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noun
Od  n.  (Physics) An alleged force or natural power, supposed, by Reichenbach and others, to produce the phenomena of mesmerism, and to be developed by various agencies, as by magnets, heat, light, chemical or vital action, etc.; called also odyle or the odylic force. (Archaic) "That od force of German Reichenbach Which still, from female finger tips, burnt blue."






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Od" Quotes from Famous Books



... the Batrachoi. The dread of the infernal apparition of the fierce Gorgo in Hades blanched the cheek of even much-daring Odysseus (Od. xi. 633). The satellites of Hecate have been compared, not disadvantageously, with the monstrous guardians of ...
— The Superstitions of Witchcraft • Howard Williams

... though you have no beauty ... Must you be therefore proud and pitiless? Why, what means this? Why do you look on me? I see no more in you than in the ordinary Of nature's sale-work: Od's my little life! I think she means to tangle my eyes too:— No, 'faith, proud mistress, hope not after it; 'Tis not your inky brows, your black silk-hair, Your bugle eyeballs, nor your cheek of cream That can entame ...
— The English Novel in the Time of Shakespeare • J. J. Jusserand

... not?" The captain stroked his bushy red beard and cursed profusely and horribly after the fashion of the sea. "Od's wounds! He's very like to swing if he bides ...
— The Sea-Hawk • Raphael Sabatini

... hitherto been overlooked. I fancy that he went spying in the attic on a rainy day. In the darkest corner, behind the rocking horse—if such devices were known in those distant days—he came upon a trunk of his father's papers. "Od's fish," said Sir Kenelm's son, "here's a box of manuscripts. It is like that they pertain to alchemy or chirurgery." He pulled out a bundle and held it to the light—such light as came through the cobwebs of the ancient windows. "Here ...
— There's Pippins And Cheese To Come • Charles S. Brooks

... uncle dressed his oaths, like himself, a little after the example of Charles II.)—"od's fish, Madam, I have thought of a better plan than that; they shall have instruction without ...
— Devereux, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... broad-leaved plantain's glossy bower; Calm was my bosom as this silent hour, When o'er the deep, scarce heard, the zephyr strays, 'Midst the cool tam'rinds indolently plays, Nor from the orange shakes its od'rous flower: But, ah! since Love has all my heart possess'd, That desolated heart what sorrows tear! Disturb'd and wild as ocean's troubled breast, When the hoarse tempest of the night is there Yet my complaining spirit asks no rest; ...
— Paul and Virginia • Bernardin de Saint Pierre

... "'Od, Dauvit, noo that ye come to mention it I wud like to hear yer advice aboot the matter. I dinna see how I can tak ...
— A Dominie in Doubt • A. S. Neill

... Rome, when the Teutonic commander Odoacer, in the year 476 after Christ, dethroned, not Romulus, brother of Remus, but Romulus Augustulus, son of Orestes. Thus history repeats itself. Roman history begins and ends with Romulus; and we fancy we can see some connection between Od-in and Od-oacer. "As the twig is ...
— The Younger Edda - Also called Snorre's Edda, or The Prose Edda • Snorre

... had he the spirit of the born flunkey; and his intercourse with the nobility, unfortunately, had not impressed him with any other idea than that they were mortals like himself; so he remarked to his fellow-servant, "Od! ye wad think, if she likes to eat her lunch amang snawy slush, she might get enough of it at the fut o' the hill, without gaun ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Vol. 17, - No. 97, January, 1876 • Various

... in the Mathematicall Sciences, and Languages, is the Od man of this land. &c.) euen he, is hable: and (I am sure) will, very willingly, let the Glasse, and profe be sene: and so I (here) request him: for the encrease of wisedome, in the honorable: and for the stopping of the mouthes malicious: and repressing the arrogancy ...
— The Mathematicall Praeface to Elements of Geometrie of Euclid of Megara • John Dee

... declare, unless ye hae twa persons o' the same appearance, and twa tongues to the same voice. But, 'od saif us, sir, do you ken what the auld wives o' the ...
— The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner • James Hogg

