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Order   Listen
noun
Order  n.  
1.
Regular arrangement; any methodical or established succession or harmonious relation; method; system; as:
(a)
Of material things, like the books in a library.
(b)
Of intellectual notions or ideas, like the topics of a discource.
(c)
Of periods of time or occurrences, and the like. "The side chambers were... thirty in order." "Bright-harnessed angels sit in order serviceable." "Good order is the foundation of all good things."
2.
Right arrangement; a normal, correct, or fit condition; as, the house is in order; the machinery is out of order.
3.
The customary mode of procedure; established system, as in the conduct of debates or the transaction of business; usage; custom; fashion. "And, pregnant with his grander thought, Brought the old order into doubt."
4.
Conformity with law or decorum; freedom from disturbance; general tranquillity; public quiet; as, to preserve order in a community or an assembly.
5.
That which prescribes a method of procedure; a rule or regulation made by competent authority; as, the rules and orders of the senate. "The church hath authority to establish that for an order at one time which at another time it may abolish."
6.
A command; a mandate; a precept; a direction. "Upon this new fright, an order was made by both houses for disarming all the papists in England."
7.
Hence: A commission to purchase, sell, or supply goods; a direction, in writing, to pay money, to furnish supplies, to admit to a building, a place of entertainment, or the like; as, orders for blankets are large. "In those days were pit orders beshrew the uncomfortable manager who abolished them."
8.
A number of things or persons arranged in a fixed or suitable place, or relative position; a rank; a row; a grade; especially, a rank or class in society; a group or division of men in the same social or other position; also, a distinct character, kind, or sort; as, the higher or lower orders of society; talent of a high order. "They are in equal order to their several ends." "Various orders various ensigns bear." "Which, to his order of mind, must have seemed little short of crime."
9.
A body of persons having some common honorary distinction or rule of obligation; esp., a body of religious persons or aggregate of convents living under a common rule; as, the Order of the Bath; the Franciscan order. "Find a barefoot brother out, One of our order, to associate me." "The venerable order of the Knights Templars."
10.
An ecclesiastical grade or rank, as of deacon, priest, or bishop; the office of the Christian ministry; often used in the plural; as, to take orders, or to take holy orders, that is, to enter some grade of the ministry.
11.
(Arch.) The disposition of a column and its component parts, and of the entablature resting upon it, in classical architecture; hence (as the column and entablature are the characteristic features of classical architecture) a style or manner of architectural designing. Note: The Greeks used three different orders, easy to distinguish, Doric, Ionic, and Corinthian. The Romans added the Tuscan, and changed the Doric so that it is hardly recognizable, and also used a modified Corinthian called Composite. The Renaissance writers on architecture recognized five orders as orthodox or classical, Doric (the Roman sort), Ionic, Tuscan, Corinthian, and Composite.
12.
(Nat. Hist.) An assemblage of genera having certain important characters in common; as, the Carnivora and Insectivora are orders of Mammalia. Note: The Linnaean artificial orders of plants rested mainly on identity in the numer of pistils, or agreement in some one character. Natural orders are groups of genera agreeing in the fundamental plan of their flowers and fruit. A natural order is usually (in botany) equivalent to a family, and may include several tribes.
13.
(Rhet.) The placing of words and members in a sentence in such a manner as to contribute to force and beauty or clearness of expression.
14.
(Math.) Rank; degree; thus, the order of a curve or surface is the same as the degree of its equation.
Artificial order or Artificial system. See Artificial classification, under Artificial, and Note to def. 12 above.
Close order (Mil.), the arrangement of the ranks with a distance of about half a pace between them; with a distance of about three yards the ranks are in open order.
The four Orders, The Orders four, the four orders of mendicant friars. See Friar.
General orders (Mil.), orders issued which concern the whole command, or the troops generally, in distinction from special orders.
Holy orders.
(a)
(Eccl.) The different grades of the Christian ministry; ordination to the ministry. See def. 10 above.
(b)
(R. C. Ch.) A sacrament for the purpose of conferring a special grace on those ordained.
In order to, for the purpose of; to the end; as means to. "The best knowledge is that which is of greatest use in order to our eternal happiness."
Minor orders (R. C. Ch.), orders beneath the diaconate in sacramental dignity, as acolyte, exorcist, reader, doorkeeper.
Money order. See under Money.
Natural order. (Bot.) See def. 12, Note.
Order book.
(a)
A merchant's book in which orders are entered.
(b)
(Mil.) A book kept at headquarters, in which all orders are recorded for the information of officers and men.
(c)
A book in the House of Commons in which proposed orders must be entered. (Eng.)
Order in Council, a royal order issued with and by the advice of the Privy Council. (Great Britain)
Order of battle (Mil.), the particular disposition given to the troops of an army on the field of battle.
Order of the day, in legislative bodies, the special business appointed for a specified day.
Order of a differential equation (Math.), the greatest index of differentiation in the equation.
Sailing orders (Naut.), the final instructions given to the commander of a ship of war before a cruise.
Sealed orders, orders sealed, and not to be opened until a certain time, or arrival at a certain place, as after a ship is at sea.
Standing order.
(a)
A continuing regulation for the conduct of parliamentary business.
(b)
(Mil.) An order not subject to change by an officer temporarily in command.
To give order, to give command or directions.
To take order for, to take charge of; to make arrangements concerning. "Whiles I take order for mine own affairs."
Synonyms: Arrangement; management. See Direction.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Order" Quotes from Famous Books



... a mortal blow at the principle of universal liability by excusing any person who found a substitute for himself or paid into the war office a sum, not exceeding three hundred dollars, to be fixed by general order. This provision, so crass and so obviously favoring the well-to-do, sowed seeds of bitterness which sprang up ...
— History of the United States • Charles A. Beard and Mary R. Beard

... the sheriff would grant no indulgence, and ordered the numerous friends who came to take the last farewell of them as they stood chained to the stake, to be forcibly torn away, and threatened them with arrest; but the indignation of the spectators made him revoke this order. They endured the terrific conflagration, and honoured God equally in ...
— Fox's Book of Martyrs - Or A History of the Lives, Sufferings, and Triumphant - Deaths of the Primitive Protestant Martyrs • John Fox

... of Hidalgo's insurrection, Don Luis had sent an express messenger to his son Don Rafael, summoning him to the Hacienda del Valle. In obedience to the order of his father, the young captain of dragoons, having obtained leave of absence from his regiment, was on his way thither, when he overtook upon the road the student of theology. Nevertheless, Don Rafael had not deemed the order of his father ...
— The Tiger Hunter • Mayne Reid

... Communist Party does invariably get its own way, there are essential differences between this Dictatorship and the dictatorship of, for example, a General. The main difference is that whereas the General merely writes an order about which most people hear for the first time only when it is promulgated, the Central Committee prepares the way for its dictation by a most elaborate series of discussions and counter discussions throughout ...
— The Crisis in Russia - 1920 • Arthur Ransome

... In order to impart to it those qualities which render it a proper vehicle for the food of the plant. Water is the chief nourishment of vegetables; if, therefore, the soil be too sandy, it will not retain a quantity of water sufficient to supply the roots of the plants. If, on the contrary, it ...
— Conversations on Chemistry, V. 1-2 • Jane Marcet

... then all fell into order, and nothing was heard but the leader's voice and the stir of many bodies moving simultaneously. An uninitiated observer would have thought himself in Bedlam; for as the evening wore on, the laws of society seemed given to the winds, and humanity ...
— On Picket Duty and Other Tales • Louisa May Alcott

... and Walton's voyages by no means corresponded with the maps of Asia constructed by the men who were at that time leaders of the Petersburg Academy. Spangberg therefore during his return journey through Siberia got orders to travel again to the same regions in order to settle the doubts that had arisen. A new vessel had to be built, and with this he started in 1741 from Okotsk to his former winter haven in Kamchatka. Hence he sailed in 1742 in a southerly direction, but he ...
— The Voyage of the Vega round Asia and Europe, Volume I and Volume II • A.E. Nordenskieold

... he had, for when we looked among his papers, all was in order,—not a debt remained; and safely put away was enough to keep his wife comfortable and independent. Then we knew why he had lived so plainly, denied himself so many pleasures, except that of charity, and worked so hard that I fear he shortened his ...
— McGuffey's Fourth Eclectic Reader • William Holmes McGuffey

... doctor in theology, desire to bring the rival Order into ridicule by showing its founder incapable of explaining a somewhat difficult verse? It appears extremely likely. "My good father," he said, "how do you understand this saying of the prophet Ezekiel, 'If thou dost not warn the wicked of his wickedness, ...
— Life of St. Francis of Assisi • Paul Sabatier

