Free Translator Free Translator
Translators Dictionaries Courses Other
Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




Quid   Listen
verb
Quid  v. t.  (Man.) To drop from the mouth, as food when partially chewed; said of horses.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"Quid" Quotes from Famous Books



... furniture for me; a change always fidgets me, even before I take in precisely what has happened." He smiled. "In that I resemble my old friend Vespasian, who would have no alterations made when he visited his home—manente villa qualis fuerat olim, ne quid scilicet oculorum consuetudini deperiret. A pleasant trait, I have ...
— The Westcotes • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... poesy, O why essay To pipe again of passion! fold thy wings O'er daring Icarus and bid thy lay Sleep hidden in the lyre's silent strings Till thou hast found the old Castalian rill, Or from the Lesbian waters plucked drowned Sappho's golden quid! ...
— Poems • Oscar Wilde

... broad shouldered Green Mountaineer. The very thought of a man paddling down the river seemed to suggest some scheme of the fakir or dodge of the showman to separate him from the coins that jingled in his pocket. The old Vermonter, turning a quid of sassafras from one corner of his mouth to the other, drawled, with all impressiveness of a judge to whom some knotty law point had been presented: "Wall, I wunder what he gits out'n this? He mus' be a darned critter tew resk himself in thet ere fashion; an' I swan whar th' profit ...
— The Story of Paul Boyton - Voyages on All the Great Rivers of the World • Paul Boyton

... what might happen to be the faulty caprice of the multitude, but the consent and agreement of learned men.'"—Creighton's Dict., p. 21. The "good judge" here spoken of, is Quintilian; whose words on the point are these: "Necessarium est judicium, constituendumque imprimis, id ipsum quid sit, quod consuetudinem vocemus. * * * In loquendo, non, si quid vitiose multis insederit, pro regula sermonis, amplendum est. * * * Ergo consuetudinem sermonis, vocabo consensum eruditorum sicut vivendi, consenum honorum."—De Inst. Orat., Lib. ...
— The Grammar of English Grammars • Goold Brown

... for some minutes silence prevailed. Then Bill Santry shifted the quid in his cheek, spat unerringly through the open window, and began to talk. His loose-jointed figure had suddenly become tense and forceful; his lean face was ...
— Hidden Gold • Wilder Anthony

... Not long since an illustrious South-African, a visitor to Montreal, voiced the opinion that Botha's party will rule South Africa for twenty years undisturbed. But it is impossible to do more than conjecture what will happen. Ex Africa semper quid novi. ...
— The Great Events by Famous Historians, Vol. 21 - The Recent Days (1910-1914) • Charles F. Horne, Editor

... man, than the reading of Virgil; to believe, with Clauserus, the translator of Cornutus, that it pleased the heavenly deity by Hesiod and Homer, under the veil of fables, to give us all knowledge, logic, rhetoric, philosophy natural and moral, and "quid non?" to believe, with me, that there are many mysteries contained in poetry, which of purpose were written darkly, lest by profane wits it should be abused; to believe, with Landin, that they are so beloved of the gods that whatsoever they write proceeds of a divine ...
— A Defence of Poesie and Poems • Philip Sidney

... nunc est, etiam minus; ut mihi vivam Quod superest aevi, si quid superesse volunt Di. Sit bona librorum et provisae frugis in annum Copia, ne fluitem dubiae spe ...
— Bibliomania; or Book-Madness - A Bibliographical Romance • Thomas Frognall Dibdin

... finish them. Alwyn looked at his watch and at Zora, but she gave no sign until they heard a rollicking song outside and Tylor burst into the room. He was nearly seven feet high and broad-shouldered, yellow, with curling hair and laughing brown eyes. He was chewing an enormous quid of tobacco, the juice of which he distributed generously, and had had just liquor enough to make him jolly. His entrance was a breeze and ...
— The Quest of the Silver Fleece - A Novel • W. E. B. Du Bois

... of Kirk—popular or party forgeries! The mellifluous copiousness of Livy conceals many a tale of wonder; the graver of Tacitus etches many a fatal stroke; and the secret history of Suetonius too often raises a suspicion of those whispers, Quid rex in aurem reginae dixerit, quid Juno fabulata sit cum Jove. It is certain that Plutarch has often told, and varied too in the telling, the same story, which he has applied to different persons. A critic in the Ritsonian style has said ...
— Curiosities of Literature, Vol. 3 (of 3) • Isaac D'Israeli

... man, in a low voice, "you can do as you like, my lad, but I should have thought that, hard up as you are, and I should say without much chance of getting another crib—say at present—you'd have been glad to earn a honest quid or two." ...
— The Dark House - A Knot Unravelled • George Manville Fenn

... III. and the chessboard of Louis XIII. are merely ridiculous. We must excuse well-intentioned monarchs when they only indulge themselves with frivolous and childish trifles. It is something to be thankful for if we have not to apply to them the adage—Quic-quid delirant reges plectuntur Achivi—'When kings go mad their people get ...
— The Gaming Table: Its Votaries and Victims - Volume I (of II) • Andrew Steinmetz

... said "is, I suppose, the tertium quid, not the Nationalist. I'm sorry to trouble you with inquiries of this kind, but in case of accident it's better for me to know ...
— Lalage's Lovers - 1911 • George A. Birmingham

... in civilised life of entertaining company, as it is called too generally without much regard to strict veracity, is so great that it cannot but be matter of wonder that people are so fond of attempting it. It is difficult to ascertain what is the quid pro quo. If they who give such laborious parties, and who endure such toil and turmoil in the vain hope of giving them successfully, really enjoyed the parties given by others, the matter would be ...
— Barchester Towers • Anthony Trollope

... tang of the vile tobacco was gone out of it, and Pica thoughtfully rolled the quid over his tongue to the other side of his mouth. At that moment he was aware of a man in a little brown hat and shabby clothes who must have come round the house very quietly, from the direction of the magazine, for he was already standing still ...
— The White Sister • F. Marion Crawford

... other hath, in regarde that the laborious care of my father made hym most acceptable to the worlde in correctinge and augmentinge his woorkes,) to enter into the examinat{i}one of this newe edit{i}one, and that the rather, because you with Horace his verse "si quid novisti rectius istis, candidus imperti," have willed all others to further the same, and to accepte yo{u}r labors in good p{ar}te, whiche as I most willingly doo, so meaninge but well to the worke, Iame to lett yo{u} understande my conceyte thereof, whiche before ...
— Animaduersions uppon the annotacions and corrections of some imperfections of impressiones of Chaucer's workes - 1865 edition • Francis Thynne