... to in Homer does not mean that dawn 'ends' the day, but 'when the fair-tressed Dawn brought the full light of the third day' (Od., v. 390). ...
— Custom and Myth • Andrew Lang

... just to step in my way, and offer me a pig (earthen pot—etym. dub.), as he said 'just to put my Scotch ointment in'; and I gave him a push, as but natural, and the tottering deevil coupit owre amang his own pigs, and damaged a score of them." So also Dandie Dinmont in the postchaise: "'Od! I ...
— On the Old Road, Vol. 2 (of 2) - A Collection of Miscellaneous Essays and Articles on Art and Literature • John Ruskin

... who chiefly angered Belden. Nor had he any great feeling against Rosamund, having no undue interest in the social rivalries of young girls. Nor was he particularly incensed against her mother, being offended chiefly by the ostentatious and invidious go'od-will shown her by Mrs. Bates. But against Truesdale Marshall he nourished a hot and rancorous grievance. He did not apprehend Truesdale's attitude towards the town at large, and the young man's manner in his own house (regardless of his insolent utterance) seemed to have carried a half-contemptuous ...
— With the Procession • Henry B. Fuller

... Iliad, telling all about the Trojan War, and the Od'ys-sey, relating how Ulysses sailed about for ten years on his way home from Troy—were finally written down, and kept so carefully that they can still be read to-day. Such was the admiration felt for these poems, that some ...
— The Story of the Greeks • H. A. Guerber

... id the arbor, love, Where you sat by by side, Whed od that calb, autubdal dight You said you'd be by bride. Oh! for wud bobedt to caress Add tederly to kiss you; Budt do! we're ...
— The Wit and Humor of America, Volume X (of X) • Various

... want their wonted year, The seasons alter; hoary-headed frosts Fall in the fresh lap of the crimson rose; And on old Hyems' chin, and icy crown, An od'rous chaplet of sweet summer buds Is, as in mock'ry set. The spring, the summer, The chiding autumn, angry winter, change Their wonted liveries; and the 'mazed world, By their increase, now knows not which is which. No night is now with hymn or carol blest; Therefore the moon, the governess ...
— Johnson's Notes to Shakespeare Vol. I Comedies • Samuel Johnson

... Its white and purple flowers aloft in air. The treasures of the spring shall hither flow; The piony by the lily here shall blow. Over the hills, and through the meads I'll roam, And bring the blooming spoils in rapture home: The purple violet, the pink shall join, The od'rous shrubs shall all their sweets combine, Of these a grove of balmy sort shall rise, And, with its fragrant blossoms, scent the skies! Then round this little favour'd isle, I'll bring, With gentle windings, yonder ...
— Translations of German Poetry in American Magazines 1741-1810 • Edward Ziegler Davis

... scurvy usage to give a shipmate in distress," said he. "'Od's life, man! I had thought there was some sense of humour in you. Your hand, Mr. ...
— The Frozen Pirate • W. Clark Russell

... respecting it, as coming from the Indians, and was resolved to follow it up zealously, by cultivating the best understanding with this powerful and hitherto hostile tribe, namely the Chippewas, or, as they call themselves, Od-jib-wae.[16] To this end, as well as for my amusement, I commenced a vocabulary, and resolved to study their ...
— Personal Memoirs Of A Residence Of Thirty Years With The Indian Tribes On The American Frontiers • Henry Rowe Schoolcraft

... "'Od name it all," murmured the timber-merchant, unimpressed by the news, but reminded of other things by the subject of it; "I've got to meet a gentleman this very morning? and yet I've planned to go to Sherton ...
— The Woodlanders • Thomas Hardy

... of stone or solid materials. peb'bles, small, roundish stones, worn by the action of water. per cus'sion, requiring to be struck; the act of striking. per'fume, scent or odor of sweet-smelling substances. pe'ri od, portion of time; an interval. per'ished, died; were destroyed. per mis'sion, the act of allowing; consent. pic'nick ing, having an outdoor party. pier, a landing-place for vessels. pierce, force a way into or through an object. pil'lars, ...
— New National Fourth Reader • Charles J. Barnes and J. Marshall Hawkes

