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Stand   Listen
verb
Stand  v. i.  (past & past part. stood; pres. part. standing)  
1.
To be at rest in an erect position; to be fixed in an upright or firm position; as:
(a)
To be supported on the feet, in an erect or nearly erect position; opposed to lie, sit, kneel, etc. "I pray you all, stand up!"
(b)
To continue upright in a certain locality, as a tree fixed by the roots, or a building resting on its foundation. "It stands as it were to the ground yglued." "The ruined wall Stands when its wind-worn battlements are gone."
2.
To occupy or hold a place; to have a situation; to be situated or located; as, Paris stands on the Seine. "Wite ye not where there stands a little town?"
3.
To cease from progress; not to proceed; to stop; to pause; to halt; to remain stationary. "I charge thee, stand, And tell thy name." "The star, which they saw in the east, went before them, till it came and stood over where the young child was."
4.
To remain without ruin or injury; to hold good against tendencies to impair or injure; to be permanent; to endure; to last; hence, to find endurance, strength, or resources. "My mind on its own center stands unmoved."
5.
To maintain one's ground; to be acquitted; not to fail or yield; to be safe. "Readers by whose judgment I would stand or fall."
6.
To maintain an invincible or permanent attitude; to be fixed, steady, or firm; to take a position in resistance or opposition. "The standing pattern of their imitation." "The king granted the Jews... to gather themselves together, and to stand for their life."
7.
To adhere to fixed principles; to maintain moral rectitude; to keep from falling into error or vice. "We must labor so as to stand with godliness, according to his appointment."
8.
To have or maintain a position, order, or rank; to be in a particular relation; as, Christian charity, or love, stands first in the rank of gifts.
9.
To be in some particular state; to have essence or being; to be; to consist. "Sacrifices... which stood only in meats and drinks." "Accomplish what your signs foreshow; I stand resigned, and am prepared to go." "Thou seest how it stands with me, and that I may not tarry."
10.
To be consistent; to agree; to accord. "Doubt me not; by heaven, I will do nothing But what may stand with honor."
11.
(Naut.) To hold a course at sea; as, to stand from the shore; to stand for the harbor. "From the same parts of heaven his navy stands."
12.
To offer one's self, or to be offered, as a candidate. "He stood to be elected one of the proctors of the university."
13.
To stagnate; not to flow; to be motionless. "Or the black water of Pomptina stands."
14.
To measure when erect on the feet. "Six feet two, as I think, he stands."
15.
(Law)
(a)
To be or remain as it is; to continue in force; to have efficacy or validity; to abide.
(b)
To appear in court.
16.
(Card Playing) To be, or signify that one is, willing to play with one's hand as dealt.
Stand by (Naut.), a preparatory order, equivalent to Be ready.
To stand against, to oppose; to resist.
To stand by.
(a)
To be near; to be a spectator; to be present.
(b)
To be aside; to be set aside with disregard. "In the interim (we) let the commands stand by neglected."
(c)
To maintain; to defend; to support; not to desert; as, to stand by one's principles or party.
(d)
To rest on for support; to be supported by.
(e)
To remain as a spectator, and take no part in an action; as, we can't just stand idly by while people are being killed.
To stand corrected, to be set right, as after an error in a statement of fact; to admit having been in error.
To stand fast, to be fixed; to be unshaken or immovable.
To stand firmly on, to be satisfied or convinced of. "Though Page be a secure fool, and stands so firmly on his wife's frailty."
To stand for.
(a)
To side with; to espouse the cause of; to support; to maintain, or to profess or attempt to maintain; to defend. "I stand wholly for you."
(b)
To be in the place of; to be the substitute or representative of; to represent; as, a cipher at the left hand of a figure stands for nothing. "I will not trouble myself, whether these names stand for the same thing, or really include one another."
(c)
To tolerate; as, I won't stand for any delay.
To stand in, to cost. "The same standeth them in much less cost." "The Punic wars could not have stood the human race in less than three millions of the species."
To stand in hand, to conduce to one's interest; to be serviceable or advantageous.
To stand off.
(a)
To keep at a distance.
(b)
Not to comply.
(c)
To keep at a distance in friendship, social intercourse, or acquaintance.
(d)
To appear prominent; to have relief. "Picture is best when it standeth off, as if it were carved."
To stand off and on (Naut.), to remain near a coast by sailing toward land and then from it.
To stand on (Naut.), to continue on the same tack or course.
To stand out.
(a)
To project; to be prominent. "Their eyes stand out with fatness."
(b)
To persist in opposition or resistance; not to yield or comply; not to give way or recede. "His spirit is come in, That so stood out against the holy church."
To stand to.
(a)
To ply; to urge; to persevere in using. "Stand to your tackles, mates, and stretch your oars."
(b)
To remain fixed in a purpose or opinion. "I will stand to it, that this is his sense."
(c)
To abide by; to adhere to; as to a contract, assertion, promise, etc.; as, to stand to an award; to stand to one's word.
(d)
Not to yield; not to fly; to maintain, as one's ground. "Their lives and fortunes were put in safety, whether they stood to it or ran away."
(e)
To be consistent with; to agree with; as, it stands to reason that he could not have done so; same as stand with, below.
(f)
To support; to uphold. "Stand to me in this cause."
To stand together, to be consistent; to agree.
To stand to reason to be reasonable; to be expected.
To stand to sea (Naut.), to direct the course from land.
To stand under, to undergo; to withstand.
To stand up.
(a)
To rise from sitting; to be on the feet.
(b)
To arise in order to speak or act. "Against whom, when the accusers stood up, they brought none accusation of such things as I supposed."
(c)
To rise and stand on end, as the hair.
(d)
To put one's self in opposition; to contend. "Once we stood up about the corn."
To stand up for, to defend; to justify; to support, or attempt to support; as, to stand up for the administration.
To stand upon.
(a)
To concern; to interest.
(b)
To value; to esteem. "We highly esteem and stand much upon our birth."
(c)
To insist on; to attach much importance to; as, to stand upon security; to stand upon ceremony.
(d)
To attack; to assault. (A Hebraism) "So I stood upon him, and slew him."
To stand with, to be consistent with. "It stands with reason that they should be rewarded liberally."






