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noun
pe  n.  The 17th letter of the Hebrew alphabet.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Pe" Quotes from Famous Books



... "Tsing-pe!" cried the lord-in-waiting, and again he ran up and down stairs, through all the halls and corridors; and half the court ran with him, for they did not like the idea of being trampled upon. There was a great inquiry about this ...
— Fairy Tales of Hans Christian Andersen • Hans Christian Andersen

... children.[10] As a token of his great love for him, Jacob gave Joseph a coat of many colors, so light and delicate that it could be crushed and concealed in the closed palm of one hand. The Hebrew name of the garment, Passim, conveys the story of the sale of Joseph. The first letter, Pe, stands for Potiphar, his Egyptian master; Samek stands for Soharim, the merchantmen that bought Joseph from the company of Ishmaelites to whom his brethren had sold him; Yod stands for these same Ishmaelites; and Mem, for the Midianites ...
— The Legends of the Jews Volume 1 • Louis Ginzberg

... poo neh wa quain noo tdin se peh wau poose noo tding sah keh we kah noong koom sau kie we nin oo jee she shebe we yause pah mah tain ta we pidt pa kah wa nain ween sah pe toon ...
— Sketch of Grammar of the Chippeway Languages - To Which is Added a Vocabulary of some of the Most Common Words • John Summerfield

... would represent the proposition p z q. Now, by way of example, I wish to examine the proposition P(p.Pp) (the law of contradiction) in order to determine whether it is a tautology. In our notation the form 'PE' is written as and the form 'E. n' as Hence the proposition P(p. Pp). reads as follows If we here substitute 'p' for 'q' and examine how the outermost T and F are connected with the innermost ones, the result will be that the truth of the whole proposition ...
— Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus • Ludwig Wittgenstein

... of abasement which grated sorely at times upon his colleagues, who reverenced no one except themselves and their Union. He appeared to revel in muddy route-marches, and invariably provoked and led the choruses. The men called him "Wee Pe'er," and ultimately adopted him as a sort of company mascot. Whereat Pe'er's heart glowed; for when your associates attach a diminutive to your Christian name, you possess something which millionaires would gladly give half their ...
— The First Hundred Thousand • Ian Hay

... und den de vimmen— Shood dem ub vile dey is schwimmen, Den you gif der men a trimmen, Kaiser Bill. For der voorit must pe mine own, So I'll pe der King alone, Mit ...
— Rhymes of the Rookies • W. E. Christian

... Joe, the horse-stealer—tarn him—and a few New England pedlars, who asked three hundred per shent for their coots, but Mr Slick is a shentleman, every inch of him, and the pest of them she ever saw, and she will pe glad to see her again whenever she ...
— Nature and Human Nature • Thomas Chandler Haliburton

... fod Mrs. Parry a'i mab yn iach galonnog.—Dyma i chwi ychydig rigwm a gysoddais wythnos neu ddwy yn ol, ar destun a mesur can ragorach y doniol Erfyl. Chwi a welwch wrthi mai amcan at annerch y "gwr ieuanc dieithr" ydyw, fel pe buaswn wyddfodol. ...
— Gwaith Alun • Alun

... son could only reply in a chirping little voice: "It is too late, father. You have killed me at last, and now I am becoming a bird." And as he spoke he turned into the o-pe-che—the robin redbreast—and flew out of the hole and away to join the other birds; but he never flew very far ...
— Boys and Girls Bookshelf (Vol 2 of 17) - Folk-Lore, Fables, And Fairy Tales • Various

... thick of thick of things, With Death across the way, 'n' traps What little Fritz the German flings Explodin' in yer lunch pe'aps, It ain't all glory for a bloke', It ain't all corfee 'ot and stoo, Nor wavin' banners in the smoke, Or practisin' the bay'net stroke— We has ...
— 'Hello, Soldier!' - Khaki Verse • Edward Dyson

... sadisfied?" A passing figure with a strong Teutonic countenance halted at the edge of the crowd and glared—but his hatred was for Hamilton Burton. "Sadisfied—not till der American toller and der sovereign and der louis d'or vear his portrait vill he pe sadisfied." ...
— Destiny • Charles Neville Buck

... territory of Carthage and the regions composing the eastern group of the Atlas. Among the numerous conjectures which have been made as to the etymology of the term Africa ('Afrike) may be quoted that which derives it from the Semitic radical resh daleth pe ("separate''), Africa being considered, in this connexion, as a Phoenician settlement "separated'' from the mother country, Asiatic Phoenicia. It has also been held that the word Africa comes from friqi, farikia (the country of fruit). ...
— Project Gutenberg Encyclopedia

... Hersell pe auchty years and twa, Te twenty-tird o' May, man; She twell amang te Heelan hills, Ayont the reefer Spey, man. Tat year tey foucht the Sherra-muir, She first peheld te licht, man; Tey shot my father in tat stoure— ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volume II. - The Songs of Scotland of the past half century • Various

... thus: Junto al estandarte que lleuoua el Pe Guardian yba un fraile lego llamado fr. Junipero y es tenido por sto sencillo como el otro vaylando y diciendo mil frialdades a ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898 • Emma Helen Blair

... peace and goodwill. His eyes were shining, his mouth was expanded in a terrible smile, displaying two rows of long, irregular, yellow teeth and his big red hands were outstretched in greeting. He shouted when he was some half-dozen yards distant, "They tell me you will pe ...
— Duncan Polite - The Watchman of Glenoro • Marian Keith

... race. An edict was issued that the various texts then in circulation should be collected and engraved on wood, to be printed and published. Here began the art of printing, but it was not till a blacksmith named Pe-Ching, three or four hundred years later, invented movable types that the astounding possibilities of the invention were seen. Off hats to the memory of that learned blacksmith! Tall oaks from little acorns grow; but surely never before nor since has the world seen such stupendous results from so ...
— Round the World • Andrew Carnegie

... thousand years before the birth of Christ, in the days when Isaac wanted to go down into Egypt, Greece was inhabited by a savage race of men called the Pe-las'gi-ans. They lived in the forests, or in caves hollowed out of the mountain side, and hunted wild beasts with great clubs and stone-tipped arrows and spears. They were so rude and wild that they ate nothing but raw meat, berries, and the roots which they ...
— The Story of the Greeks • H. A. Guerber

... language, and possessing their own national emblem which distinguished them as distinct and separate from all other tribes. This symbolical ensign of my ancestors was represented by a species of small hawk, which the Ottawas called the "Pe-pe-gwen." So we were sometimes called in this country in which we live the "Pe-pe-gwen tribe," instead of the "Undergrounds." And it was customary among the Ottawas, that if any one of our number, a descendant of the Undergrounds, should commit any punishable crime, all the Pe-pe-gwen tribe ...
— History of the Ottawa and Chippewa Indians of Michigan • Andrew J. Blackbird