... Christ as dying, rising again, ascending, and as sitting at the Father's right hand, there to be a priest for ever, after the order of Melchisedec, and to intercede for his own, and to see to the application of what benefits, pardons, favours, and other things they need, from all which they have strong ground of comfort and of hope, yea, and assurance ...
— Christ The Way, The Truth, and The Life • John Brown (of Wamphray)

... to offer a remark on reasoning which could only emanate from an understanding of the very lowest order, - so the Gitanos are so extremely ignorant, that however frank they might wish to be, they would be unable to tell the curious inquirer the names for bread and water, meat and salt, in their own peculiar tongue - for, assuredly, had they sense ...
— The Zincali - An Account of the Gypsies of Spain • George Borrow

... each other. We sat for some time mourning over his failure, until the door opened, and not the porter, but the rector himself, a most courteous and polished gentleman in the black robe and three-cornered hat of his order, came in and graciously placed himself and the university at our disposition. We had reason to congratulate ourselves upon this good fortune. He showed us every nook and corner of the vast edifice, where ...
— Castilian Days • John Hay

... deciding upon the order to be followed in their conversation with the girl, the troop of rivals started for the kitchen, as it was too cold on the porch in winter. A knock ...
— The Dead Command - From the Spanish Los Muertos Mandan • Vicente Blasco Ibanez

... over here. But though only five hundred years in power, this recent dynasty succeeded in doing about as much devilment and as little good as many dynasties much older in years. One of the missionaries explained to me yesterday that it was only when the King got very mad that he would order heads cut off without reason—but then the Koreans are very lazy and his inactivity at other periods may have been ...
— Where Half The World Is Waking Up • Clarence Poe

... expenditure was considerably below the average, as many charges had not yet matured. The expenditure has risen steadily and is now well over the daily average that I have given. To that figure must be added, in order to give a complete account of the matter, something for war services other than naval or military. At the beginning of the year these charges are not likely to be very considerable, but it will probably be within the mark to say that from April I we shall be spending ...
— New York Times Current History: The European War, Vol 2, No. 1, April, 1915 - April-September, 1915 • Various

... personality. The patient ceases to care. It is too much trouble to work; then too much trouble to read; then too much trouble to exert even those all but mechanical powers of thought which are necessary to any kind of social intercourse—to give an order, to answer a question, to recognise a name or a face: then even the passions die out, till the patient cannot be provoked to rate a stupid amba or a negligent wife; finally, there is not energy to dress or undress, to rise up or sit ...
— Across the Zodiac • Percy Greg

... those waves which diverge laterally behind the second slit. In this case the waves from the two sides of the slit have, in order to converge upon the retina, to pass over unequal distances. Let A P (fig. 19) represent, as before, the width of the second slit. We have now to consider the action of the various parts of the wave A P upon a point R' of the retina, not situated ...
— Six Lectures on Light - Delivered In The United States In 1872-1873 • John Tyndall

... order. I wonder, really," Sir Timothy went on, looking at Francis curiously, "what you ...
— The Evil Shepherd • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... Senate Districts shall be so altered by the General Assembly, at the first session after the return of every enumeration by order of Congress, that each Senate District shall contain, as near as may be, an equal number of inhabitants, excluding aliens and Indians not taxed, and shall remain unaltered until the return of another enumeration, and shall at all times consist of contiguous, ...
— School History of North Carolina • John W. Moore

... in her the desire to vindicate the worth of her order and of her sex; and the next day, after having despatched a long and tender letter to Lesley (with a formal message of thanks to her husband), she went out to call on a lady, who was noted in her circle as a great philanthropist, and mentioned to her in a ...
— Brooke's Daughter - A Novel • Adeline Sergeant

... were invented by the Goddess in order to drown the cries of the infant Jupiter. Minutius Felix, xxi. "Avido patri subtrahitur infans ne voretur, et Corybantum cymbalis, ne pater audiat, vagitus initus eliditur" (read audiat vagitus, tinnitus illi editur, from the vestigia of Cod. ...
— The Tragedies of Euripides, Volume I. • Euripides

... of the parts, fragmentary as they are, without some understanding of the whole. Capital, for instance, is his analysis of the three orders: the order of nature, the order of mind, and the order of charity. These three are discontinuous; the higher is not implicit in the lower as in an evolutionary doctrine it would be.[D] In this distinction Pascal offers much about which the modern world would do ...
— Pascal's Pensees • Blaise Pascal

... the explanation now undertaken, in order to render the meaning of the proposed Song more clear and distinct, it is requisite to divide that first part into two parts, for in the first part one speaks in the manner of a Proem or Preface; ...
— The Banquet (Il Convito) • Dante Alighieri

... allies, called Aphidnus, and, having sent his mother Aethra after to take care of her, desired him to keep them so secretly, that none might know where they were; which done, to return the same service to his friend Pirithous, he accompanied him in his journey to Epirus, in order to steal away the king of the Molossians' daughter. The king, his own name being Aidoneus, or Pluto, called his wife Proserpina, and his daughter Cora, and a great dog which he kept Cerberus, with whom he ordered all that came as suitors ...
— Plutarch's Lives • A.H. Clough

... other objectors to Hell. They began by pressing the teaching of God's mercy without any reference to His justice; and in order to get rid of the teaching as to Hell, which they thought unjust, they rejected the Scriptures as God's word; and finally ended in rejecting the teaching that "Christ died for our sins" (1 Cor. 15:3); ...
— God's Plan with Men • T. T. (Thomas Theodore) Martin

... write, describe and put in memorie the navigation of each day and night, with the points and observations of the lands, tides, elements, altitude of the sunne, course of the moon and starres, and the same so noted by the order of the master and pilot of every ship to be put in writing; the captain-general assembling the masters together once every weeke (if winde and weather shall serve) to conferre all the observations and notes of the said ships, to the ...
— Days of the Discoverers • L. Lamprey

... the lines surrounding it, so violent in some cases as positively to whiten the lips or produce lines of paleness along the course of the muscles. This is the set or twisted mouth of agony, and is due to a curious transference and reflex on this order: that inasmuch as the last food which entered the alimentary canal seems to have caused this disturbance and pain, no more will be allowed to enter it at present under any conditions. And as our alimentary instincts are the most fundamental of ...
— Preventable Diseases • Woods Hutchinson

... all theatrical performances, and it seemed as if the agitators triumphed when they induced the Privy Council on June 22, 1600, to issue to the officers of the Corporation of London and to the justices of the peace of Middlesex and Surrey an order forbidding the maintenance of more than two playhouses—one in Middlesex (Alleyn's newly erected playhouse, the 'Fortune' in Cripplegate), and the other in Surrey (the 'Globe' on the Bankside). The contemplated restriction would have ...
— A Life of William Shakespeare - with portraits and facsimiles • Sidney Lee

... Pompley, who kept his head clear in the midst of the greatest excitement, had a desire to get from the Corporation a lease of a piece of ground adjoining his garden, and he no sooner saw Richard Avenel enter than he caught him by the button, and drew him into a quiet corner, in order to secure his interest. Leonard, meanwhile, was borne on by the stream, till his progress was arrested by a sofa-table at which sat Mrs. M'Catchley herself, with Mrs. Pompley by her side. For on this great occasion ...
— My Novel, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... to where Garland was standing, and Churchill spoke to him in an angry tone, "Why did you display the white flag!" Garland replied, "I received orders to do so from one of your staff." Churchill denied giving such an order, and angry words passed between them. I stopped them, saying that it made little difference then, as they were in our power. We continued to ride down the line to its extreme point, where we found Deshler in person, ...
— The Memoirs of General W. T. Sherman, Complete • William T. Sherman

... their irregularities, and diffused a faint aerial hue, to which no description can render justice. I could have contemplated such scenery for hours, and was sorry when I found myself shut up from it by the gates of Florence. We passed several lofty palaces of the true Tuscan order, with rustic arcades and stout columns, whose solidity and magnificence were not diminished by the shades of midnight. Whilst these grand masses lay dark and solemn, the smooth flagstone, with which every street is paved, received a chequered gleam, and the ...
— Dreams, Waking Thoughts, and Incidents • William Beckford

... be termed normal morphology includes the study of the form, arrangement, size and other characteristic attributes of the several parts of plants, their internal structure, and the precise relation one form bears to another. In order the more thoroughly to investigate these matters it is necessary to consider the mode of growth, and specially the plan of evolution or development of each organ. This is the more needful owing to the common origin of things ultimately very different one from the other, and to the presence of organs ...
— Vegetable Teratology - An Account of the Principal Deviations from the Usual Construction of Plants • Maxwell T. Masters

