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Unify   Listen
verb
Unify  v. t.  (past & past part. unified; pres. part. unifying)  To cause to be one; to make into a unit; to unite; to view as one. "A comprehensive or unifying act of the judging faculty." "Perception is thus a unifying act."






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Unify" Quotes from Famous Books



... won support. From the first the Union aimed to be an expression of student life as a whole and almost immediately, side by side with an active campaign for a building, it undertook to correlate and to unify the interests of the students in the different departments, classes, and organizations. The alumni, too, were knit into a body which aimed consistently to recognize the claim of the University to the regard and loyal support of every Michigan man. The Student ...
— The University of Michigan • Wilfred Shaw

... no eyes; they feel, and see not. Governments ought to see, and not determine anything through sentiment. There is, therefore, an evident contradiction between the impulses of the multitude and the action of power whose function it is to direct and unify those impulses. To meet with a great prince is certainly a rare chance (to use your term), but to trust to a whole assembly, even though it is composed of honest men only, is folly. France is committing that folly at this moment. ...
— The Village Rector • Honore de Balzac

... bear in mind how highly our poet even at that time prized this artistic wealth. To Goethe, art was "like good deeds;" Schiller hoped with its aid to unify the nation, and Wagner, especially after the discovery of such grand art-material as those myths contained, regarded it as the real fountain of health for the nation and the time. We shall soon observe that at last his art embraced our highest ideals in religion as well. Such an art, however, exists ...
— Life of Wagner - Biographies of Musicians • Louis Nohl

... daring, between the cheerful and the melancholic; it may be extended to all human beings and to the animals nearest us, but not beyond them. On the contrary, it is the special attribute of intelligence to seek resemblances or analogies everywhere, to unify; it embraces the whole of nature. By the law of transfer (which we have already studied) sympathy follows this invading march and comprehends even inanimate objects, as in the case of the poet, who feels himself in communion with the sea, the ...
— Introduction to the Science of Sociology • Robert E. Park

... differing only in degree, and in the mode of its operation. It dissolves, diffuses, dissipates, in order to recreate: or where this process is rendered impossible, yet still at all events it struggles to idealize and to unify. It is essentially vital, even as all objects (as objects) are ...
— Biographia Literaria • Samuel Taylor Coleridge

... intercourse throughout her Empire; had Rome never developed processes and skills in agriculture and the creative arts; had there been no Roman roads and common coinage; and had Rome not done dozens of other important things to unify and civilize Europe and reduce it to law and order, it is hard to imagine the chaos that would have resulted when the Empire gave way to the barbarian hordes which finally overwhelmed it. Where we should have been to-day in the upward march of civilization, without the work of Rome, ...
— THE HISTORY OF EDUCATION • ELLWOOD P. CUBBERLEY

... of the Navy is striving to unify the various corps of the Navy to the extent possible and thereby stimulate a Navy spirit as distinguished from a corps spirit. In this ...
— Complete State of the Union Addresses from 1790 to the Present • Various

... began Modern Painters while he was yet ignorant of the classic Italians; that he wrote The Stones of Venice without realizing the full indebtedness of the Venetian to the Byzantine architecture; that he proposed to unify the various religious sects although he had no knowledge of theology; that he attempted a reconstruction of society though he had had no scientific training in political economy; but in all this neglect of mere fact the sympathetic reader will discover ...
— Selections From the Works of John Ruskin • John Ruskin

... necessary field of activity to which the egotistic arts and sciences and theologies and military puerilities are but servants, that long-despised and always valiant effort to unify the labor of the world, is at last beginning to be something more than dirty smithing. No longer does the business man thank the better classes for permitting him to make and distribute bread and motor-cars and ...
— The Job - An American Novel • Sinclair Lewis

... perception. External objects usually affect various senses at once, the impressions of which are thereby associated. Repeated experiences of one object are also associated on account of their similarity; hence a double tendency to merge and unify into a single percept, to which a name is attached, the group of those memories and reactions which in fact had one external thing for their cause. But this percept, once formed, is clearly different from those particular experiences out of which it grew. It is permanent, ...
— The Sense of Beauty - Being the Outlines of Aesthetic Theory • George Santayana