... tracks, and the whole town talks of it, but no one ever draws a gun; the feller that gets his face punched spits out his teeth and goes on about his business, and that's the end of it except for the talk; but where I've been there'd be murder in about the time it takes to shift a quid!" ...
— The Just and the Unjust • Vaughan Kester

... disputo." "This may appear harsh, nor do I give any opinion on the subject." And it is the same orator who exclaims in the same oration, "Facinus est cruciare civem Romanum; scelus verberare; prope parricidium necare: quid dicam in crucem tollere?" "It is a crime to imprison a Roman citizen; wickedness to scourge; next to parricide to put to death, what shall I call ...
— The History of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire - Volume 1 • Edward Gibbon

... may say of these our times (and with as much propriety) what some of these worthies said of theirs, Quam graviter ingemescerent illi fortes viri qui ecclesiae Scoticanae pro libertate in acte decertarunt, si nostram nunc ignaviam (ne quid gravius dicam) conspicerent, said Mr. Davidson in a letter to the general Assembly 1601, i. e. "How grievously would they bewail our stupenduous slothfulness, could they but behold it, who of old thought no expence of blood and treasure too much for the defence of the ...
— Biographia Scoticana (Scots Worthies) • John Howie

... right, anyhow,' she said, 'though I'm more used to the jink of a tanner than a quid in these cussed times. You won't skear ...
— Aylwin • Theodore Watts-Dunton

... Ne quid desit, sternam rosis, Sternam foenum violis, Pavimentum hyacinthis Et praesepe liliis. Millies tibi laudes ...
— Christmas in Ritual and Tradition, Christian and Pagan • Clement A. Miles

... he had already had some at the hotel. Then he was gone, walking with uncommon speed for such a small man. Aaron, James, and Doctor Gordon stood contemplating the new purchase. James patted him. "He looks like a fine animal," he remarked. Aaron shifted his quid, and said with emphasis, "Want me to hitch up and bring ...
— 'Doc.' Gordon • Mary E. Wilkins-Freeman

... "Semper novi quid ex Africa," cried the Roman proconsul, and he voiced the verdict of forty centuries. Yet there are those who would write world history and leave out of account this most marvelous of continents. Particularly today most men assume that Africa is far afield from the center of our burning social problems ...
— Darkwater - Voices From Within The Veil • W. E. B. Du Bois

... [409-1] Quid velit et possit rerum concordia discors (What the discordant harmony of circumstances would and could effect).—HORACE: Epistle ...
— Familiar Quotations • John Bartlett

... know what a surf like that breaking on a lee-shore under your lee can do!" observed an old salt, who stood holding on to the bulwarks with one hand, while he searched for a quid of tobacco with ...
— The Rival Crusoes • W.H.G. Kingston

... wasn't it?" sang out a deriding voice that set the crowd jeering anew. "You'll git promoted, you will! See it in all the evenin' papers—oh, yus! ''Orrible hand-to-hand struggle with a desperado. Brave constable has 'arf a quid's worth out of an infuriated ruffian!' My hat! won't your missis be proud when you take her to ...
— Cleek, the Master Detective • Thomas W. Hanshew

... inclination to smile at the naive simplicity of Virginie's creed. Life would indeed be an easy affair if one could "get rid of one's sins" on such an ingenuous principal of quid pro quo! ...
— The Lamp of Fate • Margaret Pedler

... caupone esse conjectum, & supra stercus injectum; petere, ut mani ad portum adesset, priusquam plaustrum ex oppido exiret. Hoc vero somnio commotum mano bubulco presto ad portam fuisse, quaesisse ex eo, quid esset in plaustro; ilium perterritum fugisse, mortuum erutum esse, cauponem re patefacta poenas dedisse. Quid hoc somnio dici divinius potest ?" ...
— Miscellanies upon Various Subjects • John Aubrey

... commencing. As the sun rose in the sky, his beams struck down on our undefended heads and scorched us dreadfully, till Jack bethought him of fastening his handkerchief over the top of his, and we followed his example. Instead of breakfast, we each of us took a quid from Sandy's box, and that had the effect of staying our appetites for some hours. This, however, did not satisfy our stomachs entirely, and a short time after noon we could no longer resist attacking our scanty store ...
— Salt Water - The Sea Life and Adventures of Neil D'Arcy the Midshipman • W. H. G. Kingston

... conference between the Emperor Adrian and the philosopher Secundus, reported by Vincent of Beauvais, occurs the passage which Chaucer here paraphrases: — "Quid est Paupertas? Odibile bonum; sanitas mater; remotio Curarum; sapientae repertrix; negotium sine damno; possessio absque calumnia; sine sollicitudinae felicitas." (What is Poverty? A hateful good; ...
— The Canterbury Tales and Other Poems • Geoffrey Chaucer

... Jope chewed thoughtfully for a moment or two upon a quid of tobacco. "Sort of party you'd go to supposin' as you had a corpse by you and wanted to keep it for a permanency. You take a lot of gums and spices, and first of all you lays out the deceased, ...
— News from the Duchy • Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... loco de capillis Deiparae Virginis paucis dicere, enimvero an illi sint jam in terris!—Dubitationem aliquam afferre potest mirabilis ipsius anastasis, et in coelum viventis videntisque assumptio triumphalis.—Quid ita?—quid si intra triduum ad vitam revocata, si coelis triumphantis in morem invecta, si corpore gloria circumfuso Christo assidet? Quidquid Virgineo capiti crinium inerat hand dubie caelis intulit, ne quid perfectae ac numeris omnibus ...
— Account of a Tour in Normandy, Vol. I. (of 2) • Dawson Turner

... mates," he began, taking out his quid and stowing it away in his waistcoat-pocket, "I belonged to a whaler which was lost out here, when those of her crew who escaped were picked up by an Indiaman and carried to Madras. I with others was there pressed ...
— Old Jack • W.H.G. Kingston

... compelled to use a degree of exertion little inferior to that employed by galley-slaves. I inquired of my nautical Mentor who these men were, and in what description of service they were occupied. "Them, master," replied he, releasing the quid from his mouth, and looking with his weather-eye unutterable things; "they are the Portsmouth Greys." My countenance spoke plainly enough that this reply had by no means made me au fait to the subject of my question, and my informant accordingly proceeded—"Shiver my timbers, ...
— The English Spy • Bernard Blackmantle