... of a suppressed longing which an unexpected touch has set free. He, too, has dreamed of fame; and felt no limits to his power of attaining it. But he saw, by some flash of intuition, that it must be bought by the dishonour of his works; that, in order to bring him fame, they must descend into the market, they must pass from hand to hand; they must endure the shallowness of their purchasers' comments, share in the pettiness of their lives. He has remained obscure, that his creations might be guarded against this sacrilege. ...
— A Handbook to the Works of Browning (6th ed.) • Mrs. Sutherland Orr

... fondness for learning persuaded his father to allow him to go to the village school to learn English. At the end of three weeks, however, his father, considering that he was losing his time, would allow him to go no longer, but took him into the fields in order that the boy might assist him in his labour. Nevertheless Tom would not give up his literary pursuits, but continued scribbling, and copying out songs and carols. When he was about ten he formed an acquaintance with an old man, chapel-reader in Pentre y Foelas, ...
— Wild Wales - Its People, Language and Scenery • George Borrow

... (as were also some few of those on the Continent) and incapable of civilized effort, obtained, as they did upon the Continent (notably on the left bank of the Rhine), little plots of territory which they held and governed for themselves, and in which after a short period the old Roman order decayed in the incapable ...
— Europe and the Faith - "Sine auctoritate nulla vita" • Hilaire Belloc

... that they might stand perfectly firm for as long as he should deem it necessary. To these timbers were fastened strong cords, all of which he intrusted to the sturdiest of his Lanark men, who were to lie concealed amongst the flags. These preparations being made, he drew up his troops in order of battle. Kirkpatrick and Murray commanded the flanks. In the center stood Wallace himself, with Ramsay on one side of him, and Edwin, with Scrymgeour on the other, awaiting with steady expectation the approach of the enemy, who, by this time, ...
— The Scottish Chiefs • Miss Jane Porter

... occupied a subordinate post in Mr Gales' establishment, his literary services were accepted for the Register, in which he published many of his earlier compositions, both in prose and verse. This journal had advocated sentiments of an ultra-liberal order, and commanding a wide circulation and a powerful influence among the operatives in Sheffield, had been narrowly inspected by the authorities. At length the proprietor fell into the snare of sympathising in the transactions of the French revolutionists; ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel , Volume I. - The Songs of Scotland of the past half century • Various

... "Until the heaven's fallen," was frightening beyond the rest. On the lips of her husband, those lips which had never spoken in metaphors, never swerved from the direct and commonplace, nor deserted the shibboleth of his order, such words had an ...
— Forsyte Saga • John Galsworthy

... pay $300 naturally hate being forced to fight in order to liberate the very race who they are most anxious should be slaves. It is their direct interest not only that all slaves should remain slaves, but that the free Northern negroes who compete with them for labour should be sent ...
— Three Months in the Southern States, April-June 1863 • Arthur J. L. (Lieut.-Col.) Fremantle

... soon as the signatures were affixed, Remonencq and the doctor (followed by the stone-mason's man), put Schmucke into a cab, the desperate agent whisking in afterwards, bent upon taking a definite order. ...
— Poor Relations • Honore de Balzac

... order'd well, and relisheth the Souldier; Make the division Hemskirk; you are my charge, Fair ...
— Beggars Bush - From the Works of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher (Vol. 2 of 10) • Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher

... "the organization of activity with reference to a system of fundamental values." Dewey says, "Interest in community welfare, an interest that is intellectual and practical, as well as emotional—an interest, that is to say, in perceiving whatever makes for social order and progress, and in carrying these principles into execution—is the moral habit."[17] Palmer defines it as "the choice by the individual of habits of conduct that are for the good of the race." All these definitions point to control on the part of ...
— How to Teach • George Drayton Strayer and Naomi Norsworthy

... look at the bridges he was now busily laying. When I asked for its use the next day, he said Yes, if I would send him some ducks; adding that I should need a pass. He would send it that evening by a sergeant, and an order for the skiff, which lay on this side at the lower ferry. I thanked him, and went away happy in ...
— Hugh Wynne, Free Quaker • S. Weir Mitchell

... powerful relatives and friends to turn to now for promotion to rich benefice or high ecclesiastical preferment, and he had certainly never lamented this fact. In heart and soul he was a follower of the rules of poverty laid down by the founder of his order, and would have thought himself untrue to his calling had he suffered himself to be endowed with worldly wealth. Even such moneys as he received from Sir Oliver for the instruction given to his sons were never kept by himself. ...
— The Secret Chamber at Chad • Evelyn Everett-Green

... the most part of our priests, who would fain have us think they have no more, and we ought to have no more, doubt about God's existence than our own. Nevertheless, they write abundance of books to convince us 'God is,' though they never penned a line in order to convince us, we actually are, and that to disbelieve we are ...
— An Apology for Atheism - Addressed to Religious Investigators of Every Denomination - by One of Its Apostles • Charles Southwell

... the Imperial Order of Daughters of the Empire will equip hospital ship for Admiralty; married men not accepted for service without permission of wives; cruiser Good Hope arrives at Halifax; American mass ...
— The New York Times Current History of the European War, Vol 1, Issue 4, January 23, 1915 • Various

... sons of Jacob, unto whom the word of the Lord came, saying, Israel shall be thy name. And with the stones he built an altar in the name of the Lord; and he made a trench about the altar, as great as would contain two measures of seed. And he put the wood in order, and cut the bullock in pieces, and laid him on the wood, and said, Fill four barrels with water, and pour it on the burnt sacrifice, and on the wood. And he said, Do it the second time. And they did it the second time. And he said, Do it the third time. And they did it the third ...
— The Greatest English Classic A Study of the King James Version of • Cleland Boyd McAfee

... best officers on even terms." [Footnote: To show that I am not quoting an authority biassed in our favor I will give Sir Edward Codrington's opinion of our rural better class (i, 318). "It is curious to observe the animosity which prevails here among what is called the better order of people, which I think is more a misnomer here than in any other country I have ever been. Their whig and tory are democrat and federalist, and it would seem for the sake of giving vent to that bitterness of hatred which marks the Yankee character, every gentleman (God save the ...
— The Naval War of 1812 • Theodore Roosevelt

... her madly. Having been abandoned by his wife for two years, he lived with her in free union. This evil state of affairs existed until the time when Josephine Schiltz was married by Fabien du Ronceret. In order to have revenge on the Marquis de Rochefide for abandoning her, she gave him a peculiar disease, which she had made Fabien du Ronceret contract, and which also was conveyed to Calyste du Guenic. During her life as a courtesan, her rivals were Suzanne de Val-Noble, Fanny Beaupre, Mariette, ...
— Repertory Of The Comedie Humaine, Complete, A — Z • Anatole Cerfberr and Jules Franois Christophe

... hair, it promised to be splendid; at present it was an unkempt, tangled mass, which Hannah Grieve, the children's aunt, for her own credit's sake at chapel, or in the public street, made occasional violent attempts to reduce to order—to very little purpose, so strong and stubborn was the curl of it. The whole figure was out of keeping with the English moorside, with the sheep, and ...
— The History of David Grieve • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... not a very long one. The train arrived there at four o'clock in the afternoon, and the Scouts, armed only with their clasp knives, Scout axes and sticks, lined up on the platform in excellent order. Dick Crawford, who ranked as a lieutenant for the encampment, took command, while Durland reported the arrival to Colonel Henry, as he had been ...
— The Boy Scout Automobilists - or, Jack Danby in the Woods • Robert Maitland

... sheriff it appeared that since the order for a respite had arrived too late to forestall the gathering of great multitudes to witness the hanging, it was equally clear that it had come too early to be made public at once without causing unnecessary disappointment to thousands who were still ...
— The Story of Cooperstown • Ralph Birdsall

... the end of my confession of faith. This is the confession of an individual; and what can such an one do against a whole world, even supposing his voice were heard everywhere! In order for the last time to use a precious Straussism, his judgment only possesses "that amount of subjective truth which is compatible with a complete lack of objective demonstration"—is not that so, my dear friends? Meanwhile, be of good cheer. For the time being let the matter rest at ...
— Thoughts out of Season (Part One) • Friedrich Nietzsche

... and best, remembering that the lessons of these passing hours are not for time alone, but for the ages of eternity. They tell us, in that future home—the heavenly paradise—that the human family shall be sifted out, and the good and pure shall dwell together in peace. If that be the heavenly order, is it not our duty to render earth as near like ...
— History of Woman Suffrage, Volume I • Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Matilda Joslyn Gage

... objects rather than at the one great object, which is inducing France to act with us to prevent the occupation of Constantinople or to force its evacuation. Instead of yielding upon points of minor importance, in order to carry the question, we are to insist now on the minor points-the evacuation of the Morea by the French, and then, I fear we shall weaken Polignac's Government, and lose ...
— A Political Diary 1828-1830, Volume II • Edward Law (Lord Ellenborough)