... "Od guide us, wull ye haud your skirling tongues!" said Girder,—for we are to remark, that this explanation was given like a catch for two voices, the younger dame, much encouraged by the turn of the debate, taking up and repeating in a higher ...
— Bride of Lammermoor • Sir Walter Scott

... characteristic in the present. The moving present includes the past on condition that it uses the past to direct its own movement. The past is a great resource for the imagination; it adds a new dimension to life, but OD condition that it be seen as the past of the present, and not as another and disconnected world. The principle which makes little of the present act of living and operation of growing, the only thing always present, naturally looks ...
— Democracy and Education • John Dewey

... her.—Come to your father, child; open the door. Open the door, Miss. I hear you cry husht. O Lord, who's there? [peeps] What's here to do? O the Father! A man with her! Why, miss, I say; God's my life, here's fine doings towards—O Lord, we're all undone. O you young harlotry [knocks]. Od's my life, won't you open the door? I'll come ...
— Love for Love • William Congreve

... the Lavrac[28] and forlorn While she moults those firstling plumes That had skimm'd the tender corn, Or the bean-field's od'rous blooms; ...
— Reminiscences of Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Robert Southey • Joseph Cottle

... flagons stood, and Panurge and his comrades with them, who counterfeited those that have had the pox, for he wreathed about his mouth, shrunk up his fingers, and with a harsh and hoarse voice said unto them, I forsake -od, fellow-soldiers, if I would have it to be believed that we make any war at all. Give us somewhat to eat with you whilest our masters fight against one another. To this the king and giants jointly condescended, and accordingly made them to banquet ...
— Gargantua and Pantagruel, Complete. • Francois Rabelais

... councilwoman, warden, constable, portreeve[obs3]; lord mayor; officer &c. (executive) 965; dewan[obs3], fonctionnaire[Fr]. [Naval authorities] admiral, admiralty; rear admiral, vice admiral, port admiral; commodore, captain, commander, lieutenant, ensign, skipper, mate, master, officer of the day, OD; navarch[obs3]. Phr. da locum melioribus[Lat]; der Furst ist der erste Diener seines Staats [German: the prince is the first servant of his state]; "lord of thy presence and ...
— Roget's Thesaurus

... education by natural selection into von lifetime. T'at is my t'eory. I do not know—it is not yet tried—but how ot'ervise? Ve but hasten t'e process, as t'e chemist hastens fermentation; Nature constructs, she does not adapt or alter or modify. Ve produce beauty by Nature's own met'od. V'y ...
— The Bacillus of Beauty - A Romance of To-day • Harriet Stark

... was an army of 300,000 Romans and Visigoths. It was led by a Roman general name A-e'ti-us and the Visigoth king, The-od'o-ric. The Visigoths after the death of Alaric had settled in parts of Gaul, and their king had now agreed to join the Romans against the common enemy—the terrible Huns. So the great army of the Romans and Visigoths marched ...
— Famous Men of the Middle Ages • John H. Haaren

... The dwarfs, hearing about Kvasir's great wisdom, coveted it, and finding him asleep one day, two of their number, Fialar and Galar, treacherously slew him, and drained every drop of his blood into three vessels—the kettle Od-hroerir (inspiration) and the bowls Son (expiation) and Boden (offering). After duly mixing this blood with honey, they manufactured from it a sort of beverage so inspiring that any one who tasted it immediately became a poet, ...
— Myths of the Norsemen - From the Eddas and Sagas • H. A. Guerber

... and lugs are better than mine, then," returned the ill-favoured comrade, who answered, when among his friends, to the name of Big Swankie, otherwise, and more correctly, Jock Swankie. "Od! I believe ye're right," he added, shading his heavy red brows with his heavier and redder hand, "that is the rock, but a man wad need the een o' an eagle to see onything in the face o' sik a bleezin' sun. Pull awa', Davy, we'll hae time ...
— The Lighthouse • R.M. Ballantyne