... Homo qualitatis et dives comme un Cresus. Habet grandam fievram cum redoublamentis, Grandam dolorem capitis, Cum troublatione spirii et laxamento ventris. Grandum insuper malum au cote, Cum granda difficultate Et pena a respirare; Veuillas mihi dire, Docte bacheliere, Quid illi facere. ...
— The Imaginary Invalid - Le Malade Imaginaire • Moliere

... Commander's offer literally, conceived in the reckless spirit of a man who never let slip an offer for trade, for a moment filled his brain, but a timely reflection of the commercial unimportance of the transaction checked him. He only took a capacious quid of tobacco as the Commander gravely drew a settle before the fire, and in honor of his guest untied the black-silk handkerchief ...
— Selected Stories • Bret Harte

... long, red nose, had led the choir for many years. He had a loud voice, and twisted his words so badly, that his singing was like the blare of a trumpet. On Sundays, after Rev. Mr. Surplice read the hymn, the people were accustomed to hear a loud Hawk! from Mr. Quaver, as he tossed his tobacco-quid into a spittoon, and an Ahem! from Miss Gamut. She was the leading first treble, a small lady with a sharp, shrill voice. Then Mr. Fiddleman sounded the key on the bass-viol, do-mi-sol-do, helping the trebles and tenors climb the stairs of the scale; then he hopped down ...
— Winning His Way • Charles Carleton Coffin

... anyway; so's Bhme, so's the Tertium Quid, and so are the Kormoran's men. The coast's clear—it's ...
— Riddle of the Sands • Erskine Childers

... married a snug widow in a pork-shop at Wapping Old Stairs, and got out of his course steering home through a London fog on Guy Fawkes Day, and walked straight into the river, and was found at low tide next morning with a quid of tobacco in his cheek, and nothing missing about him but his glass eye, which shows, as the boatswain said, that "Fogs is fogs anywhere, and a nasty ...
— We and the World, Part II. (of II.) - A Book for Boys • Juliana Horatia Ewing

... our language is adapted to description and narration. It is written for the people, and in the picturesque and poetic strain which is always certain to fascinate the Celtic mind. The introduction to each Vision is evidently written with elaborate care, and exquisitely polished—"ne quid possit per leve morari," and scene follows scene, painted in words which present them most vividly before one's eyes, whilst the force and liveliness of his diction sustain unflagging interest throughout. The reader is carried onward as much by the rhythmic flow of language and ...
— The Visions of the Sleeping Bard • Ellis Wynne

... is purposely restrained, light, and divided, for Debussy has a fine disdain for those orgies of sound to which Wagner's art has accustomed us; it is as sober and polished as a fine classic phrase of the latter part of the seventeenth century. Ne quid nimis ("Nothing superfluous") is the artist's motto. Instead of amalgamating the timbres to get a massive effect, he disengages their separate personalities, as it were, and delicately blends them without changing their individual nature. Like the impressionist painters ...
— Musicians of To-Day • Romain Rolland

... nascimur ejulantes, ut nostram miseriam exprimamus. Masculus enim recenter natus dicit A; foemina vero E; dicentes E vel A quotquot nascuntur ab Eva. Quid est igitur Eva nisi heu ha? Utrumque dolentis est interjectio doloris exprimens magnitudinem. Hinc enim ante peccatum virago, post peccatum Era meruit appellari.... Mulier autem ut naufragus, cum parit tristitiam habet," &c.—De Contemptu Mundi, lib. i. c. 6., a Lothario, diacono cardinali, ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 218, December 31, 1853 • Various

... quartered a purse, and what seems to be an inverted utensil of lead, hammered into a coronet. In the other is a large mouth, grinning, opposite to which is a stuffed pocket, from which hangs the motto, 'ne quid detrimenti res privata capiat.' Under the foot of the gentleman is the neck of a famine-struck woman, surrounded by naked and starving children, and it is by the convenient aid of her neck that he is enabled to reach the purse, or; and, indeed, such is his eagerness to catch it and ...
— Valentine M'Clutchy, The Irish Agent - The Works of William Carleton, Volume Two • William Carleton

... hideous truth is hid: The man is nothing but a Pacifist; And, what is worse, he draws four hundred quid For representing views which don't exist, Although in Parliament, without his poker, I'm glad to see they would not hear the croaker, But when he talked they ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 153, Dec. 5, 1917 • Various

... dying for months, but he and I hoped to have got and to have given into his hands a copy of these Horae, the correction of which had often whiled away his long hours of languor and pain. God thought otherwise. I shall miss his great knowledge, his loving and keen eye—his ne quid nimis—his sympathy—himself. Let me be thankful that it was given to me assidere valetudini, fovere deficientem, ...
— Spare Hours • John Brown

... The dark fiery eyes of the officers, nearly all tall powerful figures, glanced alternately at the flames and at old Sam, who was the only calm person present. Slowly taking a small knife from his waistcoat pocket, he opened it, produced a huge piece of Cavendish, cut off a quid, shoved it between his upper lip and front teeth, and handed the tobacco to his nearest neighbour. This was a gigantic captain, the upper part of whose body was clothed in an Indian hunting-coat, his head covered with what had once been a fine beaver hat, but of which the broad brim now ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 59, No. 363, January, 1846 • Various

... meam, ego illorum ignaviam; mihi fortuna, illis probra objectantur. Quamquam ego naturam unam et communem omnium existimo, sed fortissimum quemque generosissimum.[450] Ac si jam ex patribus Albini aut Bestiae quaeri posset, mene an illos ex se gigni maluerint, quid responsuros creditis, nisi sese liberos, quam optimos voluisse? Quodsi jure me despiciunt, faciant[451] idem majoribus suis, quibus uti mihi ex virtute nobilitas coepit. Invident honori meo; ergo invideant labori, innocentiae, periculis etiam meis, quoniam ...
— De Bello Catilinario et Jugurthino • Caius Sallustii Crispi (Sallustius)

