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Set   Listen
verb
Set  v. t.  (past & past part. set; pres. part. setting)  
1.
To cause to sit; to make to assume a specified position or attitude; to give site or place to; to place; to put; to fix; as, to set a house on a stone foundation; to set a book on a shelf; to set a dish on a table; to set a chest or trunk on its bottom or on end. "I do set my bow in the cloud."
2.
Hence, to attach or affix (something) to something else, or in or upon a certain place. "Set your affection on things above." "The Lord set a mark upon Cain."
3.
To make to assume specified place, condition, or occupation; to put in a certain condition or state (described by the accompanying words); to cause to be. "The Lord thy God will set thee on high." "I am come to set a man at variance against his father, and the daughter against her mother." "Every incident sets him thinking."
4.
To fix firmly; to make fast, permanent, or stable; to render motionless; to give an unchanging place, form, or condition to. Specifically:
(a)
To cause to stop or stick; to obstruct; to fasten to a spot; hence, to occasion difficulty to; to embarrass; as, to set a coach in the mud. "They show how hard they are set in this particular."
(b)
To fix beforehand; to determine; hence, to make unyielding or obstinate; to render stiff, unpliant, or rigid; as, to set one's countenance. "His eyes were set by reason of his age." "On these three objects his heart was set." "Make my heart as a millstone, set my face as a flint."
(c)
To fix in the ground, as a post or a tree; to plant; as, to set pear trees in an orchard.
(d)
To fix, as a precious stone, in a border of metal; to place in a setting; hence, to place in or amid something which serves as a setting; as, to set glass in a sash. "And him too rich a jewel to be set In vulgar metal for a vulgar use."
(e)
To render stiff or solid; especially, to convert into curd; to curdle; as, to set milk for cheese.
5.
To put into a desired position or condition; to adjust; to regulate; to adapt. Specifically:
(a)
To put in order in a particular manner; to prepare; as, to set (that is, to hone) a razor; to set a saw. "Tables for to sette, and beddes make."
(b)
To extend and bring into position; to spread; as, to set the sails of a ship.
(c)
To give a pitch to, as a tune; to start by fixing the keynote; as, to set a psalm.
(d)
To reduce from a dislocated or fractured state; to replace; as, to set a broken bone.
(e)
To make to agree with some standard; as, to set a watch or a clock.
(f)
(Masonry) To lower into place and fix solidly, as the blocks of cut stone in a structure.
6.
To stake at play; to wager; to risk. "I have set my life upon a cast, And I will stand the hazard of the die."
7.
To fit with music; to adapt, as words to notes; to prepare for singing. "Set thy own songs, and sing them to thy lute."
8.
To determine; to appoint; to assign; to fix; as, to set a time for a meeting; to set a price on a horse.
9.
To adorn with something infixed or affixed; to stud; to variegate with objects placed here and there. "High on their heads, with jewels richly set, Each lady wore a radiant coronet." "Pastoral dales thin set with modern farms."
10.
To value; to rate; with at. "Be you contented, wearing now the garland, To have a son set your decrees at naught." "I do not set my life at a pin's fee."
11.
To point out the seat or position of, as birds, or other game; said of hunting dogs.
12.
To establish as a rule; to furnish; to prescribe; to assign; as, to set an example; to set lessons to be learned.
13.
To suit; to become; as, it sets him ill. (Scot.)
14.
(Print.) To compose; to arrange in words, lines, etc.; as, to set type; to set a page.
To set abroach. See Abroach. (Obs.)
To set against, to oppose; to set in comparison with, or to oppose to, as an equivalent in exchange; as, to set one thing against another.
To set agoing, to cause to move.
To set apart, to separate to a particular use; to separate from the rest; to reserve.
To set a saw, to bend each tooth a little, every alternate one being bent to one side, and the intermediate ones to the other side, so that the opening made by the saw may be a little wider than the thickness of the back, to prevent the saw from sticking.
To set aside.
(a)
To leave out of account; to pass by; to omit; to neglect; to reject; to annul. "Setting aside all other considerations, I will endeavor to know the truth, and yield to that."
(b)
To set apart; to reserve; as, to set aside part of one's income.
(c)
(Law) See under Aside.
To set at defiance, to defy.
To set at ease, to quiet; to tranquilize; as, to set the heart at ease.
To set at naught, to undervalue; to contemn; to despise. "Ye have set at naught all my counsel."
To set a trap To set a snare, or To set a gin, to put it in a proper condition or position to catch prey; hence, to lay a plan to deceive and draw another into one's power.
To set at work, or To set to work.
(a)
To cause to enter on work or action, or to direct how tu enter on work.
(b)
To apply one's self; used reflexively.
To set before.
(a)
To bring out to view before; to exhibit.
(b)
To propose for choice to; to offer to.
To set by.
(a)
To set apart or on one side; to reject.
(b)
To attach the value of (anything) to. "I set not a straw by thy dreamings."
To set by the compass, to observe and note the bearing or situation of by the compass.
To set case, to suppose; to assume. Cf. Put case, under Put, v. t. (Obs.)
To set down.
(a)
To enter in writing; to register. "Some rules were to be set down for the government of the army."
(b)
To fix; to establish; to ordain. "This law we may name eternal, being that order which God... hath set down with himself, for himself to do all things by."
(c)
To humiliate.
To set eyes on, to see; to behold; to fasten the eyes on.
To set fire to, or To set on fire, to communicate fire to; fig., to inflame; to enkindle the passions of; to irritate.
To set flying (Naut.), to hook to halyards, sheets, etc., instead of extending with rings or the like on a stay; said of a sail.
To set forth.
(a)
To manifest; to offer or present to view; to exhibt; to display.
(b)
To publish; to promulgate; to make appear.
(c)
To send out; to prepare and send. (Obs.) "The Venetian admiral had a fleet of sixty galleys, set forth by the Venetians."
To set forward.
(a)
To cause to advance.
(b)
To promote.
To set free, to release from confinement, imprisonment, or bondage; to liberate; to emancipate.
To set in, to put in the way; to begin; to give a start to. (Obs.) "If you please to assist and set me in, I will recollect myself."
To set in order, to adjust or arrange; to reduce to method. "The rest will I set in order when I come."
To set milk.
(a)
To expose it in open dishes in order that the cream may rise to the surface.
(b)
To cause it to become curdled as by the action of rennet. See 4 (e).
To set much by or To set little by, to care much, or little, for.
To set of, to value; to set by. (Obs.) "I set not an haw of his proverbs."
To set off.
(a)
To separate from a whole; to assign to a particular purpose; to portion off; as, to set off a portion of an estate.
(b)
To adorn; to decorate; to embellish. "They... set off the worst faces with the best airs."
(c)
To give a flattering description of.
To set off against, to place against as an equivalent; as, to set off one man's services against another's.
To set on or To set upon.
(a)
To incite; to instigate. "Thou, traitor, hast set on thy wife to this."
(b)
To employ, as in a task. " Set on thy wife to observe."
(c)
To fix upon; to attach strongly to; as, to set one's heart or affections on some object. See definition 2, above.
To set one's cap for. See under Cap, n.
To set one's self against, to place one's self in a state of enmity or opposition to.
To set one's teeth, to press them together tightly.
To set on foot, to set going; to put in motion; to start.
To set out.
(a)
To assign; to allot; to mark off; to limit; as, to set out the share of each proprietor or heir of an estate; to set out the widow's thirds.
(b)
To publish, as a proclamation. (Obs.)
(c)
To adorn; to embellish. "An ugly woman, in rich habit set out with jewels, nothing can become."
(d)
To raise, equip, and send forth; to furnish. (R.) "The Venetians pretend they could set out, in case of great necessity, thirty men-of-war."
(e)
To show; to display; to recommend; to set off. "I could set out that best side of Luther."
(f)
To show; to prove. (R.) "Those very reasons set out how heinous his sin was."
(g)
(Law) To recite; to state at large.
To set over.
(a)
To appoint or constitute as supervisor, inspector, ruler, or commander.
(b)
To assign; to transfer; to convey.
To set right, to correct; to put in order.
To set sail. (Naut.) See under Sail, n.
To set store by, to consider valuable.
To set the fashion, to determine what shall be the fashion; to establish the mode.
To set the teeth on edge, to affect the teeth with a disagreeable sensation, as when acids are brought in contact with them.
To set the watch (Naut.), to place the starboard or port watch on duty.
To set to, to attach to; to affix to. "He... hath set to his seal that God is true."
To set up.
(a)
To erect; to raise; to elevate; as, to set up a building, or a machine; to set up a post, a wall, a pillar.
(b)
Hence, to exalt; to put in power. "I will... set up the throne of David over Israel."
(c)
To begin, as a new institution; to institute; to establish; to found; as, to set up a manufactory; to set up a school.
(d)
To enable to commence a new business; as, to set up a son in trade.
(e)
To place in view; as, to set up a mark.
(f)
To raise; to utter loudly; as, to set up the voice. "I'll set up such a note as she shall hear."
(g)
To advance; to propose as truth or for reception; as, to set up a new opinion or doctrine.
(h)
To raise from depression, or to a sufficient fortune; as, this good fortune quite set him up.
(i)
To intoxicate. (Slang)
(j)
(Print.) To put in type; as, to set up copy; to arrange in words, lines, etc., ready for printing; as, to set up type.
To set up the rigging (Naut.), to make it taut by means of tackles.
Synonyms: See Put.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Set" Quotes from Famous Books