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Stand" Quotes from Famous Books



... full of Flora. "I am sorry young Paine went so soon. I wanted to thank him. Flora can't eat the jelly, but it was good of them to send it. She can't eat anything. She's worse, George. I don't know how I am going to stand it." ...
— The Trumpeter Swan • Temple Bailey

... opposite of themselves. Thus in England Puritanism began as the hardest of creeds, but has ended as the softest; soft-hearted and not unfrequently soft-headed. Of old the Puritan in war was certainly the Puritan at his best; it was the Puritan in peace whom no Christian could be expected to stand. Yet those Englishmen to-day who claim descent from the great militarists of 1649 express the utmost horror of militarism. An inversion of an opposite kind has taken place in Germany. Out of the country that was once valued as providing a perpetual supply of kings small enough to be stop-gaps, ...
— The Crimes of England • G.K. Chesterton

... relationship as a child of a believer, promote, and make more certain, his repentance and faith; and therefore, if asked, "What profit, then, hath circumcision, and its substitute, infant baptism?" we can reply, "Much every way;" but it never stood, and never can stand, in the place of justification by free grace through the personal exercise of faith ...
— Bertha and Her Baptism • Nehemiah Adams

... does not matter at all which road you follow. All highways, as the saying is, lead roundabout to Koshchei. The one thing needful is not to stand still. This much I will tell you also for your song's sake, because that was an excellent song, and nobody ever made a song in ...
— Jurgen - A Comedy of Justice • James Branch Cabell

... and delivering the mail so limited, that many hours were consumed in the work. Large prices were often paid for places near the head of the line; and some of the more eager ones would wrap their blankets around them, and stand all night waiting, in order to get ...
— Life at Puget Sound: With Sketches of Travel in Washington Territory, British Columbia, Oregon and California • Caroline C. Leighton

... chance," Joe said. "Now this is the way I'll do it. I'll get a good momentum, swinging back and forth. You stand upon the high platform, holding your trapeze and waiting. When I give the word and start on my final swing, you jump off, hang by your knees, hands down. I'll leap toward you, turn over three times, and grab your hands. ...
— Joe Strong on the Trapeze - or The Daring Feats of a Young Circus Performer • Vance Barnum

... Senna and Salts for:—"Five cents' worth of senna leaves, one tablespoonful of epsom salts in one quart of cold water; cover and let stand over night, then strain and put in bottles. Take a wine-glass full every morning until you feel well." This is from Mrs. Jonathan Shaw, she has used it with good results in her family. A physician in England told ...
— Mother's Remedies - Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remedies from Mothers - of the United States and Canada • T. J. Ritter

... the grand stand, then the starter takes his place, and the half-dozen horses, after some little trouble, fall into something like a line. There is an instant of expectancy, then the flag drops, and away the horses fly around ...
— Jolly Sally Pendleton - The Wife Who Was Not a Wife • Laura Jean Libbey

... thitherward, and of marching there and thence, as we have partly seen. And the end is, Dresden, and to appearance Saxony along with it, is Daun's. Has not Daun good reason now to be proud of the cunctatory method? Never did his game stand better; and all has been gained at other people's expense. Daun has not played one trump card; it is those obliging Russians that have played all the trumps, and reduced the Enemy to nothing. Only continue that wise ...
— History of Friedrich II. of Prussia, Vol. XIX. (of XXI.) • Thomas Carlyle

... of France and Russia was at once aroused, England, in this instance, not taking any decided stand in affairs. England had spent many lives and much money, notably in the Crimean War, to keep Russia out of Turkey and was averse to encouraging Russo-French influences at the Sublime Porte. How far England would like either Germany ...
— The Secrets of the German War Office • Dr. Armgaard Karl Graves

... it known to you that they did not have their time in peace and quiet; for there passed no hour of the night or day but one of the divisions had to stand armed before the gate, to guard the engines, and provide against attack. And, notwithstanding all this, the Greeks ceased not to attack them, by this gate and by others, and held them so short that six or seven times a day the whole ...
— Memoirs or Chronicle of The Fourth Crusade and The Conquest of Constantinople • Geoffrey de Villehardouin

... mayn't be as old as them—as they; but I think I'm like the walnut tree out there. I still stand up straight, but I fear me I've seen my best days.... There! What are you ...
— The Devil's Garden • W. B. Maxwell

... not have it. I will not put myself so much in your debt. I will not demand so much of you. I will face it all. I will stand alone." ...
— The Judgment House • Gilbert Parker

... very arts they had created, the structures they had raised, the usages they had established, are swept away; 'in that very day their thoughts perish.' The portion they had reclaimed from the young earth's ruggedness is lost; and failing to stand fast against man, they finally get embroiled with nature, and are thrust down beneath her ever-living hand .-Martineau's Sermon, "The Good Soldier of ...
— The Earth as Modified by Human Action • George P. Marsh

... leave off. On the contrary, as though to spite him, it throbbed more and more violently. He could stand it no longer, he slowly put out his hand to the bell and rang. Half a minute later he rang again, ...
— Crime and Punishment • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

... the stand in an Alabama courthouse testifying to the details of a shooting scrape. The witness told how the prisoner at the bar drew a revolver and began firing at one George Henry, and how ...
— More Toasts • Marion Dix Mosher

... mitts some, all right; none of your parlor Y. M. C. A. business, either, but give and take. He strips at one hundred and forty and can stand punishment like a stevedore. But, of course, there's no chance of ever gettin' him on the platform. He likes to go his four rounds before dinner, just to take the drab coloring off the world in general. That's the way he ...
— Shorty McCabe • Sewell Ford

... declared that the wood had not been correctly weighed and that it must be measured afresh, a process which would have taken some days. Meanwhile he said he would give them a portion of what was due, and the balance must stand over. The men on receiving their docked pay indignantly gathered up their tools and declared that they would return to their native village, which they did. The agent had no doubt counted on this final result all the time, and was able to report to his master ...
— India and the Indians • Edward F. Elwin

... discipline of the service, and to unsettle salutary measures now in progress for the government and improvement of the Indians, I respectfully recommend that the decision arrived at by Congress at its last session be permitted to stand. ...
— State of the Union Addresses of Rutherford B. Hayes • Rutherford B. Hayes

... bring their Iroquois captives to Montreal, was excessively mortified at finding himself duped. He came to a later meeting, when this and other matters were to be discussed; but he was so weakened by fever that he could not stand. An armchair was brought him; and, seated in it, he harangued the assembly for two hours, amid a deep silence, broken only by ejaculations of approval from his Indian hearers. When the meeting ended, he was completely exhausted; and, being ...
— Count Frontenac and New France under Louis XIV • Francis Parkman

... give ground. It was impossible to stand in the face of the terrible Cossack charge. The Russians pressed the retreating ...
— The Boy Allies with the Cossacks - Or, A Wild Dash over the Carpathians • Clair W. Hayes

... dingy room, with a sanded floor, and is lighted by windows that turn on hinges and have little diamond-shaped panes of glass. The scholars sit on long benches, with desks before them. At one end of the room is a great fireplace, so very spacious that there is room enough for three or four boys to stand in each of the chimney corners. This was the good old fashion of fireplaces when there was wood enough in the forests to keep people warm without their digging into the bowels ...
— Grandfather's Chair • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... sendeth forth an hoarse kind of murmuring) doth any thing at all resound or lament, like vnto mans voice, we may in no case confesse. But wheras they say that, both in the Isle, and in mount Hecla we appoint certaine places, wherin the soules of our countrimen are tormented, we vtterly stand to the deniall of that and we thanke God & our Lord Iesus Christ from the botome of our hearts (who hath deliuered vs from death & hell, & opened vnto vs the gate of the kingdome of hean because he hath instructed vs more truely, concernmg the place, whether the soules of our deceased countrimen ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries - of the English Nation, v. 1, Northern Europe • Richard Hakluyt

