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Pas   Listen
noun
Pas  n.  
1.
A pace; a step, as in a dance.
2.
Right of going foremost; precedence.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Pas" Quotes from Famous Books



... fous nommes heros, et qui courent les champs, Couverts de sang et de poussiere, Voltaire, n'ont pas tous les ans La faceur de voir le derriere De ...
— History of Friedrich II. of Prussia, Vol. XIX. (of XXI.) • Thomas Carlyle

... her folly, and bitterly would the others upbraid her, telling again of the joys and wonders she had squandered. Then loudly would she bewail her weakness and plead in extenuation: "I seen the candy. Mouses from choc'late und Foxy Gran'pas from sugar—und I ain't never ...
— Little Citizens • Myra Kelly

... success nothing was more natural than that Chopin should allow himself to be easily persuaded to play again—il n'y a que le premier pas qui coute—but he said he would not play a third time. Accordingly, on August 18, he appeared once more on the stage of the Karnthnerthor Theatre. Also this time he received no payment, but played to oblige Count Gallenberg, ...
— Frederick Chopin as a Man and Musician - Volume 1-2, Complete • Frederick Niecks

... of great big black dogs—well, anyhow there were four or five! They were romping about, seemingly playing. One jumped on the bed, another rubbed his muzzle on mine! (the bed was low, and I slept outside). Now I never had anything but love for dogs of any kind, and as—n'est- ce pas?—love casts out fear, I simply got up, turned them all out, shut the door, and turned in again myself. Of course my idea was that they were flesh and blood, and ...
— The Book of Dreams and Ghosts • Andrew Lang

... equipment, as M. Charles Loiseau (in Le Balkan Slave et la Crise Autrichienne, Paris, 1898) remarks very truly, "n'est pas banal." One of his historians relates that he was furnished with a sword, a lance, javelins and arrows trimmed with falcons' feathers, sometimes also with a sabre and a small axe. He was garbed in a cloak of wolf's skin, using the same skin ...
— The Birth of Yugoslavia, Volume 1 • Henry Baerlein

... "On n'arrete pas dans un si beau chemin," continued the gay old gentleman, and, as the Colonel presented him to Julia, took the same liberty with that fair lady's cheek. Julia laughed, coloured, and disengaged herself. "I beg a thousand pardons," said the lawyer, with a bow which was not at all professionally ...
— Guy Mannering • Sir Walter Scott

... une fois ici un individu connu sous le nom de Jim Smiley: c'etait dans l'hiver de 49, peut-etre bien au printemps de 50, je ne me reappelle pas exactement. Ce qui me fait croire que c'etait l'un ou l'autre, c'est que je me souviens que le grand bief n'etait pas acheve lorsqu'il arriva au camp pour la premiere fois, mais de toutes facons il etait ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... no saw not that that frog had nothing of better than each frog.' (Je ne vois pas que cette grenouille ait rien de mieux qu'aucune grenouille.) [If that isn't grammar gone to seed, then ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... pas couvrir trop l'abime avec des fleurs,' said Mrs. Barton, as a sailor from his point of vantage might cry, ...
— Muslin • George Moore

... by him to the dwellers on the shores of Lake Leman, is equally applicable to the denizens of the Rhineland. "Je dirois volontiers a ceux qui ont du gout et sont sensibles—allez a Vevey, visitez le pays, examinez les sites, promenez vous sur le lac; et dites si la nature n'a pas fait ce beau pays pour une Julie, pour une Claire, et pour un St Preux; mais—— ne les y cherchez pas." In like manner we would say—Visit the Rhine, not as most tourists do, by rushing in a steam-boat from Rotterdam or Cologne to Basle or Baden, but deliberately, on shore as well as ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine - Volume 55, No. 343, May 1844 • Various

... dresses well; aristocratic manners; a good dancer, and knows all the newest steps, including the Pas de Quatre; obliging, and good-tempered; a teetotaller, and only smokes the best tobacco. Has the highest credentials from his last place. Available for "Church Parade" on Sunday, but prefers not to attend church previously, as he cannot get up ...
— The Idler Magazine, Volume III, June 1893 - An Illustrated Monthly • Various

... pas lire" argument has more than once suggested to me a certain historical comparison. There have probably never been in all history two more abominable scoundrels for cold-blooded cruelty, the worst of all vices, than Eccelino da Romano and the late Mr. Broadhead, patron saint ...
— A History of the French Novel, Vol. 2 - To the Close of the 19th Century • George Saintsbury

... dire a la fontaine, je ne boirai pas de ton eau," his Eminence cautioned her, whilst the lines of humour about his mouth emphasised themselves, and his grey eyes twinkled. "Other things equal, marriage is as much the proper state for the laity, as celibacy is the proper state for the clergy. You will marry. It would ...
— The Cardinal's Snuff-Box • Henry Harland

... {18} Ne pas confondre. Not the slim green pamphlet with the imprint of Andrew Elliot, for which (as I see with amazement from the book-lists) the gentlemen of England are willing to pay fancy prices; but its predecessor, a bulky ...
— The Art of Writing and Other Essays • Robert Louis Stevenson

... L'inconnu l'inconvenable.[2] Tu me coupe la parole d'une facon execrable— Le vice, OENONE, sais-tu ce que c'est que le vice? Que la rose n'est pas rose avant qu'elle pourrisse? Esprit terre-a-terre, ame bornee d'epicier, Non, tu ne les connais pas, les delices du fumier. Tu ne sais pas trouver tes etoiles dans l'egout, Tes ivresses dans la fange, ton amour ...
— Punch, Or the London Charivari, Volume 103, July 16, 1892 • Various

... go his own way. Marat once said of him: "Il n'est pas dangereux." The phrase had been taken up. Within the precincts of the National Convention, Marat was still looked upon as the great protagonist of Liberty, a martyr to his own convictions carried to the extreme, to squalor and ...
— I Will Repay • Baroness Emmuska Orczy

... [1] It afforded occupation and amusement for idle and solitary hours, and was published in the belief that the author's name never would be guessed at, or the work heard of beyond a very limited sphere. 'Ce n'est que le premier pas qu'il coute' in novel-writing, as in carrying one's head in their hand; The Inheritance and Destiny followed as matters of course. It has been so often and confidently asserted that almost all the characters are individual portraits, that ...
— Marriage • Susan Edmonstone Ferrier

... salon, je trouvai Mistriss B. assise sur son divan, pres d'un natif Syrien Chretien. Ils tenaient a eux deux une Bible, suspendue a une grosse cle par un mouchoir fin. Mistriss B. ne se rappelait pas avoir recu un bijou qu'un Aleppin affirmait lui avoir remis. Le Syrien disait une priere, puis prononcait alternativement les noms de la dame et de l'Aleppin. La Bible pivota au nom de la dame declaree par-la en erreur. ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 32, June 8, 1850 • Various

... En route home, each day they kill a sheep, and eat it ALL. 'What!' says I; 'the whole?' 'Every bit. I always take one leg and the liver for myself, and the totties roast the rest, and melt all the fat and entrails down in an iron pot and eat it with a wooden spoon.' Je n'en revenais pas. 'What! the whole leg and liver at one meal?' 'Every bit; ay, and you'd do the same, ma'am, if you were there.' No bread, no salt, no nothing— mutton and water. The old fellow was quite poetic and heroic in describing the joys and perils of Togt. I ...
— Letters from the Cape • Lady Duff Gordon