... indignation, interrupting them, and asking, "if they were not ashamed to refuse living in any manner which might be beneficial to their country, to which they owed even their lives?" they then delivered the king's message; and bid her "set them a pattern, and sacrifice herself to her country's welfare." Dido being thus ensnared, called on Sichaeus with tears and lamentations, and answered, "that she would go where the fate of her city called her." At the expiration of three months, she ascended the fatal pile; and with her last ...
— The Ancient History of the Egyptians, Carthaginians, Assyrians, • Charles Rollin

... clad in mourning WEED, Upon a mangy JADE unmeetly set, And a leud fool her leading ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. II., November, 1858., No. XIII. • Various

... lady rose, and Miss Fortune, taking her chair, set it by the side of the table, next the fire. Ellen was opposite to her, and now, for the first time, the old lady seemed to know that she was in the room. She looked at her very attentively, but with an expressionless gaze which Ellen did not like to meet, though otherwise ...
— The Wide, Wide World • Elizabeth Wetherell

... plunge for one hitherto watched, tended, and guarded as Malcolm had been, to set forth entirely alone; but as he had approached manhood, and strengthened in body, his spirit had gained much in courage, and the anxiety about his sister swallowed up all other considerations. Even while he entreated the prayers of the Abbess, he felt quite sure that he had those of Esclairmonde; ...
— The Caged Lion • Charlotte M. Yonge

... emphasizing why the work of our officers is so splendid I must lay down these premises. The bravery and joyous spirit of self-sacrifice in our men is above all praise, but the officers have higher and more responsible duties. They have not only to set an example of physical courage, but they must possess the mental capacity to lead and spur on their men—and that under conditions so hard and rude that the man at home has ...
— What Germany Thinks - The War as Germans see it • Thomas F. A. Smith

... my proposal, Herr Doktor: you have made yours. Yours is quite unacceptable. I have told you with great frankness why it is necessary that I should have your portion of the document and the sum I am prepared to pay for it. I set its value at five thousand dollars. I will pay you the money over in cash, here and now, in good German bank-notes, in exchange for those ...
— The Man with the Clubfoot • Valentine Williams

... troopers and to go and occupy the village of Porterin, where there had been five fights in three weeks, and to hold it all night. There were not twenty houses left standing, not a dozen houses in that wasp's nest. So I took ten troopers, and set out at about four o'clock and at five o'clock, while it was still pitch dark, we reached the first houses of Porterin. I halted and ordered Marchas, you know Pierre de Marchas, who afterwards married little Martel-Auvelin, the daughter of the Marquis de Martel-Auvelin, ...
— The Works of Guy de Maupassant, Vol. 1 (of 8) - Boule de Suif and Other Stories • Guy de Maupassant

... a twinkle in the old lady's eyes, and Janey seeing it, knew that Aunt Janice was wondering what made them forget to bring back the ferns that they had set ...
— The Quest of Happy Hearts • Kathleen Hay

... den, and it was strange also to see the spirit of the lady of royal blood, threatened as she was with a shameful death, or still more shameful life, triumph over the Indian girl whom to-day fortune had set as far ...
— Montezuma's Daughter • H. Rider Haggard

... still possessed its power to awe and restrain. Though the crowd had followed him almost into the centre of the room, they felt themselves held back by the spirit of this man, who as long as he lived and breathed would hold himself a determined barrier between them and what he had been set to guard. ...
— Dark Hollow • Anna Katharine Green

... of the useful kind so often met with in villages. The kind of shop where you seem able to buy everything that is needed, and many that are pretty, such as the blouse muslin on which Faith had set her heart. She was so afraid that it would be gone before she could get some of it, that she rushed off as soon as breakfast was over, carrying the greater part of her family ...
— Anxious Audrey • Mabel Quiller-Couch

... couldn't have helped much to tell Jules with such appalling candour that the shiver produced by his kiss was the same kind as she had once felt when a rat ran over her face during sleep. However, Jules was not a beau for nothing and could afford this exceptional set-back to one of his many amours. There was, by the way, an excellent little comedy scene between him and his wife, played by Miss MURIEL POPE with a quiet humour as piquant ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Volume 152, March 21, 1917 • Various

... among the troops: and the deserters, instead of seeking their safety in flight or concealment, infested the highways. Maternus, a private soldier, of a daring boldness above his station, collected these bands of robbers into a little army, set open the prisons, invited the slaves to assert their freedom, and plundered with impunity the rich and defenceless cities of Gaul and Spain. The governors of the provinces, who had long been the spectators, ...
— The History of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire - Volume 1 • Edward Gibbon

... the way to a large airy room over the parlor, where, in a high, old-fashioned bed, surrounded on all sides by heavy damask curtains, they laid the weary stranger. The village surgeon arriving soon after, the fractured bones were set, and then, as perfect quiet seemed necessary, the room was vacated by all save Maggie, who glided noiselessly around the apartment, while the eyes of the sick man followed her with eager, admiring glances, so beautiful she looked to him in her new ...
— Maggie Miller • Mary J. Holmes

... immediately took the proper precautions, holding him up by the feet until the water ran out of his mouth and nose, and then rolling him on the tub and manipulating his arms. At last some faint indications of breathing set in, and they concluded to carry him down to his tent. Using two boards as a stretcher, six of them acted as bearers, and the procession moved toward the camp. Cleary would have been forgotten, had he not asked them to untie him, which they did, and he followed behind, ...
— Captain Jinks, Hero • Ernest Crosby

... the angel-man according to his affection of good and truth is allotted his place in heaven, the devil-man according to his affection of evil and falsity is allotted his in hell. The two opposites, set exactly over against each other, are kept in connection. This is the inmost of divine ...
— Angelic Wisdom about Divine Providence • Emanuel Swedenborg

... was, no doubt, the best way for them of saving themselves a painful impression, and I am glad that they were able to do this, for it was really and truly far from my mind to annoy them. Ah, I wish I could this summer make at last a beautiful journey, and that I knew how to set about it! To this sigh only my own voice replies as echo from the wall of leather which surrounds me. This longing for a journey is so great in me that it has already inspired me with thoughts of ...
— Correspondence of Wagner and Liszt, Volume 1 • Francis Hueffer (translator)

... repeating heaven's at set Of sun down mountain cloud in masses arched; Since Asia upon Europe marched, Unmatched the copious multitudes; unknown To Gallia's over-runner, Rome's inveterate foe, Such hosts; all one machine for overthrow, Coruscant ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... assume the role of 'physician from Europe,' etc. Without putting the full facts of the case into the hands of the officer, we will arrange to know all about the man who will help Davlin carry out their last scheme. No train shall leave the city on which he would, by any possibility, set out for Bellair accompanied by this sham physician, without the knowledge of our man, or men, of skill. All discoveries made are to be reported, through you, to Mademoiselle Celine Leroque, who will receive ...
— Madeline Payne, the Detective's Daughter • Lawrence L. Lynch

... village pending its preparation; but it was not ready when they returned. "I ain't goin' to cook no victuals," the woman explained, not ungraciously, "till I know folks is goin' to eat it." Knowledge of the world had made her justly cautious. She intended to set out a good meal, and she had the true housewife's desire that it should be eaten, that there should be enough of it, and that the guests should like it. When she waited on the table she displayed a pair of arms that would discourage any approach to familiarity, and disincline ...
— Baddeck and That Sort of Thing • Charles Dudley Warner

... the fact of her real presence on the altar which she had been invoked to occupy as her abode, she was symbolized by an uncarved block of wood from the sacred lama[24] tree. This was wrapped in a robe of choice yellow tapa, scented with turmeric, and set conspicuously upon ...
— Unwritten Literature of Hawaii - The Sacred Songs of the Hula • Nathaniel Bright Emerson

... since Miss Greeby had not evidently mentioned him as being mixed up with the matter. "Yes, Mr. Inspector, I can guess the rest. This unfortunate woman came down to get Silver, who could have hanged her, out of the country, and he set fire to ...
— Red Money • Fergus Hume