... this, he had exquisite artistic instincts, and his massive volume on 'The Power of Sound' was, when it appeared, the most important {308} work on aesthetics in the English language. He had also the tenderest heart and a mind of rare metaphysical power, as his volumes of essays, 'Tertium Quid,' will prove to any reader. Mr. Frederic Myers, already well known as one of the most brilliant of English essayists, is the ingenium praefervidum of the S. P. R. Of the value of Mr. Myers's theoretic ...
— The Will to Believe - and Other Essays in Popular Philosophy • William James

... pericula duellorum. Juvenes Teutonici omnes ineunt pro duellis, ut habeo auditum. Pater (crudelis!) fecit extreme leve hujus periculi. "Si redeam sine naso, quid tum?" dixi. "Erit propria poena," Gubernator sarcastice respondit, "pro negligente NASONEM ad scholam." Ille, percipis, "ridet ad cicatrices, quia nunquam sensit vulnus." Laudat Caput-Magistros Marlburienses et Harrovienses et Winchesterenses pro expellendo Graecum de Intranti Examinatione ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 93, August 13, 1887 • Various

... Naturas invisibiles quam visibiles in rerum universitate. Sed horum omnium familiam quis nobis enarrabit? et gradus et cognationes et discrimina et singulorum munera? Quid agunt? quae loca habitant? Harum rerum notitiam semper ambivit ingenium humanum, nunquam attigit. Juvat, interea, non diffiteor, quandoque in animo, tanquam in tabul, majoris et melioris mundi imaginem contemplari: ne ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Vol I and II • Samuel Taylor Coleridge

... chorussed the men, and pipes were quickly produced by all save Dick, who helped himself to a fresh quid. ...
— Middy and Ensign • G. Manville Fenn

... known that the price for a meal anywhere on a railroad in the United States is fifty cents. That is the uniform price. Would that the meals were as uniform! But alas! a man might as well get a quid of tobacco with his money, for he seldom gets a quid pro quo. Once in a couple of days' travel you may perhaps get a wholesome meal, but as a general thing what you get (when you get out of New England) isn't worth over a dime. You stop at a place, ...
— Minnesota and Dacotah • C.C. Andrews

... his quid deliberately and spat at the open door. "You bet I did, Jack," he responded cheerfully, yet with a trifle of exasperation evident in his eyes. "And what's more, I reckon they was obeyed. There ain't nobody got in yere ternight without ...
— Bob Hampton of Placer • Randall Parrish

... more violent it is, the quicker it will spend its rage. Let us feel your lordship's pulse. Quid tibi videtur, Domine Frater? ...
— Comedies • Ludvig Holberg

... old fellow with a cough to teach him, named Maitre Jobelin Bride, who read unto him Hugutio, Hebrard's "Grecisme," the "Doctrinal," the "Parts," the "Quid Est," the "Supplementum"; Marmoquet "De Moribus in Mensa Servandis"; Seneca "De Quatour Virtutibus Cardinalibus"; Passavantus "Cum Commento" and "Dormi Secure," for the holidays; and some other of such-like stuff, by reading whereof he ...
— The Best of the World's Classics, Restricted to Prose, Vol. VII (of X)—Continental Europe I • Various

... of the wheel while the skipper was helping Orion make up the manifest. The steersman had jettisoned his usual quid of tobacco when the girl approached him, and without that aid to complacency ...
— Sheila of Big Wreck Cove - A Story of Cape Cod • James A. Cooper

... laudibus celebratum reverenter Di universi compellarunt. Tu animantium afflictorum es vindex, Madhus interfector! quamobrem nos afflicti te apprecamur. Sis praesidio nobis numine tuo inconcusso. Dicite, inquit Vishnus, quid pro vobis facere me oporteat. Audito eius sermone, Di hunc in modum respondent: Rex quidam, nomine Dasarathus, austeris castimoniis sese castigavit, litavit sacrificio equino, prolis cupidus et prole carens. Nostro hortatu tu, Vishnus, conditionem natorum eius subeas: ...
— The Ramayana • VALMIKI

... indignabere obire? Mortua cui vita est prope iam vivo atque videnti, Qui somno partem maiorem conteris aevi, Et vigilans stertis nec somnia cernere cessas Sollicitamque geris cassa formidine mentem Nec reperire potes tibi quid sit saepe mali, cum Ebrius urgeris multis miser undique curis, Atque animi incerto ...
— Political and Literary essays, 1908-1913 • Evelyn Baring

... likeness in unlikeness, that lies at the root of all discoveries; it is the prose imagination, common-sense at fourth proof. All this is no reason why the world should like it, however; and we fancy that the Question, Ridentem dicere verum quid vetat? was plaintively put in the primitive tongue by one of the world's gray fathers to another without producing the slightest conviction. Of course, there must be some reason for this suspicion of wit, as there is for most of the world's deep-rooted ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Volume 7, Issue 42, April, 1861 • Various

... two men looked at his companion without speaking. The other, old enough to regard feminine beauty as a trap and an illusion, turned aside to empty his mouth of a quid of tobacco, bent over, and pointed ...
— The Hunted Woman • James Oliver Curwood

... of this falling philosophy. With respect to Paley, and the naked prudentialism of his system, it is true that in a longish note Paley disclaims that consequence. But to this we may reply, with Cicero, Non quoero quid neget Epicurus, sed quid congruenter neget. Meantime, waiving all this as too notorious, and too frequently denounced, I wish to recur to this trite subject, by way of stating an objection made to the Paleyan morality in my seventeenth year, and which I have ...
— Memorials and Other Papers • Thomas de Quincey

... rudder, immovable, his eyes shifting from side to side, now under the sail, now past it. He chewed vigorously on his quid of tobacco and spat. There was much less sign now of the twitchings round his eyes than there'd been earlier in the day, and his very calmness had a ...
— Seven Icelandic Short Stories • Various

... quid postulet non videt, aut plura loquitur, aut se ostentat, aut eorum quibuscum est rationem non habet, ...
— The Coverley Papers • Various

... they would find, even in these days, precious material to make play from. Even Jack's culpable vagaries, if reproduced in anything like original form, might be utilised to entertaining effect; but the professional person insists upon making him appear with a quid rolling about in his mouth and his stomach brimful of slang, which he empties as occasion may require. It may or may not go down with their audiences, but the tar himself cannot stand it. I was seated beside a typical sailor in a London theatre not very long ago, ...
— Windjammers and Sea Tramps • Walter Runciman