... commanded, and Frederic obeyed. Mr. Philip Hale mentions a letter from Balzac to his Countess Hanska, dated March 15, 1841, which concludes: "George Sand did not leave Paris last year. She lives at Rue Pigalle, No. 16...Chopin is always there. Elle ne fume que des cigarettes, et pas autre chose" Mr. Hale states that the italics are in the letter. So much for ...
— Chopin: The Man and His Music • James Huneker

... won't you, dear Madame Gueret? You'll give me my note when it comes to "Voyez vous pas que la nuit ...
— Woman on Her Own, False Gods & The Red Robe - Three Plays By Brieux • Eugene Brieux

... road (reste en route) went astray. [8] It makes nothing (cela ne fait rien) it does not matter. [9] I have not business (le n'ai pas ...
— Deer Godchild • Marguerite Bernard and Edith Serrell

... When I reached the boy who tended them, I asked him the way to the road that I wished to strike upon the plateau. After staring at me for some time, he screwed up his mouth, and said: 'Je comprenais pas francais, you.' You did not apply to me, but to himself, for it means I in ...
— Wanderings by southern waters, eastern Aquitaine • Edward Harrison Barker

... church of Radegonde at Poitiers, dedicated to the queen of Clothaire I.—who afterwards took the veil, and was distinguished for her piety—there is shown on a white marble slab a well-defined footmark, which is called "Le pas de Dieu," and is said to indicate the spot where the Saviour appeared to the tutelary saint of the place. Near the altar of the church of St. Genaro de Poveri in Naples, Mary's foot is shown suspended in a glazed frame. In the middle ...
— Roman Mosaics - Or, Studies in Rome and Its Neighbourhood • Hugh Macmillan

... view of the spot is given of which the author candidly says,— "Je ne puis repondre d'une exactitude scrupuleuse dans la vue generale que j'en donne, car etant alle seul pour l'examiner je perdis mon crayon, et je fus oblige de m'en fier a ma memoire. Je ne crois cependant pas avoir trop a me ...
— The Iliad of Homer • Homer

... guests, assembled at the Abbey, Consisted of—we give the sex the pas— The Duchess of Fitz-Fulke; the Countess Crabby; The Ladies Scilly, Busey;—Miss Eclat, Miss Bombazeen, Miss Mackstay, Miss O'Tabby, And Mrs. Rabbi, the rich banker's squaw; Also the honourable Mrs. Sleep, Who look'd a white lamb, yet ...
— Don Juan • Lord Byron

... further. He said: "Tous les grands poetes deviennent naturellement, fatalement, critiques. Je plains les poetes que guide le seul instinct; je les crois incomplets. Il serait prodigieux qu'un critique devint poete, et il est impossible qu'un poete ne contienne pas un critique." Yet a man cannot serve two masters, and Art is a jealous mistress who will not brook a rival. Even Beddoes found that his ideal of the physiologist-poet was fast slipping through his fingers, and confessed at last that ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Vol. 12, No. 32, November, 1873 • Various

... flocks, invaded the Salle des Pas-Perdus, galloped about in all directions like excited little black kids, calling from one end to the other of the echoing hall: "O Pe! O Tche!" inhaling with delight the odor of government, of administration that filled ...
— The Nabob, Vol. 2 (of 2) • Alphonse Daudet

... In Turner's Pas de Calais there is a buoy poised on the ridge of a near wave. It casts its reflection vertically down the flank of the wave, which slopes steeply. I cannot tell whether this is a license or a mistake; I ...
— Modern Painters Volume I (of V) • John Ruskin

... are fallin' fas', Fur summer days is been an' pas'; The air is blowin' mighty cold, Like it done in ...
— The Book of American Negro Poetry • Edited by James Weldon Johnson

... afraid, mon cher. You have a way of getting off with a jest, but I always feel that if I say a word they'll construe it into a proposal. Et ca ne m'arrange pas du tout, du tout. Mais ...
— Redemption and Two Other Plays • Leo Tolstoy et al

... the moment I spoke, and the words, "Hullo, old chap!" were no sooner uttered than my face grew red as a carnation pink. I felt as if I had committed some dreadful faux-pas, and instead of gazing steadfastly into the vacant chair, as I had been wont to do in my conversation with Boswell, my eyes fell, as though the invisible occupant of the chair were regarding me with ...
— The Enchanted Typewriter • John Kendrick Bangs

... the clerk could see no vestige of the perfumer. Even careless minds gained an idea of the immensity of human disaster from the aspect of this man, on whose face sorrow had cast its black pall, who revealed the havoc caused by that which had never before appeared in him,—by thought! N'est pas detruit qui veut. Light-minded people, devoid of conscience, to whom all things are indifferent, can never present such a spectacle of disaster. Religion alone sets a special seal upon fallen human beings; they ...
— Rise and Fall of Cesar Birotteau • Honore de Balzac

... suffered years ago. Nevertheless, the original work is before us, and not a copy of a lost original, and Mr. Berenson's enthusiastic praise ought to be lavished on the actual picture as it must have appeared in all its freshness and purity. "Je n'hesiterais pas," he declares,[103] "a le proclamer le plus important des portraits du maitre, un chef-d'oeuvre ne le cedant a aucun portrait d'aucun pays ou ...
— Giorgione • Herbert Cook

... French scholar, and coming suddenly in view of Mont Blanc, I ventured to say to my guide, "C'est tres joli." "Non, Monsieur," said he, "ce n'est pas joli, mais c'est curieux a voir." I think we were both of us rather ...
— Interludes - being Two Essays, a Story, and Some Verses • Horace Smith

... and Barras (5th October). Finally, a deputation of Bretons proceeded to Yeu, and begged Artois to place himself at the head of the numerous bands of devoted gentlemen and peasants who still awaited his appearance. All was in vain. Je ne veux pas aller Chouanner (play the Chouan) was his reply (12th November). On the morrow he informed Vauban that he had received orders from England to return at once. This assertion was at the time generally believed to be false; the letters ...
— William Pitt and the Great War • John Holland Rose

... prepared for occurrences of this nature; but, to my great surprise, I found, on the contrary, that this news had thrown them all into the greatest consternation; and, on every side, I heard only one exclamation, 'Il n'y aura pas de vie pour nous.' All the night, scattered groups were assembled around the fires, smoking their pipes, and listening with the greatest eagerness to exaggerated details of Indian hostilities; and in the morning I found the camp dispirited, ...
— The Exploring Expedition to the Rocky Mountains, Oregon and California • Brevet Col. J.C. Fremont

... described by an anonymous emissary of the English Court, as leading a regular life,—hunting when the weather permitted, and hearing mass every day with great precision and devotion. "Il est fort maigre," adds the same writer, "assez grand; son teint est brun, son humeur et sa personne ne sont pas desagreables." In another place, it is added, "Il paroit manquer de jugement et de resolution:" an opinion, unhappily, too correct.[58] On the question being put by Bolingbroke to the Duke of Berwick, whether the Prince was a bigot, the answer was in the negative. "Then," said Bolingbroke, "we ...
— Memoirs of the Jacobites of 1715 and 1745. - Volume I. • Mrs. Thomson

... d'avoir premedite la guerre et de n'avoir vu dans l'incident Hohenzollern qu'un pretexte de la provocation. N'accentuez pas votre premiere depeche comme vous le prescrit l'Empereur, attenuez la. Benedetti aura deja accompli sa mission lorsque cette attenuation lui parviendra, mais devant la Chambre vous y trouverez un argument pour etablir vos ...
— Studies in Literature and History • Sir Alfred Comyn Lyall