... believe, Wigan, the first two words in Emanuele's letter should stand by themselves; that the letter should read thus: 'Once more. You do me good, I repay, etc,' I think there was a previous ...
— The Master Detective - Being Some Further Investigations of Christopher Quarles • Percy James Brebner

... for her, at least? Look here, Fred Rider. I knew you could do anything shabby or mean, if it suited you. I knew you would consent to hang a burden on anybody that would take such a weight upon them; but, by Jove, I did not think you had the heart to insult her, after all. A man can't stand by and see that. Clear off your pipe and your brandy before she comes, or, as sure as I am made of flesh and blood, ...
— The Doctor's Family • Mrs. (Margaret) Oliphant

... that case," said Oliver, "judging of him from his country and his appearance, the young man is like to stand to his arms as soon as the Wild Boar comes on them, and may not come off so easily from the tusks as he did ...
— Quentin Durward • Sir Walter Scott

... your life when you come to Paris and find that you're expected to pay for the lunches, and all the cab fares, and everything, of those shrimpy little commissionaires. Polite little fellows, they are, in frock coats, and mustaches, and they just stand aside, as courtly as you please, while you pay for everything. Their house expects it. I almost passed away, the first time, but you get used to it. Say, imagine one of our traveling men letting you pay for ...
— Fanny Herself • Edna Ferber

... "This may well stand in the place of any exaction of money. The United States is much too rich to desire to compel money payment from an exhausted and practically beggared nationality. Such a course would be belittling the war in the eyes of the nations of the world, and it is not at all in accordance with ideas ...
— Porto Rico - Its History, Products and Possibilities... • Arthur D. Hall

... John Home's works, which, after all, are poorer than I thought them. Good blank verse, and stately sentiment, but something luke-warmish, excepting Douglas, which is certainly a masterpiece. Even that does not stand the closet. Its merits are for the stage; and it is certainly one of the best acting plays going.' Lockhart's ...
— Life Of Johnson, Vol. 2 • Boswell

... came running to my encampment like two bloodhounds, and seized the wretched slave, their brother in bondage, and dragged him off to the enraged slave-driver. The poor fellow, from fear and trembling, could not stand upon his legs, and was held up by his captors. The Mandara slave being brought to Essnousee, and the two captors having pinned him down, this ferocious Moor took him aside and flogged him with a huge slave-whip until ...
— Travels in the Great Desert of Sahara, in the Years of 1845 and 1846 • James Richardson

... or so, there are those among the small knot who stand congregated on the highest point of the headland, who swear that they can see the Emperor—standing on the deck ...
— The Bronze Eagle - A Story of the Hundred Days • Emmuska Orczy, Baroness Orczy

... forward, took his place, his cap thrust under his arm, at the foot of the bier, giving his tribute of silence to the boy who had died for his country. But James Thorold went aside to stand beside an elevator-shaft. Had his son watched him as he was watching Peter, he would have seen the swift emotions that took their way across his father's face. He would have seen the older man's look ...
— The Best Short Stories of 1915 - And the Yearbook of the American Short Story • Various

... sort went on briskly while fans waved, programs rustled, and ushers flew about distractedly, till an important gentleman appeared, made his bow, skipped upon the leader's stand, and with a wave of his baton caused a general uprising of white pinafores as the orphans led off with that much-enduring melody "America" in shrill small voices, but with creditable attention to time and tune. Pity and patriotism ...
— Rose in Bloom - A Sequel to "Eight Cousins" • Louisa May Alcott

... sir, but I don't feel up to it. I should go down on my nose if I tried to stand; and," he continued, laughing weakly, "smash ...
— Jack at Sea - All Work and no Play made him a Dull Boy • George Manville Fenn

... "Why do you stand?" she added, stamping her little foot with impatience; "why do you not obey me?" and her dark eyes flashed and sparkled, "go and tell your master that I ...
— Shanty the Blacksmith; A Tale of Other Times • Mrs. Sherwood [AKA: Mrs. Mary Martha Sherwood]

... foolish victory, she rushes upon her own destruction. Nor, indeed, does the daughter of Jupiter decline {it}, or advise her any further, nor does she now put off the contest. There is no delay; they both take their stand in different places, and stretch out two webs {on the loom} with a fine warp. The web is tied around the beam; the sley separates the warp; the woof is inserted in the middle with sharp shuttles, which the fingers hurry ...
— The Metamorphoses of Ovid - Vol. I, Books I-VII • Publius Ovidius Naso

... heart! So soon in the spring are thy leaves broken and the feathers torn from the wings! When the spring-red of life opens the hidden calyx of the soul, it perfumes our whole being with love. We learn to stand and to walk, to speak and to read, but no one teaches us love. It is inherent in us like life, they say, and is the very deepest foundation of our existence. As the heavenly bodies incline to and attract each other, and will always cling together by the everlasting law of gravitation, ...
— Memories • Max Muller

... memory the disgust and horror of that moment. I had heard of such things, but heretofore had not realized that in the nineteenth century men could be beaten like dogs, much less that other men not only could sentence such barbarism, but could actually stand by and see their own manhood degraded in such disgraceful manner. One of these unhappy persons was a very gentlemanly young Spaniard, who implored for death in the most moving terms. He appealed to his judges in the most eloquent ...
— The Shirley Letters from California Mines in 1851-52 • Louise Amelia Knapp Smith Clappe

... a sedative and was asleep by the time Martin finished cleaning the .30-.30 rifle he used for deer hunting. He put it by the stairs, ready for use, fully loaded, leaning it against the wall next to the telephone stand. ...
— The Ultroom Error • Gerald Allan Sohl

... so great in any case as might have been expected from the mere dilution of the oxygen and hydrogen, and the consequent mechanical obstruction to its contact with the platina. The order in which carbonic acid and these substances seemed to stand was as follows, the first interfering least with the action; nitrous oxide, hydrogen, carbonic acid, nitrogen, oxygen: but it is possible the plates were not equally well prepared in all the cases, and that other circumstances ...
— Experimental Researches in Electricity, Volume 1 • Michael Faraday

... constitutions themselves are wholly founded, they could not but command the warm sympathy of the people of this country. Well-known circumstances in their history, indeed their whole history, have made them the representatives of purely popular principles of government. In this light they now stand before the world. They could not, if they would, conceal their character, their condition, or their destiny. They could not, if they so desired, shut out from the view of mankind the causes which have ...
— The Great Speeches and Orations of Daniel Webster • Daniel Webster

... her tenderly, and little Rose-Leaf placed a flower crown on her head, whispering softly, "When you would come to us again, stand by the brook-side and wave this in the air, and we will gladly take you to our home again. Farewell, dear Eva. Think of your little Rose-Leaf when ...
— Flower Fables • Louisa May Alcott