... far as possible, to unify the collection by arranging the poems so that each should set the keynote to the next, or at least bear some relation to it in mood or theme. While it is impossible, with so varied a mass of material, that such ...
— The Little Book of Modern Verse • Jessie B. Rittenhouse

... own divinity degrees, and maintaining an Arts and Science department, for the present at least affiliated to the Calcutta University. It is justly claimed that such a Christian University at Serampore will both unify and raise the standard of theological education in the Indian Church, helping to build the Eastern structure of Christian thought and life on the one Foundation of Jesus Christ, ...
— The Life of William Carey • George Smith

... first. A walking and speaking statue of God finds himself at one particular moment employed as a shop assistant. He has in himself a power of terrible love, a promise of paternity, a thirst for some loyalty that shall unify life, and in the ordinary course of things he asks himself, "How far do the existing conditions of those assisting in shops fit in with my evident and epic destiny in the matter of love and marriage?" But here, as I have said, comes in the quiet and crushing power of modern ...
— Tremendous Trifles • G. K. Chesterton

... in much of our study in schools and textbooks. The problem for our thought is not so much one of invention or discovery as of grasp and assimilation. Our thinking is to apprehend meanings and relations, and so unify and give coherence ...
— The Mind and Its Education • George Herbert Betts

... on his wanderings, by the roadside, in lonely places, he would go through ceremonies with his disciples. Why?—Why is an army drilled? If you go to the root of the matter, it is to make one the consciousness of the individual soldiers. So Confucius, as I take it, in his ceremonies sought to unify the consciousness of his disciples, that the li might have passage through them. I say boldly it was a proof of that deep occult knowledge of his,—which he never ...
— The Crest-Wave of Evolution • Kenneth Morris

... early part of July, 1914, a collection of Frenchmen in Paris, or Germans in Berlin, was not a crowd in a psychological sense. Each individual had his own special interests and needs, and there was no powerful common idea to unify them. A group then represented only a collection of individuals. A month later, any collection of Frenchmen or Germans formed a crowd: Patriotism, hate, a common fear, a pervasive grief, had unified ...
— The Art of Public Speaking • Dale Carnagey (AKA Dale Carnegie) and J. Berg Esenwein

... Space and time, far from being very simple and primitive functions, are shown to be intellectual constructions of great complexity. And further, even in some of those who do not altogether deny to space and time the quality of forming or of categories and functions, one may observe the attempt to unify and to understand them in a different manner from that generally maintained in respect of these categories. Some reduce intuition to the unique category of spatiality, maintaining that time also can only be conceived in terms of space. Others abandon the three dimensions ...
— Aesthetic as Science of Expression and General Linguistic • Benedetto Croce

... Unhandy mallerta. Unhappy malfelicxa. Unhappiness malfelicxeco. Unhealthy malsana. Unheeded nezorgita. Unhook malkrocxi. Unhurt sendifekta. Unicorn unukornulo. Unification unuigo. Uniform (dress) uniformo. Uniform unuforma. Uniformity simileco, unuformeco. Unify unuigi. Uninhabited senhoma. Union unuigo, kunigo. Unique sola, senegala. Unison, in (mus.) agorde. Unit unuo. Unite unuigi, kunigi. Universal universala. Universe universo. University universitato. Unjust maljusta. Unknown nekonata—ita. Unlawful ...
— English-Esperanto Dictionary • John Charles O'Connor and Charles Frederic Hayes



Words linked to "Unify" :   concoct, bring together, merge, integrate, modify, get together, aggregate, coalesce, ally with, intermix, associate, consolidate, bond, unit, syncretise, confederate, disunify, commix, divide, converge, unite, intermingle, espouse, marry, immingle, couple, mix, conjoin, consubstantiate, federalize, band together, amalgamate, fall in, unification, consociate



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