... cela donne au Pere et a la Reine, me font regretter vivement de l'avoir faite. Comme je l'ecris a ton Roi, je ne renvoie que mepris a toutes les interpretations qu'on y donne; ce que peuvent dire ministre et journaux ne me touche en rien, mais il n'y a pas de sacrifices que je ne suis dispose a faire pour l'interieur de ...
— The Letters of Queen Victoria, Vol 2 (of 3), 1844-1853 • Queen Victoria

... before his death handled the Saxons so hardlie, keeping them besieged within the Ile of Tenet, till at length they were constrained to sue for licence to depart home into Germanie in safetie: and the better to bring this to pas, they sent Vortigerne, (whome they had kept still with them in all these battels) vnto his sonne Vortimer, to be a meane for the obteining of their sute. But whilest this treatie was in hand, they got ...
— Chronicles 1 (of 6): The Historie of England 5 (of 8) - The Fift Booke of the Historie of England. • Raphael Holinshed

... noble warden," whispered Bea, "studying on Friday night! Looks like a dig as well as a prig, n'est-ce-pas?" ...
— Beatrice Leigh at College - A Story for Girls • Julia Augusta Schwartz

... j'ai ete conduit, dans ma definition de l'espece, a mettre decidement la ressemblance au-dessus de caracteres de succession. Ce n'est pas seulement a cause des circonstances propres au regne vegetal, dont je m'occupe exclusivement; ce n'est pas non plus afin de sortir ma definition des theories et de la rendre le plus possible utile aux naturalistes descripteurs et ...
— Darwiniana - Essays and Reviews Pertaining to Darwinism • Asa Gray

... curtain with a pas and r swirl of his draperies like the Lord Chancellor in Iolanthe, and the audience again abandoned itself ...
— Henry James, Jr. • William Dean Howells

... master, and an artist to direct personally the whole production. For he is most careful to tell us the dress and appearance of each character. 'Racine abhorre la realite,' says Auguste Vacquerie somewhere; 'il ne daigne pas s'occuper de son costume. Si l'on s'en rapportait aux indications du poete, Agamemnon serait vetu d'un sceptre et Achille d'une epee.' But with Shakespeare it is very different. He gives us directions about the costumes of Perdita, Florizel, Autolycus, ...
— Intentions • Oscar Wilde

... murmured the delighted professor. "La Francais est une belle langue. If, then, you like it, you weel study your lessons, n'est pas?" ...
— Marjorie Dean High School Freshman • Pauline Lester

... que je me donnois des airs qui ne m'appartenoient pas, en me portant le poing au nez. Je vous avoue, Monsieur, que je pensai oublier qu'il etoit pretre, et que je vis le moment ou j'allois luy demonter la machoire; mais, Dieu merci, je me contentai de le prendre par le bras et de le pousser dehors, avec ordre ...
— A Half Century of Conflict - Volume I - France and England in North America • Francis Parkman

... drew up abreast of us, her captain sprang into the mizen rigging and hailed through a speaking-trumpet, "Mais, Monsieur le capitaine, why you shall not haul down votre drapeau; Vous avez se rendre, n'est pas?" ...
— Under the Meteor Flag - Log of a Midshipman during the French Revolutionary War • Harry Collingwood

... to the 'Change, and there found her waiting for me and took her away, and to an alehouse, and there I made much of her, and then away thence and to another and endeavoured to caress her, but 'elle ne voulait pas', which did vex me, but I think it was chiefly not having a good easy place to do it upon. So we broke up and parted and I to the office, where we sat hiring of ships an hour or two, and then to my office, and thence (with Captain Taylor home to my house) to give him instructions and some ...
— Diary of Samuel Pepys, Complete • Samuel Pepys

... sort n'est pas a plaindre, Il est a desirer; Je n'ai plus rien a craindre, Car Dieu ...
— The Maidens' Lodge - None of Self and All of Thee, (In the Reign of Queen Anne) • Emily Sarah Holt

... "O, ne pleurez pas, mon Breitmann! Je trouve cela trop fort," Gry der Colonel sehr politely; "How! - you crois dat I was mort! Mon Dieu! 'Tis but one minute, As we galloped to this plain, I thought your spear, mon gaillard, ...
— The Breitmann Ballads • Charles G. Leland

... my countrymen as I think over it! Surely we are not such a race of snobs as not to recognize that a good barber is more to be respected than a poor lawyer; that, as a French saying goes, Il n'y a pas de sot metier. It is only the fool who is ashamed of ...
— Worldly Ways and Byways • Eliot Gregory

... quarrel," he said, "as related in the Bible, was exceedingly vulgar. It must have been a kind of prize-fight. Ce n'etait pas fin." ...
— Vendetta - A Story of One Forgotten • Marie Corelli

... rule of succession was a fixed one, and that he was unworthy to perform the sacrifices to the gods of the land and grain. It is a curious coincidence that the question of status in wives affects the present rulers of both China and Japan. Though the dowager was Empress-Mother, she always ceded the pas to the senior dowager, who had no children. And as to the Mikado's mother, who died last October, she was, it seems, never ...
— Ancient China Simplified • Edward Harper Parker

... I do not understand. Why do you desire so much to speak to me to-night and then not desire me at Constance? Ca—je ne le comprends pas!" ...
— A Woman's Will • Anne Warner

... were, though uncomfortably plain, adequate for temporary use. Happily we shall not have to endure many more meals here, as to-morrow we all dine with the King in the State House; and as the cuisine is under the control of that cordon bleu, Gaston de Faux Pas, who so long controlled the gastronomic (we might almost say Gastonomic) destinies of the Rois des Diamants in the Place Vendome, we may, I think, look forward to not going to bed hungry. Indeed, the anticipations formed from a survey of our meagre sleeping accommodation were not realized at dinnertime ...
— The Lady of the Shroud • Bram Stoker

... frequemment dans les rues adjacentes a votre cathedrale, n'avez-vous pas remarque la figure d'un artiste recemment installe, avec son chevalet, aupres du gigantesque monument et mettant toute la science technique de son art a ...
— Original Letters and Biographic Epitomes • J. Atwood.Slater

... necessite de mentir pour desavouer un ouvrage est une extremite qui repugne egalement a la conscience et a la noblesse du caractere; mais le crime est pour les hommes injustes qui rendent ce desaveu necessaire a la surete de celui qu'ils y forcent. Si vous avez erige en crime ce qui n'en est pas un, si vous avez porte atteinte, par des lois absurdes ou par des lois arbitraires, au droit naturel qu'ont tous les hommes, non seulement d'avoir une opinion, mais de la rendre publique, alors vous meritez de perdre celui qu'a ...
— Critical Miscellanies (Vol. 2 of 3) - Essay 3: Condorcet • John Morley

... out a series of works extending along the left bank of the Nive, as far as Itsassou, and of which the Pas-de-Roland marks the extreme limit. A merely superficial examination is enough to show that these defences existed only on the side to which access would otherwise have been easy, while the height overlooking the river on the other side, which is impregnable by nature, has been left ...
— Manners and Monuments of Prehistoric Peoples • The Marquis de Nadaillac

... in this instance, and rightfully enough. But is Monsieur X the only gentleman involved? Let us see. Who comes before Monsieur X? Why, Monsieur W, to be sure. And who before Monsieur W? Monsieur V, n'est-ce pas? And there is somebody still in front of Monsieur V. And if we go far enough back, we may come at last even to Monsieur A. Now, why are all these worthy gentlemen passed over in favor of ce cher Monsieur X? Well, perhaps Monsieur ...
— With the Procession • Henry B. Fuller