... the hole made just previously by the awl, before the leather has been moved forward. By this means the sewing may be carried on with great regularity, and the material be turned in any direction in order to execute small designs. Secondly, the invention relates to improvements in the arrangement of the shuttle, whereby it is caused to pass through the loops formed by the waxed thread ...
— Scientific American, Vol.22, No. 1, January 1, 1870 • Various

... the 2d, at seven o'clock in the morning, the printing-office had been occupied by twenty-eight soldiers of the Republican Guard, commanded by a Lieutenant named Pape (since decorated for this achievement). This man had given Serriere an order prohibiting the printing of any article signed "Nusse." A Commissary of Police accompanied Lieutenant Pape. This Commissary had notified Serriere of a "decree of the President of the Republic," suppressing the Avenement du Peuple, and had placed sentinels over the presses. The workmen had resisted, ...
— The History of a Crime - The Testimony of an Eye-Witness • Victor Hugo

... any sliding, as usual, upon the teeth of the wheel. He constructed a clock on the recoiling principle, which went perfectly, and never lost a minute within fourteen years. Sir Edmund Denison Beckett says that he invented this method in order to save himself the trouble of going so frequently to oil the escapement of a turret clock, of which he had charge; though there were other influences at work ...
— Men of Invention and Industry • Samuel Smiles

... time, under this constitutional amendment, if it should be adopted, they are led to enlarge their franchise. That necessarily will lead them to consider how much further they can go, what is necessary in order to fit their people for its exercise, thus leading to education, thus leading to a greater degree of civilization, thus bringing up an oppressed and downtrodden race to an equality, if capable of an equality—and ...
— History of the Thirty-Ninth Congress of the United States • Wiliam H. Barnes

... to have been to enact a drama in which the deity was supposed to exercise his procreative function by sexual union with the women. This was an ideal which they wished to express dramatically. In order to realize this ideal obstacles were introduced that they might be overcome; in the old myth, Adonis was emasculated under a pine tree, and in Egypt Osiris was similarly mutilated, his sex organs being lost. But at the festivals it was portrayed that Adonis was found, and in the ...
— The Sex Worship and Symbolism of Primitive Races - An Interpretation • Sanger Brown, II

... are surely not content that our authors should be pedants in order that they may be happy and devoted. As one of the great class for whose sole use and behalf literature exists—the class of readers—I protest that it is to me a matter of indifference whether an author is happy or not. ...
— Obiter Dicta - Second Series • Augustine Birrell

... then she resolved to sacrifice their reputation for their safety. 'At least, they haven't said anything; but I'm sure they'd feel more comfortable in the drawing-room. Can't you order them to stay and ...
— The Talking Horse - And Other Tales • F. Anstey

... table to Hall, as he had no wish to revive the previous irritability of his comrades. "He's gone, but," turning to the others, "you'd have had to wait for Mr. Hall's arrival, anyhow. And now you've got your order you can start. Go in two parties by different roads, and meet on the other side of the hotel at Hymettus. I'll be there before you. Pick up some shovels and drills as you go; remember you're honest miners, but don't ...
— The Three Partners • Bret Harte

... the Horse Guards' Stables. On seeing a trooper mount his charger, (both being fully accoutred,) Kalli was puzzled. He could not account for the perfect order and discipline of the animal, and the mutual fitness of the man and his horse, ...
— Kalli, the Esquimaux Christian - A Memoir • Thomas Boyles Murray

... "superposed'' period of about thirty-five years, which some investigators aver exists, affects sun-spots and aurora alike. In short, the coincidences are so numerous and significant that one would have to throw the doctrine of probability to the winds in order to be able to reject the conclusion to which they so ...
— Curiosities of the Sky • Garrett Serviss

... embracing all Is like the Maker's love, Wherewith encompassed, great and small In peace and order move. ...
— The Christian Year • Rev. John Keble

... of the expeditions from England to the Polar seas, a white bear was seen to perform an ingenious feat in order to capture some walruses. He was seen to swim cautiously to a large, rough piece of ice, on which these walruses were lying, fast asleep, with their cubs. The wily animal crept up some little hillocks of ice, behind the party, and with his fore feet loosened ...
— Stories about Animals: with Pictures to Match • Francis C. Woodworth

... made a visit to him in order to judge of his understanding and talents, and to procure him a situation suitable to his character and education. But how great was our surprise to find, that in addition to a defect in his utterance, which rendered it difficult ...
— The Empire of Russia • John S. C. Abbott

... compromise, the system flourished, and was widely accepted: local vanity was always able to find a means for placing in a prominent place within it the feudal deity, and for reconciling his pretensions to the highest rank with the order of precedence laid down by the theologians of Uruk. The local god was always the king of the gods, the father of the gods, he who was worshipped above the others in everyday life, and whose public cult constituted the religion of ...
— History Of Egypt, Chaldaea, Syria, Babylonia, and Assyria, Volume 3 (of 12) • G. Maspero

... his men, was starting in the cutter, and had already hailed the Tiger to order the other boat sent ashore. Tom and Jeremy hurried into the cabin, and stuffing some clothes into Jeremy's sea-chest along with a brace of good pistols and a cutlass apiece, were soon ...
— The Black Buccaneer • Stephen W. Meader

... it right, senhor," Lourenco affirmed. "I have heard this sort of thing used, though I never before saw the instrument itself. Those notes will carry at least five miles, and the cannibals send messages by striking the bars in different order. This run which we have just heard is always used first, and no message is sent until a reply ...
— The Pathless Trail • Arthur O. (Arthur Olney) Friel

... in her account of the affair, "that the savages would suppose it to be a ruse to draw them towards the fort, in order to make a sortie upon them. They did suppose so; and thus I was able to save the Fontaine family. When they were all landed, I made them march before me in full sight of the enemy. We put so bold a face on it, that they thought they had more to fear than we. Strengthened by this ...
— The Ontario Readers - Third Book • Ontario Ministry of Education

... represented by the chemist—appears by his own confession, to have copied the prescriptions with a malicious object in view. 'I have sent them, (he informs me, in a second letter) to Doctor Benjulia; in order that he too may learn something in his profession from the master who has dispensed with our services.' This new effort of irony means that I stand self-condemned of vanity, in presuming to rely on my own commonplace resources—represented ...
— Heart and Science - A Story of the Present Time • Wilkie Collins

... required for the building of the various dams and locks on the river, as well as for the making of embankments and "spurs." These "spurs" are little embankments which project into the river at a slight angle pointing down-stream, and are made in order to turn the direction of the current towards the middle of the river, and so protect the banks from the scour of the water; for each year a portion of the banks is lost, and in many places large numbers of palm-trees and dwellings ...
— Peeps at Many Lands: Egypt • R. Talbot Kelly

... this connection to the conservative element in primitive religion, it is not surprising to find that the growth of religious myths was not so spontaneous in early civilizations of the highest order as has hitherto been assumed. It seems clear that in each great local mythology we have to deal, in the first place, not with symbolized ideas so much as symbolized folk beliefs of remote antiquity and, to a certain degree, of common inheritance. It ...
— Myths of Babylonia and Assyria • Donald A. Mackenzie

... of the Old Order.—The Revolutionary fathers, in setting up their first state constitutions, although they often spoke of government as founded on the consent of the governed, did not think that consistency required giving ...
— History of the United States • Charles A. Beard and Mary R. Beard

... deeds. Now, said King Evelake, where shall I put this shield, that this worthy knight may have it? Ye shall leave it thereas Nacien, the hermit, shall be put after his death; for thither shall that good knight come the fifteenth day after that he shall receive the order of knighthood: and so that day that they set is this time that he have his shield, and in the same abbey lieth Nacien, the hermit. And then the White ...
— Le Morte D'Arthur, Volume II (of II) - King Arthur and of his Noble Knights of the Round Table • Thomas Malory

... the Templars collected his small and devoted band, and prepared to defend to the death the last possession of the order. Europe was deaf to his cry, the numbers of the foe were overwhelming, and devoted bravery was of no avail. In the disastrous siege the Christians were all but exterminated. The Grand Master fell at the head of ...
— Ten Great Events in History • James Johonnot

... authorities. That's Simon Crood and Company. He'll hear all they've got to say. They'll say what they like. He'll examine their documents. The documents will be all ready for him. Everything will be nice and proper and in strict order, and every man will say precisely what he's been ordered to say—and there you are! The Inspector will issue his report that he's carefully examined everything and found all correct, and the comedy will conclude with the farce of votes of thanks all round! ...
— In the Mayor's Parlour • J. S. (Joseph Smith) Fletcher