... the regular so-called imperial highway, running from Suidun. From the Catholic missionaries at Kuldja we had obtained very accurate information about this route as far as the Gobi desert. The expression Tian Shan Pe-lu, or northern Tian Shan route, in opposition to the Tian Shan Nan-lu, or southern Tian Shan route, shows that the Chinese had fully appreciated the importance of this historic highway, which continues the road running from the extreme western gate of the Great Wall obliquely ...
— Across Asia on a Bicycle • Thomas Gaskell Allen and William Lewis Sachtleben

... our arrival the "Vigilant" came in, en route for Tientsin, a port further up the Gulf of Pe-chili, and to the westward of us. You may perhaps remember that it was here the recent massacre of some helpless French sisters of mercy took place, an event which at one time seemed very likely to have embroiled China ...
— In Eastern Seas - The Commission of H.M.S. 'Iron Duke,' flag-ship in China, 1878-83 • J. J. Smith

... inspired by the war, have been made in directions entirely unfamiliar to Western experience,—in the manufacture, for example, of women's hair ornaments and dress materials. Dress goods decorated with war pictures have actually become a fashion,—especially cr[^e]pe silks for underwear, and figured silk linings for cloaks and sleeves. More remarkable than these are the new hairpins;—by hairpins I mean those long double-pronged ornaments of flexible metal which are called kanzashi, and are more or less ornamented ...
— The Romance of the Milky Way - And Other Studies & Stories • Lafcadio Hearn

... she ejaculated, as soon as she could get her breath, "ef dat ain' de beatinis' pe'fo'mance I ever seed er heared of! Dese yer young niggers ain' got de manners dey wuz bawned wid! I don' know w'at dey're comin' to, w'en dey ain' got no mo' rispec' fer ole age—I don' ...
— The Marrow of Tradition • Charles W. Chesnutt

... Androscoggin is one of these, a river, winding, capricious and most beautiful; just the one to touch the fancy of the poet, and tempt the cupidity of a millwright. It abounds with scenery of the most lovely and romantic interest, and falls already in bondage to loom and shuttle. Lewiston Falls, or Pe-jip-scot, as the aboriginals called this beautiful place, are, perhaps, among the finest water plunges in the country. It is not merely the beauty of the river itself, a broad and lengthened sheet of ...
— Graham's Magazine Vol XXXIII No. 1 July 1848 • Various

... of horses and cattle, and machinery for farmin', from back there in Ohio and Indiany and Ellinoi—all over that country where things a man plants in the ground grows up and comes to something. They went into this pe-rairie and started a bustin' it up like the ones ahead of 'em did. Shucks! you can turn a ribbon of this blame sod a hundred miles long and never break it. What can a farmer do with land that holds together that way? Nothin'. But ...
— Trail's End • George W. Ogden

... rests the first Chinese Emperor of the Manchu dynasty, and his son, the great Kang Hi, who reigned over the Middle Kingdom for sixty-one years. Pe-ling consists of several temple-like buildings. The visitor first enters a hall containing an enormous tortoise of stone, which supports a stone tablet inscribed with an epitaph extolling the deceased Emperor. ...
— From Pole to Pole - A Book for Young People • Sven Anders Hedin

... for its constitutional action thereon, a treaty made with the Woll-pah-pe tribe of Snake Indians on the 12th of August, 1865, ...
— A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents - Section 2 (of 2) of Volume 6: Andrew Johnson • James D. Richardson

... grandparents. He saw his own name: he saw something more,—words that made his heart stand still, and his blood seem like ice in his veins. As he thus stood aghast, a hand was laid on the letter, and a voice, in an angry growl, muttered, "How dare you come into my room, and pe reading ...
— My Novel, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... alarm in western Europe. This was increased when, in 1345, he proclaimed his country an empire. He first called together a special Church council, at which the Serbian Church, an archbishopric, whose centre was then at Pe['c] (in Montenegro, Ipek in Turkish), was proclaimed a Patriarchate, with Archbishop Joannice as Patriarch; then this prelate, together with the Bulgarian Patriarch, Simeon, and Nicholas, Archbishop ...
— The Balkans - A History Of Bulgaria—Serbia—Greece—Rumania—Turkey • Nevill Forbes, Arnold J. Toynbee, D. Mitrany, D.G. Hogarth

... Bodies, sKu-Lna. dPe-dKar or Pe-har is by some authorities identified with the Chinese deity Wei-to. This latter is represented in the outer court of ...
— Hinduism and Buddhism, An Historical Sketch, Vol. 3 (of 3) • Charles Eliot

... . . "Happy Establishment" So called after two ranges of hills, Fu-Kien or Fo-Kien Congou . . . Labor Named so at Amoy from the labor in preparing it. Sou chong . . . Small Kind Hyson . . . Flourishing Spring Pe-koe . . . White Hair So called because only the youngest leaves are gathered, which still have the delicate down—white hair—on the surface. Pou-chong . . . Folded Tea So called at Canton after the manner of ...
— The Little Tea Book • Arthur Gray

... because Kelalah, curse, outweighs the advantage of being the first in Kadosh, the Holy One. In vain did Zadde call attention to Zaddik, the Righteous One; there was Zarot, the misfortunes of Israel, to testify against it. Pe had Podeh, redeemer, to its credit, but Pesha: transgression, reflected dishonor upon it. 'Ain was declared unfit, because, though it begins 'Anawah, humility, it performs the same service for 'Erwah, immorality. Samek said: "O Lord, may it be Thy will to begin the ...
— The Legends of the Jews Volume 1 • Louis Ginzberg

... Paradise and the Pe'ri. A peri was told she would be admitted into heaven if she would bring thither the gift most acceptable to the Almighty. She first brought a drop of a young patriot's blood, shed on his country's behalf; but the gates would not open ...
— Character Sketches of Romance, Fiction and the Drama - A Revised American Edition of the Reader's Handbook, Vol. 3 • E. Cobham Brewer

... "O! to pe sure! I vas there," said Carl. "Pecause I left my books in there last week, and I vas going to get 'em. But I saw somebody in the house, ...
— Cudjo's Cave • J. T. Trowbridge

... the great city of Pekin, and Pe-Chi-Li is the greatest province in all China. And second only to that is the province of Shantung, which borders Pe-Chi-Li, the home of our Emperors for more centuries than you have years. And for so many generations that we cannot remember my forefathers have been rulers of Shantung. ...
— The River's End • James Oliver Curwood

... misdress had some liddle blace vere the master could pe hidden," said Kolb; "I bromise to take him dere so dot nopody ...
— Lost Illusions • Honore De Balzac

... lines read thus: pa pe poo pah; ta te too tah; ka ke koo kah; cha che choo chah; ma mee moo mah; na ne noo nah; sa se soo sah; ya ...
— By Canoe and Dog-Train • Egerton Ryerson Young