... believed all that mother church taught, (Joinville, p. 10,) but he cautioned Joinville against disputing with infidels. "L'omme lay (said he in his old language) quand il ot medire de la loi Crestienne, ne doit pas deffendre la loi Crestienne ne mais que de l'espee, dequoi il doit donner parmi le ventre dedens, tant comme elle ...
— The History of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire - Volume 6 • Edward Gibbon

... "Ce n'est pas mon affaire. I have no fancy for nursing infant geniuses. I suppose there are some stray gleams of mind and soul among these wretches. The Lord will take care of his own; or else they can work out their own salvation. I have heard you call our American system a ladder which any man can scale. ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Volume 7, Issue 42, April, 1861 • Various

... to circulate in front of the haut-pas, where he had still paced and still swung his glasses; but with these words he had paused, leaning against the billiard-table, to meet the interested urbanity of the answer they produced. "Are you very sure that having got rid of it you ...
— The Awkward Age • Henry James

... les chauffeurs. Ils devront conduire comme les cochers ordinaires a yeux nus ou avec les lunettes ordinaires de myopes ou de presbytes. Nos sportsmen declarent que ces lunettes de motoristes favorisent l'anonymat. Ces lunettes sont de veritables masques. On fait sous ce masque ce qu'on n'oserait pas faire a visage decouvert. En France il est defendu de se masquer en dehors du temps de carnaval ... si le masque tombe, la vitesse des motors deviendra fatalement normale."—M. N. de Noduwez ...
— Mr. Punch Awheel - The Humours of Motoring and Cycling • J. A. Hammerton

... personnellement M. Heger, mais je sais qu'il est peu de caracteres aussi nobles, aussi admirables que le sien. Il est un des membres les plus zeles de cette Societe de S. Vincent de Paul dont je t'ai deja parle, et ne se contente pas de servir les pauvres et les malades, mais leur consacre encore les soirees. Apres des journees absorbees tout entieres par les devoirs que sa place lui impose, il reunit les pauvres, les ouvriers, leur ...
— The Life of Charlotte Bronte - Volume 1 • Elizabeth Gaskell

... Chipiez, iii. 666:—"On obtenait ainsi un ensemble qui, malgre la rapidite du travail, ne manquait pas de gaiete, d'harmonie ...
— History of Phoenicia • George Rawlinson

... talens etaient consacres a procurer le bonheur d'un pays separe par un espace immense de la Grece, celle-ci ne voyait pas sans admiration, sans interet, sans une espece de jalousie secrete meme, les succes brillants qui ont toujours couronne vos nobles efforts, et rendu a l'independance un des plus beaux, des plus riches pays du monde. Votre retour en ...
— The Life of Thomas, Lord Cochrane, Tenth Earl of Dundonald, G.C.B., Admiral of the Red, Rear-Admiral of the Fleet, Etc., Etc. • Thomas Cochrane, Earl of Dundonald

... enough to young American eyes, advanced and spoke Monsieur Duval, in whose regard I was the most homelike and natural figure in the landscape, I have no doubt. It was with a real kindness that he called out some cheery nothing, some "Ah! Ah! ca va bien—vous vous amusez, n'est-ce pas?" or such like, and with an equal and unconscious amiability that I replied in like manner. The language was perfectly familiar to me, especially in its present routine connection, and I took off my cap instinctively, ...
— Margarita's Soul - The Romantic Recollections of a Man of Fifty • Ingraham Lovell

... "you refer me to those, do you? Ce n'est pas poli, Buddha dear, but you are always honest, aren't you?" She picked op the envelopes and held them fanwise before her. "Tell me, Buddha, why have they all been sent back? I myself read them with ...
— A Daughter of To-Day • Sara Jeannette Duncan (aka Mrs. Everard Cotes)

... who had no lines in her face and such beautiful grey hair; who had so strong a will-power, too, and knitted such soft comforters "pour nos braves chers poilus." And suddenly she would say: "Madame n'est pas fatiguee?" And Madame would answer: "No. Speak English, Augustine—Polly will pick up your French! Come here!" And, reaching up a pale hand, she would set straight a stray fluff of the girl's dark-brown hair or improve the ...
— Tatterdemalion • John Galsworthy

... l'on vous a trahi, ce n'est pas la trahison qui importe; c'est le pardon qu'elle a fait naitre dans votre ame. . . . Mais si la trahison n'a pas accru la simplicite, la confiance plus haute, l'etendue de l'amour, on vous aura trahi bien inutilement, et vous pouvez ...
— Red Pottage • Mary Cholmondeley

... said, slipping his arms through mine. "Ne vous fachez pas! Allow me to interest myself in my coffee-cups, and I will respect your coco. ...
— The Mysterious Affair at Styles • Agatha Christie

... to give way to her now. Can it ever be too early to acquire self-reliance, and is it not one of the most necessary lessons for a responsible human being to learn? Besides, 'ce n'est que le premier pas qui coute.' It is only the first wrench which will hurt her. She will find plenty of fresh interests and congenial occupations at St. Ambrose's. In a week, a fortnight, she will ...
— A Houseful of Girls • Sarah Tytler

... chateau in Blanque. The Ste. Valeries and the D'Arthenays were always friends, since Adam was, and till the Grand Monarque separated them with his accursed Revocation. Monsieur, that I am enchanted at this rencounter! La bonne aventure, oh gai! n'est-ce pas, ...
— Rosin the Beau • Laura Elizabeth Howe Richards

... to our language. A Parisian rolls his r, by making his uvula vibrate, keeping the tongue quite still: producing a peculiar gurgling sound. This is an abomination in the ears of the Conservatoire. "Ne grasseyez donc pas, Monsieur," or "Mademoiselle," says the professor, fiercely,—this peculiar way of saying r being called grasseyement. The pupil tries again, using the tip of his tongue this time. "Ah! I thought ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Volume 10, Number 59, September, 1862 • Various

... Babylonian deity Belus, and the Teutonic deity Wodan or Odin, should have been supposed to be connected with the founder of Buddhism in India. As Burnouf said in his "Introduction a l'Histoire du Buddhisme," p. 70: "On avait meme fait du Buddha une planete; et je ne sais pas si quelques savants ne se plaisent pas encore aujourd'hui a retrouver ce sage paisible sous les traits du belliqueux Odin." But we did not expect that we should have to read again, in a book published in 1869, such statements ...
— Chips From A German Workshop, Vol. V. • F. Max Mueller

... op. cit., who says, p. 171:—"Jamais, pas meme a l'epoque des invasions mussulmanes, l'Europe ne sembla plus pres de devenir asiatique qu'au moment ou Diocletien reconnaissait officiellement en Mithra, le protecteur de l'empire reconstitue." See also Cumont's Mysteres de Mithra, ...
— Pagan & Christian Creeds - Their Origin and Meaning • Edward Carpenter

... GENTLEMEN:—[3]Voulez-vous me permettre de faire mes remarques en francais? Si je m'addresse a vous dans une langue que je ne parle pas, et que personne ici ne comprends, j'en impute la faute entierement a l'example malheureux de Monsieur Coudert. Ce que je veux dire est que—this is the fault of Coudert. He has been switching the ...
— Modern Eloquence: Vol III, After-Dinner Speeches P-Z • Various

... from the shore-line. "Pa-pas-ku," says one of the Cree lads, pulling his pipe from his mouth and listening. Young Hudson's Bay to my enquiring look returns, "The Canadian ruffed grouse," which Sussex elucidated, "Bonasa umbellus logata," at which we all feel ...
— The New North • Agnes Deans Cameron