... been contemplating this scene apparently quite unmoved, now ejected from his mouth a huge quid of tobacco, replaced it by another, and then stepping up to the officer, touched him on the arm, and offered him the pass he had received from his passengers. The Spaniard waved him back almost with disgust. There ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine — Volume 54, No. 335, September 1843 • Various

... to be, "Oh, shucks!" and his yarns were so interlarded with this exclamation, that in giving one of his stories I must ask the reader to imagine that expressive utterance about every other word. Affectionately hugging his knee, and generously expectorating as he made a transfer of his quid from one side of his mouth ...
— Four Months in a Sneak-Box • Nathaniel H. Bishop

... sic situs est, medica celeberrimus arte Expectans regni Gaudia laeta Dei; Dignus erat meritis qui nestora vinceret annis, In terris omnes, sed capit aequa dies; Ne tumulo quid desit adest fidessima conjux Est vitae ...
— Shakespeare's Family • Mrs. C. C. Stopes

... common people of Afric being asked who they were, replied Chanani, that is, Canaanites. Interrogati rustici nostri, saith he, quid sint, Punice respondentes Chanani, corrupta scilicet voce sicut in talibus solet, quid aliud respondent quam Chanaanaei? Procopius also [250] tells us of two pillars in the west of Afric, with inscriptions signifying that the people were Canaanites who fled from Joshuah: and Eusebius [251] tells us, that these Canaanites flying from the sons ...
— The Chronology of Ancient Kingdoms Amended • Isaac Newton

... manet: juvenesque senesque Gaudebunt nomen concelebrare tuum; Condiet appositum dum fercula nostra salinum, Praebebitque suas mensa secunda nuces; Dum stantis rhedae aurigam tua pagina fallet, Contentum in sella taedia longa pati! Quid, quod et ipsa sibi devinctum Scotia nutrix Te perget gremio grata fovere senem; Officiumque pium simili pietate rependens, Saecula nulla ...
— Reminiscences of Scottish Life and Character • Edward Bannerman Ramsay

... and kawffee, so to speak, afore I tries on with the ear scratchin'. Mind you," he added philosophically, "there's a deal of the same nature in us as in them theer animiles. Here's you a-comin' and arskin' of me questions about my business, and I that grump-like that only for your bloomin' 'arf-quid I'd 'a' seen you blowed fust 'fore I'd answer. Not even when you arsked me sarcastic like if I'd like you to arsk the Superintendent if you might arsk me questions. Without offence did I tell ...
— Dracula • Bram Stoker

... 1686), and of the trial and sentence of Guido Franceschini. The fact that taxes credulity in regard to this manuscript, of whose existence, even, no one in modern times had ever dreamed, is that the three points of view, as presented by Browning in the "Half Rome," "The Other Half Rome," and "Tertium Quid," are in accord with those given in this strange document, which for more than a century had lain ...
— The Brownings - Their Life and Art • Lilian Whiting

... ingenuique pudoris." Then resumed his learned queries. "et quid hodie lugdunenses loquuntur—vossius vester nihilne novi scripsit?—nihil certe, ...
— The Fortunes of Nigel • Sir Walter Scott

... in medical practice. The old Brunonian stimulating treatment has come into vogue again in the practice of Dr. Todd and his followers. The compounds of mercury have yielded their place as drugs of all work, and specifics for that very frequent subjective complaint, nescio quid faciam,—to compounds of iodine. [Sir Astley Cooper has the boldness,—or honesty,—to speak of medicines which "are given as much to assist the medical man as his patient." Lectures (London, 1832), p. 14.] Opium is believed ...
— Medical Essays • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

... Long rolled the inseparable quid in his cheek, and slyly drawled out, "W-ell, if ye must, ye must! I a'n't a-goin' ter stand in the way ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. I, No. 1, Nov. 1857 • Various

... tell you briefly the history of my personal relation to tobacco. It began, I think, when I was a lad, and took the form of a quid, which I became expert in tucking under my tongue. Afterward I learned the delights of the pipe, and I suppose there was no other youngster of my age who could more deftly cut plug tobacco so as to make ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... limitation of kind,—a horse minus Dick and Bessie and the brown mare, etc. (Haecceitas). But an individual horse, simply by virtue of his equine nature. Only so far as he is an actual complete horse, is he an individual at all. (Per quod quid est, per id unum numero est.) His individuality is nothing superadded to his equiety. (Unum supra ens nihil addit reale.) Neither is it anything subtracted therefrom. (Negatio non potest producere accidentia individualia.) In fine, there is ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. II, No. 8, June 1858 • Various

... Europe, not being able to find a plug of genuine Cavendish, I was forced to satisfy the cravings of this morbid appetite by nibbling bad cigars. But a new difficulty soon became manifest—there was not a spot in all Germany where it was possible to get rid of a quid without attracting undue attention. No man likes to be stared at as an outlaw against the recognized decencies of life. One may smoke cigars under a lady's nose, dress like a popinjay, or kiss his bearded friend in ...
— The Land of Thor • J. Ross Browne

... when without the slightest warning some animal seized him by the finger. It was a mink that had been raiding the house; and in the excitement that followed, the brute escaped. The hunter, however, made little of his injury; chewing up a quid of tobacco, he placed it over the wound and bound it securely with a rag torn from the ...
— The Drama of the Forests - Romance and Adventure • Arthur Heming

... quum et ipsi invisum consensu imperium, et plebs, quid privatis jus non esset vocandi senatum, non convenire patres interpretarentur, i. e. while, on the one hand, the decemvirs themselves accounted for the staying away of the senators from the meeting, by the fact of ...
— The History of Rome, Books 01 to 08 • Titus Livius

... a Laird by rights, but I could no afoord the loss o' that siller. Oh, he is the proud deil! His high stomach could no stand my plain words. Forty quid, odd, he owed me, but I could no hold my tongue when he raided the cutter and made off wi' the shell. The MacLeans were ne'er pirates, ye ken. They are honest men and kirkgoers—though I'll no pretend in the old days they didna' lift a ...
— Fire Mountain - A Thrilling Sea Story • Norman Springer

... to be used here, as not uncommonly, of a single letter. See above, p.114. The sentence runs in the Latin (when some obvious errors of transcription are corrected):—'Quid ergo mirum si Johannes singula etiam in epistulis suis proferat dicens in semet ipsum, Quae vidimus,' etc.; and so I have translated it. But I cannot help suspecting that the order in the original was, [Greek: hekasta propherei, kai en tais epistolais autou ...
— Essays on "Supernatural Religion" • Joseph B. Lightfoot