... busily engaged in a game exactly similar to our blind man's buff. Another set were walking on stilts, which raised the children three feet from the ground. They were very expert at this amusement, and seldom tumbled. In another place I observed a group of girls standing together, and apparently enjoying ...
— The Coral Island • R.M. Ballantyne

... and pale. She threw out the coffee, which she suspected had been made by the time-saving method of pouring water on last night's grounds, and made a fresh pot of it. After that she inspected the tea towels, and getting a tin dishpan, set them to boil in it on the top of ...
— A Poor Wise Man • Mary Roberts Rinehart

... coming up to town, Pope formed part of King Joseph's court, and was his rather too eager and obsequious humble servant.(127) Dick Steele, the editor of the Tatler, Mr. Addison's man, and his own man too—a person of no little figure in the world of letters, patronized the young poet, and set him a task or two. Young Mr. Pope did the tasks very quickly and smartly (he had been at the feet quite as a boy of Wycherley's decrepit reputation, and propped up for a year that doting old wit): he was ...
— Henry Esmond; The English Humourists; The Four Georges • William Makepeace Thackeray

... Commerce, but hitherto with little success. The magnificent chemical discoveries heralded some two years ago, whereby each bog was to be transformed into a mimic California, have not endured the rough test of practical experience. There is no doubt that Peat contains all the valuable elements therein set forth—Carbon, Ammonia, Stearine, Tar, &c., but unfortunately it has hitherto cost more to extract them than they will sell for in market; so the high-raised expectations of 1849 have been temporarily blasted, like ...
— Glances at Europe - In a Series of Letters from Great Britain, France, Italy, - Switzerland, &c. During the Summer of 1851. • Horace Greeley

... menu in various parts of his person, slipping fistsful of crawfish in his shirt-bosom and pouring his cup of hoopa into an old fire-extinguisher which rolled in the ship's waist. Pinioning his arms we squirted the fiery liquid between his set jaws, after which he too gave himself up to ...
— The Cruise of the Kawa • Walter E. Traprock

... single patch of vivid green trees that guaranteed the brummagem umbrageousness of Riverside Drive. Across the water were the Palisades, crowned by the ugly framework of the amusement park—yet soon it would be dusk and those same iron cobwebs would be a glory against the heavens, an enchanted palace set over the smooth radiance ...
— The Beautiful and Damned • F. Scott Fitzgerald

... plenty of creeks in this country that have only so far been scratched—a hole sunk here and there and abandoned. No luck, no perseverance; and so the place has been set down as a duffer, or, as the old diggers' more expressive term ...
— A Dictionary of Austral English • Edward Morris

... a bearded man of strong build, but bent and wasted with age, toil, sickness, and hardship. He is an old soldier, and has lost an arm. His nose is sharp, his complexion ashen-grey, and he shakes; he is nothing but skin and bone, and has the deep-set, ...
— The Dramatic Works of Gerhart Hauptmann - Volume I • Gerhart Hauptmann

... trapped, the springe is set. Not ignorantly I offered counsel in the Synagogue, Quelled panic with authoritative calm, But knowing, having weighed the opposing risks. Our friends in Strasburg have been overmastered, The imperial voice is drowned, the papal arm Drops paralyzed—both, lifted for the truth; We can ...
— The Poems of Emma Lazarus - Vol. II. (of II.), Jewish Poems: Translations • Emma Lazarus

... country; for all now came in, eager to offer their congratulations to the victor, and do him homage. The prince of Quito no longer hesitated to assume the scarlet borla, the diadem of the Incas. His triumph was complete. He had beaten his enemies on their own ground; had taken their capital; had set his foot on the neck of his rival, and won for himself the ancient sceptre of the Children of the Sun. But the hour of triumph was destined to be that of his deepest humiliation. Atahuallpa was not one of those to whom, in the language of the Grecian bard, "the Gods are willing to reveal ...
— The History Of The Conquest Of Peru • William H. Prescott

... Plato. And for philosophy as a whole I have the greatest respect. But it is the crown of a man's education, not the foundation. Myself, I read it with the utmost profit, but I have known endless trouble result from boys who attempt it too soon, before they were set." ...
— The Longest Journey • E. M. Forster

... ma'am, indeed!" said the captain, with an encouraging smile, as the lady seized hold of the copper stanchions which surrounded the sky-lights, to support herself, when she had gained the deck. "You're a capital sailor, and have by your conduct set an example to the other ladies, as I have no doubt your husband does to the gentlemen. Now allow me ...
— Newton Forster • Frederick Marryat

... Portuguese were the first who set on foot discoveries by sea, and carried them on for many years before any other European nation attempted to follow their example; yet, as soon as these voyages appeared to be attended with commercial gain, the English were ready to put in for a share. The Portuguese discovered Guinea ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume VII • Robert Kerr

... lift it, bear it solemnly, Stand up and walk beneath it steadfastly; Fail not for sorrow, falter not for sin, But onward, upward, till the goal ye win; God guard ye, and God guide ye on your way, Young pilgrim warriors who set forth to-day! ...
— Poems • Frances Anne Butler

... were able to reply. The shower of shells had driven the gunners to the bomb-proofs. In one hour and fifteen minutes after the first gun was fired, not a shot came from the fort. Two magazines had been blown up, and the fort set on fire in several places. Such a torrent of missiles was falling and bursting that it was impossible for ...
— Autobiography of Seventy Years, Vol. 1-2 • George Hoar

... when the Pagan's joy and comfort fled, It seemed the sun was set, the day was night, Gainst the brave prince with whom he combated He turned, and on the forehead struck the knight: When thunders forged are in Typhoius' bed, Not Brontes' hammer falls so swift, so right; ...
— Jerusalem Delivered • Torquato Tasso

... The first of these was the easier, although no slight task; the second was one of great difficulty. The field for the machine then in sight was the newspaper, and the newspaper must appear daily. The old method of printing from founder's type, set for the most part by hand, was doing the work; a revolutionary method by which the type was to be made and set by machine, although promising great economies, was a dangerous innovation and one from which publishers naturally shrank. ...
— The Building of a Book • Various

... if it is better for inferior courts to hold office for short terms, it is best that the Supreme Court be subject to the same policy. It is ridiculous that our representatives should be made such by popular vote, and the laws they make be construed by a set of judges whose office expires only when the spirit judge has a harp, and the dust judge has a coffin. Popular vote retires the inferior judge, a fashionable funeral retires the supreme judge, but the robe is left as the imperial emblem. It seems ...
— One Thousand Secrets of Wise and Rich Men Revealed • C. A. Bogardus

... The Hottentots now set to work and discovered five or six more, which they brought out. They then tried in vain to get at the water in the deep cleft, but finding it impossible, the caravan continued ...
— The Mission • Frederick Marryat

... not forget the croup. One could trust Vi never to forget anything about which she once set out to ...
— Six Little Bunkers at Mammy June's • Laura Lee Hope

... was standing by the window looking into the garden; he was a rather short, thick-set man, and he turned ...
— The Beggar Man • Ruby Mildred Ayres

... rogue, an unjust knave; I will no more trust him when he winks with one eye, than I will a serpent when he hisses. He will spend his mouth, and promise, like Brabbler the hound; but when he performs, astronomers set it down for a prodigy: though I long to see Hector, I cannot forbear dogging him. They say he keeps a Trojan drab; and uses Calchas's tent, that fugitive priest of Troy, that canonical rogue of our side. I'll after him; nothing but whoring in this ...
— The Works of John Dryden, Vol. 6 (of 18) - Limberham; Oedipus; Troilus and Cressida; The Spanish Friar • John Dryden

... forgive me for what I am about to do; and you might as well set about it at once, for you haven't much time. I should never think of swallowing you if it were not so easy; but opportunity is the strongest of all temptations. Besides, I am ...
— Cobwebs From an Empty Skull • Ambrose Bierce (AKA: Dod Grile)

... thou in a barbarous soyle betrayd, Defrawded Pompey of thy funerall rites, There none could weepe vpon thy funerall hearse, 1000 None could thy Consulshipes and triumphs tell, And in thy death set fourth thy liuing praise, None would erect to thee a sepulcher. Or put thine ashes in a pretious vrne, Cice. Peace Lords lament not noble Pompeys death, Nor thinke him wreched, cause he wants a Tombe, Heauen ...
— The Tragedy Of Caesar's Revenge • Anonymous

... does so wilfully. If, after all, he still persists, I shall be compelled to reconstruct the course I have marked out for myself, and draw upon such humble resources, as I have, for a new course, better suited to the real exigencies of the case. I set out in this campaign with the intention of conducting it strictly as a gentleman, in substance at least, if not in the outside polish. The latter I shall never be; but that which constitutes the inside of a gentleman I hope ...
— The Papers And Writings Of Abraham Lincoln, Complete - Constitutional Edition • Abraham Lincoln