... fully occupied, were exchanged for a few old surly-looking slaves, and the huts were all deserted. The inhabitants, in consequence of the rumour of approaching war, having betaken themselves to one of their fortified pas, I had no alternative but to pass the night with these suspicious-looking creatures, who, feeling themselves beyond the control of their cruel masters, soon gave way to their own vile passions, and became most impertinent and intrusive—taking every advantage of my loneliness to indulge ...
— A Narrative of a Nine Months' Residence in New Zealand in 1827 • Augustus Earle

... of her seamstress friend. "De ce Paris, ou elle etait nee, elle savait tout—elle connaissait tout. Rien ne l'etonnait, nul ne l'intimidait. Sa science des details materiels de l'existence etait inconcevable. Impossible de la duper!—Eh bien! cette fille si laborieuse et si econome n'avait meme pas la plus vague notion des sentiments qui sont l'honneur de la femme. Je n'avais pas idee d'une si complete absence de sens moral; d'une si inconscience depravation, d'une impudence si effrontement naive."—"L'Argent des ...
— On the Old Road, Vol. 2 (of 2) - A Collection of Miscellaneous Essays and Articles on Art and Literature • John Ruskin

... duree des brouillards la proximite des rochers," goes on to enact as follows:—"Il est defendu de prendre, enlever ou detruire les ceufs des oiseaux de mer dans toute I'entendue de la jurisdiction de cette isle, sur la peine d'une amende qui ne sera pas moindre de sept livres tournois et n'excedera pas trente livres tournois."[3] Sec. 2 enacts, "Depuis ce jour[4] au 15 Octobre prochain, il est defendu de tuer, blesser, prendre ou chasser les oiseaux de mer dans toute l'entendue de la jurisdiction de cette isle." Sec. 3, "Ceux qui depuis ...
— Birds of Guernsey (1879) • Cecil Smith

... le meme grand journal, que M. Old-Nick, apres avoir derobe cet orang-outang a la Quotidienne, l'aurait ensuite cede au Commerce, comme propriete a lui appartenant. Je sais que M. Old-Nick est un garcon plein d'esprit et plein d'honneur, assez riche de son propre fond pour ne pas s'approprier les orangs-outangs des autres; cette accusation me surprit. Apres tout, me dis-je, il y a eu des monomanies plus extraodinaires que celle-la; le grand Bacon ne pouvait voir un baton de cire a ...
— International Miscellany of Literature, Art and Science, Vol. 1, - No. 3, Oct. 1, 1850 • Various

... "L'un n'empeche pas l'autre," he said, which puzzled Janey, whose French was very deficient. Even Ursula, supposed to be the best French scholar in the family, was not quite sure what it meant; but it was evidently something in favour of Cousin Anne, which was sweet to ...
— Phoebe, Junior • Mrs [Margaret] Oliphant

... absolutely with scorn, as she surveyed the little poems cursorily. I chid her. 'Ma cousine,' said she, 'tout cela m'ennuie a la mort.' I told her this was improper language. 'Dieu!' she exclaimed, 'il n'y a donc pas deux lignes de poesie dans toute la litterature francaise?' I inquired what she meant. She begged my pardon with proper submission. Ere long she was still. I saw her smiling to herself over the book. She began to learn assiduously. In half an hour she came and stood before me, ...
— Shirley • Charlotte Bronte

... began to differentiate themselves as in a chemical process. The thought of Pascal's was brought home to him: "A mesure qu'on a plus d'esprit, on trouve qu'il y a plus d'hommes originaux. Les gens du commun ne trouvent pas de difference entre les hommes." The typical and unvarying Hodge ceased to exist. He had been disintegrated into a number of varied fellow-creatures—beings of many minds, beings infinite in difference; some happy, many serene, a few depressed, ...
— Tess of the d'Urbervilles - A Pure Woman • Thomas Hardy

... en 1793," and "Paris in 1794." Read General Henriot's orders of the day in these two works. Comparton, "Histoire du Tribunal Revolutionaire de Paris," a letter by Trinchard, I. 306 (which is here given in the original, on account of the ortography): "Si tu nest pas toute seulle et que le compagnion soit a travailler tu peus ma chaire amie ventir voir juger 24 mesieurs tous si devent president ou conselier au parlement de Paris et de Toulouse. Je t'ainvite a prendre quelque chose ...
— The Origins of Contemporary France, Volume 3 (of 6) - The French Revolution, Volume 2 (of 3) • Hippolyte A. Taine

... toujour en pas. Oh! que nani; de laire, Vesin, vesino o barrulaire, T'an vist cava lou pous. An set; venon, doulent, Te prene un degout per si tasso. Mesfiso-te, ma bello: aqueli curo-biasso, Umble d'abord, soun leu de ...
— Social Life in the Insect World • J. H. Fabre

... reached Berteaucourt-les-Dames. A few days were spent here, during which Major C.P. James took over the command of the Battalion, and afterwards it marched via Doullens to Amplier, and after a night's rest in some huts there it reached Berles-au-Bois the next day. En route it passed through Pas, where there was a steep hill which presented such difficulties to the transport section that they remembered it when they returned in two year's time. At Berles-au-Bois the men were billeted in the ...
— The Story of the "9th King's" in France • Enos Herbert Glynne Roberts

... criminels par la faute des puissances, que par l'instinct de leur propre nature. Les Venetiens les aigrirent; l'eglise Romaine prefera de les persecuter au devoir de les eclaircir; la maison d'Autriche en fit les instruments de sa politique, et quand le philosophe examine leur histoire il ne voit pas que les ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, No. CCCXLII. Vol. LV. April, 1844 • Various

... letter to Aunt Freddy, or to Barty Mangan, would briefly announce his continued existence. Sometimes he wrote to Christian, and would expand a little more to her; telling her of how one Professor had remarked of his work that it was now presque pas mal, and that this dizzying encomium had encouraged him to begin a Salon (its subject described at length, with elucidatory sketches); further, that he had taken a very jolly atelier, and "dear old Chose" was "on the Jury," ...
— Mount Music • E. Oe. Somerville and Martin Ross

... inseparable du nom Roman." And her constancy: "Voila de fruit glorieux de la patience Romaine. Des peuples qui s'enhardissaient et se fortifiaient par leurs malheurs avaient bien raison de croire qu'on sauvait tout pourvu qu'on ne perdit pas l'esperance." And again: "Parmi eux, dans les etats les plus tristes, jamais les faibles conseils n'ont ete seulement ecoutes." The reading of such a fine tribute to the glory of ancient liberties is not likely to diminish our desire for freedom; rather, to add to the natural ...
— Principles of Freedom • Terence J. MacSwiney

... DES CANNIBALES; and the strong expressions of the ESSAYS on man, the inconstant, irresolute being, contrary to himself, marvellously vain, various and changeful, were perhaps not unconnected with (peut etre pas etrangeres a) the conception of HAMLET. The author of the scene of the grave-diggers must have felt the savour and retained the impression of this thought, humid and cold as the grave: 'The heart and the life of a great and triumphant emperor are but the repast of a little ...
— Montaigne and Shakspere • John M. Robertson

... forget himself in the lap of money, or spend his hours in counting idle treasures, but be up and briskly doing; he will have the true alchemic touch, which is not that of Midas, but which transmutes dead money into living delight and satisfaction. Etre et pas avoir—to be, not to possess—that is the problem of life. To be wealthy, a rich nature is the first requisite and money but the second. To be of a quick and healthy blood, to share in all honourable ...
— Lay Morals • Robert Louis Stevenson