... at least verbally, to the infinite God as well, under the guise of liberalism, love of mankind, or the negation of classes. But today this imperfect homage is retracted, and nothing is reverenced except that which gives strength. If anyone preaches human kindness, it is in order to establish a "strong" community martially trained, like a super-state, to oppose everything not included within it, and to become omnipotent in the art of utilising the non-human forces of nature.... The will to return ...
— Some Turns of Thought in Modern Philosophy - Five Essays • George Santayana

... instance, not to belie the old proverb, jugglers were never received into the order of knighthood. They were, after a time, as much abused as they had before been extolled. Their licentious lives reflected itself in their obscene language. Their pantomimes, like their songs, showed that they were the votaries of the lowest vices. The lower ...
— Manners, Custom and Dress During the Middle Ages and During the Renaissance Period • Paul Lacroix

... If you want to know why, you had best crawl out and ask Mr. Bossom. He gave the order, and Stanislas has gone ashore to buy provisions. Marketing," said Mrs. Mortimer, "is not my husband's strong point, but we'll ...
— True Tilda • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... daughter, and one can't stand too much of it at once." He gave another order, and they presently came into a wider street, that was almost like a viaduct for shelter, as awnings were stretched above it the whole length. There was scarcely any life here, and the high stone walls of wealthy homes shut them in, with only an occasional balcony, or latticed window, to break ...
— All Aboard - A Story for Girls • Fannie E. Newberry

... curved with a suggestion of a smile that was a nervous habit rather than any sign of mirth. The nerves of the left eye were also affected, and the lid dropped and fluttered almost shut, so that he had to carry his head far back in order to see plainly. There was such indomitable pride and scorn in the man that his name came up to the lips of ...
— Riders of the Silences • John Frederick

... theorised and speculated himself almost into insanity, he thought he had not done enough to secure a gracious reception at home. With a view to make himself master of all which could aid him in preparing his report, he determined to call a general meeting of the Indian tribes, in order to acquire a knowledge of their traditionary lore, and it is from this period that he seems to have laboured to a more useful purpose than that of making "velvet purses of sows' ears, and twisting ropes of sand." The shafts of ridicule ...
— Traditions of the North American Indians, Vol. 1 (of 3) • James Athearn Jones

... not here be forgotten that this dominant body was an exclusive caste; that is, it consisted of a limited number of noble families, who allowed none of their members to marry with persons born out of the pale of their own order. The child of a patrician and a plebeian, or of a patrician and a client, was not considered as born in lawful wedlock; and however proud the blood which it derived from one parent, the child sank to the condition of the parent of lower rank. This was expressed ...
— The Great Events by Famous Historians, Vol. 1 • Various

... his practice forever. When a debtor is unable to meet the demand of his creditor he receives thirty blows, and the same number may be repeated from time to time till the debt is paid. In case the creditor violently seize the debtor's goods he is liable to eighty blows. In order to the collection of debts, it is customary for creditors to enter the houses of their debtors on the first day of the year and pronounce their claims with a loud voice, and continue there until they are reimbursed. It is said ...
— The Christian Foundation, February, 1880

... weaponed men going, and presently there is the head of a much bigger company coming on to the wide space betwixt the narrows, three hundreds of men at least. They were armed and mounted as well as they might be, but kept not very good order. When the first of them came to the place where the marsh-lurkers had been, they found lying athwart the causeway, one on each side, two dead porkers, two dead dogs, two hares, and in the very midst a fox, these also dead. The first men wonder at this, and get off their horses and ...
— The Sundering Flood • William Morris

... Mrs. Pike's nurse, made housekeeping a more serious matter certainly, and illness complicated things; but Aunt Pike's reign, though unpleasant in many ways, had made others easier for Kitty. The house was in good order, rules had been made and enforced. Fanny and Grace had learned much, and profited a good deal by the training, and, best of all, all worked together with a will to ...
— Kitty Trenire • Mabel Quiller-Couch

... rejoiced to see the Vicar's wife amongst them again, every heart in the village shared in the joy of the Vicar and his family. Miss Babbs was out at her shop door, waving her best lace handkerchief. The old sexton's wife ran into the road in order to present a bunch of the best flowers in her garden. All stood out at their doors with welcoming smiles and ...
— Anxious Audrey • Mabel Quiller-Couch

... what he said gave Godfrey the greatest comfort. Still, being young, he made one mistake. He did send Madame Riennes some money, partly out of pity—ten pounds in a postal order without any covering letter, a folly that did not tend to a cessation ...
— Love Eternal • H. Rider Haggard

... who really have faith in Jesus Christ are 'strangers of the Dispersion'; scattered throughout the world, and dwelling dispersedly in an order of things to which they do not belong, 'seeking a city which hath foundations.' The word 'strangers' means, originally, persons for a time living in an alien city. And that is the idea that the Apostle would impress upon us as true for ...
— Expositions of Holy Scripture - Ephesians; Epistles of St. Peter and St. John • Alexander Maclaren

... for Canada. It is certain that those who sent him there little dreamed of the consequences of their action. Lord Melbourne, the Prime Minister, in a letter to the Queen, charged him with magnifying the Canadian troubles "in order to give greater eclat to his own departure."[28] Still, he did his work of investigation faithfully, and formed his conclusions sanely, and there were plain men of greater ability at his elbow in the persons of Wakefield and Buller, by whose advice he ...
— The Framework of Home Rule • Erskine Childers

... for the three tragedies, and in order to protect the copyright, he applied, through counsel (Lancelot Shadwell, afterwards Vice-Chancellor), for an injunction in Chancery to stop the sale of piratical editions of Cain. In delivering judgment (February 12, 1822), the Chancellor, Lord Eldon ...
— The Works of Lord Byron - Poetry, Volume V. • Lord Byron

... of substances arranged in the order in which they are electrostatically charged by contact, generally by rubbing against each other. The following series is due to Faraday. The first members become positively excited when rubbed with any of the following members, ...
— The Standard Electrical Dictionary - A Popular Dictionary of Words and Terms Used in the Practice - of Electrical Engineering • T. O'Conor Slone

... me. And yet, in a way, it seems strange. I remember some things Laban Ginn, Azuba's husband, told me about you and your ways aboard ship; he said your crews obeyed every order you gave as if it was what he called 'Gospel.' You, and no one else, was master there. However, that is not pertinent just now. Run along to bed, ...
— Cap'n Dan's Daughter • Joseph C. Lincoln

... of the rescuing party splashed out upon the sandy beach before Shanty Town, he headed for the open level. There was no waiting for commands, no attempt at order; only the sound of laboured breathing, of frantic urging, of the plying of heel and fist. Butchery threatened, and a wasted moment might be the one that could have stayed ...
— The Plow-Woman • Eleanor Gates

... place of the prisoner at the outset, and I was to be the flower of his love, whatever it might be. Well, it was the "Forget-me-not." If there were a flower called the "Always-loving," maybe I might find out to what order and class I belong. Dear me; there's the old clock striking twelve, and I verily meant to go to bed at ten, so as to sleep away as much of the time as possible before your coming, but I fell into a fit of loving meditation, and ...
— The Life and Letters of Elizabeth Prentiss • George L. Prentiss

... he to himself, "is the disproportion between the promises made to her by Jesus and the results achieved. Never, I really believe, have so many tribulations and hindrances, or so much ill-fortune attended the founding of a new Order. Jeanne spent her days on the high roads, running from one monastery to another, and toil as she would to dig up the conventual soil, nothing would grow. She could not even assume the habit of her Institution, or at any rate ...
— The Cathedral • Joris-Karl Huysmans

... morality has vanished with the red Indian and the trout-fishing. In the early days of that town there used to be nobody to maintain public order but an efficient Vigilance Committee, which executed justice by the simple process of hanging persons whom the public disliked, and which was still in nominal existence when I was there. Now the city has the proper complement of courts, from the United States Court downwards, ...
— The Twentieth Century American - Being a Comparative Study of the Peoples of the Two Great - Anglo-Saxon Nations • H. Perry Robinson

... different type from Cecily—delicate, picturesque, dreamy. She was mildly intellectual at this time, engaged in reading Marlowe and Jonson; and Cowperwood, busy in the matter of the West Chicago Street Railway, and conferring with her father, was conceived by her as a great personage of the Elizabethan order. In a tentative way she was in revolt against an apple-pie order of existence which was being forced upon her. Cowperwood recognized the mood, trifled with her spiritedly, looked into her eyes, and found the response he wanted. Neither old Aymar Cochrane nor his impeccably ...
— The Titan • Theodore Dreiser

... session. Mr. Mildmay and his men had then made their effort in turning out their opponents, and had been well pleased to rest awhile upon their oars. Now, however, they must go again to work, and therefore the liberal party was collected at Mr. Mildmay's house, in order that the liberal party might be told what it was that Mr. Mildmay and his ...
— Phineas Finn - The Irish Member • Anthony Trollope