... respective lengths, to suit the inequalities of the rock; several of the stanchions were also tried into their places, and other necessary observations made, to prevent mistakes on the application of the apparatus, and to facilitate the operations when the beams came to be set up, which would require to be done in the course of a ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 16 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... speeches were the feature of the canvass of 1860. There had, perhaps, been more exciting and enthusiastic campaigns, but the number of meetings was without precedent. The Tribune estimated that ten thousand set addresses were made in New York alone, and that the number in the country equalled all that had been made in previous presidential canvasses since 1789. It is likewise true that at no time in the history of the State did so many distinguished men take part ...
— A Political History of the State of New York, Volumes 1-3 • DeAlva Stanwood Alexander

... that some one was on the watch. In this mood Mr. Spence usually seemed unconscious of his secretary's presence, or aware of it only as an arm terminating in a pen. Millner, accustomed on such occasions to exist merely as a function, sat waiting for the click of the spring that should set him in action; but the pressure not being applied, he finally hazarded: "Are we to go on with ...
— Tales Of Men And Ghosts • Edith Wharton

... Will'm here could stan' a tussle wi' the others. Ah! I wish it war them. But it arn't likely: they had a good boat an' a compass in it; and if they've made any use o' their oars, they ought to be far from here long afore this. You've got the best ears, nigger: keep them well set, an' listen. You know the voices o' the ole Pan's crew. See if you can ...
— The Ocean Waifs - A Story of Adventure on Land and Sea • Mayne Reid

... now more than a month since 'Arry had been removed from the drain-pipes and set going on his new course, and Richard was watching the experiment gravely. Connected with it was his exceptional stay at Wanley over the Sunday; he designed to go up to London quite unexpectedly about ...
— Demos • George Gissing

... copy of a proclamation dated the 25th day of December last. The authority of law by which it was made is set forth in the proclamation itself, which expressly affirms that it was issued "by virtue of the power and authority in me vested by the Constitution, and in the name of the sovereign people of the United States," and proclaims and declares "unconditionally and without reservation, ...
— A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents - Section 2 (of 2) of Volume 6: Andrew Johnson • James D. Richardson

... a table, took a pencil from his pocket, set the different sums on paper, and added them up deliberately. All this was humbug, for he had added it up before Philip came in, and knew to a dollar how much it amounted to. Philip stood by, feeling miserably uncomfortable, while ...
— The Tin Box - and What it Contained • Horatio Alger

... is down here for him, and for me too, for that matter; everybody here is so borne, and narrow-minded and self-centred; nothing expansive or sympathetic about them, as there used to be about Ernest's set in dear, quiet, peaceable old Oxford. It's been such a pleasure to us to hear some conversation again that wasn't about the school, and the rector, and the Haigh Park people, and the flower show, and old ...
— Philistia • Grant Allen

... worse, and we all saw that his words would come true—he was dying; and before the sun had again set poor Fred had ...
— Fighting the Whales • R. M. Ballantyne

... of April 1856, Hawthorne and Bennoch set off on a bachelor expedition of their own, first to visit Tupper at Albany, as has been already related, and then going to view a muster of British troops at Aldershot; thence to Battle Abbey, which ...
— The Life and Genius of Nathaniel Hawthorne • Frank Preston Stearns

... but begin to surmise something of the state of his feelings, but without dreaming of their intensity, now smiled on him, and asked him inside the office. No man or woman can be quite indifferent to one, whom they know has set them on a pedestal, apart from ...
— Wired Love - A Romance of Dots and Dashes • Ella Cheever Thayer

... it like this, Althea,' he said. 'It's not so bad as all this. It can all be made right. You must just tell him the truth and set him free.' ...
— Franklin Kane • Anne Douglas Sedgwick

... brought her a set of forget-me-nots to match those which she intended to wear herself, and which had been long ago given to Lady Cecilia by the dear good dean himself. This was irresistible to Helen, and they were accepted. But this was only the prelude to presents of more value, which Helen ...
— Helen • Maria Edgeworth

... she had been playing under a heavy strain. Her face looked weary and flushed, and her eyes were brilliant with feverish excitement. Those eyes seemed to be pleading with him now to set her free from the kindly scrutiny of these good-hearted, curious strangers. They gathered about her in delight, pouring their ...
— The Mystery of Mary • Grace Livingston Hill

... the son of Prince Okar or Otkar of Bavaria having been killed by a blow on the temple, struck by a son of Pippin after a game of chess; and there is another well-known tradition as to the magnificent chess-board and set of men said to have been sent over as a present by the empress Irene to Charlemagne. But both tales are not less mythical than the romance which relates how the great Frankish monarch lost his kingdom over a game of chess to Guerin de Montglave; for van der Linde ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 6, Slice 1 - "Chtelet" to "Chicago" • Various

... at the same time ordered to set the whole town on fire, except the two churches (which by good fortune stood at some distance from the other houses), and then he was to abandon the place and to come on board. These orders were punctually complied with, for Mr. Brett immediately set his men to work ...
— Anson's Voyage Round the World - The Text Reduced • Richard Walter

... localities. Petrarca, in his avocation of barber, was in the greatest request. The costume of the women does not differ widely, but the coat is longer, and a petticoat replaces the blue drawers—round their waist is a belt of great weight, about three inches wide, and of the thickest leather, set with cornelians and other coarse stones, mounted in brass. The red cap is usual, and the hair is often prettily braided. I have seen some head-dresses composed of silver coins. None of the people seem to be in the habit of bathing or washing, and they do not remove their garments at night. The ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine — Volume 57, No. 351, January 1845 • Various

... its tribe is the low-growing GRAY or FIELD GOLDENROD or DYER'S WEED (S. nemoralis). The rich, deep yellow of its little spreading, recurved, and usually one-sided panicles is admirably set off by the ashy gray, or often cottony, stem, and the hoary, grayish-green leaves in the open, sterile places where they arise from July to November. Quebec and the Northwest Territory to ...
— Wild Flowers, An Aid to Knowledge of Our Wild Flowers and - Their Insect Visitors - - Title: Nature's Garden • Neltje Blanchan

... is a slated house, without any ornament, except a set of wooden cuts, painted red and blue, that are placed seriatum around the square of the building in the internal side. Fourteen* of these suspind at equal distances on the walls, each set in a painted frame; these constitute ...
— The Ned M'Keown Stories - Traits And Stories Of The Irish Peasantry, The Works of - William Carleton, Volume Three • William Carleton

... and smooth, season with pepper and salt, and a few drops of onion juice, put in a saucepan over the fire, and add a tablespoonful of butter, two tablespoonfuls of milk, and just before removing from the fire add a tablespoonful of cream and one egg, stir well, turn out into a bowl and set aside to cool. When cold make into croquettes, dip in egg and cracker crumbs and fry in ...
— The Golden Age Cook Book • Henrietta Latham Dwight

... in any way, is not discreditable to B. F. You observe that he is acquiring a knowledge of zoology at the same time that he is learning French. Fathers of families in moderate circumstances will find it profitable to their children, and an economical mode of instruction, to set them to revising and amending this boy's exercise. The passage was originally taken from the "Histoire Naturelle des Betes Ruminans et Rongeurs, Bipedes et Autres," lately published in Paris. This was translated into English and published in London. It was republished at Great Pedlington, ...
— The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (The Physician and Poet not the Jurist)

... corruption of the nation. Sexual relations, he says, were an alternation of disorderly lust and of incest; commerce was nought but fraud and treachery; avarice withheld from the Church her tithes, and ordinary conversation was a succession of blasphemies. The Church, set up by God as a model and protector of the people, was false to all its obligations. The bishops, through the basest and most criminal of motives, were habitual accepters of persons; they annointed themselves with the last essence extracted from their ...
— The Profits of Religion, Fifth Edition • Upton Sinclair

... possible and alternative aspirants who were to be complimented by the first votes of their States—"William L. Dayton, Simon Cameron, Salmon P. Chase, Edward Bates, Jacob Collamer, John McLean. The fifteen minutes required by this formality had already indisputably marked out and set apart the real contestants. The "complimentary" statesmen were lustily cheered by their respective State delegations; but at the names of Seward and Lincoln the whole wigwam seemed to ...
— Abraham Lincoln, A History, Volume 2 • John George Nicolay and John Hay

... the mill we saw the water that was not wanted for the wheel, tumbling in fury down a steep, narrow channel, in which were set various poles and cross-beams. And it was down this villainous diversoir that the old rascal would have sent us, knowing that we should have come to grief there. The boat would almost certainly have struck some obstacle and ...
— Two Summers in Guyenne • Edward Harrison Barker