... the lower branch of a tall, slim tree (the chandelier), and swung himself to and fro with joyous abandon. For Gwendolyn suddenly remembered the cruel truth borne out by the ink-line on the pier-glass. And instead of climbing upon the table, she went to stand in front of ...
— The Poor Little Rich Girl • Eleanor Gates

... becomes FIXED. With Turner it looks as if a fairy's breath would stir it, but the fairy's breath is not there. So also his boats are intensely motionless, because intensely capable of motion. No other painter ever floated a boat quite rightly; all other boats stand on the water, or are fastened in it; only his float in it. It is very difficult to trace the reasons of this, for the rightness of the placing on the water depends on such subtle curves and shadows in the floating ...
— The Harbours of England • John Ruskin

... scar on the bridge of my nose?" he asked. "That came from a crack with a shinny club when I was not more than ten years old. Shinny is a great game; a great game! It requires quickness of eye and limb, and more than that it demands a high degree of courage. It teaches a boy to stand a hard knock without whimpering. Yes, sir, shinny is a great game, and all boys should play it," and he rubbed the scar on his ...
— John Henry Smith - A Humorous Romance of Outdoor Life • Frederick Upham Adams

... at your work, sir. My son told me you were the grating gentleman; I am Stercutio his father, sir, simple as I stand here. ...
— A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. IX • Various

... weed from Europe is the FIELD or CORN MUSTARD, CHARLOCK or FIELD KALE (Brassica arvensis; Sinapis arvensis of Gray) found in grain fields, gardens, rich waste lands, and rubbish heaps. The alternate leaves, which stand boldly out from the stem, are oval, coarsely saw-toothed, or the lower ones more irregular, and lobed at their bases, all rough to the touch, and conspicuously veined. The four-parted yellow flowers, measuring ...
— Wild Flowers, An Aid to Knowledge of Our Wild Flowers and - Their Insect Visitors - - Title: Nature's Garden • Neltje Blanchan

... and one other things. Men who seek money and goods may therefore be seeking very different things; one is merely acquisitive, has the miser trend; another loves the game for the game's sake, picks up houses, bonds, money, ships, as a fighter picks up trophies, and they stand to him as symbols of his superiority. Some see in property the fulcrum by which they can apply the power that will shift the lives of other men and make of themselves a sort of God or Fate in the destinies of others. For others, and for all in part, there is in money the safety against emergencies ...
— The Foundations of Personality • Abraham Myerson

... brave yourself," cried Peggy; and Lobelia started again, and shrank in her chair. "Don't be so—so—well, I don't know any word but meeching, and Margaret won't let me say that. But have a spirit of your own, and stand up to them, and give 'em as good as they send. I would, I tell you, quick enough, if ...
— Peggy • Laura E. Richards

... it,' said the Hatter. 'He won't stand beating. Now, if you only kept on good terms with him, he'd do almost anything you liked with the clock. For instance, suppose it were nine o'clock in the morning, just time to begin lessons: you'd only have to whisper a hint to Time, and round goes the ...
— Alice's Adventures in Wonderland • Lewis Carroll

... says Mr. Henry. "And considering the cruel falseness of the position in which I stand to my brother, and that you, my lord, are my father, and have the right to command me, I set my hand to this paper. But one thing I will say first: I have been ungenerously pushed, and when next, my lord, you are tempted to compare your sons, I call ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. XII (of 25) - The Master of Ballantrae • Robert Louis Stevenson

... ask Peter's pardon," he muttered, "seeing that he is like to be laid by the heels in a dungeon over this business, yes, and put upon his trial for causing the man's death. Remember, he was in the service of de Ayala, with whom our liege wishes to stand well, and de Ayala, it seems, ...
— Fair Margaret • H. Rider Haggard

... me to a retired part of the forest (of Towskipowski, Poland) where few animals ever came; and telling me that I must now stand alone, extended both paws, and slowly lowered me towards the earth. The height as I looked down, seemed terrible, and I felt my legs kick in the air, with fear of I did not know what, till suddenly I felt four hard things and no ...
— A Study of Fairy Tales • Laura F. Kready

... should relate the circumstances of the adventure, to convince them of the affliction it had occasioned us. The two heaps of ashes, to which the princess and the genie had been reduced, were a sufficient demonstration. The sultan was hardly able to stand, but was under the necessity of being ...
— The Arabian Nights Entertainments vol. 1 • Anon.

... And did you go, perhaps, from Avignon to Nismes by the Pont du Gard? There is a place I have made here—a little, little place—with olive-trees. And now they have grown, and it looks something like that country, if you stand in a particular position. I will take you there to-morrow. I think you ...
— The Jimmyjohn Boss and Other Stories • Owen Wister

... back court, where the Castle Brady stables stand, and there I found a dragoon whistling the 'Roast Beef of Old England,' as he cleaned down a cavalry horse. 'Whose horse, ...
— Barry Lyndon • William Makepeace Thackeray

... and the blind and furious Milton fighting and slashing the air, like the hoodwinked horse-combatants in the old circus, not knowing by whom he was struck and whom he struck in return. But Morus, unable to stand out against so much ill-will, began to cool in the King's cause, and gave Milton to know who the author of the Clamor really was (Clamoris authorem Miltono indicavit). For, in fact, in his Reply to Milton's attack he produced two witnesses, of the highest credit among the rebels, who ...
— The Life of John Milton, Volume 5 (of 7), 1654-1660 • David Masson

... forward—can the Creoles, Cubans, Spaniards, San Domingo refugees, and other loungers—can they hope it is a fight? They hurry forward. Is a man in a fit? The crowd pours in from the side-streets. Have they killed a so-long snake? Bareheaded shopmen leave their wives, who stand upon chairs. The crowd huddles and packs. Those on the outside make little leaps into the air, trying to ...
— Short Stories for English Courses • Various (Rosa M. R. Mikels ed.)

... bed-room to sitting-room, from sofa to bed again. But he did know that Miss Barrett received him lying down, and that his very ignorance of her condition left him without security for her ever being able to stand. A strong sense of sympathy and pity could alone entirely justify or explain his act—a strong desire to bring sunshine into that darkened life. We might be sure that these motives had been present with him if we had no direct authority for believing it; and we have ...
— Life and Letters of Robert Browning • Mrs. Sutherland Orr

... but, in coorse, 'tain't natur' fur black nor white ter stand long a workin' in th' mud and water up ter thar knees; sech work would kill off th' very devil arter a while. But th' white kin stand it longer nor the black, and it's 'cordin' ter reason that he shud; for, I reckon, stranger, that the spirit and pluck ...
— The Continental Monthly, Vol. 2, No. 2, August, 1862 - Devoted to Literature and National Policy • Various

... beside himself. "I will not stand it; by St. Maur! she shall pay for all this! I, who have caught women all my life, to be caught by one thus! ...
— The Golden Dog - Le Chien d'Or • William Kirby