... was not without some material to afford him occupation. Distances were calculated from native report; preparations were pushed on for the coming journey to Lake Bangweolo; apparatus was set in order. Travellers from all quarters dropped in from time to time: each contributed something about his own land; whilst waifs and strays of news from the expedition sent by the Arabs against Mirambo kept the settlement alive. ...
— The Last Journals of David Livingstone, in Central Africa, from 1865 to His Death, Volume II (of 2), 1869-1873 • David Livingstone

... of tea on the lawn, it is a pity if an able-bodied young gentleman couldn't secure one cup," said the Colonel smiling. "Now you mention it, I believe I have had none either. Ring the bell by all means and order it. I was absorbed in verifying some points of old Norman law," he added to Win. "Our islands ...
— The Spanish Chest • Edna A. Brown

... little shy. Being himself a plain man—plain in aspect, plain in manners, plain in speech—he seemed to fear their dash, elegance, and airs. But Miss Helstone had neither dash nor airs, and her native elegance was of a very quiet order—quiet as the beauty of a ground-loving hedge-flower. He was a fluent, cheerful, agreeable talker. Caroline could talk too in a tete-a-tete. She liked Mr. Hall to come and take the seat next her in a party, and ...
— Shirley • Charlotte Bronte

... of education had extended to fourteen months, and the house was in order for Edmond's return to take up his abode there with Barbara, when, instead of the accustomed letter for her, came one to Sir John Grebe in the handwriting of the said tutor, informing him of a terrible catastrophe that had occurred to them at Venice. Mr Willowes and himself ...
— A Group of Noble Dames • Thomas Hardy

... holding up his hand to stop the joyous yelling, "I wish to thank you one and all for your confidence in me and in the good faith of our Government. It called for a high order of manhood, I am sure; but in not offering any armed resistance to the incoming of the sheep your loyalty has withstood ...
— Hidden Water • Dane Coolidge

... way; and these things the vulgar commonly call omens, which are not based upon any natural reason, will by him who is wise be esteemed and reckoned happy accidents merely. One of these believers in omens will get up of a morning, leave his house, and meet a friar of the order of the blessed Saint Francis, and, as if he had met a griffin, he will turn about and go home. With another Mendoza the salt is spilt on his table, and gloom is spilt over his heart, as if nature was obliged to give warning of coming misfortunes by means of such ...
— Don Quixote • Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra

... is written large in the Diary, and it is not necessary here to do more than catalogue the chief incidents of it in chronological order. In February, 1661-62, he was chosen a Younger Brother of the Trinity House, and in April, 1662, when on an official visit to Portsmouth Dockyard, he was made a burgess of the town. In August of the same ...
— Diary of Samuel Pepys, Complete • Samuel Pepys

... doctor did not seem inclined to be communicative, and in reply to her question he merely mumbled something to the effect that the liver was out of order. ...
— A Mummer's Wife • George Moore

... language of the country, "the Town." A most furious barking was set up at their approach, by the whole three generations of Mustard and Pepper, and a number of allies, names unknown. The farmer made his well-known voice lustily heard to restore order—the door opened, and a half-dressed ewe-milker, who had done that good office, shut it in their faces, in order that she might run ben the house, to cry, "Mistress, mistress, it's the master, and another man wi' him." Dumple, turned loose, walked to his own stable-door, ...
— Guy Mannering • Sir Walter Scott

... at six o'clock the night before, and all safe in the stable, and now to see him in the meadow, with all the marks of having been driven somewhere and by somebody, what excuse could I make, or what story could I invent in order to save my poor back from that awful flogging which I knew must be the result of the revelation of the truth. I studied and tried, but could think of no lie that would stand muster. At last I went into the stable and turned all the rest out, ...
— Narrative of the Life of J.D. Green, a Runaway Slave, from Kentucky • Jacob D. Green

... cried another—"see the order that one of the birds is wearing. It is plain that the old passion of royalty still lurks here, for even here ribbons are given away as signs of distinction. The republic forbids such things, and we ...
— Marie Antoinette And Her Son • Louise Muhlbach

... Finn and Oscar, I would say that God is a strong man." Then they all cried out upon him, and some picked up stones, but the overseer bade them let him be until the Talkenn had spoken with him, and till he should order what was ...
— The High Deeds of Finn and other Bardic Romances of Ancient Ireland • T. W. Rolleston

... of introduction from Goodhue and Co. to Philadelphia, Boston, Baltimore, Canada, and Washington. Had a long talk with Mr. M., 60, Cedar-street. Introduced by Pearce, about my intended trip: found him very useful. Received an order from a good house, without soliciting them. Wrote and finished my letters home per Great Western. Mr. Blane, and my old friend Brough, the performer, dined with me. Was introduced to Capt. M'Lean, of the Swallow, running to Albany; and then walked with Mr. ...
— Journal of a Voyage across the Atlantic • George Moore

... lads, you must do everything in order. We don't want any hurrying and tumbling about. When you get into the boat, step easy, and keep quiet in your places," said Uncle Ben, as he brought the boat alongside the rock. "Fend off, there! Don't let ...
— The Boat Club - or, The Bunkers of Rippleton • Oliver Optic

... neighbourhood of the Rio Plata, a considerable smuggling trade is carried on between the Portuguese and Spaniards, especially in exchanging gold for silver, by which both princes are defrauded of their fifths; and as Don Jose was deeply engaged in this prohibited commerce, in order to ingratiate himself with his Spanish correspondents, he treacherously dispatched an express to Buenos Ayres, where Pizarro then lay, with an account of our arrival, our strength, the number, of our ships, guns, men, ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume 11 • Robert Kerr

... to be seen round the table consists usually of Russians and French, both male and female, with a sprinkling of Germans, who escape from their own police in order to satisfy their itching for play. Thus, for instance, we have Nassau and Darmstadt people at Baden-Baden, while the Badese and Suabese rush to Homburg and Wisbaden. There is a very salutary law in every land where gambling is permitted, that no inhabitant of that land be allowed to ...
— The International Monthly, Volume 5, No. 3, March, 1852 • Various

... Why should I order you to bring Captain Bluntschli's luggage out here? What are you ...
— Arms and the Man • George Bernard Shaw

... and vast divisions; secondly, because divisions at such distances must be sharply and forcibly marked by aerial perspective, so that not only they must be there, but they must be visible and evident to the eye; and thirdly, because these multitudinous divisions are absolutely necessary, in order to express this space and distance, which cannot but be fully and imperfectly felt, even with every aid and evidence that ...
— Modern Painters Volume I (of V) • John Ruskin

... divided into small peices was given to each child in the village. this custom is founded in a supersticious opinon that it will hasten the arrival of the salmon. with much difficulty we obtained four other horses from the Indians today, we wer obliged to dispence with two of our kettles in order to acquire those. we have now only one small kettle to a mess of 8 men. in the evening Capt. Clark set out with four men to the Enesher village at the grand falls in order to make a further attempt to procure horses. ...
— The Journals of Lewis and Clark • Meriwether Lewis et al

... Democritus maintained that every operation is by way of a discharge of atoms, as we gather from De Gener. i, 8. But Aristotle held that the intellect has an operation which is independent of the body's cooperation. Now nothing corporeal can make an impression on the incorporeal. And therefore in order to cause the intellectual operation according to Aristotle, the impression caused by the sensible does not suffice, but something more noble is required, for "the agent is more noble than the patient," as he says ...
— Summa Theologica, Part I (Prima Pars) - From the Complete American Edition • Thomas Aquinas

... see much of her after I grew up. I moved away from the old county. Most others did the same. It had been desolated by the war, and got poorer and poorer. With an old maid's usual crankiness and inability to adapt herself to the order of things, Cousin Fanny remained behind. She refused to come away; said, I believe, she had to look after the old place, mammy, and Fash, or some such nonsense. I think she had some idea that the church would go down, or that the poor people around ...
— The Burial of the Guns • Thomas Nelson Page

... journey to Paris—Lord Dumbello was forthcoming at Plumstead on the 5th of August, and went through his work like a man. The Hartletop family, when the alliance was found to be unavoidable, endeavoured to arrange that the wedding should be held at Hartletop Priory, in order that the clerical dust and dinginess of Barchester Close might not soil the splendour of the marriage gala doings; for, to tell the truth, the Hartletopians, as a rule, were not proud of their new clerical connexions. ...
— Framley Parsonage • Anthony Trollope

... entered our boats, and the clock struck one before we got home. The bishop of Como was sitting by me all the evening, and his infinite weariness at the length of the performance, and his dislike of the great heat in that crowded hall, made me laugh as I never laughed before. And in order to tease him and have more fun, I kept on telling him that there was still more to come, and that the acting would go on till to-morrow morning; and it was most amusing to see him stretch himself first on one leg, then on the other, and to hear him complain, 'My ...
— Beatrice d'Este, Duchess of Milan, 1475-1497 • Julia Mary Cartwright

