilton Musgrove

... silver sheen And oft at dawn like some resplendent queen, Thou sittest on the hills in majesty; And all the flowers wake at thy decree. But now farewell to all thy joys serene; The autumn comes with swift-winged, silent flight, And he will woo thee with his fiery breath; In crimson robes and hues of flashing gold He'll clothe thee, and thy beauty in the night Will take a richer glow. But wintry death Will come and wrap thee ...
— Love or Fame; and Other Poems • Fannie Isabelle Sherrick

... was a little man, And he woo'd a little maid, And he said, "Little maid, will you wed, wed, wed? I have little more to say, Than will you, yea or nay, For least ...
— Harry's Ladder to Learning - Horn-Book, Picture-Book, Nursery Songs, Nursery Tales, - Harry's Simple Stories, Country Walks • Anonymous

... might have been managed at a tank within fifteen miles of your royal father's palace. And allow me to say that you may still thank your stars: in love a lost opportunity is seldom if ever recovered. The time to woo a woman is the moment you meet her, before she has had time to think; allow her the use of reflection and she may escape the net. And after avoiding the rock of Modesty, fall not, I conjure you, into the gulf of Security. I fear the lady Padmavati, she is too clever ...
— Vikram and the Vampire • Sir Richard F. Burton

... the lover who comes to woo, but the lover's way of wooing!" His successful lover was the one who threw the girl across his saddle and rode away with her. But one kind of woman does not like to have her lover approach shouting: "At ...
— The Lost Road • Richard Harding Davis

... vain to woo a widow over long, In once or twice her mind you may perceive; Widows are subtle, be they old or young, And by their wiles young ...
— Bracebridge Hall • Washington Irving

... not, I care not, I cannot tell how to woo, But I'll away to the merry green woods, And there get ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 188, June 4, 1853 • Various

... is the year's pleasant king; Then blooms each thing, then maids dance in a ring, Cold doth not sting, the pretty birds do sing, Cuckoo, jug-jug, pu-we, to-witta-woo! ...
— The Golden Treasury - Of the Best Songs and Lyrical Poems in the English Language • Various

... dig'ger plant'er pa'cer cru sad'er dip'per build'er pav'er dic ta'tor clip'per giv'er stran'ger en grav'er trot'ter 1aw'yer writ'er sur viv'or los'er saw'yer boast'er be liev'er woo'er read'er mourn'er ad vis'er vouch'er rid'er own'er as sign'er wres'tler dy'er rul'er ...
— McGuffey's Eclectic Spelling Book • W. H. McGuffey

... newspapers puffed her each day, Till the princes of Greece came to woo her, Then coaxing the rest to give way, She took Menalaus unto her, So said they, "though we grieve to resign, Yet if ever you're put to a shift, Let your majesty drop us a line, And we'll all of us lend you a ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 10, - Issue 284, November 24, 1827 • Various

... the land. Cha. You are deceiv'd, Sir, Now I perceive what 'tis that woes a woman, And what maintaines her when shee's woo'd: Ile stop here. A wilfull poverty nere made a beauty, Nor want of meanes maintain'd it vertuously: Though land and monies be no happinesse, Yet they are counted good additions. That use Ile make; He that neglects a blessing, Though he want present ...
— The Works of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher - Vol. 2 of 10: Introduction to The Elder Brother • Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher

... those voices, giving a different measure to the oak, the pine, the willow, &c.' The same journal from which we take this anecdote mentions, that in Henry Taylor's drama, 'Edwin the Fair,' there are some pleasing lines, where the wind is feigned to feel the want of a voice, and to woo the trees ...
— Music and Some Highly Musical People • James M. Trotter

... we're pretty nearly through. I'll step outside and woo the blonde while you're talking," Moffatt rejoined in ...
— The Custom of the Country • Edith Wharton

... the all-conquering lover, for he never yields an inch of his heart. If a goddess condescended from Olympus, he would woo her with hot blood and cold brain. His eyes are torches of desire, but there never is a tender light in them. If a woman died in his arms, he would leave her without a sigh. And yet he can speak the speech of love more eloquently than an angel. You will laugh ...
— The Proud Prince • Justin Huntly McCarthy

... the chief concerns of his life. He could not forget that in her veins flowed some of the very best of Spanish blood, and he considered her altogether too good for the common sheep-herders and wood-cutters who aspired to woo her. These he summarily warned away, and brought his big Winchester rifle into the argument whenever it became warm. When he left the girl alone, in order to guard her from temptation he locked her into the house together ...
— The Blood of the Conquerors • Harvey Fergusson

... the morn, descend! Breathe, summer gales, My flushed cheeks woo ye! Play, sweet wantons, play 'Mid my loose tresses, fan my panting breast, Quench my blood's burning fever!—Vain, vain prayer! Not Winter, throned 'midst Alpine snows, whose will Can with one breath, one touch, congeal whole realms, And blanch whole seas; not ...
— The Mirror of Taste, and Dramatic Censor, Vol. I, No. 5, May 1810 • Various