... the seventh day Sabbath ever changed? If so, when, and for what reason? Here we find, by examining the proofs set forth by those who favor and insist upon the change, that there is not one passage of scripture in the bible to sustain it, but to the contrary, that Jesus kept it and gave directions about it at the destruction ...
— The Seventh Day Sabbath, a Perpetual Sign - 1847 edition • Joseph Bates

... food for the depraved appetites of a certain class of readers in the North; and furnish it they must, by some means. They truly, are an unlucky set of fellows, for I never yet heard of one of them, who was so fortunate as to find anything good or praiseworthy among Southern people. This is very strange indeed! They travel South with an understanding ...
— A Review of Uncle Tom's Cabin - or, An Essay on Slavery • A. Woodward

... gleaming Pharos,[180] and aloud Shout, Commerce, to the kingdoms of the earth; Shout, for thy golden portals are set wide, And all thy streamers o'er the surge, aloft, In pomp triumphant wave. The weary way That pale Nearchus passed, from creek to creek Advancing slow, no longer bounds the track Of the adventurous mariner, who steers Steady, with eye intent upon the stars, ...
— The Poetical Works of William Lisle Bowles, Vol. 1 • William Lisle Bowles

... pace with our own progress, George. We got to. We're bumping against new people, and they set up to be gentlefolks—etiquette dinners and all the rest of it. They give themselves airs and expect us to be fish-out-of-water. We aren't going to be. They think we've no Style. Well, we give them Style for our advertisements, and we're going to give 'em Style all through.... You needn't ...
— Tono Bungay • H. G. Wells

... was brought and set behind me, so that its light fell upon the discarded toys, miscellaneous but beloved—a china head long parted from its body, one whole new doll, a tin with little stones in it, a matchbox, and other sundries. If anything ...
— Lotus Buds • Amy Carmichael

... hypotheses of descent, which keeps strictly to the nearest structural relationships. This is the only basis that justifies the drawing up of a special hypothesis of descent. If this fundamental proposition be recognised, it will be admitted that the doctrine of special descent upheld by Haeckel, and set forth in Darwin's "Descent of Man", is still valid to-day. In the genealogical tree, man's place is quite close to the anthropoid apes; these again have as their nearest relatives the lower Old World ...
— Darwin and Modern Science • A.C. Seward and Others

... strange," he muttered; "very strange. I'm more than ever glad to be of use to you. Now for my name. It's not a long one. I'm called Ned Gale. I was born at sea and bred at sea; and it isn't often I set foot on shore, so that what good there is in me I picked ...
— Manco, the Peruvian Chief - An Englishman's Adventures in the Country of the Incas • W.H.G. Kingston

... done infinitely more by pointing the possible road of our endeavour. Through all his work moves the urgency of one who would create something more than a mere work of art to amuse the multitude or afford satisfaction to the critic. His chief achievement is that he has set up the ideal of a finer civilisation, of a more generous life than that in which we live; an ideal that, if it is still too high for us of this generation, will be appreciated and followed by ...
— H. G. Wells • J. D. Beresford

... the English walnut on the Pacific Coast has been assured, many commercial groves have been set out. ...
— Walnut Growing in Oregon • Various

... him to go without protest, and he buttoned his coat and set out in the storm to find the others. Fogerty and Arthur were by this time in the lane back of the grounds, where the detective was advancing slowly with his eyes ...
— Aunt Jane's Nieces in Society • Edith Van Dyne

... modern and much less important instance. I am sorry to observe my old acquaintance Jedediah Cleishbotham has misbehaved himself so far as to desert his original patron, and set up for himself. I am afraid the poor pedagogue will make little by his new allies, unless the pleasure of entertaining the public, and, for aught I know, the gentlemen of the long robe, with ...
— The Monastery • Sir Walter Scott

... contact with the nervous system of the receiving person, set up a peculiar vibration in the substance of the pineal gland and thus the first step in the transformation of these vibrations into thought-forms in the mind of the person is under way. The remainder of the process is too technical, ...
— Clairvoyance and Occult Powers • Swami Panchadasi

... People are afraid of these supernatural associations but not of the departed soul. Formerly, when erecting a funeral house for an important man, an attendant in the next life was provided for him by placing a slave, alive, in the hole dug for one of the upright posts, the end of the post being set directly over him. ...
— Through Central Borneo: - An Account of Two Years' Travel in the Land of Head-Hunters - Between the Years 1913 and 1917 • Carl Lumholtz

... an old room looking on to the garden, scantily furnished, with a patch of carpet by the window and a table and chair set upon it. More turned round from the window-seat on which he was kneeling to look out, and smiled genially as Ralph heard the servant close ...
— The King's Achievement • Robert Hugh Benson

... Montauban, an order was issued to demolish its walls. The case was far otherwise with turbulent Roman Catholic towns. The people were encouraged to acts of violence toward the Huguenots by the impunity of the perpetrators of similar crimes, and by the evident partiality of those who were set to administer justice. Out of six or seven score murders of Protestants since the peace, not two of the abominable acts had been punished. Under such circumstances it would not be surprising if the victims of inordinate cruelty should at length be driven ...
— History of the Rise of the Huguenots - Volume 2 • Henry Baird

... said flatly, her taste outraged and her sensibilities set on edge by the stupid, blundering, hammer-and-tongs onset which from first to last he had made. She loved him, and had meant to accept him, but if she had loved him ten times as much she couldn't have helped refusing him just then, under those circumstances—not if she died for it. As ...
— Lippincott's Magazine, Vol. 22, November, 1878 - of Popular Literature and Science • Various

... Peter to come along, as I thought if the brook was ahead of us I could not possibly keep close to him, going at that pace. To my surprise and delight, as we approached the willows Peter passed me and the water widened out in front of us; I saw by his set face that it was neck or nothing with him. Havoc was going well within himself, but his stable-companion was precipitate and flurried; and before I knew what had happened Peter was in the middle of the brook ...
— Margot Asquith, An Autobiography: Volumes I & II • Margot Asquith

... February, heavy rains set in, fortunately, they were in the neighbourhood of some stony ridges and sand hills, on which they camped, and where they had plenty of space to feed their animals, although ...
— The History of Australian Exploration from 1788 to 1888 • Ernest Favenc

... provided for the succession of the members of the cabinet in case of the removal or death of the president and vice-president. The Electoral Count Act placed on the states the burden of deciding contests arising from the choice of presidential electors. When more than one set of electoral returns come from a state, each purporting to be legal, Congress must decide which shall be counted. Of some importance, too, was the establishment of the Department of Agriculture in 1889 and the inclusion of its secretary in the cabinet. The ...
— The United States Since The Civil War • Charles Ramsdell Lingley

... put upon his legs greaves of shining bronze, the splendid gift of Hephaestus. Next he fastened about his breast a fine golden breast-plate, curiously wrought, which Pallas Athene the daughter of Zeus had given him when first he was about to set out upon his grievous labours. Over his shoulders the fierce warrior put the steel that saves men from doom, and across his breast he slung behind him a hollow quiver. Within it were many chilling arrows, dealers of death which makes ...
— Hesiod, The Homeric Hymns, and Homerica • Homer and Hesiod

... tend, in that case, to undermine its own basis; for in proportion as signals for action are quick and efficacious they diminish their sensuous stimulus and fade from consciousness. Were language such a set of signals it would be something merely instrumental, which if made perfect ought to be automatic and unconscious. It would be a buzzing in the ears, not a music native to the mind. Such a theory of language would treat it as a necessary evil and would look forward hopefully to the extinction ...
— The Life of Reason • George Santayana

... receive the children. She was urgent, however, that Isabel should come as soon as possible, since Louisa had been more unwell than usual, and was pining for her eldest sister; and she hoped that James would join her there as soon as the holidays should set ...
— Dynevor Terrace (Vol. II) • Charlotte M. Yonge

... the torments of the lost. Saturday evening I had a sudden call, by telegraph, and took the night train for Boston. The occasion was the death of a valued old friend who had requested that I should preach his funeral sermon. I took my seat in the cars and set myself to framing the discourse. But I never got beyond the opening paragraph; for then the train started and the car-wheels began their 'clack, clack-clack-clack-clack! clack-clack! —clack-clack-clack!' and right away those odious ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... I can do myself; and my son as comes home from a Saturday to a Monday, it's not much that he can do either; but last month a man from London, what lives at the Crown, he came here and asked me to show him the house, and when he see'd the garden and the condition it was in, he asked me to let him set to work in it and put it to rights; and a deal he has done in it to be sure for the time. He got Madge, the washerwoman, to come over one day and tell him how it all was when them people as lived in ...
— Ellen Middleton—A Tale • Georgiana Fullerton