... in regione abundantius pullulant mordacius carpenda: partimque ob Rithmi difficultatem. Adieci etiam quasdam Biblie aliorumque autorum concordancias in margine notatas quo singula magis lectoribus illucescant: Simul ad inuidorum caninos latratus pacandos: et rabida ora obstruenda: qui vbi quid facinorum: quo ipsi scatent: reprehensum audierint. continuo patulo gutture liuida euomunt dicta, scripta dilacerant. digna scombris ac thus carmina recensent: sed hi si pergant maledicere: vt stultiuagi comites classem insiliant. At tu venerande Presul Discipuli ...
— The Ship of Fools, Volume 1 • Sebastian Brandt

... slipped out, although he pleasantly remarked that they need not, and those who looked in later and saw the two men sitting face to face drew back. "That thing last night," said Weed to Usher, going to the door of their store to throw his quid into the street, "givm the Courier about the hahdest kick in the ribs she evva got." But no one divined Ravenel's errand, unless Garnet darkly suspected it as he waited beside Jeff-Jack's desk for its owner's return, to ask him for ten thousand dollars ...
— John March, Southerner • George W. Cable

... the woman, so quickly that Robert felt he had been unfair to himself, and wished he had asked thirty. 'Come on now - and see my Bill - and we'll fix a price for the season. I dessay you might get as much as two quid a week reg'lar. Come on - and make yourself as small as you can, for ...
— Five Children and It • E. Nesbit

... blame him for trying to escape—that was only natural—but it made us more cautious in the future. Excepting the inconvenience of being unable to get away, he had nothing to complain of, and had the advantage of plenty to eat and drink without the trouble of looking for it. The manufacture of the "quid" mentioned above is interesting. Cleaning and smoothing a place in the sand, a small branch from a silvery-leafed ti-tree (a grevillea, I think), is set alight and held up; from it as it burns a light, white, very fine ash falls on to the prepared ground. Now the stems ...
— Spinifex and Sand - Five Years' Pioneering and Exploration in Western Australia • David W Carnegie

... commendarat a colorum varietate ac praeterea fulgore, quod et Appuleius facit in secundo Floridorum, contra contendit esse deformem, non modo ob foeditatem rostri, ac crurum, et linguae, sed etiam quia sit coloris fusci ac cinericii, qui tristis. Quid faciamus summo Viro? Si Cardanus ea dixisset, provocasset ad judicia poetarum, atque adeo omnium hominum. Nunc quia pulchri dixit coloris, ille deformis contendit. Hoc contradictionis studium, quod ubique in hisce exercitationibus se prodit, sophista dignius est, quamque philosopho."—Bayle: ...
— Jerome Cardan - A Biographical Study • William George Waters

... jacket are "paid"—permit me to dig you in the ribs when I make use of this nautical expression—with white. In my hand I hold the very box connected with the story of Sandomingerbilly. I lift up my eyebrows as far as I can (on the T. P. model), take a quid from the box, screw the lid on again (chewing at the same time, and looking pleasantly at the pit), brush it with my right elbow, take up my right leg, scrape my right foot on the ground, hitch up my trousers, and in reply to a question of yours, namely, "Indeed, what weather, ...
— The Letters of Charles Dickens - Vol. 1 (of 3), 1833-1856 • Charles Dickens

... quid in his cheek. The cards were so thumbed and tattered that by the backs of them each player guessed pretty shrewdly what the other held. Yet they went on playing night after night; the Snipe shrilly blessing or cursing his luck, the Scotsman phlegmatic ...
— Old Fires and Profitable Ghosts • A. T. Quiller-Couch

... Henderson chewed his quid of tobacco reflectively and spat at a crack in the sidewalk. "No," he replied, "I'll admit he ain't started scrappin' it yet, but I happen to know he's sold the rollin'- stock an' rails to the Freshwater Lumber Company, so I reckon they'll ...
— The Valley of the Giants • Peter B. Kyne

... the natives of Western Australia are very fond of singing and dancing: to a sulky old native his song is what a quid of tobacco is to a sailor; is he angry, he sings; is he glad, he sings; is he hungry, he sings; if he is full, provided he is not so full as to be in a state of stupor, he sings more lustily than ever; and it is the peculiar character of their songs which renders ...
— Journals Of Two Expeditions Of Discovery In North-West And Western Australia, Vol. 2 (of 2) • George Grey

... against the wall, and grin, and be more in everybody's way than any other two people that I ever set my eyes on. Nothing that he did became him; and yet you were conscious that he was one of your own race, that his mind was cumbrously at work, revolving the problem of existence like a quid of gum, and in his own cloudy manner enjoying life, and passing judgment on his fellows. Above all things, he was delighted with himself. You would not have thought it, from his uneasy manners and troubled, struggling utterance; but he loved himself to the marrow, and ...
— The Silverado Squatters • Robert Louis Stevenson

... daily noting down, in my memorandum or common place books, both incidents and observations, whatever had occurred to me from without, and all the flux and reflux of my mind within itself. The number of these notices and their tendency, miscellaneous as they were, to one common end ('quid sumus et quid futuri gignimur,' what we are and what we are born to become; and thus from the end of our being to deduce its proper objects), first encouraged me to undertake the weekly essay, of which you will consider this letter ...
— The Life of Samuel Taylor Coleridge - 1838 • James Gillman

... like the Browns did," volunteered Young Jeff, squirting his quid accurately to the center of the hearth. "Be around borrowing my car in two or three weeks, run up to Mountain City for to be married, then give a big party upstairs here, and nobody ...
— Judith of the Godless Valley • Honore Willsie

... among the inhabitants of the Malay Peninsula; the betel-nut being as essential to a Malay as tobacco is to a Japanese, or opium to the confirmed Chinese opium-smoker. It is a revolting habit, and if a person speaks to you while he is chewing his "quid" of betel, his mouth looks as if it were full of blood. People say that the craving for stimulants is created by our raw, damp climate; but it is as strong here, at the equator, in this sunny, balmy air. I have not yet come across a region in which men, weary in body or spirit, are not seeking to ...
— The Golden Chersonese and the Way Thither • Isabella L. Bird (Mrs. Bishop)