... multitudinous clientele look upward. He was mistaken. He came to know it, too, for he said to me one evening, "I am only a fad." "I'll pass away when my vogue is done, like brick pomeroy." He wished he could believe that the best way to help people up was to take a stand and view a little above them. He said, when it was suggested that he try this tack, that he feared it was too late. Not that he wholly abandoned his belief in his own plan, but it seemed to me that he felt sorry that once attention ...
— Volume 12 of Brann The Iconoclast • William Cowper Brann

... a new and most unexpected result. A long white finger was extended by the Van Eyck in a line with the speaker's eye, and an agitated voice bade him stand, in the name of all the saints. "You are beautiful, so," cried she. "You are inspired—with folly. What matters that? you are inspired. I must take off your head." And in a moment she was at work with her pencil. "Come ...
— The Cloister and the Hearth • Charles Reade

... who must choose," her face still uplifted. "Because I am not a leaf to float on the air, my destiny decided by a breath of wind, I must choose; yet how can I know I decide rightly? When heart and conscience stand opposed, any decision means sacrifice and pain. I meant those hasty words wrung out of me in shame, and spoken yonder; I meant them then, and yet they haunt me like so many sheeted ghosts. 'Tis not their untruth, ...
— Beth Norvell - A Romance of the West • Randall Parrish

... a common entry, ye observe—me maybe going down with my everyday hat on to my dinner, and she coming up, carrying a stoup of water, or half-a-pound of pouthered butter on a plate, with a piece paper thrown over it—we frequently met half-way, and had to stand still to let one another pass. Nothing came out of these fore-gatherings, howsomever, for a month or two, she being as shy and modest as she was bonny, with her clean demity short-gown, and snow-white morning mutch, to say nothing ...
— The Life of Mansie Wauch - Tailor in Dalkeith, written by himself • David Macbeth Moir

... chordula-larva of the chordonia has in reality this great significance—it is the typical reproduction (preserved by heredity) of the ancient common stem-form of all the vertebrates and tunicates, the long-extinct Chordaea. We will return in Chapter 2.20 to these worm-like ancestors, which stand out as luminous points in the obscure stem-history of the ...
— The Evolution of Man, V.1. • Ernst Haeckel

... After all, before this higher beauty, royal pomp even seems only a coarse excrescence, and all would be better if the accessories of the rendering were very simple. Already in my mind is the grove for Comus designed; the mass of green which shall stand in the centre, the blasted trunk that shall rise for contrast to one side, and the vine that shall half conceal the splintered summit, the banks of wild-flowers that shall be transferred, the light the laboratory shall yield us to make ...
— The Last Leaf - Observations, during Seventy-Five Years, of Men and Events in America - and Europe • James Kendall Hosmer

... but no one offered him anything. Close by was a stall of splendid purple grapes, but the old woman that kept it was busy knitting. She only called to him to stand out ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Vol. 26, October, 1880 • Various

... lucky for you," Sommers remarked good-humoredly, "that I was thick enough with the bloodsuckers to get you that letter from Hitchcock. One of us will have to stand in with ...
— The Web of Life • Robert Herrick

... days, making it run freely, clear as water, and slightly sweet—from these troughs, or bark dishes, it is collected in pails, by walking upon the now soft snow, by the aid of snow shoes, and poured into barrels which stand near the boilers, ready to supply them as the syrup boils down. When it reaches the consistence required for sugar, it is poured into moulds of different forms. Visits to these sugar camps are a ...
— Sketches And Tales Illustrative Of Life In The Backwoods Of New Brunswick • Mrs. F. Beavan

... There was but a dim light, for some of the window slits had been filled in.[2132] From a locksmith of Rouen, one Etienne Castille, the English had ordered an iron cage, in which it was said to be impossible to stand upright. If the reports of the ecclesiastical registrars are to be believed, Jeanne was placed in it and chained by the neck, feet, and hands,[2133] and left there till the opening of the trial. At Jean ...
— The Life of Joan of Arc, Vol. 1 and 2 (of 2) • Anatole France

... love for each other than you now have, but that is not the question. You must see how great would be the advantage to us all of our union being at once completed You should not now allow a phantasy of misplaced generosity to stand in the way of an arrangement which ...
— La Vendee • Anthony Trollope

... followed by bands of townsfolk. They were a quarrelsome set, the ploughmen and others; and it was generally admitted in the town that their overbearing behaviour was responsible for the fights. I mind them being driven out of the square, stones flying thick; also some stand-up fights with sticks, and others fair enough with fists. The worst fight I did not see. It took place in a field. At first it was only between two who had been miscalling one another; but there was many looking on, and when the town man was like getting the worst of it the others set to, ...
— Auld Licht Idylls • J. M. Barrie

... linked be To reach the goal of growing; In the whole only worketh he; Many drops go to make the sea; Much water sets mills going. Then with the wild wolves do not stand, But knit the state's enduring band:" From doctor's chair thus, ...
— Rampolli • George MacDonald

... to myself all manner of ways of avoiding this dread event; sometimes I meditated an exchange into an African corps—sometimes to leave the army altogether. However, I turned the affair over in my mind—innumerable difficulties presented themselves, and I was at last reduced to that stand-still point, in which, after continual vacillation, one only waits for the slightest impulse of persuasion from another, to adopt any, no matter what suggestion. In this enviable frame of mind I sat sipping my wine, and watching the clock for that hour at which, with a safe ...
— The Confessions of Harry Lorrequer, Complete • Charles James Lever (1806-1872)

... seen at once before Caesar's door no less than six score rods of proconsuls and praetors. The rest of his addressers he sent all away full fraught with hopes and money; but with Crassus and Pompey, he entered into special articles of agreement, that they should stand candidates for the consulship next year; that Caesar on his part should send a number of his soldiers to give their votes at the election; that as soon as they were elected, they should use their ...
— Plutarch's Lives • A.H. Clough

... observation of this kind is cited by Geoffroy-Saint-Hilaire. These two girls were born in 1495, and lived to be ten years old. They were normal in every respect, except that they were joined at the forehead, causing them to stand face to face and belly to belly. When one walked forward, the other was compelled to walk backward; their noses almost touched, and their eyes were directed laterally. At the death of one an attempt to separate the other from the cadaver was made, but it was unsuccessful, ...
— Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine • George M. Gould

... Scott records in his diary that he dined with the Duchess of Kent on 19th May 1828. 'I was very kindly received by Prince Leopold, and presented to the little Victoria—the heir-apparent to the crown as things now stand. The little lady is educated with much care, and watched so closely that no busy maid has a moment to whisper "You are heir of England." I suspect if we could dissect the little heart, we should find that some pigeon or other bird of the air had carried the matter, however.' This, it seems, ...
— Queen Victoria • Anonymous

... He hath arm'd our answer, And Florence is deni'de before he comes: Yet for our Gentlemen that meane to see The Tuscan seruice, freely haue they leaue To stand on either part ...
— The First Folio [35 Plays] • William Shakespeare