... Franchomme, who knew what had been done, visited Chopin a few days afterwards, the invalid lamented as on previous occasions his impecuniosity, and in answer to the questions of his astonished friend stated that he had received nothing. The enquiries which were forthwith set on foot led to the envelope with the precious enclosure being found untouched in the clock of the portiere, who intentionally or unintentionally had omitted to deliver it. The story is told in various ways, the above is the skeleton of apparently solid facts. I will now make the ...
— Frederick Chopin as a Man and Musician - Volume 1-2, Complete • Frederick Niecks

... she learned that the Emperor had set out for Landshut, she entreated Wolf to seek out Pyramus Kogel, for she had just learned that during her illness her father's travelling companion had asked to see her, but, like every one else, had been ...
— Uarda • Georg Ebers

... back on his seat, and covered his face with his hands. The last seal on the fate of THE MAN OF CRIME was set; the last wave in the terrible and mysterious tide of his destiny had dashed on his soul to the shore whence there is no return. Vain, now and henceforth, the humour, the sentiment, the kindly impulse, the social instincts which had invested ...
— Night and Morning, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... or shells from Accra, both of which we obtained for the building of an armourer's shop and a bakehouse. Indeed, we were obliged to use the utmost exertion to get any thing erected to shelter the Europeans and African soldiers, before the rainy season set in. As for the African mechanics and labourers, they built their own huts, in certain lines, ...
— A Voyage Round the World, Vol. I (of ?) • James Holman

... here with the greatest circumspection. It is a dangerous thing to set up for a wit. There is inherent to it a certain touch of absurdity which is catching, and we should be warned by the example ...
— The Countess of Escarbagnas • Moliere

... craved naturally for the vegetable food of her native forests; at all events the bishop's stores of fruit and sweetmeats diminished rapidly; and what was worse, so did the sweet Spanish wine which Amyas had set apart for poor Lucy's daily cordial. Whereon another severe lecture, in which Amyas told her how mean it was to rob poor sick Lucy; whereat she, as usual, threatened to drown herself; and was running upon deck to do it, when ...
— Westward Ho! • Charles Kingsley

... twenty-six most successful concerts throughout the State. They appeared in University caps, apparently something entirely new, as some thought they were members of a fire company, while others "mistook them for Arabs from Forepaugh's circus." The example set by this successful club, to which belongs the credit of elevating and popularizing college songs, was not immediately followed, however, and there were several years when the glee club was dormant. With its effectual revival in 1884, the history of the University Glee ...
— The University of Michigan • Wilfred Shaw

... the blunder of being a bit too eager. Had he waited a few months longer, and then pulled the string—Dios y diablo! there would have been such a fracas as to turn the Cordilleras bottom up! Now all that is set back for ...
— Carmen Ariza • Charles Francis Stocking

... freedom of telling him everything and of hearing everything from him, and of having him for my own best friend. He might go away for twelve months, and I should not be unhappy, believing, as I do, that he would be true to me." All of which set Lady Laura thinking whether her friend had not been wiser than she had been. She had never known anything of that sort of friendship with her husband which already seemed to be quite established ...
— Phineas Finn - The Irish Member • Anthony Trollope

... Motte Cadillac was the founder of a permanent settlement on the west shore of Detroit River, it is said that Greysolon du Lhut set up the first palisades there. About a hundred houses stood crowded together within the wooden wall of these tall log pickets, which were twenty-five feet high. The houses were roofed with bark or thatched with straw. The streets were mere paths, but a wide road went all around the town next ...
— Heroes of the Middle West - The French • Mary Hartwell Catherwood

... season. Not one of these noble men ever returned. Unfortunately for the success of this mission, the Gray Wolf warriors were at home. The medicine man's dreams had been unfavorable, and they dared not set out on their annual hunt. This year they will send ...
— The Wit of Women - Fourth Edition • Kate Sanborn

... RANDOLPH, an English Conservative politician, third son of the 7th Duke of Marlborough, who, though a man of mark, and more than once in office, could never heart and soul join any party and settle down to steady statesmanship; set out on travel, took ill on the journey, and came home in a state of collapse ...
— The Nuttall Encyclopaedia - Being a Concise and Comprehensive Dictionary of General Knowledge • Edited by Rev. James Wood

... should at once go down to the river, on the banks of which we might possibly obtain some wild-fowl; and as we were too hungry to discuss the pros and cons for any length of time, we immediately set out. Not far off a stream ran into the river, and we hoped that near its mouth we might meet with some wild ducks. We had not gone far when Martin exclaimed, "I see some birds; we shall have one of them ...
— Snow Shoes and Canoes - The Early Days of a Fur-Trader in the Hudson Bay Territory • William H. G. Kingston

... shallow bays and mouths of rivers along the coast. Three grabs grappled the President at once, but the boarders were beaten back, and all three were blown up and sunk, on which the rest of the squadron made off. The President was set on fire in sixteen places, and lost eleven men killed and ...
— The Pirates of Malabar, and An Englishwoman in India Two Hundred Years Ago • John Biddulph

... the bit of bric-a-brac traveled from one hand to another until it reached a heavy-set man with red mustache, who stood but a couple of yards ...
— Young Auctioneers - The Polishing of a Rolling Stone • Edward Stratemeyer

... in his heart, as to endeavour to debauch the daughter of a brave officer, who had served his country with credit and reputation. Notwithstanding this remonstrance, which Pickle imputed to the commodore's ignorance of the world, he set out for the habitation of Mrs. Gauntlet, with the unjustifiable sentiments of a man of pleasure, who sacrifices every consideration to the desire of his ruling appetite; and, as Winchester lay in his way, resolved to visit some of his friends who lived in that ...
— The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle, Volume I • Tobias Smollett

... stick, and, unfortunately, he fastened it in the chimney upside down. Having done so, he fumbled in his pocket, the darkness being intense, for his matches, and applied the light underneath in the usual place. But the rocket being upside down he of course failed to set it off, and then he unluckily tried the other end, which was uppermost, with the disastrous result, as my English informant described it, that 'the hexplosion blowed him clean ...
— Heroes of the Goodwin Sands • Thomas Stanley Treanor

... formerly intimated to you, that besides Mint and Pompions, I produced divers other Vegetables of very differing Natures out of Water. Wherefore you will not, I presume, think it incongruous to suppose, that when a slender Vine-slip is set into the ground, and takes root, there it may likewise receive its Nutriment from the water attracted out of the earth by his roots, or impell'd by the warm'th of the sun, or pressure of the ambient air into the ...
— The Sceptical Chymist • Robert Boyle

... dig circles around them both!" yelled little Semi-Colon, who had the utmost faith in his cousin's ability to accomplish every task set ...
— Fred Fenton on the Track - or, The Athletes of Riverport School • Allen Chapman

... Death is a stench in the nostrils, Life is beauty and joy. The planters are ever brothers. Never are the warriors brothers; Their ways are set apart, Their hands raised each against each. The planters' ways are the one way. Ever they plant for life, For life more abundant, For beauty of head and hand, For the voices of children playing, And the laughter ...
— The Acorn-Planter - A California Forest Play (1916) • Jack London

... himself received in this way by his colleagues, pretended not to see it, and after a few moments quitted the House, never more to set foot within it.] ...
— My Recollections of Lord Byron • Teresa Guiccioli

... what I call a reg'lar set-to. Fire away, my lads," cried Captain Oughton, rubbing his hands. "A proper rally this. Damn ...
— Newton Forster - The Merchant Service • Captain Frederick Marryat

... murmured the old Englishman, his hand going tremulously to his chin. "It seems unjust; it does. But Mr. Schouler could not have set them on to do it. I can't quite ...
— McTeague • Frank Norris

... conflict is set up in his mind. His dislike of human flesh plus that dread of the human species which he shares with the whole brute creation is on the one side, his ravening hunger on the other. Increase the hunger-pressure to a certain pitch, and the lion will attack. I have not forgotten ...
— Reminiscences of a South African Pioneer • W. C. Scully

... distinctly lower plane than Marcus Aurelius. Perhaps of all the characters of antiquity he most resembles Julian, whose career as a man of action wrung from the Christian Prudentius the fine epitaph, "Perfidus ille Deo, quamvis non perfidus orbi." These early Greek philosophers were, in fact, a strange set of men. They were not always engaged in the study of philosophy. They occasionally, whilst pursuing knowledge and wisdom, indulged in practices of singular unwisdom or of very dubious morality. Thus the eminent historian Hieronymus endeavoured ...
— Political and Literary essays, 1908-1913 • Evelyn Baring