... projected into the ocian about 4 miles further than the direction of the Coast. after walking for 21/2 miles on the Stones my guide made a Sudin halt, pointed to the top of the mountain and uttered the word Pe Shack which means bad, and made Signs that we could not proceed any further on the rocks, but must pass over that mountain, I hesitated a moment & view this emence mountain the top of which was obscured in the clouds, and the assent appeard. to be almost perpindecular; as the ...
— The Journals of Lewis and Clark • Meriwether Lewis et al

... and pointing to that edifice, put them in mind of what he had there done for his country. 25. The multitude, whose compassion or whose justice seldom springs from rational motives, refused to condemn him, so long as he pleaded in sight of the Capitol; but when he was brought from thence to the Pe'teline grove, where the Capitol was no longer in view, they condemned him to be thrown headlong from the Tarpe'ian rock.[16] 26. Thus, the place which had been the theatre of his glory, became that of his ...
— Pinnock's Improved Edition of Dr. Goldsmith's History of Rome • Oliver Goldsmith

... Colonel in amazement. "Is dot der Karl Leland vot dranslate de Reisebilder? Herr je! I hafe got dat very pook here on mein table! Look at it. Bei Gott! here's his name! Dot is der crate Leland vot edit de Continental Magazine! Dot moost pe a fery deep man. Und I dink ...
— Memoirs • Charles Godfrey Leland

... was grounded the foundation of all their next year's wine, returned unto the choir of the church where the other monks were, all amazed and astonished like so many bell-melters. Whom when he heard sing, im, nim, pe, ne, ne, ne, ne, nene, tum, ne, num, num, ini, i mi, co, o, no, o, o, neno, ne, no, no, no, rum, nenum, num: It is well shit, well sung, said he. By the virtue of God, why do not you sing, Panniers, farewell, vintage ...
— Gargantua and Pantagruel, Complete. • Francois Rabelais

... stay on that river. This individual was among the earlier visitors who presented himself at my office. He recognized me as one of the party on that occasion. He was introduced to me by the name of Wabish-ke-pe-nace, or the White Bird, and seemed to rouse up from a settled look of melancholy when referring to those events. It appears that his conduct as a guide on that occasion had made him unpopular with the band, who told him he had received an honor for that which should be condemned. That it was a ...
— Personal Memoirs Of A Residence Of Thirty Years With The Indian Tribes On The American Frontiers • Henry Rowe Schoolcraft

... guest. With the Cheyennes, the white man, when the tribe was at peace with him, was ever welcome, as in the early days of the border he generally had a supply of coffee, of which the savage is particularly fond—Mok-ta-bo-mah-pe, as they call it. Their salutation to the stranger coming into the presence of the owner of a lodge is "Hook-ah-hay! Num-whit,"—"How do you do? Stay with us." Water is then handed by a squaw, as it is supposed a traveller is thirsty after riding; then meat, for ...
— The Old Santa Fe Trail - The Story of a Great Highway • Henry Inman

... Chusan fell into our hands. Admiral Elliot, accompanied by Captain Elliot, sailed to the Pe-che-lee harbour, where he arrived on the 9 th of August, 1840. On the 30th of that month an interview took place between Captain Elliot and Keshen, the-imperial commissioner, the third man in the empire, and the negociations were protracted until the 15th ...
— The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.III. - From George III. to Victoria • E. Farr and E. H. Nolan

... proudly call mountains, and being less frequented than the county road, was rough and full of surprises in the way of snakes and insects. Sarah was just beginning to wonder if she could survive Comanche's next fright, when a loud "Whoa-o-o-pe!" sounded from somewhere above and ahead of them. Blue Bonnet answered immediately with the ranch-call which she and some of the cowboys had adapted years ago from one of ...
— Blue Bonnet's Ranch Party • C. E. Jacobs

... of these people, who since they lived in Greece may be called Greeks, though their more proper title would be "Pe-lasgians," are to be found in the tombs of Rekhmara and Senmut, the former a vizier under Thothmes III, the latter the architect of Hatshepsu's temple at Der el-Bahari. Senmut's tomb is a new rediscovery. It was known, as Rekhmara's was, in the early days of Egyptological science, and ...
— History Of Egypt, Chaldaea, Syria, Babylonia, And Assyria In The Light Of Recent Discovery • L.W. King and H.R. Hall

... profound metaphysical bearing on the case of Walter and Florence; and it excited him so much, that on very festive occasions, as birthdays and a few other non-Dominical holidays, he would roar through the whole song in the little back parlour; making an amazing shake on the word Pe-e-eg, with which every verse concluded, in compliment to ...
— Dombey and Son • Charles Dickens

... forsook Bo-hea, Pe-koe, and Wiry-leaf'd Gun-pow-der, To revel in the lip and sunny look Of the young stranger; spite of all they'd vow'd her, The ladies each with jealous anger shook, And rail'd against the simple maid aloud—Ah! This woman's pride is a fine thing to ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 1, Complete • Various

... pringin wyn an pread ut o de seller te mi mestir's tebil. Sin efer I kam til him I nefer wantit a pottle o petter ele nor isi m a' Shon Glass hous, for I ay set toun wi de pairns te dennir. Mi mestir seys til mi, fan I kon speek lyk de fouk hier dat I sanna pe pidden di nating pat gar his plackimors wurk, for de fyt fouk dinna ise te wurk pat te first yeer aftir dey kum in te de quintry. Tey speek a' lyk de sogers in Inerness. Lofen fater, fan de sarvants hier he deen wi der mestirs, ...
— An Historical Account of the Settlements of Scotch Highlanders in America • J. P. MacLean

... where he came from, nobody don't seem to know. Here it is: 'Pe-culiar Story from Iping.' And it says in this paper that the evidence ...
— The Invisible Man • H. G. Wells

... shust look here und see A Deutscher so habby as habby can pe. Der beoples all dink dat no prains I haf got, Vas grazy mit trinking, or someding like dot; Id vasn't pecause I trinks lager und vine, Id vas all on aggount of ...
— Successful Recitations • Various

... sent Kelly along to look after them a leetle und make them keep a goot watch. We are shust as safe as bossible. Und to-morrow we will basture the animals. It is a goot blace for a gamp, Leftenant, und we shall pe all right in a ...
— Overland • John William De Forest

... may have a new administrative structure consisting of 58 departments; the following additional departments have been reported but not yet confirmed by the US Board on Geographic Names (BGN); Adiake', Ale'pe', Dabon, Grand Bassam, ...
— The 2001 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency.

