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Rectum   Listen
noun
Rectum  n.  (Anat.) The terminal part of the large intestine; so named because supposed by the old anatomists to be straight.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Rectum" Quotes from Famous Books



... prisoner and kept him. He had wounded most of those who were attacking him and killed three. Then they went for Grettir, who had fallen forward on his face. There was no resistance in him for he was already dead from his wounded leg; his thigh was all mortified up to the rectum. Many more wounds they gave him, but little or no ...
— Grettir The Strong - Grettir's Saga • Unknown

... quoque corrigendum, quod pravum est; quod autem rectum est, approbandum. De Bapt. cont. ...
— The Ancient History of the Egyptians, Carthaginians, Assyrians, • Charles Rollin

... red, and alkaline in reaction, in contradistinction to the acid "coffee ground" blood of gastric origin. Esophageal varices may coexist with the common dilatation of the venous system in which the veins of the rectum, scrotum, and legs are most conspicuously affected. Cirrhosis and cancer of the liver may, by interference with the portal circulation, produce dilatation of the veins in the lower third of the esophagus. Angioma of the esophagus is amenable ...
— Bronchoscopy and Esophagoscopy - A Manual of Peroral Endoscopy and Laryngeal Surgery • Chevalier Jackson

... passion and iliac passion derive their names from the supposed origin of the pain in the colon or ileum, a remark which furnishes occasion for the statement that Gilbert divides the bowels into six sections, viz., the duodenum jejunum and ileum, and the orobus, colon and longaon (rectum). ...
— Gilbertus Anglicus - Medicine of the Thirteenth Century • Henry Ebenezer Handerson

... membranous canal extending from the surface of the body to the uterus, or womb. Its posterior wall is about 3-1/2 inches long, and its anterior about 3 inches. A careful study should be made of our illustration, in order that the relation of the vagina and uterus to the rectum behind and the bladder in front may be thoroughly understood; also the angle which is formed by the vagina and ...
— Treatise on the Diseases of Women • Lydia E. Pinkham

... but as quickly grew worse, so that the drug was continued at short intervals all night, ten grammes in all having been used. In the morning the patient was better, and 0.5 gramme of digitalis was then given in infusion per rectum, and repeated on the following day, after which the patient remained comparatively well until a year and a half later, when a second attack of the kind just described was quickly cut ...
— Scientific American Suppl. No. 299 • Various

... impeded that he is obliged to consent to be fed by others. The bowels, which had been all along torpid, now, in most cases, demand stimulating medicines of very considerable power: the expulsion of the faeces from the rectum sometimes requiring mechanical aid. As the disease proceeds towards its last stage, the trunk is almost permanently bowed, the muscular power is more decidedly diminished, and the tremulous agitation becomes violent. The patient walks now with great difficulty, and unable ...
— An Essay on the Shaking Palsy • James Parkinson

... record in which the menstruation occurs by the rectum or the urinary tract. Barbee illustrates this by a case in which cholera morbus occurred monthly in lieu of the regular menstrual discharge. Barrett speaks of a case of vicarious menstruation by the ...
— Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine • George M. Gould

... from hemorrhage, we have learned the value of injections of warm saline water, either into the veins, the skin or the rectum, and the same treatment is available in other cases ...
— Alcohol: A Dangerous and Unnecessary Medicine, How and Why - What Medical Writers Say • Martha M. Allen

... discovery of anaesthetics, tobacco was used as a remedy to produce relaxation in cases of strangulated hernia; and although very cautiously administered in the form of tea, or smoke per rectum, proved fatal in many instances. As little as twelve grains in six ounces of water having thus acted; and from half a drachm to two drachms in a number of instances. When men chew as high as a pound and a quarter of strong navy ...
— Grappling with the Monster • T. S. Arthur