... had thought him frantically interesting as he described the immediate command of the city assumed by General Funston, the efforts of the Committee of Fifty, formed early that morning by leading citizens, to help preserve order and to give assistance to the refugees; of rich young men, and middle-aged citizens who had not spent an afternoon away from their club window for ten years, carrying dynamite in their cars through the very flames; of wild and terrible episodes he had witnessed or ...
— The Sisters-In-Law • Gertrude Atherton

... a basket. One was a certificate from a physician—another from the person who had employed her husband. As she opened her trunk I observed its contents were nicely folded and arranged, as if she had a love of order. She told me she was able to do nothing but sew and could not procure ...
— The Nest in the Honeysuckles, and other Stories • Various

... Bible stories, a performance which Lowell gayly called inspiration and water. In what now seems a languid, Byronic way, he figured as a Yankee Pelham or Vivian Grey. Yet in his prose and verse there was a tacit protest against the old order, and that it was felt is shown by the bitterness of ridicule and taunt and insult with which, both publicly and privately, this most amiable youth was attacked, who, at that time, had never said an ill-natured word of anybody, and who was always most generous in his ...
— Literary and Social Essays • George William Curtis

... I shouted as I caught Kennedy's signal. At a hurried order from Marlowe the gangs quit. A hush ...
— The Treasure-Train • Arthur B. Reeve

... been useless, effendi," said Yussuf. "Unless you had brought an order to the pasha of the district, and these people had been forced to work, they ...
— Yussuf the Guide - The Mountain Bandits; Strange Adventure in Asia Minor • George Manville Fenn

... Sir Douglas Haig's Order of the Day—getting our backs to the wall," growled the adjutant to me, after he had sprung up and saluted the colonel. "The staff captain met us two hours ago at ——; but they were shelling the place, and he said it wouldn't be safe for waggon ...
— Pushed and the Return Push • George Herbert Fosdike Nichols, (AKA Quex)

... me: men are mind, And mind can conquer mind; but how can it quell The unappointed purpose of great waters?— Well, say the sea is past: why, then I have My feet but on the threshold of my task, To gospel India,—my single heart To seize into the order of its beat All the strange blood of India, my brain To lord the dark thought of that tann'd mankind!— O horrible those sweltry places are, Where the sun comes so close, it makes the earth Burn in a frenzy of breeding,—smoke and flame Of lives burning ...
— Georgian Poetry 1911-12 • Various

... that this is a first attempt at a "Harmony of the Gospels." Luke must have had before him a narrative in which the death of Jesus was erroneously attributed to Herod. In order not to sacrifice this version entirely he must have combined the two traditions. What makes this more likely is, that he probably had a vague knowledge that Jesus (as John teaches us) appeared before three authorities. In many other ...
— The Life of Jesus • Ernest Renan

... converted to universal military training—as a war measure. Better late than never, as Noah remarked to the Zebra, which had understood that passengers arrived in alphabetical order. ...
— The So-called Human Race • Bert Leston Taylor

... In order to make clear and irrefutable the statement that the illusive value of private property is, like "the illusion of dead matter," a thing conceived, projected and maintained by the aboriginal power of evil, it is necessary to prove two things. It is necessary ...
— The Complex Vision • John Cowper Powys

... the Collegian. "In order to be a real Varsity Devil, one must bring home a few Souvenirs every Night he goes out. If the Missionaries did it, it would be called Looting. If the Common People did it, it would be called Petit Larceny. But with us, it is merely a ...
— People You Know • George Ade

... refuse to assign any standard of equality, but assert, that it is sufficient to present two objects, that are equal, in order to give us a just notion of this proportion. All definitions, say they, are fruitless, without the perception of such objects; and where we perceive such objects, we no longer stand in need of any ...
— A Treatise of Human Nature • David Hume

... this is taking place, the Sons of Personality are on the same level on which man now stands. They are then passing through their "human" period. In order to look at this fact with an unprejudiced eye, we must imagine it possible for a being to be human without being in the exact form in which man now exists. The Sons of Personality are "human beings" on Saturn. They have as their lowest principle not the physical body, ...
— An Outline of Occult Science • Rudolf Steiner

... about them. In the "Daily News" a leading-article was devoted to arguing, with admirable mock-gravity, that the artist's object in these drawings—especially in that of the Prehistoric Parliament, in which all our legislators are clad in primeval fashion, while the Speaker keeps order with the aid of an enormous tomahawk—was, of course, to prove the theory that similarity of face and figure accompanies similarity of pursuit throughout the generations. At Cambridge, in the May Week, the tableaux vivants of ...
— The History of "Punch" • M. H. Spielmann

... benevolence towards her poor cousin a means of recovering her position in the social world of Provins. She accordingly went to call on Madame Tiphaine, of whose reprobation she was conscious, in order to impart the fact of Pierrette's approaching arrival,—deploring the girl's unfortunate position, and posing herself as being only too happy to succor her and give her a position ...
— The Celibates - Includes: Pierrette, The Vicar of Tours, and The Two Brothers • Honore de Balzac

... Sir Launcelot kneeled down upon his knees, and threw away his shield and his sword from him. When Sir Percivale saw him do so he marvelled what he meant. And then thus he said: Sir knight, whatsomever thou be, I require thee upon the high order of knighthood, tell me thy true name. Then he said: So God me help, my name is Sir Launcelot du Lake, King Ban's son of Benoy. Alas, said Sir Percivale, what have I done? I was sent by the queen for ...
— Le Morte D'Arthur, Volume II (of II) - King Arthur and of his Noble Knights of the Round Table • Thomas Malory

... England. They may not separate us at first, and I have been thinking that if they find out the value of a company of men freely choosing to work together in harmony, they will hardly separate us at all. But we must obey their will, we must keep order among ourselves, and above all, we must seem to have given up all hope of escape. ...
— Masters of the Guild • L. Lamprey

... white (as I have seen on returning Plattsburgers) while our canvas leggings were still unshaped to our manly calves. Our hats were new and stiff, and their gaudy cords were bright. And we were inquisitive of the life that was ahead of us, readily making acquaintance in order to compare our scraps of information. Dismay ran here and there with the knowledge that the typhoid inoculation required three weekly doses. Thank goodness, that is over with for me. We tried to be very soldierly ...
— At Plattsburg • Allen French

... sunrise, from their dewy lair Crossing the stream, the kine are seen Round the wall to stray— The churchyard wall that clips the square Of open hill-sward fresh and green Where last year they lay. But all things now are order'd fair Round the ...
— Poetical Works of Matthew Arnold • Matthew Arnold

... things which we had to say that we did not like to discuss before the inspector, so that when he arose to go, we felt thankful. We then drew up articles of partnership, and gave Smith an order to get the gold which we had stored at the old stockman's, and to take a certain portion of it to buy goods, and deposit the remainder to our order in the Melbourne Bank. After our business was completed, the night was far advanced; and with bright anticipations ...
— The Gold Hunter's Adventures - Or, Life in Australia • William H. Thomes

... of solids which can be handled—some of them frozen, thawed, soaked in water, with impunity—but let a spark of fire touch them and they break into vast volumes of uncontrollable gas that will rend the heart out of a mountain in order to expand. ...
— Among the Forces • Henry White Warren

... to play the game of solitaire, for if she should ever have to go to prison it might save her life and reason, as it had his. She consented, not with the anticipation of spending any portion of her life behind prison-bars, but in order to use the game to amuse her husband during his long periods of forced and speechless seclusion. She would sit by his bedside and play her game, and he took great pleasure in watching it and pointing at the ...
— The Life of Mrs. Robert Louis Stevenson • Nellie Van de Grift Sanchez

... rites may be cited, in order to bring out the earnestness of this type of religion, which is concerned with doing, instead of mere not-doing. There is none of the Toda perfunctoriness here. It will be enough to glance at the commencement of the ritual of the honey-ant totemites. The master ...
— Anthropology • Robert Marett

... utmost annoyance. Moreover, the Duke of Florence has during the last month been making me the greatest offers, and putting strong pressure upon me to return home. I have begged for time to arrange my affairs here and leave S. Peter's in good order. So I expect to remain in Rome all the summer; and when I have settled my business, and yours with the Monte della Fede, I shall probably remove to Florence this winter and take up my abode there for good. I am old now, and ...
— The Life of Michelangelo Buonarroti • John Addington Symonds

... not have given it to the Alcalde of Ronda,' he said in a sneering voice, 'because you want it yourself. You require it in order to make your peace with ...
— In Kedar's Tents • Henry Seton Merriman