... 1865, an Ojha held a village in Hoshangabad District which he had obtained as follows: [356] "He was singing and dancing before Raja Raghuji, when the Raja said he would give a rent-free village to any one who would pick up and chew a quid of betel-leaf which he (the Raja) had had in his mouth and had spat out. The Ojha did this and ...
— The Tribes and Castes of the Central Provinces of India - Volume IV of IV - Kumhar-Yemkala • R.V. Russell

... good ones, and you ought to be able to get stacks for two quid. I shan't want them till to-morrow morning, so they've got to be fresh. You'd better get them as late as you can, and put them in water directly you get in. ...
— Anthony Lyveden • Dornford Yates

... whether their competitors existed or not. Observe too, that the chronicle of Croyland, after relating Richard's second coronation at York, says, it was advised by some in the sanctuary at Westminster to convey abroad some of king Edward's daughters, "ut si quid dictis masculis humanitus in Turri contingerat, nihilominus per salvandas personas filiarum, regnum aliquando ad veros rediret haeredes." He says not a word of the princes being murdered, only urges the fears of their friends that it might happen. This was a living witness, ...
— Historic Doubts on the Life and Reign of King Richard the Third • Horace Walpole

... primo secundum Theologiam Ethnicam, ubi explicatur, Quantum hactenus Alii in Gentilium sententiis, de summi Numinis Natura eruendis, hallucinati fuerint; deinde secundum Theologiam Christianam: Et quid de Divina Essentia ac Attributis statuendum sit, diceretur. Quibus postremo accedit specialis Dissertatio de Primo Numinis Attributo, AETERNITATE. ...
— Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society - Vol 1 - 1666 • Various

... back finally to the old definition of Florentinus L. 4 D. 1, 5: "Libertas est naturalis facultas eius, quod cuique facere libet, nisi si quid vi aut jure prohibetur."] ...
— The Declaration of the Rights of Man and of Citizens • Georg Jellinek

... in summo ut vides colle hortulorum consitos, si forte quid audes probare, scire debes hos hero herique ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 193, July 9, 1853 • Various

... siderum scientiam putantur effecisse, ut praedeci posset quid cuique eventurum et quo quisque fato natus esset."—CICERO, De ...
— A History of Art in Chaldaea & Assyria, v. 1 • Georges Perrot

... inugire putes nemus aut mare Thuscum, Tanto cum strepitu ludi spectantur; et artes, Divitiaeque peregrina, quibus oblitus actor Cum stetit in Scena, concurrit dextera laevae. Dixit adhuc aliquid? Nil sane. Quid placet ergo? ...
— The Spectator, Volumes 1, 2 and 3 - With Translations and Index for the Series • Joseph Addison and Richard Steele

... tibi explicem, quid me moueat ad libellum hoc titulo co{n}scribendum et publicandu{m}. Quu{m} duobus annis plus minus iam prteritis, ex Romana urbe in patriam redijssem, inter-fui cuida{m} conuiuio multis incognitus. Vbi quu{m} satis fuisset potatum, unus, nescio quis, ex conuiuis, ...
— Early English Meals and Manners • Various

... three days, and then sent in his bill—three days' pay for each man taken. Fifty men at twelve bob a head, plus five pounds for the Dove as a captured officer, and Kyd here, his junior, three, made about forty quid to Burden & Co. They crowed over ...
— Traffics and Discoveries • Rudyard Kipling

... can't press you; but I may, perhaps, suggest that, as we'll have to work together in other matters, I might be able to give you a quid pro quo." ...
— Vane of the Timberlands • Harold Bindloss

... you know, and punishes his Scotch no end, but a topping fellow underneath. I don't know who the bit of fluff is that they're fighting about, but you can wager a quid to a bob that Dick thought he was doing her a ...
— The Parts Men Play • Arthur Beverley Baxter

... modern poets. I can remember the editor of that golden Quarterly reading, declaiming, quoting, almost breathing, Browning! It was from Henry Harland that this reader learnt to read The Ring and the Book: "Leave out the lawyers and the Tertium Quid, and all after Guido until the Envoi." It was Henry Harland who would answer, if one asked him what he ...
— Browning's Heroines • Ethel Colburn Mayne

... Mannhardt's disciple, protests a grands cris against these identifications when made by others than Mannhardt, who says, 'The Marchen is an old obscure solar myth' (p. 242). To others the story of Bitiou seems an Egyptian literary complex, based on a popular set of tales illustrating furens quid femina possit, and illustrating the world- wide theory of the separable life, dragging in formulas from other Marchen, and giving to all a thoroughly classical Egyptian colouring. {61a} Solar myths, we think, have not necessarily anything to make ...
— Modern Mythology • Andrew Lang

... in the moleskin trousers and the shapeless hat laughed, lounged indeterminately for a minute, rolled his quid in his cheek, spat, wiped his bearded mouth with the back of a sunburnt hand, and laughed again. 'There's room enough for both of ...
— Despair's Last Journey • David Christie Murray

... not being a tocsin song, like the 'Marseillaise.' Indeed, there is not a restful, soothing, or even humane sentiment in all that stormy shout. It is the scream of oppressed humanity against its oppressor, presaging a more than quid pro quo; and it fitly prefigured the sight of that long file of tumbrils bearing to the Place de la Revolution the fairest scions of French aristocracy. On the other hand, 'God Save the King,' in its original, has one or two lines as grotesque as 'Yankee Doodle' ...
— Eclectic School Readings: Stories from Life • Orison Swett Marden

... hot afternoon, and I'd just whipped a quid in my mouth and leaned atop of my musket for forty winks after dinner. The second-timers was codding afront of me, and 2001 and the young chap as was dying of the consumption was wheeling and filling ahead. Well, up ...
— A Son of Hagar - A Romance of Our Time • Sir Hall Caine

... I shall not lose much in the end. Ted will buy the horses, and all the gear from me. I think I can jew him into giving me something for them, even if it is only thirty quid." ...
— Tom Gerrard - 1904 • Louis Becke

... Chief of Police, a burly figure with a brown moustache and a quid of tobacco tucked in the corner of his mouth. "That means ...
— 100%: The Story of a Patriot • Upton Sinclair

... rolled his enraptured eyes and now his quid, spat freely on the rich carpet, beat time on one big palm with the other and on the floor with one vast foot, while through the song like a lifeboat through waves, undisturbed and undisturbing, cleft ...
— Gideon's Band - A Tale of the Mississippi • George W. Cable