... village street and so continues into Yonkers. In 1646 the Indian sachem Tacharew granted the land to Adrian Von der Donck, the first lawyer of New Netherland. The Indians called it Nap-pe-cha-mack, the "rapid water settlement," the "settlement" being located about the mouth of the stream now known as Sawmill River. The Dutch called their settlement Younkers, Younckers, Jonkers or Yonkers, derived from Jonkheer, a common name for the male ...
— The New York and Albany Post Road • Charles Gilbert Hine

... for science, and a proud day for New England education. Said the farmer, "I suppose dat ish all right, but it vouldn't do to send any of us Pennsylvany fellers down dare to fight mit does pattles. Like as not ve vould shoost pe fools enough to kill somepody." [Loud applause and laughter, and cries ...
— Modern Eloquence: Vol III, After-Dinner Speeches P-Z • Various

... 2. The "pe-ho," which ought to be written "la sol," pitched at about upper D and C, above the soprano staff, and ...
— Some Winter Days in Iowa • Frederick John Lazell

... standing at his door, in a pe-green dressing-gown, smoakin a segar, and singing a hunting coarus, looked surprised, flattered, ...
— Memoirs of Mr. Charles J. Yellowplush - The Yellowplush Papers • William Makepeace Thackeray

... (calling from some distant part of the inn). Giusep-pe! (The voice is very musical, and the two final notes make an ...
— The Man of Destiny • George Bernard Shaw

... thee cherish thee as King of the North and South, thou beautiful and beloved Man-child. When, thou risest men and women live. The nations rejoice in thee, and the Souls of Annu [Footnote: i.e., R[a], Shu and Tefnut.] (Heliopolis) sing unto thee songs of joy. The Souls of the city of Pe, [Footnote: Part of the city of Buto (Per-Uatchit). The souls of Pe were Horus, Mestha, H[a]pi.] and the Souls of the city of Nekhen [Footnote: i.e., Horus, Tuamutef, and Qebhsennuf.] exalt thee, the apes of dawn adore thee, and all beasts and cattle praise thee with one accord. ...
— Egyptian Ideas of the Future Life • E. A. Wallis Budge

... at Manitou I soon stumbled upon feathered strangers. What was this little square-shouldered bird that kept uttering a shrill scream, which he seemed to mistake for a song? It was the western wood-pewee. Instead of piping the sweet, pensive "Pe-e-e-o-we-e-e-e" of the woodland bird of the Eastern States, this western swain persists in ringing the changes hour by hour upon that piercing scream, which sounds more like a cry of anguish than a song. ...
— Birds of the Rockies • Leander Sylvester Keyser

... the Wandering Albatross (Diomedia exulans). A few lay on Inaccessible but none on Tristan. 2. The "Pe-o," the Sooty Albatross (Phoebetria fuliginosa). Comes to nest in August, leaves in April. 3. The Molly, Yellow-nosed Mollyhawk (Thalassogeron chlororhyncus). Comes to nest in August, leaves in April. 4. The Sea-hen, the Southern Skua (Stercorarius ...
— Three Years in Tristan da Cunha • K. M. Barrow

... to pe angeseen py anypodies ash schvearin, boot ash inderesdin Norse or Sherman idioms. Goot many refiewers vot refiewsed to admire soosh derms in de earlier editions ish politelich requestet to braise dem in future nodices from a transcendental ...
— The Breitmann Ballads • Charles G. Leland

... when she mentioned that, "it ain't the kind of news the cattlemen spreads around. But if we shoot one of them in defendin' our own, the news runs like a pe-rairie fire. They call us rustlers, and come ridin' up to swipe us out. Well, they's goin' to be ...
— The Rustler of Wind River • G. W. Ogden

... 'Tsing-pe!' said the gentleman-in-waiting, and away he ran again, up and down all the stairs, in and out of all the rooms and corridors; half the court ran with him, for they none of them wished to be trampled on. There was much questioning about this nightingale, which was known to all ...
— Stories from Hans Andersen • Hans Christian Andersen

... decorated with red and black designs on a cream body, from the ruins of W-mai-a, one of the ancient Zui pueblos on the north side of the valley of Zui, the birth-place of the grandparents of a living aged Zui named "-pe-kwi-na." ...
— Illustrated Catalogue of the Collections Obtained from the Pueblos of New Mexico and Arizona in 1881 • James Stevenson

... each other. It will not do to omit "O-kee-chuck" from this enumeration—a word signifying trade, barter, or sale, and one most commonly heard among these people. When they wish to say a thing is bad they use "A-shu-ruk," and when disapproval is meant they say "pe-chuk." The latter word also expresses general negation. For instance, on looking into several unoccupied houses a native informs us "Innuit pechuk," meaning that the people are away or not at home; "Allopar" is cold, and "allopar ...
— The First Landing on Wrangel Island - With Some Remarks on the Northern Inhabitants • Irving C. Rosse

... forest-brook The farthest hem of silence shook: When in the hollow shades I heard,— Was it a spirit, or a bird? Or, strayed from Eden, desolate, Some Peri calling to her mate, Whom nevermore her mate would cheer? Pe-ri! pe-ri! peer!" ...
— The Home Book of Verse, Vol. 3 (of 4) • Various

... honour to meet at dinner recently, a person of this class, and a conversation having arisen on the subject, he said, "I aam pe-fectly ce-tain no one caaen know that I aam an I-ishman;" and the next instant, turning to a servant, he added, "Po-ta, if you plaze." When this thoroughly low-bred Irishism came out I could not help smiling, ...
— Facts for the Kind-Hearted of England! - As to the Wretchedness of the Irish Peasantry, and the Means for their Regeneration • Jasper W. Rogers

... the bird, "peep, peep, pe—weep!" And nothing else would it say, but only, "Peep, peep, pe—weep!" in a melancholy cadence, and over and over and over again. As often as Ulysses moved forward, however, the bird showed the greatest alarm, and did its ...
— Tanglewood Tales • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... open 'em 'thout my pe'mision," answered Jim imperiously. "When you's asleep, Chief, I'm awake; and I take care of you' things, same as ever I done. There ain't no wires been opened, and there ain't goin' to be whiles I'm ...
— The Judgment House • Gilbert Parker

... cheese, bread Rain, rain Tom he was a Pi-per's son I had a little dog, they called him Buff Molly, my sister, and I fell out Solomon Grundy Handy Spandy, Jack a-dandy Go to bed Tom, go to bed Tom Mary had a pretty bird Lit-tle boy blue, come blow your horn I had a lit-tle po-ny Pe-ter White See, see. What shall I see? I had a little hen, the prettiest ever seen Ride a cock horse Pus-sy cat ate the dump-lings, the dump-lings I have a lit-tle sister; they call her Peep, Peep This lit-tle pig went to mar-ket ...
— Aunt Kitty's Stories • Various

... —Whan pe horde is thynne, as of seruyse, Nought replenesshed with grete diuersite Of mete & drinke, good chere may then suffise With honest ...
— The Gilded Age, Complete • Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner

... know dot me, I haf peen practice on der quiet dis long time, so as to surbrize you all," came the proud reply. "Feel dot muscle, Seth, undt tell me if you think idt could pe peat. Gymnastics I haf take, py shiminy, till all der while I dream of chinning mineself, hanging py one toe, undt all der rest. Meppy you vill surbrised pe yet. Holdt on, don't say nuttings, ...
— Boy Scouts on a Long Hike - Or, To the Rescue in the Black Water Swamps • Archibald Lee Fletcher