... part of it sufficed to procure competence for himself. How inferior in wit, in acuteness, in stratagem, was Douce to Vargrave; and yet Douce had gulled him like a child! Well said the shrewd small philosopher of France—"On peut etre plus fin qu'un autre, mais pas plus fin que ...
— Alice, or The Mysteries, Book XI • Edward Bulwer Lytton

... has his pretty phrases!' cried the margravine; adding encouragingly, 'S'il nest pas tant ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... received from a very distinguished Swiss: "Une chose me frappait aussi, dans les tendances allemandes, une incroyable inconscience. Accaparer le bien d'autrui leur paraissait si naturel qu'ils ne comprenaient meme pas que l'on eut quelque desir de se defendre. Le monde entier etait fait pour constituer le champ d'exploitation de l'Allemagne, et celui qui s'opposait a l'accomplissement de cette destinee etait, pour tout allemand, l'objet d'une ...
— New York Times Current History: The European War, Vol 2, No. 1, April, 1915 - April-September, 1915 • Various

... gone, the Earl observed, 'Bon sang ne peut pas mentir! To think of that beautiful creature condemned to waste her lovely eyes on faded ink and yellow papers! Why, she is, as the modern poet says, "a sight to make an old ...
— The Disentanglers • Andrew Lang

... pas most deeply," he murmured. "Sir Everard," he went on, "you promised to tell me of some of your days with a shotgun in South Africa. Isn't there a bird there which ...
— The Great Impersonation • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... both with themselves and with their neighbors. Trains, travel, traffic, eat into their solidarity, and may in time disintegrate it; but a Basque has not yet lost a particle of his pride of clan; it is inborn and ineradicable; he would be no other than he is; "je ne suis pas un homme" he boasts, "je suis un Basque." You note instinctively his straighter bearing among the neighboring French peasantry; you can often single out a Basque by his air. This hardens into a peculiar result: since they are all of the same high lineage, all are aristocrats; every ...
— A Midsummer Drive Through The Pyrenees • Edwin Asa Dix

... Francorum, assigned to about the year 720. St. Martin, iv. 469. The modern French writers in general subscribe to the opinion of Thierry: Faramond fils de Markomir, quo que son nom soit bien germanique, et son regne possible, ne figure pas dans les histoires les plus dignes de foi. A. Thierry, Lettres ...
— The History of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire - Volume 3 • Edward Gibbon

... exceedingly filthy and poor, so filthy and so poor that the brigadier, noticing, probably, by the expression of my face, the impression it made on me, observed, shrugging his shoulders, and half closing his eyelids: 'Ce n'est pas ... oeil de perdrix.' ... What precisely he meant by this remained a mystery to me.... When I addressed him in French, I got no reply from him in that language. Two objects struck me especially in the brigadier's abode: a large ...
— A Desperate Character and Other Stories • Ivan Turgenev

... theatre as it was, I dare well say, in all this world there n'as*. *was not The circuit a mile was about, Walled of stone, and ditched all without. *Round was the shape, in manner of compass, Full of degrees, the height of sixty pas* *see note * That when a man was set on one degree He letted* not his fellow for to see. *hindered Eastward there stood a gate of marble white, Westward right such another opposite. And, shortly to conclude, such a place Was never on earth made in so little space, For in the land there ...
— The Canterbury Tales and Other Poems • Geoffrey Chaucer

... being the local representative of Paradise, we may say, as the courteous Frenchman did to Dr Moore, upon the Doctor's apologetically remarking of a word which he had used, that he feared it was not good French—"Non, Monsieur, il n'est pas; mais il merite bien l'etre." Certainly, if Ceylon was not, at least it ought to have been, Paradise; for at this day there is no place on earth which better supports the paradisiacal character (always excepting Lapland, as an Upsal professor ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 54, No. 337, November, 1843 • Various

... que mes humbles remercimens pour le grand honneur que vous m'avez fait, par vos tres-agreables visites, tant a Hambourg qu'en ce lieu, comme aussi en m'envoyant ce noble gentilhomme qui m'a apporte les lettres de votre Excellence. Je ne manquerai pas, quand il plaira a Dieu me ramener en Angleterre, de contribuer tout ce qui sera en mon pouvoir pour votre service, et j'espere que l'issue en sera a votre contentement, et que dans peu de temps je ...
— A Journal of the Swedish Embassy in the Years 1653 and 1654, Vol II. • Bulstrode Whitelocke

... De mistis knows it aint much, pas' noo bread, An' two—three pies. I've sot some bacon sisslin', An' put some taties on ...
— Laura Secord, the heroine of 1812. - A Drama. And Other Poems. • Sarah Anne Curzon

... grandees I see about, can there be a grander gentleman than your dear old father? You need not squeeze my hand so.—Those little imps are look—that has nothing to do with the question. Viens, Leonore! Tu connois bien, monsieur, n'est-ce pas? qui te fait de si ...
— The Newcomes • William Makepeace Thackeray

... Moi, je suis socialiste. Je ne crois pas en l'existence de Dieu. Faut pas le dire ...
— Ulysses • James Joyce

... battle cry of Verdun, "Ne passeront pas!" ("They shall not pass!"), was an inspiration to the French army and to the world. Then as autumn drifted its red foliage over the heights surrounding the bloody field, the French struck back. General Nivelle, who had taken command at Verdun under Joffre, commenced a series ...
— History of the World War - An Authentic Narrative of the World's Greatest War • Francis A. March and Richard J. Beamish

... singer, "n'il n'est pas defendu d'etre voleur, mais c'est defendu d'etre attrape" (It is not against the law to be a thief, ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Vol. 11, - No. 22, January, 1873 • Various

... the governess, with her black eyebrows meeting over a short, thick nose, and a complexion like pale-brown paper. Of all the eyes turned toward the carriage, her good-natured eyes only were dropping tears, and it was her sobbing voice alone that broke the silence with an appeal to me: "N'oublie pas ton francais, mon cheri." In three months, simply by playing with us, she had taught me not only to speak French, but to read it as well. She was indeed an excellent playmate. In the distance, half-way down to the great gates, a light, open trap, harnessed ...
— A Personal Record • Joseph Conrad

... ces connoissances il semble avoir perverti l'ordre naturel, puisqu'au lieu de s'attacher d'abord a rechercher l'origine de notre globe il a commence par travailler a s'instruire de la nature. Mais a l'entendre, ce renversement de l'ordre a ete pour lui l'effet d'un genie favorable qui l'a conduit pas a pas et comme par la main aux decouvertes les plus sublimes. C'est en decomposant la substance de ce globe par une anatomie exacte de toutes ses parties qu'il a premierement appris de quelles matieres il etait compose et quels arrangemens ces memes matieres observaient ...
— The Origin of Species - From 'The Westminster Review', April 1860 • Thomas H. Huxley

... moment longer Maisie remembered what Mrs. Wix had said about every one's liking him. It came out enough through the morning powder, it came out enough in the heaving bosom, how the landlady liked him. He had evidently ordered something lovely for Mrs. Wix. "Et bien soigne, n'est-ce-pas?" ...
— What Maisie Knew • Henry James

... in spite of the French proverb, "Toute verite n'est pas bonne a dire," that I think all truth is to be told; that is the teller's part: how it is received, or what effect it has, is the receiver's.... I think to suspect a person of wrongdoing more painful than to know that they have done wrong. In the first place, uncertainty ...
— Records of Later Life • Frances Anne Kemble