... things to think about. I'm going to Graysdale. Can you lend me a couple of quid for the journey? I'll pay you back when I ...
— The Rocks of Valpre • Ethel May Dell

... Vos tunc reseisire De terra vasconie Nec quid deperire Ius v'r'm certissime Potestis hoc scire Si q'd petit ...
— A Chronicle of London from 1089 to 1483 • Anonymous

... Plutarch's. He bases his conclusion partly on external, partly on internal, grounds. It is not quoted by Stobaeus, or any of the ancients, before the fourteenth century. And its style is not Plutarch's; it has many words foreign to Plutarch: it has "nescio quid novum ac peregrinum, ab illa Plutarchea copia et gravitate diversum leve et inane." Certainly its matter ...
— Plutarch's Morals • Plutarch

... knew your face. Lost half a quid over your horse runnin' at Gatwood Park last Spring twel' months. 'White Lady' came in second to 'The Nun,' half a quid. I'd made a bit on 'Champane Bottle' in the sellin' plate. Run me eye over the lists and picked out 'White Lady.' Didn't know nothin' abaht her, ...
— The Man Who Lost Himself • H. De Vere Stacpoole

... pulpit of a parish church, would have brought me a full reward in honour and coin. Alas! my dear boy, it seems to be written that none of my actions will ever produce any kind of savoury fruit, and for me ought to have been written the following words from Ecclesiastes:—'Quid habet am plius homo de universe labore suo, quo laborat sub sole?' Far from bringing him to reason, my discourses strengthened the young nobleman's obstinacy, and I cannot deny that he actually counted ...
— The Queen Pedauque • Anatole France

... regni consulatur; Et quid universitas sentiat, sciatur, Cui leges propriae maxime sunt notae. Nec cuncti provinciae sic sunt idiotae, Quin sciant plus caeteris regni sui mores, Quos relinquunt ...
— A Student's History of England, v. 1 (of 3) - From the earliest times to the Death of King Edward VII • Samuel Rawson Gardiner

... been taking a bit of one of them betel-nuts out of a bag, and then taking a sirih-leaf from a sort of book, and laying it on his hand before he opened his little brass box full of that wet lime. Then he smeared some of the lime over the leaf, laid the bit of nut on it, rolled the leaf up into a quid, and tucked it in his cheek, just like a Jack-tar. Nasty brute! Making his teeth black and the corners of his mouth all red. 'Tain't as if it was a bit of decent 'bacco! Well, perhaps when he has had a good chew he ...
— Trapped by Malays - A Tale of Bayonet and Kris • George Manville Fenn

... any. Used to, but most people nowaday, specially drummers, wanted automobiles, and old Colonel Tavis, who owned the place, wouldn't let an automobile come in his yard. Perhaps Major Bresee might let him have his horse and buggy. The person who gave the information changed his quid of tobacco from his left to his right cheek and, spitting on the ground below the plank-loose platform on which we were standing, pointed to a one-room office-building down the street, then again surveyed us. Two or three men across the road came over, and ...
— People Like That • Kate Langley Bosher

... old, Popes made eel-breeding pay (At least Lord DESBOROUGH says they did), And cleared per annum in this way Twelve hundred jingling, tingling quid. In fact my brain in anguish reels To think we never took a leaf Out of the book which taught that eels Are better than prime cuts ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 153, Aug 29, 1917 • Various

... ever after a kindness, he renewed his quid of tobacco, turning quickly to the littered ...
— D'Ri and I • Irving Bacheller

... of the building has a quite modern look, but the architect has spared the portal, and the three steps which lead down to the flagged entrance hall seem to mark a century apiece. I call it an entrance hall, but it is rather a small adytum, spanned by a pointed arch carrying the legend Stemmata Quid Faciunt. The modern exterior is, in fact, but a shell. All within dates from Henry VI.; and Mr. Robertson (but this is only a theory) would explain the sunken level of the ground-floor rooms by the action of earthworms, which have gradually lifted the surface of Dean's Yard outside. He contends ...
— From a Cornish Window - A New Edition • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... became so interested in the subject of immortality at this time that when another philosopher, Simon Porzio, tried to lecture on meteorology at Pisa, his audience interrupted him with cries, "Quid de anima?" He, also, maintained that the soul of man {628} was like that of the beasts. But he had few followers who dared to express such an opinion. After the Inquisition had shown its teeth, the life of the Italian nation was like that of its great poet, Tasso, whose youth was spent at the ...
— The Age of the Reformation • Preserved Smith

... seipso totus teres atque rotundus, Externi ne quid valeat per laeve morari; In quem ...
— The History of Tom Jones, a foundling • Henry Fielding

... Senatus, Quid caput stertit grave Lambethanum, Quid comes Guilford, quid habent novorum. "Dawksque ...
— The Tatler, Volume 1, 1899 • George A. Aitken

... society forgot its impotence; but no one better than Bacon knew its tricks, and for his true followers science always meant self-restraint, obedience, sensitiveness to impulse from without. "Non fingendum aut excogitandum sed inveniendum quid Natura faciat aut ferat." ...
— The Education of Henry Adams • Henry Adams

... Besides this, he had exquisite artistic instincts, and his massive volume on 'The Power of Sound' was, when it appeared, the most important {308} work on aesthetics in the English language. He had also the tenderest heart and a mind of rare metaphysical power, as his volumes of essays, 'Tertium Quid,' will prove to any reader. Mr. Frederic Myers, already well known as one of the most brilliant of English essayists, is the ingenium praefervidum of the S. P. R. Of the value of Mr. Myers's theoretic writings I will say a word later. Dr. Hodgson, ...
— The Will to Believe - and Other Essays in Popular Philosophy • William James

... contemplated a trip round the Horn. I think what chiefly amused them was their failure to smell a rat before. "How could I have been such an ass as not to think of it long ago?" said Beck, as he sent a nearly new quid into the sea. "Of course, it was as plain as a pikestaff. Here we are with all these dogs, this fine 'observation house,' with its big kitchen-range and shiny cloth on the table, and everything else. Any fool might have ...
— The South Pole, Volumes 1 and 2 • Roald Amundsen



Words linked to "Quid" :   British monetary unit, consideration, pound, cud, chaw, British pound, tertium quid, morsel, chew, quid pro quo, plug, retainer, bit



Copyright © 2022 Free-Translator.com