... stoppage to travel has chanced, this ten long year, No break into hall or grange, no lifting of nag or steer, Not a single roguery, from the clipping of a purse To the cutting of a throat, but paid us toll. Od's curse! When Gipsy Smouch made bold to cheat us of our due, —Eh, Tab? the Squire's strong-box we helped the rascal to— I think he pulled a face, next Sessions' swinging-time! He danced the jig that needs no floor,—and, here's the prime, 'T was Scroggs that ...
— Browning's England - A Study in English Influences in Browning • Helen Archibald Clarke

... World, to Learning, and to Heauen, Three nines there are, to euerie one a nine; One number of the earth, the other both diuine, One wonder woman now makes three od numbers euen. Nine orders, first, of Angels be in heauen; Nine Muses doe with learning still frequent: These with the Gods are euer resident. Nine worthy men vnto the world were giuen. My Worthie one to these nine Worthies addeth, And ...
— Minor Poems of Michael Drayton • Michael Drayton

... marvellously fine person for one country-bred—I dressed her as was fitting in my robes: a white striped silk petticoat, and a white body made of foreign taffeta, the sleeves looped up with white pearls, no cap upon her head, but a satin hood just edged with Paris lace. 'Od's Gemini! young man, if you had but seen her. Then all of a sudden her lady wanted her to get some flowers, and she had only time to throw on her cardinal and run ...
— The Buccaneer - A Tale • Mrs. S. C. Hall

... ladies, but at the expense of the married ones! What do you see of freedom in me?"—"Or in me?" said Lady Davers. "Nay, for that matter you are very well, I must needs say. But will you pretend to blush with that virgin rose?—Od's my life, Miss—Lady Jenny I would say, come from behind your mamma's chair, and you two ladies stand up now together. There, so you do—Why now, blush for blush, and Lady Jenny shall be three to one, and a deeper crimson by half. Look you there ...
— Pamela (Vol. II.) • Samuel Richardson

... interpretation of [Greek] (a word which occurs only here) is 'pretext'; but this does not agree with any of the meanings of the verb from which the noun is derived. The usage of [Greek] in Od. xix. 71, xxii. 75, of [Greek] in Il. xvii. 465, and of [Greek] in Od. xxii. 15, suggests rather for [Greek] the idea of 'aiming ...
— DONE INTO ENGLISH PROSE • S. H. BUTCHER, M.A.

... o' Rudgeway the folk seem as come to a pause there.—Be this true, never again do I stir my stumps for any alarm short of the Day of Judgment! Nine times has my rheumatical rest been broke in these last three years by hues and cries of Boney upon us. 'Od rot the feller; now he's made a fool of me once more, till my inside is like a wash-tub, what wi' being so gallied, and running so leery!—But how if you be one of the enemy, sent to sow these tares, so to speak it, these false tidings, and coax us into a fancied safety? ...
— The Dynasts - An Epic-Drama Of The War With Napoleon, In Three Parts, - Nineteen Acts, And One Hundred And Thirty Scenes • Thomas Hardy

... friendless boy had made acquaintance with a shoemaker and his wife, who had a shop near the school, and who were kind to him; and thereupon he conceived the extraordinary idea of getting himself apprenticed to his friend, whom he persuaded to go to the head-master to make this wonderful proposal. "Od's, my life, man, what d'ye mean?" cried the master, with not unnatural indignation mingling with his amazement; and notwithstanding Coleridge's support of the application, the shoemaker was turned out of the place, and the would-be ...
— Stories of Authors, British and American • Edwin Watts Chubb

... Lei a Cola, od altrove che fosse, e uno de' miei piu cari desideri, e son lieta delle sue parole che ...
— Personal Recollections, from Early Life to Old Age, of Mary Somerville • Mary Somerville

... could hardly bear the jest; for he pretended to retire like a philosopher, though he was but twenty-eight years old: and I believe the thing was true: for he had been a thorough rake. I think the three grave lines do introduce the last well enough. Od so, but I will go sleep; ...
— The Journal to Stella • Jonathan Swift