... pe'brok). This is a wild, irregular species of music, peculiar to the Highlands of Scotland. It is performed on a bagpipe, and adapted to excite or assuage passion, and particularly to rouse a martial spirit among ...
— McGuffey's Sixth Eclectic Reader • William Holmes McGuffey

... St. Ignace to the iron ports on the Little Bay de Noquet, or Badderknock in lake phraseology, a hundred miles of nothing, according to the map-makers, who, knowing nothing of the region, set it down accordingly, withholding even those long-legged letters, 'Chip-pe-was,' 'Ric-ca-rees,' that stretch accommodatingly across so much townless territory farther west. This northern curve is and always has been off the route to anywhere; and mortals, even Indians, prefer as a general rule, when once started, to go somewhere. The earliest Jesuit explorers ...
— Castle Nowhere • Constance Fenimore Woolson

... makes white as snow. So the old gentleman one day remarked to some friends who drank wine with him, that he would geeve one ten tousant tollare, begare, to te man tat maree his oltest daughtare, Mathilde. Eh bien, te man must vary surelee pe w'ite and re-spect-ah-ble. Of course this confidential remark soon spread abroad, as it was meant to spread abroad. It came to many ears. The most utterly worthless white men, on hearing it, generally drew themselves up in pride and vowed they'd see the ole frog-eatin' ...
— The Mystery of Metropolisville • Edward Eggleston

... better than bein' throde onto the cold, cold charities of the world, especially where a man has got the gout, for anything cold in apt to bring on the pain and make him pe-uuk. ...
— Punchinello, Vol. 1, No. 25, September 17, 1870 • Various

... so bitter that the church which Captain Egydio organized in his own house was removed to Pe da Serra, three miles away, and from there it was driven by persecution to Rio Preto, where today it flourishes with a membership of about fifty people and is in a hopeful condition. The widow and her children have been compelled to move into the city of Bahia. A recent letter informs me ...
— Brazilian Sketches • T. B. Ray

... "It will not be soh soon. At der end of der day, ven we shall have home gecommen, den wull it pe adjudge, eh? A REward of merit to him who der bes' pehaves. It is an ...
— McTeague • Frank Norris

... in der channel, Shonny,— Shonny Schwartz: Life's voyich vill pe quickly o'er; Und den ubon dot bedder shore Ve'll meet again, to bart ...
— The Wit and Humor of America, Volume VI. (of X.) • Various

... poker: Ye are also lank and slim?— Your king he comes of an ancient line Which "length without breadth" the Gods define, And look ye follow him! Lanky lieges! the Gods one day Will cut off this line, as geometers say, Equal to any given line:— PI,—PE—their hands divine Do more than we can see: They cut off every length of clay Really in a most extraordinary way— They fill your bowls up—Dutch C'naster, Shag, York River—fill 'em faster, Fill 'em faster up, I say. What Turkey, Oronoko, Cavendish! There's the fuel to make a chafing ...
— The Germ - Thoughts towards Nature in Poetry, Literature and Art • Various

... Two nights together had these gentlemen, Marcellus and Bernardo, on their watch, In the dead waste and middle of the night,[59] Been thus encounter'd. A figure like your father, Arm'd at all points exactly, cap-a-pe, Appears before them, and, with solemn march Goes slow and stately by them: thrice he walk'd By their oppress'd and fear-surprised eyes, Within his truncheon's length; whilst they, distill'd Almost to jelly with the act of ...
— Hamlet • William Shakespeare

... custom of moving about with the golden horde, attended by numerous flocks and herds, according to the changes of the season: but Mangu-Khan, and Cublai-Khan, established their principal seat of empire in the new city of Pe-king, or Khan-balu, and perfected the conquest of China, reducing Corea, Tonkin, Cochin-china, Pegu, Bengal, and Thibet, to different degrees of subjection, or tribute, under the direct influence of the great Khan, and his ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. 1 • Robert Kerr

... kiving notice to aal it may pe concerning, tat Rory Dhu Mhor of ta Clan Donachy will pe keeping ta crown of ta causeway in ta toun of Tunkel for wan hour and mhore. And he iss civilly tesiring it to pe known tat if there will pe any canting, poo-hooing, psalm-singing whig repellioner in ...
— Stories of the Border Marches • John Lang and Jean Lang

... I haue expressed this summe 198 l'i.[{2}] 19s. 11d. So that you maye se that the lowest lyne serueth for pe{n}nes, the next aboue for shyllynges, the thyrde for poundes, and the fourth for scores of pou{n}des. And farther you maye se, that the space betwene pennes and shyllynges may receaue but one counter (as all other spaces lyke wayes do) and that one standeth ...
— The Earliest Arithmetics in English • Anonymous

... you not shpeak? Can't you virshta blain Eenglish ven you hears it? Hey? You a'n't no teef vot shteels I shposes, unt you ton't kit no troonks mit vishky? Vot you too tat you pe shamt of? Pin lazin' rount? Kon you nicht Eenglish shprachen? ...
— The End Of The World - A Love Story • Edward Eggleston

... who follows close upon the steps of winter, is the Pe-wit, or Pe-wee, or Phoebe-bird; for he is called by each of these names, from a fancied resemblance to the sound of his monotonous note. He is a sociable little being, and seeks the habitation of man. A pair of them have built beneath my porch, and ...
— Wolfert's Roost and Miscellanies • Washington Irving

... sorry, sir, if I 'ave seemed to tresparse on your private feelin's," said the clerk, cringing and stealing a step. "At least, sir, you will never pe'suade me that you are not a perfec' gentleman; I know a gentleman when I see him; and as such, I 'ave no 'esitation in throwin' myself on your merciful consideration. It is 'ard lines, no doubt; it's 'ard lines to have ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. XIX (of 25) - The Ebb-Tide; Weir of Hermiston • Robert Louis Stevenson

... doubtless thinking I am cleaning it myself instead of letting him swab it with a besom with the single purpose in view of dodging the inevitable tip. The proprietor can speak a few words of English. He puts his bald head out of the window above, and asks: "Pe you Herr Shtevens ?" "Yah, yah," ...
— Around the World on a Bicycle V1 • Thomas Stevens

... Angus, rising in wrath, and cramming his pipe into his vest pocket; "it is herself that will pe pothering you no more spout your ...
— The Red Man's Revenge - A Tale of The Red River Flood • R.M. Ballantyne

... his father and mother was recommenced. Both were exposed afresh: four chamberlains once more kept guard over the bodies, as if they had only died the day before; and the two coffins are now placed by the side of each other, compelled to live in pe*&ce under the empire of death. Among the sovereigns who have stayed the despotic power transmitted to them by Peter I. there are several whom a bloody conspiracy has cast from the throne. The same courtiers, who have not the strength to tell their master the least truth, know how to ...
— Ten Years' Exile • Anne Louise Germaine Necker, Baronne (Baroness) de Stael-Holstein