... between the word which is flung without provocation, and the word which is the speaker's last resource. When "Bobus" Smith told Talleyrand that his mother had been a beautiful woman, and Talleyrand replied, "C'etait donc Monsieur votre pere qui n'etait pas bien," we hold the witticism to have been cruel because unjustifiable. A man should be privileged to say his mother was beautiful, without inviting such a very obvious sarcasm. But when Madame de Stael pestered Talleyrand to say what he would do if he saw ...
— Americans and Others • Agnes Repplier

... earth, every child will be born naturally evil and worthy of punishment, a moral advance of humanity to perfection is plainly impossible. [Footnote: It may be added that, as G. Monod observed, "les hommes du moyen age n'avaient pas conscience des modifications successives que le temps apporte avec lui dans les choses humaines" ...
— The Idea of Progress - An Inquiry Into Its Origin And Growth • J. B. Bury

... with rebuilding the edifice after the fire and refitted first the Grand Salle, to-day the famous Salle des Pas Perdus, crowded with the shuffling coming and going crowd of men and women whose business, or no business at all, brings them to this central point for the dissemination of legal gossip. It is a magnificent apartment, ...
— Royal Palaces and Parks of France • Milburg Francisco Mansfield

... will be a baptism in dis chu'ch, at half-pas' ten in de mawnin'. Dis baptism will be of two adults an' ...
— Jokes For All Occasions - Selected and Edited by One of America's Foremost Public Speakers • Anonymous

... having the faculty of propagation within himself: A circumstance necessary to the state of innocence, wherein a man's happiness was not to depend upon the caprice of another. It was not till after he had made a faux pas, that he had his female mate. Many such transformations of individuals have been well attested; particularly one by Montaigne, and another by the late Bishop of Salisbury. From all which it appears, that this system of male and female ...
— The Bickerstaff-Partridge Papers • Jonathan Swift

... curious extract shows "Ils sont grands preneurs d'opium, et je me suis quelque fois etonne de la quantite que je leur en voiois prendre; aussi ils s'y accoutumerent des la jeunesse; le jour d'une bataille ils ne s'oublient pas de doubler la dose; cette drogue les anime ou plutot les enyvre, et les rend insensibles an danger, de sorte quils se jettant dans le combat comma des betes furieuses, ne sachant ce que c'est de fuir ... c'est un plaisir de les voir ainsi avec leur ...
— A Holiday in the Happy Valley with Pen and Pencil • T. R. Swinburne

... 405: "Ces jours passez, il y eust ung personnaige de la haulte chambre, auquel il sembla pour ne perdre temps debvoir porter, (comme il fist) un billette a la basse par laquelle il mettait en advant s'il n'estoit pas raisonnable que le filz secourust le pere, voullant dire de ce roy a l'Empereur. Ce qui fut si bien recueilly du tiers estat, si promptment et avecques grande raison respondu, comme par le dernier parlement et le ...
— The Reign of Mary Tudor • James Anthony Froude

... asked Laura, and coloured at the thought that she had again, without knowing it, been guilty of a FAUX PAS. ...
— The Getting of Wisdom • Henry Handel Richardson

... any means, sparing of their Insults; But their Offrs Esspacially, Represented to ye life (as far as their Capacitys would admit) ye conduct of Infernal Spirits, under Certain Restrictions; Having pas'd through those Savage Insults, we at length came to a hill nigh to the place where we at first engaged ye Enimy ye morning; we were here met by a number of Insolent Soldiers among whom was one Woman who appeared remarkably Malicious and attempted several ...
— The Campaign of 1776 around New York and Brooklyn • Henry P. Johnston

... into the river in the presence of Diana, after an engraving by C. de Pas, in "L'Endimion de Gombauld," Paris, 1624, 8vo, p. 223. The French plates were sent to England and used for the English version of this novel: "Endimion, an excellent fancy ... interpreted by Richard Hurst," London, 1639, ...
— The English Novel in the Time of Shakespeare • J. J. Jusserand

... would have to give the pas to ye, Miss Janice," protested Evatt, "could ye but be presented ...
— Janice Meredith • Paul Leicester Ford

... another subject—"go down to the foundations." He answered that he was afraid it did on all subjects really of any significance to man. "As to the present life," he continued, "I am quite willing to accept Bayle's dictum: 'Les Sceptiques ne nioient pas qu'il ne se fallut conformer aux coutumes de son pays, et pratiquer des devoirs de la morale, et prendre parti en ces choses la sur des probabilites, sans ...
— The Eclipse of Faith - Or, A Visit To A Religious Sceptic • Henry Rogers

... "Ce n'est pas une vie, monsieur," were the first words he uttered. He admired Miss Petrovitch very much, and told us in an undertone that she was a daughter of the governor of Scutari, niece of the King of Montenegro, and one of "les familles le ...
— The Luck of Thirteen - Wanderings and Flight through Montenegro and Serbia • Jan Gordon

... it. Flatter the peasant and you will be almost sure to move him. Say, 'Ah, what a time that was when you had the old wine in your cellars!' He will say, 'Nest-ce pas, monsieur?' and brighten up at the thought of it. Then you will continue: 'Yes, indeed, that was a wine worth drinking. There was nothing like it to be found within fifty kilomtres. What a bouquet! What a fine got du terroir!' ...
— Two Summers in Guyenne • Edward Harrison Barker

... thrilling and heart-rending situations, and virtue triumphant at the end. Owing to Balzac's attack on journalism in the "Monographie de la Presse Parisienne," which had appeared in March, and finished with the words, "Si la presse n'existait pas, il faudrait ne pas l'inventer," the whole newspaper world was peculiarly hostile to him at this time, and his play received no mercy, and was a failure. Curiously enough, Balzac seemed rather pleased ...
— Honore de Balzac, His Life and Writings • Mary F. Sandars

... the points of repulsion by which a stranger is apt to be encountered. Still less do they mean those mental habits of suspicion, mystery and indirectness, which may infect communities as well as individuals. For these there is neither extenuation nor excuse. Rousseau has finely said: 'Le premier pas vers le vice est de mettre du mystere aux actions innocentes; et quiconque aime a se cacher, a tot ou tard raison de se cacher. Un seul precepte de morale peut tenir lieu de tous les autres, c'est celui-ci: Ne fais, ni ne dis jamais rien que tu ne veuilles que tout le monde ...
— The Knickerbocker, or New-York Monthly Magazine, April 1844 - Volume 23, Number 4 • Various

... attention of Bukawai's audience to him. It also brought Bukawai quite miraculously out of his swoon, but when the old witch-doctor saw the reason for the disturbance he quickly relapsed into unconsciousness before anyone discovered his FAUX PAS. ...
— Jungle Tales of Tarzan • Edgar Rice Burroughs

... 368,000, of whom 92,000 were fighting men. They were bound for the West; and there were two roads, by one or other of which alone they could leave their country. One was on the right bank of the Rhone by the Pas de l'Ecluse, a pass between the Jura mountains and the river, so narrow that but two carts could go abreast along it; the other, and easier, was through ...
— Caesar: A Sketch • James Anthony Froude

... those of whom we have just spoken, wens out by the Rue de Bourgogne, others were dragged through the Salle des Pas Perdus towards the grated door opposite the Pont de ...
— The History of a Crime - The Testimony of an Eye-Witness • Victor Hugo

... portrait of another than Rosalie. The younger man was much affected; he groaned aloud and covered his face with his hands. Not so the old general. 'Tenez,' said he, wiping the barrel of his weapon on his glove, 'c'est dommage! je ne contais pas la-dessus; mais, que voulez-vous? Peste! ce n'est qu'un Anglais ...
— Kate Coventry - An Autobiography • G. J. Whyte-Melville