... equipped in the defensive armor of the regular Greek infantry. And thus the phalanx presented a ponderous and bristling mass, which, as long as its order was kept compact, was sure to bear down all opposition. The defects of such an organization are obvious, and were proved in after-years, when the Macedonians were opposed to the Roman legions. But it is clear that under Alexander the phalanx was not the cumbrous, unwieldy body which ...
— The Great Events by Famous Historians, Vol. 2 • Various

... older friend, working among the disjointed patterns, saw his trouble clearly too. It was not that he lacked this sympathy that starlight brings, but that he applied it without discernment. The receiving instrument was out of order, some parts moving faster than others. Reason and imagination were not exaccurately adjusted. He gathered plenty in, but no clear stream issued forth again; there was confusion in delivery. The rays were twisted, the golden lines caught into knots and tangles. Yet, ever just outside ...
— A Prisoner in Fairyland • Algernon Blackwood

... toward her. This started him on a new track for conjecture, and he soon learned and saw enough to get some general idea of the truth. Yet, after all, it was not the actual truth which he conjectured. His conclusion was that Hilda was playing a deep game in order to win Lord Chetwynde's affection to herself. The possibility of her actually loving him did not then suggest itself. He looked upon it as one of those profound pieces of policy for which he was always on the look-out from ...
— The Cryptogram - A Novel • James De Mille

... a wrecked world around us, but there was a splendor here once. Here the alphabet of the stars was first traced out, and the order of their shining processions made known; here barbarism was first beaten back; the first code was made here; here were originated the sciences of architecture and of war; here the arts of agriculture and mechanics were born; and here ...
— The Wedge of Gold • C. C. Goodwin

... lights on this little group, and the discussion which Pistol had solicited, apparently on his own behalf, actually takes place, for the benefit of the Poet's audience, and the answer to these inquiries comes out in due order. ...
— The Philosophy of the Plays of Shakspere Unfolded • Delia Bacon

... are in quarto and not paged,' continues Beckmann, 'the following order is observed. The Latin books occupy the first place . . . and after these, books of jurisprudence, medicine, philosophy, poetry and music. The second place is assigned to German works, which are arranged ...
— The Book-Hunter at Home • P. B. M. Allan



Words linked to "Order" :   acolyte, anagnost, order Parietales, order Belemnoidea, organisation, status, order Trichoptera, order Ostariophysi, order Platyctenea, association, wish, order Filicales, order Casuarinales, zone, order Ichthyosauria, disentangle, stability, order Chlorococcales, order Sclerodermatales, order Dinornithiformes, order Sphaeriales, alphabetisation, first-order correlation, gag order, rescript, order code, order Charales, order Apodes, yacht club, order oedogoniales, order Amoebida, tidy, order Cetacea, order Blastocladiales, order Branchiura, order Papaverales, proscription, order Primates, order Batrachia, order Batoidei, order Aristolochiales, golf club, order Scorpionida, order Santalales, rules of order, ban, succession, exorcist, lector, order Coleoptera, order Dictyoptera, order Peronosporales, Order Osteoglossiformes, armed forces, orderer, order Isopoda, order Cycadales, order Lepidoptera, order Myrtales, tranquillity, order Scrophulariales, order Crocodilia, order Xyridales, systematise, reader, gag law, concord, deacon, order Columbiformes, order Phallales, tall order, order Myaceae, order Piciformes, order Embiodea, order Ericales, order Agaricales, standing order, order Anguilliformes, mail-order buying, order Pseudoscorpionida, holy order, order Cycadofilicales, order Volvocales, order Eubryales, order Lycopodiales, Carthusian order, command, order Collembola, order Sphaerocarpales, asking, investors club, boat club, order Hymenogastrales, taxonomic category, order Aplacophora, order Heterotrichales, order form, quest, genome, order Lepidodendrales, religious sect, magnitude, orderliness, stop order, decide, order Campanulales, word, order Ciconiiformes, order Colymbiformes, jurisprudence, law, credit order, order Amphipoda, order Xiphosura, marching orders, put, order of the day, order Pseudoscorpiones, order Proteales, Augustinian order, order Amoebina, Orange Order, parliamentary procedure, order Testudinata, order Arales, order Heterosomata, order Sarcosporidia, order Notostraca, order Naiadales, athenaeum, order Marattiales, order Sauropterygia, order Aepyorniformes, alphabetization, jockey club, order Selaginellales, order of Saint Benedict, order Therapsida, Distinguished Service Order, civil order, set up, order Isoetales, animal order, ostiary, consecrate, order Saurischia, order Dinoflagellata, order Tulostomatales, upgrade, order Juglandales, order Plumbaginales, disorder, artistic style, military machine, vest, order Actinomyxidia, order Plecoptera, order Ornithischia, order Polymastigina, square away, standardize, call to order, order Cypriniformes, gild, order Anoplura, programma, order Cydippea, Franciscan order, order paper, govern, sorority, religious order, order Psittaciformes, order Nidulariales, lodge, order Myricales, order Polemoniales, order Primulales, say, fraternity, order Malvales, order Galliformes, order Urticales, order Decapoda, reorder, order Anostraca, order Coraciiformes, club, direct, order Lagomorpha, order Pezizales, order Testacea, order Tremellales, rank-order correlation coefficient, priest, order Loricata, order Saprolegniales, order Foraminifera, order Eurotiales, grading, order Ebenales, rank-order correlation, order Exocycloida, quiet, order Palmales, order Anthocerotales, act, order Siphonophora, commercial document, order Insectivora, plural form, order Myxobacteriales, order Actinaria, order Aspergillales, synchronize, order book, order Salicales, bill-me order, order Siluriformes, idiom, production order, commission, order Entomophthorales, order of magnitude, order Podicipitiformes, order Coniferales, bull, enjoin, order Anacanthini, order Ictodosauria, telephone order, doorkeeper, Carmelite order, order Squamata, order Myxosporidia, kelter, order Geraniales, order Rubiales, order Perissodactyla, consent decree, order Secotiales, order Solenogastres, Order of the Purple Heart, summons, order Heliozoa, clean up, peace, order Rajiformes, order Synentognathi, order Crocodylia, Robert's Rules of Order, order Podicipediformes, seed, slate club, Composite order, order mantophasmatodea, order Artiodactyla, biological science, ordering, Tuscan order, order Gadiformes, order Phasmatodea, order Gymnophiona, order Lechanorales, short-order, architecture, order Hyracoidea, order Gaviiformes, order Plantaginales, regularize, phrase, legal separation, order Stereospondyli, Jesuit order, order Andreaeales, order Mycrosporidia, determine, order Taxales, taxon, order Anseriformes, organise, concordance, sect, order Dicranales, scaling, spit and polish, contemporize, order Actiniaria, Benedictine order, order Psilotales, order Pediculati, interpellation, order Pholidota, point of order, order Trogoniformes, invest, prioritize, series, order Phasmida, order Mecoptera, bid, ordain, order Pulmonata, guild, order Insessores, society, state, order Conodonta, synchronise, order-Chenopodiales, order Mucorales, bring down, organize, order Apodiformes, judicial separation, order Uredinales, order Temnospondyli, order Scleroparei, tell, order Bryales, order Lobata, order Carnivora, order Musales, atheneum, order Moniliales, plant order, commercial instrument, order Madreporaria, order Salientia, military, in short order, order Marchantiales, closure, send for, order Tubulidentata, order Psocoptera, order Accipitriformes, regularise, straighten, class, request, orderly, polity, rank order, order Mycoplasmatales, order Pleuronectiformes, order Charadriiformes, warn, proposer, order Chiroptera, order Ulvales, indent, social club, order Pectinibranchia, order Ranunculales, deregulate, prioritise, order Radiolaria, mover, made-to-order, kilter, frat, order Laminariales, prohibition, order Anaspida, order Rodentia, tranquility, layout, order Protura, order Helotiales, order Plectognathi, order Odonata, open order, call for, systemize, order Acarina, order Testudines, service club, order Rheiformes, cease and desist order, order Zygnematales, order arms, order Ephemeroptera, call, order Procellariiformes, dictate, visit, make up one's mind, order Diapensiales, order Urodella, order Umbellales, order Orchidales, large order, order Hemiptera, order Guttiferales, order of business, order Dinocerata, order Conodontophorida, Corinthian order, order Tinamiformes, grade, order Chelonia, order Perciformes, order Caprimulgiformes, shortlist, order Chelonethida, standardise, order Zygnemales, fiat, order Tuberales, banning-order, order Raptores, order Coccidia, order Rhamnales, order Stegocephalia, stop payment, downgrade, decree, order Gregarinida, mandate, district, order Stomatopoda, order Polygonales, genetic code, position, order Rhoeadales, systematize, parliamentary law, order Spirochaetales



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