... his cares were fit to mow; Eight hundred horse (from Champain came) he guies, Champain a land where wealth, ease, pleasure, grow, Rich Nature's pomp and pride, the Tirrhene main There woos the hills, hills woo the ...
— Jerusalem Delivered • Torquato Tasso

... that she will," he answered, in tones as inscrutable as his glance. "So that you woo with grace and ardour, what woman could withstand your Highness? Be not put off by such ...
— Love-at-Arms • Raphael Sabatini

... for love so strong: She hath no mercy fro' me, but still * She pleadeth a plea that our love was long: She falsed, turned face, doubted, recked her naught * And her hard false heart wrought me traitor's wrong: Were my heart now changed her love to woo * She with quick despisal my heart had stung: Were my eyne to eye her, she'd pluck them out * With tip of fingers before the throng: Soft and tranquil life for her term she seeks * While with hardness and harshness our ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 5 • Richard F. Burton

... required to woo her in the usual form, he would do so. And what a charming yet resolute creature was the other E, who, in her anxiety about her sister, had crossed his path with such grave, firm dignity! She was Wolff ...
— Uarda • Georg Ebers

... them, and at times, perhaps, succeed; we may flee from them or endeavor to still the voice of their pain; or, when unable to escape them, we may, in our wrath and desperation, rise up against them and rebuke them: but they persistently remain, they continue to haunt, as if to woo and to win us to penetrate their deeper meaning, and discover the treasure that in them lies concealed. The very breakdown of human things, the severing of human ties and relationships, the loss of health and wealth, of treasures and friends, and of all that life holds dear, are really ...
— The Shepherd Of My Soul • Rev. Charles J. Callan

... not have knocked at the door of the pretty little gabled house at the Dollington end of the town for many days to come. The vicar would have had to seek out the attorney, to lie in wait for and to woo him. ...
— Wylder's Hand • J. Sheridan Le Fanu

... two on the front seat were a thousand miles away. Neither we, nor the day, nor the beauty of the drive had power to woo their glances from coming back to the focal point of interest they had found in each other. They were beginning to talk, not about each other but of themselves—the danger-signal of ...
— In and Out of Three Normady Inns • Anna Bowman Dodd

... hear them graciously, And hear me too, that with incessant hand Honoured thee richly from my former store! And now, fierce slayer, I importune thee, And woo thee with such gifts as I can give, Be kindly aidant to this enterprise, And make the world take note, what meed of bane Heaven still bestows on man's ...
— The Seven Plays in English Verse • Sophocles

... something for him, and started to meet him, as fast as he could, with all that load of hay and molasses. He was crying, too, but nobody could really tell it from the sound he made, which was something like 'Woo—ooo, woo—ooo,' and very mournful. ...
— Hollow Tree Nights and Days • Albert Bigelow Paine

... His mane is dapple-gray; Ride along, ride a cock-horse, Little boy, ride away. Where shall the little boy ride to? To the king's court to woo"— ...
— The Junior Classics • Various

... the doughty heroes gave oaths one to another. They offered him the maid Gudrun, Giuki's daughter, and store of treasure; they drank and took counsel together many a day, Child Sigurd and the sons of Giuki; until they went to woo Brynhild, and Sigurd the Volsung rode in their company; he was to win her if he could get her. The Southern hero laid a naked sword, a falchion graven, between them twain; nor did the Hunnish king ever kiss her, neither take her into ...
— Epic and Romance - Essays on Medieval Literature • W. P. Ker

... had rarely disturbed her; and now her imaginative forecast did not grapple it with any vigor or longing. If, indeed, it had been possible that a man of high standing, character, cultivation,—equal, in short, to the Johnses in every way,—should woo her with pertinacity, she might have been disposed to yield a dignified assent, but not unless he could be made to understand and adequately appreciate the immense favor she was conferring. In short, the suitor who could abide and admit her exalted pretensions, and submit ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 15, No. 90, April, 1865 • Various

... in the regular army before the rebellion, and had been in the volunteer service during the entire war. He was a sturdy, big-hearted fellow, now becoming somewhat gray with years. His favorite word was "Woo-haw," which he pressed into service quite frequently. From this we ...
— In The Ranks - From the Wilderness to Appomattox Court House • R. E. McBride

... together, thoroughly cleaned, and loaded in readiness for any emergency. Then they retired to their respective couches, and after Peter had carefully closed the mosquito curtains round them and extinguished the hurricane lamp, proceeded to "woo the ...
— In Search of El Dorado • Harry Collingwood