... a bazaar. I grant you it makes a very pretty setting for her and all her coquetries. But in my time respectable women were contented with furniture covered with red or yellow silk damask furnished by their upholsterers. They didn't go about trying to hunt up the impossible. 'On ne cherche pas midi a quatorze heures'. You hold, as I do, to the old fashions, though you are not nearly so old, my dear Elise, and Jacqueline's mother thought as we think. She would say that her daughter is being very badly brought up. To be sure, all young creatures nowadays ...
— Serge Panine • Georges Ohnet

... her his hand as she rose from her chair, and bowing over hers until his lips touched it. "Take it, unworthy as it is, as an earnest of the realisation of the happy dreams that will come to me to-night. Au revoir, pas adieu!" ...
— The Mummy and Miss Nitocris - A Phantasy of the Fourth Dimension • George Griffith

... boys who play on the sidewalks, are in the vernacular of La Belle France. In Jackson Square, notices to warn visitors not to disturb the shrubbery, are posted in two languages, the French being first. On one poster I saw the sentence: "Ne touche pas a les fleurs," followed by the literal translation into English: "Don't touch to the flowers." I was happy to observe that the ...
— Camp-Fire and Cotton-Field • Thomas W. Knox

... mentioned its Creator." Laplace, who, though the most supple of politicians, was as stiff as a martyr on every point of his philosophy or religion (e. g., even under Charles X he never concealed his dislike of the priests), drew himself up and answered {2} bluntly, "Je n'avais pas besoin de cette hypothese-la."[2] Napoleon, greatly amused, told this reply to Lagrange, who exclaimed, "Ah! c'est une belle hypothese; ca explique beaucoup ...
— A Budget of Paradoxes, Volume II (of II) • Augustus de Morgan

... vais vous dire est un r'ecit du car'eme Irlandais. Le boiteux, l'aveugle, le paralytique des rues de Dublin ou de Limerick, vous le diraient mieux que moi, cher lecteur, si vous alliez le leur demander, un sixpense d'argent 'a la main.-Il n'est pas une jeune fille catholique 'a laquelle on ne Fait appris pendant les jours de pr'eparation 'a la communion sainte, pas un berger des bords de la Blackwater qui ne le puisse ...
— The Countess Cathleen • William Butler Yeats

... the liberty of the house. They share the family mats, and sometimes have a special ladder provided for their ascent and descent. Their food at the best is somewhat scanty. They have names such as "Diguim,"[30] "Spas,"[31] and are addressed by their masters with the greatest familiarity. A dog, however, that howls in its sleep, is thought to forebode the death of its master or of some inmate of the house. It must be sold, ...
— The Manbos of Mindano - Memoirs of the National Academy of Sciences, Volume XXIII, First Memoir • John M. Garvan

... your jolly gossiping letter, full of cricket, archery, fishing, and I know not what pleasant goings-on. But what is one to do? one can only write about what is one's subject of interest for the time being, and Blake stands in that relation to me just now. I should prefer it otherwise, but si on n'a pas ce qu'on aime il faut aimer ce qu'on a. I have no incident to relate; these parts get on without incidents somehow, and without society. I wish there were some, particularly ladies' society. I break the tenth commandment ...
— Tom Brown at Oxford • Thomas Hughes

... poet Boileau was made very unhappy by neglect and restraint during his education: when he grew up, he would never agree with those who talked to him of the pleasures of childhood.[49] "Peut on," disoit ce poete amoureux de l'independence, "ne pas regarder comme un grand malheur, le chagrin continuel et particulier a cet age, de ne jamais faire sa volonte?" It was in vain, continues his biographer, to boast to him of the advantages of this happy constraint, which saves youth from so many follies. "What ...
— Practical Education, Volume I • Maria Edgeworth

... (and that only at last) is slavishly to entreat pardon from his brothers-in-law for the mere offence of marrying their sister; and he dies by an improbable accident, the same pious and respectable insipidity which he has lived,—'ne valant pas la peine qui se donne pour lui.' The prison-scenes between the Duchess and her tormentors are painful enough, if to give pain be a dramatic virtue; and she appears in them really noble; and might have appeared far more so, had Webster ...
— Plays and Puritans - from "Plays and Puritans and Other Historical Essays" • Charles Kingsley

... Protag; Ion; Apol.). The characters are ill-drawn. Socrates assumes the 'superior person' and preaches too much, while Alcibiades is stupid and heavy-in-hand. There are traces of Stoic influence in the general tone and phraseology of the Dialogue (compare opos melesei tis...kaka: oti pas aphron mainetai): and the writer seems to have been acquainted with the 'Laws' of Plato (compare Laws). An incident from the Symposium is rather clumsily introduced, and two somewhat hackneyed quotations (Symp., ...
— Alcibiades II • An Imitator of Plato

... my dear Anne: it was hazardous so to speak to you. I ought to have said his thoughtless ways. Quant a moi, je ne vois pas la ...
— Elster's Folly • Mrs. Henry Wood

... of the two realists was no doubt widely different. 'C'est en haine du realisme', wrote Flaubert, 'que j'ai entrepris ce roman. Mais je n'en deteste pas moins la fausse idealite, dont nous sommes berces par le temps qui court' (Corresp. ...
— Recent Developments in European Thought • Various

... than to hear the French of the country. You can't understand why all the people insist upon speaking it so badly. I asked the conductor if he had been at the battle; he burst out laughing like a philosopher, as he was, and said "Pas si bete." I asked the farmer whether his contributions were lighter now than in King William's time, and lighter than those in the time of the Emperor? He vowed that in war-time he had not more to pay than in time of peace (and this strange fact is vouched for by every person of ...
— Little Travels and Roadside Sketches • William Makepeace Thackeray

... designed to reach Calais, and which swept before it multitudes of Flemish refugees. There was an exodus of all classes from Antwerp into Holland and England, and then a huge process of depopulation in Flanders and the Pas de Calais. This flood came to the eastern and southern parts of England and particularly to London, and there hastily improvised organisations distributed it to a number of local committees, each of which took a share of the refugees, hired and ...
— Mr. Britling Sees It Through • H. G. Wells

... comprenez pas, dites-vous, comment je pourrois prouver ce que j'ai ovance touchant la communication, ou l'harmonie de deux suhstances aussi differentes que l'ame et le corps? Il est vrai que je crois en avoir trouve ...
— Froude's Essays in Literature and History - With Introduction by Hilaire Belloc • James Froude

... it eat men, women, and children, say the old chronicles, but "ne pardonnait meme pas aux vaisseaux ...
— The Story of Rouen • Sir Theodore Andrea Cook

... suivez en arriere, et gardez bien que le prisonnier n'echappe pas;" so saying, monsieur le capitaine led the way to a large white house and buildings, about two hundred yards from the river's banks. On their arrival, Newton was surrounded by twenty or thirty slaves of both sexes, who chattered and jabbered ...
— Newton Forster - The Merchant Service • Captain Frederick Marryat

... carriage, Mary, and come to stay with you. You want me—n'est ce pas?" she said, coaxingly, with her arms round Mary's neck; "if you don't, tant pis! for I am the bad penny you English speak ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 4, No. 24, Oct. 1859 • Various

... when all this world's wealth stands waste, as now up and down in the world there are wind-buffeted walls standing in mouldering decay"—and the description which follows is either a reminiscence of "The Ruined City," or else it shows that the subject of ruins was familiar with the Sc{-o}pas.[86] ...
— Anglo-Saxon Literature • John Earle



Words linked to "Pas" :   pas de trois, Pas de Calais, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, step, faux pas



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