... divan there were two or three fine Sine carpets; a couple of trophies of splendidly ornamented weapons adorned the wall; by his side, upon a small eight-sided table inlaid with tortoise-shell and mother-of-pearl, stood a silver salver with an empty coffee-cup of beautiful workmanship,—the stand of beaten gold, and the delicate shell of the most exquisite transparent china. He had evidently been on duty at the palace, for he was in uniform, and had removed only his long riding-boots, throwing himself down in his chair to read the book ...
— Paul Patoff • F. Marion Crawford

... various edifices that have been disentombed by the labors of recent excavators. The specimen should be, if possible, complete; it should have been accurately surveyed, and the survey should have been scientifically recorded; it should further stand single and separate, that there may be no danger of confusion between its remains and those of adjacent edifices. These requirements, though nowhere exactly met, are very nearly met by the building at Khorsabad, which stands on a mound of its own, unmixed with other edifices, has ...
— The Seven Great Monarchies Of The Ancient Eastern World, Vol 2. (of 7): Assyria • George Rawlinson

... which occupied the little town of Malo-Iaroslawetz. The enemy was in an exceedingly strong position, nevertheless the Emperor sent into the attack Prince Eugne, at the head of the Italian Corps and the French divisions of Morand and Gerard. Nothing could stand in the way of these men and they took the town after a long and murderous fight which cost us 4000 killed or wounded. Among the dead was General Delzons, a very ...
— The Memoirs of General the Baron de Marbot, Translated by - Oliver C. Colt • Baron de Marbot

... 1678, had warned the king against a plot that was directed at his life, etc. But the king did not attach any importance to the statement until Tongue referred to Titus Oates as his authority. The latter proved himself a most arrant liar while on the stand: but the people were in a credulous state of mind, and Oates became the hero of the hour;[242] and under his wicked influence many souls were hurried into eternity. Read Hume's account of the Popish Plot, and then follow the bloody narrative of the Negro plot of New ...
— History of the Negro Race in America From 1619 to 1880. Vol 1 - Negroes as Slaves, as Soldiers, and as Citizens • George W. Williams

... be ashamed, sir," said Pelagea, and he could hear the tears in her voice. "Gentlefolks . . . educated, and yet not a notion that with our hard lot . . . in our life of toil"—she burst into tears. "It's easy to insult us. There's no one to stand ...
— The Schoolmaster and Other Stories • Anton Chekhov

... bored now when Emma suddenly began to sob on his breast, and his heart, like the people who can only stand a certain amount of music, dozed to the sound of a love whose delicacies ...
— Madame Bovary • Gustave Flaubert

... jumped to her feet to react against the numbness, to discover whether her body would obey her will. It did. She could stand up, and she could move her arms freely. Though no physiologist, she concluded that all that sudden numbness was in her head, not in her limbs. Her fears assuaged, she thanked God for it mentally, and to Heyst murmured ...
— Victory • Joseph Conrad

... nations. A traveler would find little difficulty, if he so willed it, in sailing away to Greenland's icy mountains or India's coral strand. The cosmopolitan character of San Francisco is the first thing that impresses a visitor. Almost from one stand-point he may see the church, the synagogue, and the pagoda. The mosque is by no means ...
— Overland through Asia; Pictures of Siberian, Chinese, and Tartar - Life • Thomas Wallace Knox

... only making the sketch of my grand picture. Wolsey, I assure you, shall stand in the foreground. Nor shall the immortal Leland be treated in a less distinguished manner. Give me only "ample room and verge enough," and a little time to ...
— Bibliomania; or Book-Madness - A Bibliographical Romance • Thomas Frognall Dibdin

... supper. There was a great rush to get downstairs, but Charley was so clever that even this did not put him out. Of course there was no sitting down; which means that the bashful, retiring, and obedient guests were to stand on their legs; while those who were forward, and impudent, and disobedient, found seats for themselves wherever they could. Charley was certainly among the latter class, and he did not rest therefore till he had got Katie into an old arm-chair in one corner ...
— The Three Clerks • Anthony Trollope

... is the slick un that robbed the bank, and got away on thet there Brazos pony thet miserable bookkeepin' dude giv him. The sergeant here an' his men are a-goin' to take him to Cuivaca in the mornin'. You stand guard over him 'til midnight, then they'll relieve you. They gotta get a little sleep first, though, an' I gotta get some supper. Don't stand fer no funny business now, Eddie," Grayson admonished him, and was on the point of leaving the office when a thought occurred to him. ...
— The Mucker • Edgar Rice Burroughs

... own. Why shouldn't you believe me? I've been hoarding up my scrap of an income for years, thinking that some day I'd find I couldn't stand this any longer..." Her gesture embraced their sumptuous setting. "But now I know I shall never budge. There are the children; and besides, things are easier for ...
— The Custom of the Country • Edith Wharton

... were a rich man, I should be content to be the loser, but I am a poor man, and am compelled to ask that those mortgages stand forfeit." ...
— A Son of Hagar - A Romance of Our Time • Sir Hall Caine

... of stars must stand for those dreadful consequences, for Bryda never heard them! Uncle James and grandfather had come up by this time, and she fled, as fast as wet, clinging clothes would let her, to the house. It was "out of the frying-pan into the fire," though, for nurse's wrath was really something too dreadful; ...
— Junior Classics, V6 • Various

... from behind the brush and come walking in at the cabin door, or put his face up against the window and peer in, if the door happened to be closed. One settler who had two doors had her husband nail one up so that when the Indians did come to call on them, she could stand in the other door and keep them from coming in. The mothers never let their children get out of their sight, for fear they would ...
— Mormon Settlement in Arizona • James H. McClintock

... He could stand being spoken roughly to, he could bear his disappointment, but to hear his father's precious gift spoken of as a "miserable, second-hand tin ticker," was more than he could endure, and he made his way back to his room conscious ...
— The Adventures of a Three-Guinea Watch • Talbot Baines Reed

... and Nurse went out one day, And left Pauline alone at play; Around the room she gayly sprang, Clapp'd her hands, and danced, and sang. Now, on the table close at hand, A box of matches chanced to stand, And kind Mamma and Nurse had told her, That if she touched them they would scold her. But Pauline said, "Oh, what a pity! For when they burn it is so pretty; They crackle so, and spit, and flame; And Mamma often burns the same. I'll only light a match ...
— Slovenly Betsy • Heinrich Hoffman

... much more precarious than with us; because, while a hundred considerations carry weight in our case, in theirs there is only one, namely, with which man they have found favor; as also that they stand in much nearer relations with one another than men do, in consequence of the one-sided nature of their calling. This makes them endeavor to lay stress ...
— The Essays of Arthur Schopenhauer; Studies in Pessimism • Arthur Schopenhauer