... as he concluded his quotation—sighed, and slackened the pace of his flying steeds. "But give me something of Praed's in return," he said, rallying suddenly; "is there not a pretty little thing called 'How shall I woo her?'" glancing archly and somewhat impertinently at me, I thought—or, perhaps, what would simply have amused me in another man and mood shocked me in him, the recent widower—widowed, too, under such peculiar and awful circumstances! I did not reflect sufficiently perhaps, on his ...
— Sea and Shore - A Sequel to "Miriam's Memoirs" • Mrs. Catharine A. Warfield

... of how the comic lovers woo, we perhaps cannot do better than subjoin the following ...
— Stage-Land • Jerome K. Jerome

... since she doth own them. But Phyllis hath too hard a heart, Alas, that she should have it! It yields no mercy to desert Nor peace to those that crave it. Sweet Sun, when thou look'st on, Pray her regard my moan! Sweet birds, when you sing to her, To yield some pity woo her! Sweet flowers, that she treads on, Tell her, her beauty dreads one; And if in life her love she'll not agree me, Pray her before I die, she will come ...
— Tudor and Stuart Love Songs • Various

... Eleanor Gray—and especially if Bertram Chester is the man—cannot take her by assault. If you reach out to grasp her—you who are so strong—it will only break something in that delicate nature of hers. Don't woo. Serve. Don't even see her too often. Don't renew that scene on the balcony—never make that mistake again. When you are with her, show by your attitude how you feel, and show her—well, that you're ...
— The Readjustment • Will Irwin

... must seldom come in her sight: But he that woos a Widow, must woo her Day and Night. He that woos a Maid, must feign, lye, and flatter: But he that woos a Widow, must down with his Breeches, ...
— Hudibras • Samuel Butler

... which to amuse, enjoy, and distract themselves. They find it in love. If no European is near upon whom they can bestow their smiles and the lustre of their magnificent eyes, they have to be content with their own countrymen, who woo them after the fashion of their Spanish ancestors, by serenades at night, in which the strumming of guitars generally plays a more important part than the words ...
— The Aldine, Vol. 5, No. 1., January, 1872 - A Typographic Art Journal • Various

... thanne was woo, That day was taken prisonere; The erl of Ewe he was also; The duke of Braband slayn was there; The duke of Barre fast hym by; The duke of Launson wente nevere away; Ne the erle Neverse certeynly, Ne many other lordes that y cannot say. ...
— A Chronicle of London from 1089 to 1483 • Anonymous

... a creeping cove the wave unshocked Lays itself calm and wide, Over a stream two birds of glancing feather Do woo each other, carolling together. Both alike, they glide together Side by side; Both alike, they sing together, Arching blue-glossed ...
— The Suppressed Poems of Alfred Lord Tennyson • Alfred Lord Tennyson

... her address to the daughters of Zion; so in this section the presence of the KING is unnoted until He Himself addresses His bride. But she is one with her LORD as she engages in His service! His promise, "Lo, I am with you alway," is ever fulfilled to her; and He has no more to woo her to arise and come away; to tell her that His "head is filled with dew," His "locks with the drops of the night"; or to urge her if she love Him to feed His sheep and care for His lambs. Herself ...
— Union And Communion - or Thoughts on the Song of Solomon • J. Hudson Taylor

... thou woo her as in the play I saw when last I was in London, King Richard wooed the widow of him he had slain, following her husband's corse to the grave? Nay then, nay then, man, I meant it not awry. But to ask ...
— Standish of Standish - A story of the Pilgrims • Jane G. Austin

... let us don the motley cap, The jester's chastened mien, If we would woo that looking-glass And ...
— The Congo and Other Poems • Vachel Lindsay

... phrase that allowed or dissuaded; To foresee, to allay, to avert from us perils unnumbered; To stand guard at our gates when he guessed that our watchman had slumbered; To win time, to turn hate, to woo folly to service, and mightily schooling His strength to the use of his nations; to rule as not ruling. These were the works of our King; earth's peace is the proof of them. God gave him great works to fulfil and to use ...
— The Life of King Edward VII - with a sketch of the career of King George V • J. Castell Hopkins

... chant anew; But I cannot mimic it, Not a whit of thy tuhoo, Thee to woo to thy tuwhit, Thee to woo to ...
— Birds Illustrated by Color Photography [June, 1897] - A Monthly Serial designed to Promote Knowledge of Bird-Life • Various

... "Woman, you woo your own destruction. None has ever set out to betray that secret and survived the first offense!" ...
— Caves of Terror • Talbot Mundy

... woo her, and sweetly he wooed, For his love for her grew—to a mountain it grewed, And what he was longing to do, then ...
— English as She is Wrote - Showing Curious Ways in which the English Language may be - made to Convey Ideas or obscure them. • Anonymous



Words linked to "Woo" :   display, romance, move, act, court, chase, wooer



Copyright © 2023 Free-Translator.com