... this pathological love, this perversion of the erotic sense, one of the marvellous list of amorous vagaries which deserve, not prosecution but the pitiful care of the physician and the study of the psychologist. According to him the nerves of the rectum and the genitalia, in all cases closely connected, are abnormally so in the pathic, who obtains, by intromission, the venereal orgasm which is usually sought through the sexual organs. So amongst women there are tribads who can procure no pleasure except by foreign objects introduced a posteriori. ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 10 • Richard F. Burton

... of the stomach, nothing should be given by mouth. Small quantities of water may be given by rectum every two or three hours. In appendicitis only very small quantities of water are to be given by mouth at first, until the acute symptoms have subsided. Large quantities of fluid may excite violent peristalsis with resulting pain. In all eases of nausea, give nothing by mouth, not even water, ...
— Maintaining Health • R. L. Alsaker

... verum Queis in versamur, queis vivimu' rebu' potesse; Virtus est homini scire quo quaeque habeat res; Virtus scire homini rectum, utile, quid sit honestum, Quae bona, quae mala item, quid inutile, turpe, inhonestum; Virtus quaerendae finem rei scire modumque; Virtus divitiis pretium persolvere posse; Virtus id dare quod re ipsa debetur honori, Hostem esse atque inimicum hominum ...
— The History of Rome (Volumes 1-5) • Theodor Mommsen

... clearly altered for the worse. The character of the stools, their consistency, smell, and colour, is apt to be changed because the bacterial context of the bowel has become abnormal. Rickets, mucous disease, lienteric diarrhoea, infantilism, prolapse of the rectum, and infection with thread-worms are common complications. No doubt children with primary dyspepsia are often nervous and restless, and the elements of infection and of neurosis are frequently combined. Yet often we meet with cases in which the ...
— The Nervous Child • Hector Charles Cameron

... flagrantia causis. * * * * * Chrysippus non dicet idem nec mite Thaletis ingenium dulcique senex vicinus Hymetto, qui partem acceptae saeva inter vincla cicutae accusatori nollet dare. plurima felix paulatim vitia atque errores exuit omnes, prima docet rectum sapientia. quippe minuti semper et infirmi est animi exiguique voluptas ultio. continuo sic collige, quod vindicta nemo magis gaudet quam femina. cur tamen hos tu evasisse putes, quos diri conscia facti mens habet attonitos et surdo verbere caedit occultum quatiente ...
— Post-Augustan Poetry - From Seneca to Juvenal • H.E. Butler

... weight of bosom you remark that she has in front well to the fore two protuberances of very respectable dimensions, inclined to fall in the noonday soupplate, while on her rere lower down are two additional protuberances, suggestive of potent rectum and tumescent for palpation, which leave nothing to be desired save compactness. Such fleshy parts are the product of careful nurture. When coopfattened their livers reach an elephantine size. Pellets of new bread with fennygreek ...
— Ulysses • James Joyce

... midst of the most delicate and susceptible cavity of the body, the general cavity of the abdomen, or peritoneum. The thin, sensitive sheet of peritoneum which lines this cavity covers every fold and part of the food-tube, from the stomach down to the rectum. And when once infection or inflammation has occurred at any point in it, there is nothing to prevent its spreading like a prairie fire, all over the entire abdominal cavity from diaphragm to pelvis. If this wretched little remnant were a coil ...
— Preventable Diseases • Woods Hutchinson

... it receives a new elaboration by being mingled with bile and the panchreatic juice. It loses the grey color and acidity it previously possessed, becomes yellow and commences to assume a stercoral odor, which increases as it advances to the rectum. The various substances act reciprocally on each other; there must, consequently, be many ...
— The Physiology of Taste • Brillat Savarin

... erection and emission centers are stimulated by any unusual pressure within the vesicles. Unusual pressure may be caused either by distention due to accumulated secretion or by pressure upon the vesicles from over-distended rectum or bladder. It sometimes happens that two or more of these influences are acting at the same time. These impulses are most likely to be effective when the subject is asleep, and particularly if he is lying upon his back. The result of the stimulus is to cause an erection, accompanied ...
— The Biology, Physiology and Sociology of Reproduction - Also Sexual Hygiene with Special Reference to the Male • Winfield S. Hall