... flower garden on its quaint original lines; planted its borders thickly with old time perennials, peonies, larkspurs, hollyhocks, clove pinks, irises, and lilies; replanted the rose beds with old-fashioned roses, set the wall beds with fruit trees and gay annuals, sodded, trimmed, raked, levelled, cleaned up, and pruned, until the garden was a charming ...
— Athalie • Robert W. Chambers

... mayor coming under this head. We elect other citizens to enforce and interpret the laws, and we term them judges and officers of the court. In fact, it is a principle in our government that no man or set of men shall have authority in all departments of government, legislative, executive, and judicial. You will see that the Constitution of the United States is divided into these three departments of government, and the state constitutions and city ...
— Boy Scouts Handbook - The First Edition, 1911 • Boy Scouts of America

... my meals, it was brought out of master's house by one of the servant girls, and set on a pine coffin, such as we used to furnish the poor devils who hadn't got much money, and who couldn't afford to go the expensive ones. When we had a holiday, such as Christmas, I'd slyly move the grub to one of the polished silver-plated affairs, and ...
— The Gold Hunter's Adventures - Or, Life in Australia • William H. Thomes

... to get the money to pay that bill, and where was it to come from? All the money, except a few dollars in the bank, had been withdrawn to pay for the car. It had been an expensive luxury, she was well aware, but John had set his mind upon it, and she had not the heart to oppose his wish. Hitherto the car had cost but little apart from the running expenses. In case anything did happen they had the one hundred dollars for immediate use. Now that ...
— Jess of the Rebel Trail • H. A. Cody

... until they reached the bound Where the great linden stood, set deep in snow, Up to the lower branches. "Here we stop," Said Eva, "for my mother has my word That I will go no further than this tree." Then the snow-maiden laughed: "And what is this? This fear ...
— The Little People of the Snow • William Cullen Bryant

... to come, when students enter the Columbia University Dramatic Museum, founded by Professor Brander Matthews, they will be able to judge, from the model of the stage set for "Peter Grimm," exactly how far David Belasco's much-talked-of realism went; they will rightly regard it as the high point in accomplishment before the advent of the "new" scenery, whose philosophy Belasco understands, but whose artistic ...
— The Return of Peter Grimm • David Belasco

... not rosewood. The top of these shelves on either side to be covered with the same stuff as the furniture, finished with a crimson fringe. On top of the shelves on one side of the fireplace I shall set our noble Venus di Milo, and I shall buy at Cicci's the lovely Clytie, and put it the other side. Then I shall get of Williams & Everett two of their chromo lithographs, which give you all the style and charm of the best English watercolor school. I will have the lovely Bay of Amalfi over my Venus, ...
— Household Papers and Stories • Harriet Beecher Stowe

... Trollope's early novels were set in Ireland, including The Macdermots of Ballycloran, his first published novel, and Castle Richmond. Readers of those early Irish novels can easily perceive Trollope's great affection for and sympathy with the Irish people, especially ...
— The Landleaguers • Anthony Trollope

... word from him will set that right," he said to himself. "Poor fellow! He must be done up to sleep like that. Why, he never even asked how we got on ...
— The Kopje Garrison - A Story of the Boer War • George Manville Fenn

... compliment with him. He spoke well; and though his hands were clean of Sir Meeson Corby's reproach of them, the caricature of presentable men blushed absurdly and seemed uneasy in his monstrous collar. The touching of him again would not be required to set him pacing to her steps. His hang of the head testified to the unerring stamp of a likeness Captain Abrane could affix with a stroke: he looked the fiddler over his bow, playing wonderfully to conceal the crack of a string. The merit ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... point of view which my friend and correspondent of years ago, Mr Edmund Clarence Stedman, of New York, set out by emphasising in his address, as President of the meeting under the auspices of the Uncut Leaves Society in New York, in the beginning of 1895, on the death of Stevenson, and to honour the memory of the great romancer, as reported in ...
— Robert Louis Stevenson - a Record, an Estimate, and a Memorial • Alexander H. Japp

... are set before us that we thankful should be, (Which we of taste and feeling are) for those parts that do fructify in ...
— The Philosophy of the Plays of Shakspere Unfolded • Delia Bacon

... in Wine, Beer and Tobacco; whilest they attend there the coming of their Adversaries and other lovers of the sport. Here then a view must be taken of each others Cocks, which are forsooth according to their merits and value, set apart in their Coops either in the yard, or above in the Garret, to be fed as is most convenient; and there's then a discourse held concerning them, as if they were persons of some extraordinary state, quality, and great valour. Not a word must be spoke, (as much as if there were a penalty imposed ...
— The Ten Pleasures of Marriage and The Confession of the New-married Couple (1682) • A. Marsh

... the other young lydy till the young lydy what 'e's married to sets 'im free. Now that young lydy what 'e's married to 'as started out to set 'im free, and if I was ...
— The Dust Flower • Basil King

... We decided to set out for the Transvaal in order to discuss the matter with the Government; and on the evening of the 5th of June we marched four or five miles from Liebenbergsvlei, to a place opposite Verkijkersdorp. We were, all told, between sixty and seventy men, ...
— Three Years' War • Christiaan Rudolf de Wet

... to Sally, and he, too, said, "Sell! sell—oh, don't make a blunder, now, you own the earth! —sell, sell!" But she set her iron will and lashed it amidships, and said she would hold on for five points more ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... said Betty, "it was this way." She now looked full up at her mistress. "The Scotch heather could not live in exile. So we burnt it, and set all the fairies free. They are in Aberdeenshire ...
— Betty Vivian - A Story of Haddo Court School • L. T. Meade

... mine! What! thou'st set the other two aburning? Impatient dog, thou cheat'st me to the last! I should have done the deed—and yet 'tis well. Thou diest by ...
— Graham's Magazine Vol XXXII. No. 3. March 1848 • Various

... conducting Henry Wharton to a place where he might procure surgical aid, set about performing his duty with alacrity, in order to return as soon as possible to the scene of strife. They had not reached the middle of the plain, before the captain noticed a man whose appearance and occupation ...
— The Spy • James Fenimore Cooper

... value, for already physicians have begun to find it serviceable in some to which I had not thought of applying it,[11] and its sphere of usefulness is therefore likely to extend beyond the limits originally set by me. It will be well here, however, to state the various disorders in which it has seemed to me applicable. As regards some of them, I shall try briefly to indicate why their peculiarities point it out ...
— Fat and Blood - An Essay on the Treatment of Certain Forms of Neurasthenia and Hysteria • S. Weir Mitchell

... hidden from her. Syn, the tenth, keeps the door in the hall, and shuts it against those who ought not to enter. She presides at trials when any thing is to be denied on oath, whence the proverb, 'Syn (negation) is set against it,' when ought is denied. Hlina, the eleventh, has the care of those whom Frigga intends to deliver from peril. Snotra, the twelfth, is wise and courteous, and men and women who possess these qualities have her name applied to them. Gna, the thirteenth, is the ...
— The Elder Eddas of Saemund Sigfusson; and the Younger Eddas of Snorre Sturleson • Saemund Sigfusson and Snorre Sturleson

... he suddenly exclaimed, catching sight of a small triangular piece of looking-glass set in the upholstery at the back of the front seat of the compartment. "Read what it says underneath, Charlie;" which the latter accordingly did, reporting that it was a device for calling the guard in cases of emergency, the way of doing so being to break ...
— Harper's Young People, March 9, 1880 - An Illustrated Weekly • Various

... official: the gensdarmes, who guarded the path with naked bayonet, stepped aside; and the quick, sharp crack of the postilion's whip set the horses a-moving. We skirted the spacious esplanade, and saw in the distance the beauteous form of the Arco della Pace. We had not gone far till the drum's roll struck upon the ear, and a long glittering line of Austrian ...
— Pilgrimage from the Alps to the Tiber - Or The Influence of Romanism on Trade, Justice, and Knowledge • James Aitken Wylie

... an armchair round with his foot and set his lady down on it so that her back was turned ...
— High Noon - A New Sequel to 'Three Weeks' by Elinor Glyn • Anonymous

... of Bombay. He is quite right when he says that as a man of responsibility, a man having received a fair share of education, having had a fair share of experience of this world, I should know them. I knew that I was playing with fire. I ran the risk and if I was set free I would still do the same. I would be failing in my duty if I do not do so. I have felt it this morning that I would have failed in my duty if I did not say all what I said here just now. I wanted to avoid violence. Non-violence ...
— Freedom's Battle - Being a Comprehensive Collection of Writings and Speeches on the Present Situation • Mahatma Gandhi