... himself, on July 19, had favored a step like this proposed; but, as he correctly observed, the time for it was when Brown was advancing and might be helped. Now, when Brown had been brought to a stand, and was retiring, the movement would not aid him, but would weaken the Champlain frontier; and that at the very moment when the divisions from Wellington's army, which had embarked at Bordeaux, were arriving ...
— Sea Power in its Relations to the War of 1812 - Volume 2 • Alfred Thayer Mahan

... incense the Egyptians still more, to whose party numbers were added daily, whereas the Roman soldiers from Syria were not yet on the scene. Caesar was anxious to bring the people to a condition of peace, and so he had Ptolemy take his stand on a high place from which they could hear his voice and bade him say to them that he was unharmed and was averse to warfare. He urged them to peaceful measures and promised that he would arrange the ...
— Dio's Rome • Cassius Dio

... Grounds three games in succession by Chicago. After that New York settled into a winning stride again and won six games in succession. Pittsburgh came to the Polo Grounds and stopped the winning streak of the champions by defeating them three times in succession. That was a hard jolt for any team to stand. Yet the Giants rallied and won the test ...
— Spalding's Official Baseball Guide - 1913 • John B. Foster

... for the competition was the 1st of October, but, to allow sufficient time to get the locomotives into good working order, the directors extended it to the 6th. It was quite characteristic of the Stephensons that, although their engine did not stand first on the list for trial, it was the first that was ready, and it was accordingly ordered out by the judges for an experimental trip. Yet the "Rocket" was by no means the "favourite" with either the ...
— Little Masterpieces of Science: - Invention and Discovery • Various

... what Staniford began to laugh at. "Our Puritan ancestors knew just how much human nature could stand, after all. We did not have an uninterrupted Sabbath till the Sabbath had become much milder. Is ...
— The Lady of the Aroostook • W. D. Howells

... of this venerable structure stand in a lovely and sequestered valley, about two miles from Llangollen, and are approached by as delightful and inviting road as ever rambler need wish to tread. The Rev. John Williams, in his learned description of this ...
— The "Ladies of Llangollen" • John Hicklin

... in drawing the breath, but expiration is very difficult, and usually accompanied by wheezing or whistling sounds. The patient appears to be on the brink of suffocation; the eyeballs protrude; the face is anxious and pale; the muscles of the neck stand out; the lips may be blue; a cold sweat covers the body; the hands and feet are cold, and talking becomes impossible. Altogether, a case of asthma presents a most alarming appearance to the bystander, and the patient seems to be on the verge ...
— The Home Medical Library, Volume II (of VI) • Various

... consequence of this, entertained a new anxiety, that English might neatly stand in the series of my other studies in languages. Now, I will confess that it became more and more burdensome for me to take my occasions for study now from this grammar or collection of examples, now from that; now from one author, now from ...
— Autobiography • Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

... not when others speak, sit not when others stand, speak not when you should hold your peace, walk not ...
— The Farmer Boy, and How He Became Commander-In-Chief • Morrison Heady

... hot lead struck me thar; but," he continued, solemnly, "I knowed the Lord hed tuk that way o' punishin' me fer the sin o havin' murder in my mind, 'n' I fell on my knees right thar a-prayin' fer fergiveness: 'n' since that night I hev stayed away from ye till the Lord give me power to stand ag'in the temptation o' harmin' ye. He hev showed me another way, 'n' now I hev come to ye as he hev tol' me. I hevn't tol' ye this fer nothin'. Y'u in see now whut I think o' Easter, ef I was tempted ...
— A Mountain Europa • John Fox Jr.

... like a man of honour.' 'Sir,' said Vaneur, for that was the Captain's name; 'do not, in the circumstances we are now in, talk of treating (with those that would betray us) like men of honour; we cannot stand upon decency in killing, who have so many to dispatch; we came not into France to fight duels, and stand on nice punctilios: I say, we must make quick work, and I have a good pistol, charged with ...
— Love-Letters Between a Nobleman and His Sister • Aphra Behn

... "Stand aside," said Seti. "The matter shall be seen to later. Appear, O Ana the Scribe. Swear the oath and tell us what you have seen of this man's death, since two ...
— Moon of Israel • H. Rider Haggard

... revolver and went His idea was to stand in the passage near the smoking-room, and defend the place should the door give way; for he did not believe that timber had ever been grown ...
— Stories by English Authors: Ireland • Various

... listening to fortune-tellers and wasting thy substance. Ay, I mind it well," said Humfrey, "and how thou didst stand simpering at her pack of lies, ere mother made thee ...
— Unknown to History - A Story of the Captivity of Mary of Scotland • Charlotte M. Yonge

... add to the list of Indian industries, lace making, which is being successfully taught at some of the reservations, but as it is not as yet even a self-supporting industry, the above-named "curiosities" and the Navajo blanket stand alone as characteristic hand-work produced by native races; while from our own, or that of the co-existent Afro-American, we have nothing to show in the way ...
— How to make rugs • Candace Wheeler

... would have gone off into a trance. When I ceased speaking she opened wide her eyes, and murmured with fixed gaze, as though still dazed: "O Traveller in the path of Destruction! Who is there that can stay your progress? Do I not see that none shall stand in the way of your desires? Kings shall lay their crowns at your feet; the wealthy shall hasten to throw open their treasure for your acceptance; those who have nothing else shall beg to be allowed to offer their lives. O my king, my god! What you ...
— The Home and the World • Rabindranath Tagore

... That which I charge her with, I have certain ground for. Her crime was authoritatively proved to me. But to satisfy your doubt by producing testimony, that, verily, would ill become my pride. Here I stand! Here is my sword! Who among you will fight with me, casting slur upon my honour?"—"None of us!" comes promptly from the Brabantians, "We only fight for you!" The high-tempered gentleman turns somewhat ...
— The Wagnerian Romances • Gertrude Hall

... evidence against them is their own confession, made with a view to save the gentlemen of the Stock Exchange a useless loss of money. I think I may be permitted to say, particularly as it regards Mr. Holloway and Mr. Lyte, that they stand in a situation which at least entitles them to the consideration of your lordships. I will not presume to say, the confession of Mr. Holloway and Mr. Lyte was made under any promise from the gentlemen of the Stock Exchange that it should ...
— The Trial of Charles Random de Berenger, Sir Thomas Cochrane, • William Brodie Gurney

... rock and set the firing chamber there; it's heavy enough to stand the stress. They use a gas-powder, as Althora calls it, for the charge, and the same stuff but deadlier is in the shell. But they must have underground workings for loading and firing. Is there a chance ...
— Astounding Stories of Super-Science January 1931 • Various

... He believed he was close to the discovery of that solid basis of truth on which to stand while teaching Carmen. At any rate, her faith, which he could no longer believe to be baseless illusion, would not ...
— Carmen Ariza • Charles Francis Stocking

... ended, and only the more striking episodes stand out in a desperate close combat, during which the black ships of Austria and the gray of Italy rammed or fired into each other amid a smother of smoke and spray. The Austrian left flank and rear held up the ...
— A History of Sea Power • William Oliver Stevens and Allan Westcott