... again on the hard bunk that, aside from the single chair, was the only furniture in the small cell. "Ass well ass coot pe expectet. I ket ferry little exercisse. I ... how iss it set? ... I ...
— The Highest Treason • Randall Garrett

... in greater abundance than ever. Dr. Edkins tells us that "in an account of the Ko-t'sing monastery in the History of T'ian-t'ai-shan it is said that a single work was saved from a fire there several centuries ago, which was written on the Pei-to (Pe-ta) or palm leaf of India." He also states that great pagodas were built on purpose as safe repositories of Sanskrit MSS., one being erected by the Emperor for the preservation of the newly arrived Sanskrit ...
— Chips From A German Workshop, Vol. V. • F. Max Mueller

... rampart of which he passed about 30 miles north of the Great Wall at Kalgan, and some 55 miles from Siuen-hwa, adjoining the Imperial pastures. It stands near a lake still called Chaghan-Nor, and is called by the Chinese Pe-ching-tzu, or White City, a translation of Chaghan Balghasun. Dr. Bushell says of one of the lakes (Ichi-Nor), a few miles east of Chaghan-Nor: "We ... found the water black with waterfowl, which ...
— The Travels of Marco Polo Volume 1 • Marco Polo and Rustichello of Pisa

... been deemed necessary. "Silas," he resumed, in that respectful tone which one should always adopt when speaking of capital, "is a man of considerable property; lives on his interest, and keeps a hoss and shay. He's a great scholar, too, Silas: takes all the pe-ri-odicals and ...
— Library of the World's Best Literature, Ancient and Modern, Vol. 1 • Charles Dudley Warner

... l'uocchie de miricula nere; Che ffa la vostra matre che n'n de' marite? La vostra matre n'a de' marito' apposte Pe' ne' lleva' ...
— The Naples Riviera • Herbert M. Vaughan

... tefle! dont pe zo humple, Monsieur der debudy-mayor; I haf heard dat der king say ...
— Rise and Fall of Cesar Birotteau • Honore de Balzac

... early to break open the hatches and discharge the ship. My comrade and I went ashore to a place called Pe[n]ryn, a little further up the bay, where it ends and as far as they can go with any vessels. We went walking thence into the country, over and among the hills, for the purpose of recreating and recruiting ourselves, ...
— Journal of Jasper Danckaerts, 1679-1680 • Jasper Danckaerts

... please hersel'; she'll pe owing ta Beg naething by ta next new moon." And with a mocking laugh Sandy loitered ...
— Scottish sketches • Amelia Edith Huddleston Barr

... "Peep, peep, pe—weep!" And nothing else would it say, but only, "Peep, peep, pe—weep!" in a melancholy cadence, and over and over and over again. As often as Ulysses moved forward, however, the bird showed the greatest alarm, and ...
— The Children's Hour, Volume 3 (of 10) • Various

... phasin euporesai kardias Kai te men einai thumikon to therion Eis akrate kinesin erethismenon, Te de prosenes kai thrasytetos xenon. Kai pe men auton akroasthai ton logon Ous an tis Indos eu tithaseuon legoi, Pe de pros autous tous nomeis epitrechein Eis tas palaias ektrapen kakoupgias."] PHILE, Expos. de ...
— Sketches of the Natural History of Ceylon • J. Emerson Tennent

... the Salle des Pas-Perdus, galloped about in all directions like excited little black kids, calling from one end to the other of the echoing hall: "O Pe! O Tche!" inhaling with delight the odor of government, of administration that filled the air, making eyes at the ministers who passed, sniffing at their heels, as if some prebend were about to fall from their venerable ...
— The Nabob, Vol. 2 (of 2) • Alphonse Daudet

... means, "the back fat of the buffalo;" and if you had seen him and Peh-to-pe-kiss, "the ribs of the eagle," another chief dressed up in their splendid mantles, buffaloes' horns, ermine tails, and scalp-locks, you would not soon have turned your eyes ...
— History, Manners, and Customs of the North American Indians • George Mogridge

... from an American, A-pe-le[1], that Se[)i]h-lan was the original country of Teen-chuh (India), and that which is now called Woo-yin-too was Teen-ch[)u]h, but in the course of time the names have become confused. According to the records of the later Han dynasty, Teen-ch[)u]h was considered the Shin-t[)u]h, ...
— Ceylon; an Account of the Island Physical, Historical, and • James Emerson Tennent

... "Den if he pe so grand, why you don't make all de fortune, and keep him yourshelf?" said Hanz, rubbing his head ...
— The Von Toodleburgs - Or, The History of a Very Distinguished Family • F. Colburn Adams

... bends over her work once more: "I will weave a fragment of verse among the flowers of his robe, and perhaps its words will tell him to return." —LI-TAI-PE. ...
— Peter the Brazen - A Mystery Story of Modern China • George F. Worts

... was so full of questions that he hardly knew which one to ask first. But Yellow Wing the Flicker didn't give him a chance to ask any. From the edge of the Green forest there came a clear, loud call of, "Pe-ok! Pe-ok! Pe-ok!" ...
— The Burgess Bird Book for Children • Thornton W. Burgess

... with pious hands the brass lock of "the study," which had for many years been covered with a thick coat of paint. On that I found scratched; as with a nail or fork, the following inscription: E PE ...
— The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (The Physician and Poet not the Jurist)

... of attesting her recognition of Passover as a "national holiday" she was in festive array, wearing her newest dress, a garment of blue taffeta embroidered in old rose, with a crpe collar of gray. It mellowed the glow of her healthful pink complexion. She was the most beautiful creature at the table, excluding neither her picturesque younger brother nor her majestic old mother. She shone. She ...
— The Rise of David Levinsky • Abraham Cahan

... between t'e hours of seven unt eight," he had announced. "Hiss Highness, pe it understood, Lord Vernon, t'e great Englishman. He comes in a special vessel—a sheep-of-t'e-war," he added with a triumphant flourish. "He could pring mit' him t'e whole nafy of England, if he wish'!" Ah, what an honour ...
— Affairs of State • Burton E. Stevenson

... of a sixteenth century Spanish play published in Bibli['o]f. Esp. t. 6 (1870) declares that, in order to write it, he has 'trastornado todo Amadis y la Demanda del Sancto Grial de pe a pa.' The result, according to the colophon, is 'un deleitoso jardin de hermosas y olientes flores,' a description which would ...
— Four Plays of Gil Vicente • Gil Vicente

... so terrible a power lorded it everywhere. No one would dare shut his door against them. One magistrate, the criminal assessor of Bayonne, allowed the Sabbath to be held in his own house. Urtubi, Lord of Saint Pe, was forced to hold the festival in his castle. But his head was shaken to that degree, that he imagined a witch was sucking his blood. Emboldened, however, by his fear, he, with another gentleman, repaired ...
— La Sorciere: The Witch of the Middle Ages • Jules Michelet