... in the lodgment of an embolus in the brain or kidneys. The latter authority also states that muscular atrophy may occur owing to lack of blood supply in some of these cases. Moeller states that moderate exercise or work stimulates the establishment of collateral circulation. Massage per rectum is condemned as ...
— Lameness of the Horse - Veterinary Practitioners' Series, No. 1 • John Victor Lacroix

... especially at the lower end. In man and the higher vertebrates it is divided into several sections, often separated by valves—the mouth, pharynx, oesophagus, stomach, small and large intestine, and rectum. All these parts develop from a very simple structure, which originally (throughout life in the amphioxus) runs from end to end under the chorda in the shape of a straight ...
— The Evolution of Man, V.1. • Ernst Haeckel

... We find in both the same very short oesophagus, the same chylific ventricle, empty in the perfect insect, distended in the larva with an abundant orange-coloured pulp; in both the same gall-bladders, four in number, connected with the rectum by one of their extremities. Like the perfect insect, the larva is devoid of salivary glands or any other similar apparatus. Its nervous system comprises eleven ganglia, not counting the oesophageal collar, ...
— The Glow-Worm and Other Beetles • Jean Henri Fabre

... testicles. Excessive sex abuse. Ulcer or cancer rectum. Piles. Disease of hip-joint. ...
— Camping For Boys • H.W. Gibson

... as it has nothing to do with "sympathy") checks digestion, hastens the heart beat, and stimulates the adrenal glands to rapid secretion, thus giving {125} rise to the organic condition of anger. The lower division has to do with the bladder, rectum and sex organs, and is active during ...
— Psychology - A Study Of Mental Life • Robert S. Woodworth

... However, it pleased God that I reached it after nightfall with great toil, and immediately proceeded to my farm, where I went to bed. During the night I got no sleep, and was constantly disturbed by motions of my bowels. When day broke, feeling an intense heat in the rectum, I looked eagerly to see what this might mean, and found the cloth covered with blood. Then in a moment I conceived that I had eaten something poisonous, and racked my brains to think what it could possibly have been. It came back to my memory how Sbietta's wife ...
— The Autobiography of Benvenuto Cellini • Benvenuto Cellini

... attention. In many cases, especially with animals of a lymphatic and indolent nature, the use made of them is inordinate. The patient rests so continually in them that alarming swellings commence to make their appearance about the rectum, or in the case of a mare about the vulva. The animal must then be let down at regular intervals and again raised ...
— Diseases of the Horse's Foot • Harry Caulton Reeks

... pudorem Cuncti pene patres, ea cum reprehendere coner, Quae gravis AEsopus, quae doctus Roscius egit: Vel quia nil rectum, nisi quod placuit sibi, ducunt; Vel quia turpe putant parere minoribus, et, quae Imberbes ...
— The Spectator, Volumes 1, 2 and 3 - With Translations and Index for the Series • Joseph Addison and Richard Steele

... depresso-globosa, subcarinata, solida, radiato striata et subtilissime granulata, flavida; spira late depressa, convexiuscula, apice obtusa; anfractus 6 convexiusculi, ultimo obsolete carinato; apertura lunaris, intus alba; peristoma superne rectum, margine basali margine columellarique sub-reflexis, umbilicus profundus, conspicuus, vix obtectus. Diam. maj. 24, min. 21, alt. 16, mill. ...
— Voyage Of H.M.S. Rattlesnake, Vol. 2 (of 2) • John MacGillivray

... told some of you in former talks, the womb is designed as a nest for the babe during its process of development from the egg or ovule. It lies in the center of the pelvis, or lower part of the body cavity, in front of the rectum and behind and above the bladder. It is pear-shaped, with the small end downward, and is about three inches long, two inches wide and one inch thick. It consists of layers of muscles enclosing a cavity which, ...
— Herself - Talks with Women Concerning Themselves • E. B. Lowry



Words linked to "Rectum" :   arteria rectalis, rectal artery, large intestine, anus



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