... they came clearer, the foe they drew nearer; Oh, how the bolts whistled, and how the lights shone! "I cannot get further, this running is murther; Come carry me, some one!" cried big Father John. And even the statue grew frightened, "Od rat you!" It cried, "Mr. Prior, I wish you'd get on!" On tugged the good friar, but nigher and nigher Appeared the fierce Russians, with sword and with fire. On tugged the good prior at Saint Sophy's desire,— A scramble through bramble, through mud, and through mire, ...
— Ballads • William Makepeace Thackeray

... at a trifle or two that I writ, Your judgment at once, and my passion you wrong: You take that for fact, which will scarce be found wit: Od's life! must one swear to the ...
— The Home Book of Verse, Vol. 2 (of 4) • Various

... which Attila saw was an army of 300,000 Romans and Visigoths. It was led by a Roman general name Aetius (A-e'-ti-us) and the Visigoth king Theodoric (The-od'-o-ric). The Visigoths after the death of Alaric had settled in parts of Gaul, and their king had now agreed to join the Romans against the common enemy—the terrible Huns. So the great army of the Romans and Visigoths marched up and attacked the Huns at Chalons. It was a fierce battle. Both ...
— Famous Men of The Middle Ages • John H. Haaren, LL.D. and A. B. Poland, Ph.D.

... not brought up, but bring up their own souls outside the Church—proud in their isolation, most proud of never yielding inward obedience or owning themselves in the wrong, and of being sufficient for themselves. When the grace of Q-od reaches them and they are admitted into the Church, one of the most overwhelming experiences is that of becoming one of a family, for whom there is some one responsible, the Father of the family whose authority and love pass ...
— The Education of Catholic Girls • Janet Erskine Stuart

... thing I did in my life, Nae doubt but ye 'll think I was wrang o 't, Od! I tauld a bit bodie in Fife A' my tale, and he made a bit sang o 't; I have aye had a voice a' my days, But for singing I ne'er got the knack o 't; Yet I tried whiles, just thinking to please The greedy wi' Tak it, man, tak it. Hey ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volume III - The Songs of Scotland of the Past Half Century • Various

... borrow 500 and without acknowledging) still in a Sonnet—a personal poem—I do not "ask my friend the aiding verse." I would not wrong your feelings by proposing any improvements (did I think myself capable of suggesting 'em) in such personal poems as "Thou bleedest my poor heart"—'od so, I am catchd, I have already done it—but that simile I propose abridging would not change the feeling or introduce any alien ones. Do you understand me? In the 28th however, and in the "Sigh" and that composed at Clevedon, things that ...
— The Works of Charles and Mary Lamb, Vol. 5 • Edited by E. V. Lucas

... the island, where a garrison was stationed to trade with the savages and permit neither whites nor Indians to pass except on the President's order. Even the domestic animals partook the industrious spirit: "of three sowes in eighteen months increased 60 and od Pigs; and neare 500 chickings brought up themselves without having any meat given them." The hogs were transferred to Hog Isle, where another block house was built and garrisoned, and the garrison were permitted to take "exercise" in cutting down trees and making clapboards ...
— Baddeck and That Sort of Thing • Charles Dudley Warner

... "Od's life," said Aske; "surely the rain will not again prevent us from passing the river, as it did in our ...
— Traditions of Lancashire, Volume 1 (of 2) • John Roby

... said she. "Samuel! Stand to it, I say. Damme, I'll have a whip about that loose belly of yours! Now pull, you swine, pull. Odso, flog the black horse. You, devil broil your bones, lay on to him. What now? Od rot you, Antony, you'll see no money this month, you—" She became unprintable. As she took breath again, she saw Harry Boyce calmly contemplative. "You dog, who bade you stand and gape? Go, give a ...
— The Highwayman • H.C. Bailey

... their providence and government of the world, is a familiar thought. They seem to have an abiding conviction of their dependence on the gods. The results of all actions depend on the will of the gods; it lies on their knees (Theon ev gounasi keitai, Od. i. 267), is the often repeated and significant expression of their feeling of dependence."—Tyler, "Theology ...
— Christianity and Greek Philosophy • Benjamin Franklin Cocker