... VIII. In the year 1543, Ockam, with two other criminals mounted on horseback, with papers on their heads, and their faces towards the tails of the horses, had to ride about Windsor, Newbury, and Reading, and stand in the pillory of each of the ...
— Bygone Punishments • William Andrews

... would have destroyed the trout forever, and, indeed, in one month a party of those reckless near-sportsmen destroyed almost one thousand of them. But the President's interest was enlisted, the Bureau of Fisheries made a firm stand, and to-day the region containing these most exquisite and most wonderful of all fresh-water fish is a part of the Mount Whitney National Park, and the golden trout are saved ...
— The Boy With the U. S. Fisheries • Francis Rolt-Wheeler

... Thursday, may seem a nightmare; but to that nightmare we give the name of modern culture. One great decadent, who is now dead, published a poem some time ago, in which he powerfully summed up the whole spirit of the movement by declaring that he could stand in the prison yard and entirely comprehend the feelings of a man about to ...
— The Defendant • G.K. Chesterton

... you keep thinking it, and sulking is the one thing I cannot stand. No, Manuel, no, I do not complain, but I do think that, after all I have been through with, sleeping around in tents, and running away from Northmen, and never having a moment's comfort, after I had naturally figured on being a real countess—" ...
— Figures of Earth • James Branch Cabell

... seemed so long. Mr. Murray, a good old man, whose discourses had steadily lengthened with his years, preached on and on. Forest Glen nodded and woke up and nodded again, and finally roused itself to stand up for the closing psalm. As the people slowly and silently filed out of church, still only half-awake, Elizabeth followed her aunt with the feelings of a criminal going to the gallows. She knew that her secret was safe with John and ...
— 'Lizbeth of the Dale • Marian Keith

... little surprised, as well as shocked, at the sight. Nothing under heaven could have a more beautiful face; but, though between five and six years old, and seemingly healthy, he was so far from being able to walk or stand, that he could not so much as move any one joint; his limbs were vastly long for his age, but smaller than any infant's of six months; his complexion was perfectly delicate, and he had the finest hair in the world. He never spoke ...
— Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border, Vol. II (of 3) • Walter Scott

... mouth to widen in a smile which was disarmingly benevolent. The horse at Bowie had proved dark indeed,—so dark that it had still been merged with the background when the winner passed the judge's stand—and this colour-test had cost Mr. Mix precisely two thousand dollars. Beyond that, he had paid off a few of his most pressing creditors, and he had spent a peculiarly carefree week in New York (where he had also taken ...
— Rope • Holworthy Hall

... yourselves—out of your own vain conceits do you fashion—modes and instruments, by the aid of which you fondly imagine to invest yourselves with attributes which belong only to Omniscience; and now I warn you—and it is a voice from the tomb, in whose shadow I already stand, which addresses you—that you are about to commit a most cruel and ...
— The Experiences of a Barrister, and Confessions of an Attorney • Samuel Warren

... to find freedom in my love. Not be bound as Porter wants to bind me. He'd put me on a pedestal and worship me, and I'd rather stand shoulder to shoulder with my husband and be his comrade. I don't want him to look up too far, or to look down as Gordon ...
— Contrary Mary • Temple Bailey

... before him, as one who came softly to bring him the answer to his questionings. And he knew that his vexation arose from the secret apprehension of a future in which he would desire to stand between her and the Marchesino with clean hands, and tell Doro certain truths which are universal, not national. Such truths would come ill from one ...
— A Spirit in Prison • Robert Hichens

... of time, and the fraud charged upon Jesus, I must observe to you, that this charge had no evidence to support it; all the facts reported of Jesus stand in full contradiction to it. To suppose, as the council did, that this fraud might possibly appear, if we had any Jewish books written at the time, is not to bring proof, but to wish for proof: for, ...
— The Trial of the Witnessses of the Resurrection of Jesus Christ • Thomas Sherlock

... arbiter between the United States and Great Britain in the matter of the American northwestern boundary. How could arbitration affect the true position of the sovereign? Take, for example, matters as they now stand between Germany and the United States. There is a vast mass of petty questions which constantly trouble the relations between the two countries. These little questions embitter debates, whether in your Reichstag on one hand, ...
— Autobiography of Andrew Dickson White Volume II • Andrew Dickson White

... o'er the spirit of my dream. The Wanderer was returned.—I saw him stand Before an Altar—with a gentle bride; Her face was fair, but was not that which made The Starlight[49] of his Boyhood;—as he stood Even at the altar, o'er his brow there came The self-same aspect, ...
— The Works of Lord Byron, Volume 4 • Lord Byron

... "She wouldn't stand the things old Prince does, and you wouldn't have any show at all, if you ...
— Teddy: Her Book - A Story of Sweet Sixteen • Anna Chapin Ray

... cause you so nobly advocate I may say that I have actually read every article contributed by Mr. MASTERMAN to your paper. I am strongly in favour of an entente with Labour, by which Labour should agree not to contest any seats where the true Asquithians stand a chance. I enclose as a specimen of my work the first of a series of articles on "How LLOYD GEORGE lost the War," which I am sure will ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. CLVIII, January 7, 1920 • Various

... Paul, confronting him steadily for a moment. "After all, you only count as one. That's why I've called the Form, who count a good deal more, so that they could give their opinion. Whatever their opinion is, I'll stand to it." ...
— The Hero of Garside School • J. Harwood Panting

... angelic brightness over their households, and families of children are trained to act well their part in this great and growing nation. The institution I suggest, and for which I must plead, should not only be large enough to accommodate girls near at hand, but from other neighboring States who stand in need of such a home and training. It should be a Bethel for these immortal waifs, a house of bread, so well provided for as to take the poorest who cannot pay a cent of their own expenses. On this base ...
— American Missionary, Volume 43, No. 2, February, 1889 • Various

... said he, when he came within hearing, "a holyday for you! Ods fish,—and a holier day than my old house has known since its former proprietor, Sir Hugo, of valorous memory, demolished the nunnery, of which some remains yet stand on yonder eminence. Morton, my man of might, the thing is done; the court is purified; the wicked one is departed. Look here, and be as happy as I am at our release;" and he threw me a note in ...
— Devereux, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... the jack-tars ran for the engines of death; leaping over the wall of the defenses; bayonetting the gunners; turning the spitting war-engines upon the cavalry, which, in confusion and dismay, was driven down a crooked lane. It was the last stand. The English standard soon waved from the flag-pole of ...
— Famous Privateersmen and Adventurers of the Sea • Charles H. L. Johnston

... bound by laws which he finds but does not make; they are, however, laws not of fact but of thought, the laws of the idea—that is, of the inmost truth of things, and of God. Hence it is that the works of the poet seem to come from God, rather than from man. They stand rather on a level with nature, the material of all sciences, than with the sciences themselves, which are nothing more than man's interpretation of nature. In some sense, indeed, they are above nature; they stand ...
— English literary criticism • Various



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