... Island Salisbury Islands "Sam" Schwatka, Lieut. Fred'k. Scotland Seaforth Point Sebeucktolee Seenteetuar Sekoselar "Selkirshire," The Shepherd's Bay Sherman, General Sherman Inlet Shok-pe-nark Sidney, Cape Simpson, Dease and Strait Sinclair, Capt. Sinuksook Swansea Smithsonian Institute Smith Point Smith Sound Sound, Cumberland Sound, Eclipse Sound, Melville Southampton Island South Street Spoon, Franklin Starvation Cove St. John, N. ...
— Schwatka's Search • William H. Gilder

... voice, as I continued my survey, "you mus pe so dronk as de pig, den, for not zee me as I zit here ...
— The Works of Edgar Allan Poe - Volume 4 (of 5) of the Raven Edition • Edgar Allan Poe

... long operation of having their names called aloud, as their carriages arrived, by an official, who knew the names and addresses of us all. We also knew his mode of adapting the names of foreigners to his Italian organs. "Hasa" (Florentine for casa) "Tro-lo-pe," with a long-drawn-out accent on the last vowel, was the absolutely fatal signal for the sudden breaking up of many a ...
— What I Remember, Volume 2 • Thomas Adolphus Trollope

... to come out of it, and the supper is to be there, Miss, you see, and the most of the dhrinking, and then we'll have the big kitchen comfortable to oursells for the music and the dancing. And what do you think! Pat has got Shamus na Pe'bria, all the ways out of County Mayo, him that makes all the pipes through the counthry, Miss; and did the music about O'Connell all out of his own head, Miss. Oh, it 'll be the most illigant wedding intirely, Miss, anywhere through the counthry, this long ...
— The Macdermots of Ballycloran • Anthony Trollope

... Pe'leus married a beautiful sea-nymph named The'tis. All the gods and goddesses were present at the wedding feast except E'ris, the goddess of discord. She was not invited, and being angry on that account, she resolved to cause dissension among the guests. With this object she threw ...
— Story of Aeneas • Michael Clarke

... the inequality of our Stature rightly consider'd, ought to be for us as full a Security from Slander, as that between Mr. P—pe, and those great Ladies who do nothing without him; admit him to their Closets, their Bed-sides, consult him in the choice of their Servents, their Garments, and make no scruple of putting them on or off before him: Every body knows they are Women of strict ...
— The Life and Romances of Mrs. Eliza Haywood • George Frisbie Whicher

... added, presently, "when she gets better, just tell her never mind about that reci-pe. I copied it out of her reci-pe book whilst she was under the weather, an' dropped a dime in her cash-drawer. I recollect how old Morris used to look forward to her angel-cakes week-ends he'd be goin' home, an' you know there's nothin' like havin' ammunition, in marriage, ...
— Humorous Ghost Stories • Dorothy Scarborough

... of the place, including the rector of the Jesuits, Lozano gave it as his opinion that, if the Governor refused to pay, a general interdict should be proclaimed. The rector of the Jesuits retired indignantly, and 'Pe e Lozano, retroussant sa robe le poursuivit en criant a pleine te^te, et s'exprimant en des termes peu seans a sa profession.'* By this time Asuncion must have been like a madhouse, for no one seems to have been astonished, ...
— A Vanished Arcadia, • R. B. Cunninghame Graham

... na patience wi' ye. Bonny enough—tricked oot in her furbelows, gallivantin' wi' every royster fra Pe'rith. Bonny enough—that be all ye think on. She's bin a proper parson's niece—the giddy, feckless creature, an she'd mak' ye a proper sort o' wife, Tony Garstin, ye ...
— Victorian Short Stories • Various

... PE ELL is a town of 1,000 people on the South Bend branch of the Northern Pacific railway, chiefly engaged in milling ...
— A Review of the Resources and Industries of the State of Washington, 1909 • Ithamar Howell

... right side. This bread which I have made for thee is warmth. Adoration to thee, O Osiris! The doors of heaven are opened to thee, the doors of the streams are thrown wide open to thee. The gods in the city of Pe come [to thee], Osiris, at the sound (or voice) of the supplication of Isis and Nephthys. . . . . Thy elder sister took thy body in her arms, she chafed thy hands, she clasped thee to her breast [when] she found ...
— Legends Of The Gods - The Egyptian Texts, edited with Translations • E. A. Wallis Budge

... cortege had been sailing through the immense alluvial plain of Pe-tche-Li. Not until the fourth day after leaving Tien Tsing was the blue outline of mountains perceived on the horizon. Pekin was now in sight; and on the 6th of August, 1793, the yachts anchored within two miles of the capital, and half a mile ...
— Celebrated Travels and Travellers - Part 2. The Great Navigators of the Eighteenth Century • Jules Verne

... poera was Much people were Wera and Wifa pe pat win rued Men and women who that wine house Gest sele gyredon gold fag scinon That guest-hall garnished. Cloths embroidered with gold Web-after wagum. Wundersiona feld Those along the walls many wonderful sights Sioga gustryleum para pe on swyle stara [female or Venus symbol] To every ...
— Needlework As Art • Marian Alford

... make one of them long by pronunciation, which els would be by ortographie short as, [me'ri'ly'] [minion] & such like. For your foote bacchius of a short & two long ye haue these and the like words trissillables [la'me-nti-ng] [re'que-sti-ng] [re'nou-nci-ng] [re'pe-nta-nce] [e'nu-ri-ng]. For your foote antibacchius, of two long and a short ye haue these words [fo-rsa-ke'n] [i-mpu-gne'd] and others many: For your amphimacer that is a long, a short ...
— The Arte of English Poesie • George Puttenham

... respectful tone which one should always adopt when speaking of capital, "is a man of considerable property; lives on his interest, and keeps a hoss and shay. He 's a great scholar, too, Silas; takes all the pe-ri-odicals and ...
— Miss Mehetabel's Son • Thomas Bailey Aldrich

... mangerye to marie his here dere, 52 & sende his sonde en to say at ay samne schulde, & in comly quoyntis to com to his feste; [Sidenote: The king's invitation.] "For my boles & my bore[gh] arn bayted & slayne, & my fedde foule[gh] fatted w{i}t{h} scla[gh]t, 56 My polyle at is pe{n}ne-fed & partrykes boe, Wyth schelde[gh] of wylde swyn, swane[gh] & crone[gh]; Al is roeled & rosted ry[gh]t to e sete, Come[gh] cof to my corte, ...
— Early English Alliterative Poems - in the West-Midland Dialect of the Fourteenth Century • Various

... as the Chinese have it, Pe-tsai, is a substitute for the cabbage. In appearance it is as different from cabbage as can be imagined. It is tall and cylindrical and its leaves are narrow, delicately curled, with frilled edges. The petsai can, however, be grown on any soil where the ordinary cabbage could ...
— Three Acres and Liberty • Bolton Hall