... said processions went down this street; among them we may number all the coronation processions up to the time when Parliament Street was cut through numerous small courts and by-streets in the reign of George II. Lord Howard of Effingham set out from King Street to fight the Spanish Armada. Charles I. came this way from Whitehall Palace to his trial at Westminster; he went back by the same route condemned to death; and later Cromwell's funeral procession followed the same route. Cromwell himself ...
— Westminster - The Fascination of London • Sir Walter Besant

... inability to move. I now earnestly pressed upon them the necessity of continuing our journey, as the only means of saving their own lives, as well as those of our friends at the tent; and, after much entreaty, got them to set out at ten A.M.: Belanger and Michel were left at the encampment, and proposed to start shortly afterwards. By the time we had gone about two hundred yards, Perrault became again dizzy, and desired us to halt, which we did, until he, recovering, offered to march on. Ten minutes more had hardly ...
— Narrative of a Journey to the Shores of the Polar Sea, in the years 1819-20-21-22, Volume 2 • John Franklin

... minutes later Conniston himself pounded one of the cook's pans as a summons to breakfast. The cook, surly, glowering as he moved, set forth the ...
— Under Handicap - A Novel • Jackson Gregory

... this: As we are all pretty strong, excepting the Professor, to stand the march on foot, I would convert our wagon into a vehicle which would carry the fort with us, and this fort, whenever we camped, could be set up so that the yaks would be inside, and thus protected ...
— The Wonder Island Boys: The Tribesmen • Roger Finlay

... gave a really great exhibition of perversity. On this occasion a dog frightened him, and having twisted the rope from Oates' hands he bolted for all he was worth. When, however, he had obtained his freedom, he set about most systematically to get rid of his load. At first he gave sudden twists and thus dislodged two bales of hay, but when he caught sight of some other sledges a better idea at once struck him, and he dashed straight at them with the evident intention ...
— The Voyages of Captain Scott - Retold from 'The Voyage of the "Discovery"' and 'Scott's - Last Expedition' • Charles Turley

... mass, irrefragably firm, 220 The axes and the rods which awe mankind; The sound has poison in it, 'tis the sperm Of what makes life foul, cankerous, and abhorred; Disdain not thou, at thine appointed term, To set thine armed heel on this reluctant ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley Volume I • Percy Bysshe Shelley

... of his kind friend the wagoner, who was to set off on his return early in the morning, our young adventurer was up betimes, and went to the stable to look for him. As he stood at the door, a tall young stripling, dressed in what they call a smock frock, with a pitchfork in his ...
— The Mirror of Taste, and Dramatic Censor, Vol. I, No. 4, April 1810 • Various

... came down with a store of them done up in a basket. There is another tale told about this Samoan Phaethon similar to what is related of the Hawaiian Maui. He and his mother were annoyed at the rapidity of the sun's course in those days—it rose, reached the meridian, and set, "before they could get their mats aired." He determined to make it go slower. He climbed a tree in the early morning, and with a rope and noose threw again and caught the sun as it emerged from the horizon. The sun ...
— Samoa, A Hundred Years Ago And Long Before • George Turner

... had been cast in a single mould. Hence we never know with what sort of person we are dealing, hence the hateful troop of suspicions, fears, reserves, and treacheries, and the concealment of impiety, arrogance, calumny, and scepticism, under a dangerous varnish of refinement. So terrible a set of effects must have a cause. History shows that the cause here is to be found in the progress of sciences and arts. Egypt, once so mighty, becomes the mother of philosophy and the fine arts; straightway ...
— Rousseau - Volumes I. and II. • John Morley

... is twofold,—to meet the present demand for new selections suited to the spirit of the hour, and also to furnish a choice collection of standard pieces for elocutionary exercises on which time has set its lasting seal. In the execution of this design no pains have been spared in selecting and preparing the best pieces, both new ...
— The American Union Speaker • John D. Philbrick

... covers are cut on hardened brass, and are capable of standing an immense pressure. They are not set in chases, as are the forms on printing presses, but are glued to iron plates. The head of the press to which the plates are clamped is heated, either by running a jet of live steam through it, or by ...
— The Building of a Book • Various

... will you?" he shouted, swinging his club aloft and bringing it down on the heads of the others. "I'll show you—we've been watching you. We know you. You're a fine set of cracksmen. You think Damietta is a country town, but ...
— The Telegraph Messenger Boy - The Straight Road to Success • Edward S. Ellis

... To down this dynasty, set that one up, Goad panting peoples to the throes thereof, Make wither here my fruit, maintain it there, And hold me travailling through fineless years In vain and objectless monotony, When all such tedious ...
— The Dynasts - An Epic-Drama Of The War With Napoleon, In Three Parts, - Nineteen Acts, And One Hundred And Thirty Scenes • Thomas Hardy

... me to help her set a trap to ketch a mink and a fox; she said we should git two dollars apiece; and we caught—we caught Miss ...
— Vesty of the Basins • Sarah P. McLean Greene

... we have explained the limit of those things which are to be desired, we must next show why the facts are as I have stated them. Wherefore, let us set out from the position which I first laid down, which is also in reality the first, so that we may understand that every animal loves itself. And though there is no doubt of this, (for it is a principle fixed ...
— The Academic Questions • M. T. Cicero

... in the world, whom he presented on the spot to Elvira, and who divided the journey between licking himself and devouring the fragments of biscuit with which Jock supplied him. Allen had also bought a beautiful statuette for himself, and a set of studs. Janet had set herself up with a case of mathematical instruments and various books; Bobus's purchases were divers chemical appliances and a pocket microscope, also what he thrust into Jessie's lap ...
— Magnum Bonum • Charlotte M. Yonge

... the old rooms; strangers who knew nothing whatever about my mother. I found that I had so set my heart against this marriage, that I had not even cared to inquire the name of the man my mother had married; so I had no clew to give anyone, no one could help me. I was only a child then, and I wandered away without ...
— The Children's Pilgrimage • L. T. Meade

... The First Consul, anxious before all things for peace in France, opened negotiations with the rebel chiefs, and took energetic military measures; but, while combining his plans of campaign with the insinuating charm of Italian diplomacy, he also set the Machiavelian springs of the police in movement, Fouche then being at its head. And none of these means were superfluous to stifle the fire of war then ...
— Parisians in the Country - The Illustrious Gaudissart, and The Muse of the Department • Honore de Balzac

... knew, I was for a short space of time anxious lest, in the terrific excitement in which we were all lapped, someone might say or do something which might make for trouble later on. The Gospodar's splendid achievement, which was worthy of any hero of old romance, had set us all on fire. He himself must have been wrought to a high pitch of excitement to dare such an act; and it is not at such a time that discretion must be expected from any man. Most of all did I fear danger from the womanhood of the Voivodin. ...
— The Lady of the Shroud • Bram Stoker

... which the remains of Ralston were laid at rest, Rodney, on returning home, found Mam in a state of agitation. She beckoned him into the house and hoarsely whispered: "Dar's a dirty Injun in de shed. I wouldn' 'low him ter set foot in dis yar house, I wouldn', not ef he'd scalped me on de spot. He grunt, an' squat, an' 'lowed he done wouldn' stir ...
— Rodney, the Ranger - With Daniel Morgan on Trail and Battlefield • John V. Lane

... with the county with which we have a right to hold ourselves connected, not merely because father's patients are willing to take us up and make quite a fuss about us sometimes, but because his Aunt Penny married and was welcomed into that set. You have not yourself alone to consider, remember, Dora; you might not mind, but you have the rest of us to think of, some of ...
— A Houseful of Girls • Sarah Tytler

... were made in many departments of the state, and an elective element was introduced into the provincial administrations. The old conception of government with such modifications as had been made up to 1910 are set forth below. ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 6, Slice 2 - "Chicago, University of" to "Chiton" • Various

... administrator of the funds collected by the Swiss Committee. Lord Cochrane's disconsolate arrival at Marseilles, and the miserable failure of the plans for his enterprise, had not been known to M. Eynard and his friends a week, before they set themselves to remedy the mischief as far as lay in their power. As a first and chief movement they proposed to buy a French corvette, then lying in Marseilles Harbour, and fit her out as a stout auxiliary to Lord Cochrane's little force expected ...
— The Life of Thomas, Lord Cochrane, Tenth Earl of Dundonald, G.C.B., Admiral of the Red, Rear-Admiral of the Fleet, Etc., Etc. • Thomas Cochrane, Earl of Dundonald

... (which were storm sails, bran-new, small, and made of the strongest canvas) to be got up and bent; leaving the main topsail to blow away, with a blessing on it, if it would only last until we could set the spencers. These we bent on very carefully, with strong robands and seizings, and, making tackles fast to the clews, bowsed them down to the water-ways. By this time the main topsail was among the things that have been, and we went ...
— Two Years Before the Mast • Richard Henry Dana



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