... to see what has cot Mr. Safareen. He went to town early this morning to see about some money matters, and promised to pe pack in a couple of hours, put he ain't pack yet. Mrs. Safareen cot so uneasy apout him to-night, that she came up to my place and pegged me to ride down and hunt him up. I suppose you saw ...
— The Gerrard Street Mystery and Other Weird Tales • John Charles Dent

... pe a pad crowd," answered the guide. "Zis tells ze tale," and he held up some greasy cards which he must have gathered in the bushes behind the rocks near which ...
— Boy Scouts on Hudson Bay - The Disappearing Fleet • G. Harvey Ralphson

... the former course, which he had indicated by double dotted lines, and that of the present course to the Gulf of Pe-chi-li. ...
— Four Young Explorers - Sight-Seeing in the Tropics • Oliver Optic

... Jew, with apparent honesty, "v'y don'd you go pack? Maype uf you sdop a vile, you don'd pe aple to do dat." ...
— Frank Merriwell's Bravery • Burt L. Standish

... you, my dear Dick, if I tell you of an old Indian's death? It seems a pretty and touching story. Old Pe-shau-ba was a friend of Tanner. One day he fell violently ill. He sent for Tanner and said to him: "I remember before I came to live in this world, I was with the Great Spirit above. I saw many good and desirable things, and among others a beautiful woman. And the Great Spirit ...
— Letters on Literature • Andrew Lang

... been subdued by the Chinese were given different names. Those who lived on the great level rice-plain over which the missionaries were traveling, were called Pe-po-hoan, "Barbarians of the plain." Mackay could see little difference between them and the Chinese, except in the cast of their features, and their long-shaped heads. They wore Chinese dress, even to the cue, worshiped the Chinese gods, ...
— The Black-Bearded Barbarian (George Leslie Mackay) • Mary Esther Miller MacGregor, AKA Marion Keith

... "Pe de Puyane was a brave man and a skillful sailor, who, in his day, was Mayor of Bayonne and admiral; but he was harsh with his men, like all who have managed vessels, and would any day rather fell a ...
— A Midsummer Drive Through The Pyrenees • Edwin Asa Dix

... faer and chentle and coot!" murmured the old man as he held her hand for a moment in his. With a start of suspicion he dropped it, and cried out in alarm, "She'll not pe a Cam'ell, Malcolm?" ...
— Lippincott's Magazine, Vol. 20, August 1877 • Various

... "Pe tamned if I touch you!" he cried, and asked me bitterly what right I had to stand up before "shentlemans" when I did not know the back of a sword ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 11 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... atque hc Ponto mihi lecta venena Ipse dedit Mris; nascuntur plurima Ponto. His ego spe lupum fieri et se conducere sylvis Mrim, spe animas imis excire sepulchris, Atque satas ...
— The Book of Were-Wolves • Sabine Baring-Gould

... Indians of the North-West Territories—who speedily became apprised of the concessions which had been granted to the Ojibbeway nation. The closing scenes were striking and impressive. The chief speaker, Mawe-do-pe-nais, thus winding up the conference on the part of the Indians, in his final address to the Lieutenant-Governor and his ...
— The Treaties of Canada with The Indians of Manitoba - and the North-West Territories • Alexander Morris

... a convict who was employed by the governor to shoot for him, was dangerously wounded by a native named Pe-mul-wy*, while in quest of game in the woods at some considerable distance from the settlement. When brought in he declared, and at a time when he thought himself dying, that he did not give any offence to the man who wounded him; that he had ...
— An Account of the English Colony in New South Wales, Vol. 1 • David Collins

... Indo-Scythian kings with whom Balas was so closely connected. The full legend upon the coins appears to be Hur Kadi Valdk-dshi, "Volagases, the Fire King." The reverse exhibits the usual fire-altar, but with the king's head in the flames, and with the star and crescent on either side, as introduced by Pe-rozes. It bears commonly the legend, ValaJcdshi, with a mint-mark. The mints employed are those of Iran, Kerman, Ispahan, Nisa, Ledan, Shiz, Zadracarta, and one or two ...
— The Seven Great Monarchies Of The Ancient Eastern World, Vol 7. (of 7): The Sassanian or New Persian Empire • George Rawlinson

... Nevertheless, if you will but retard your elegant footsteps for a few moments, this exceedingly unprepossessing individual will endeavour to entertain you with the recital of the adventures of the noble Yung Chang, as recorded by the celebrated Pe-ku-hi." ...
— The Wallet of Kai Lung • Ernest Bramah

... Philippines a great many books, "printed in various parts of that kingdom [China], but mostly in the province of Ochian [the former province of Hu-Kwang, now forming the two provinces of Hou-Nan and Hou-Pe] ... for therein were bookshops of the largest size," where books were sold at low prices. In ch. xvii (fol. 89-91), Mendoza enumerates the subjects treated in the books procured by Herrada; they included ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1803 - Volume III, 1569-1576 • E.H. Blair

... the complainant shrewdly. "Why vor shouldt you pe paid vor he'pin' your mamma yedt?" she asked. "You vouldn't haf gone from school home yedt undt helped her, if it hadn't been for vat she toldt you about de money. You vorked for de ...
— The Corner House Girls at School • Grace Brooks Hill

... stirred to excitability in quest of a "small cask of lager and large box of cheese;" John Chinaman "Hi yah'd" for one "bag lice all samee hab one Melican man," while a chivalric but seedy-looking Southerner, who seemed to have "seen better days," wished he "might be—if he didn't lay a pe-yor of boots thar whar that blanket whar." Not to be lost in the shuffle was a tall canting specimen of Yankee-dom perched on a water cask that "reckoned ther is right smart chance of folks on this 'ere ship," and "kalkerlate that that boat swinging thar war a ...
— Shadow and Light - An Autobiography with Reminiscences of the Last and Present Century • Mifflin Wistar Gibbs

... degrees north, and upon the banks of a stream flowing into the Great River, it is supposed that these villages were upon the stream now called Des Moines, which forms a part of the boundary between Iowa and Missouri. The Indians called the villages Pe-ou-a-sea and Moing-wena. They were probably situated about six miles above the present city ...
— The Adventures of the Chevalier De La Salle and His Companions, in Their Explorations of the Prairies, Forests, Lakes, and Rivers, of the New World, and Their Interviews with the Savage Tribes, Two Hu • John S. C. Abbott

... found food in abundance for all. The rivers gave them plenty of la-pe'-si (trout). They found in the meadows sweet ha'-ker (clover), and sour yu-yu-yu-mah (oxalis) for spring medicine, and sweet toon'-gy and other edible roots in abundance. The trees and bushes yielded acorns, pine nuts, fruits and berries. In the forests were ...
— Indians of the Yosemite Valley and Vicinity - Their History, Customs and Traditions • Galen Clark



Words linked to "Pe" :   Hebrew alphabet, Hebrew script, letter of the alphabet, letter, pe-tsai, alphabetic character, Hebraic alphabet



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