... of all things, attracted my attention on that memorable day, was the show of cows, sheep, and horses, mooing, baaing and neighering; and the race—that was best! Od, what a sight!—we were jammed in the crowd of old wives, with their toys and shining ribands; and carter lads, with their blue bonnets; and young wenches, carrying home their fairings in napkins, as muckle as would hold their teeth going for a month;—there scarcely ...
— The Life of Mansie Wauch - tailor in Dalkeith • D. M. Moir

... is, 'Old Charley,' you are, by all odds, the heartiest old fellow I ever came across in all my born days; and, since you love to guzzle the wine at that fashion, I'll be darned if I don't have to make thee a present of a big box of the Chateau-Margaux. Od rot me,"—(Mr. Shuttleworthy had a sad habit of swearing, although he seldom went beyond "Od rot me," or "By gosh," or "By the jolly golly,")—"Od rot me," says he, "if I don't send an order to town this very afternoon for a double ...
— The Works of Edgar Allan Poe - Volume 5 (of 5) of the Raven Edition • Edgar Allan Poe

... OD, name given to a physical force recently surmised and believed to pervade all nature, and as manifesting itself chiefly in ...
— The Nuttall Encyclopaedia - Being a Concise and Comprehensive Dictionary of General Knowledge • Edited by Rev. James Wood

... some account of the magnificence of that prince into his poem. As Solomon was famous for wisdom, so the name of Alcinous signifies strength of knowledge; as the gardens of Solomon were celebrated, so are those of Alcinous (Od. 7.112.); as the kingdom of Solomon was distinguished by twelve tribes under twelve princes (1 Kings, ch. 4.), so that of Alcinous (Od. 8. 390.) was ruled by an equal number; as the throne of Solomon ...
— Life of Lord Byron, Vol. 6 (of 6) - With his Letters and Journals • Thomas Moore

... powers all to their judgment-seats, the all-holy gods, and thereon held council: who had all the air with evil mingled? or to the Joetun race Od's maid had given? ...
— The Elder Eddas of Saemund Sigfusson; and the Younger Eddas of Snorre Sturleson • Saemund Sigfusson and Snorre Sturleson

... mark my answer. 'Uncle Issy,' says I, quick as thought, 'you dunderheaded old antic,— leave that to the musicianers. At the word 'whales,' let the music go snorty; an' for wells, gliddery; an' likewise in a moving dulcet manner for the holy an' humble Men o' heart.' Why, 'od rabbet us!—what's wrong wi' ...
— I Saw Three Ships and Other Winter Tales • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... R.—'Why should Honesty fly to some safer retreat, From attorneys and barges, od rot 'em? For the lawyers are just at the top of the street, And the barges are just at ...
— Books and Authors - Curious Facts and Characteristic Sketches • Anonymous

... right a-cowstick organ is temp'rar'ly to the bad from shootin' a po-o-olecat. The gun busted on me, and I massacreed the marauder wid an ax. Did iver ye disthroy a skunk wid an ax? Then don't. Avoid mixin' it wid the od'riferous animals. Faix, I've buried me clothes—it was a new nightshirt, a flannel wan that I had on—and scrubbed meself wid kerosene and whale-oil soap that I keep f'r the dog, and I'm no bed of vi'lets yet. I can see ye wrinkle yer nose, and I don't blame yez. I'll move ...
— Desert Conquest - or, Precious Waters • A. M. Chisholm

... suspicari Cujus octavum trepidavit otas Claudere lustrum.—Od. 4.1. ii. Now tottering on to forty years, My age forbids ...
— The English Spy • Bernard Blackmantle

... in Bath have been here to play. They would know you, wouldn't they, fool? You've had thousands out of Bantison, Rakell, Guilford, and Townbrake. They would have you lashed by the grooms as your ugly deserts are. You to speak to Lady Mary Carlisle! 'Od's blood! You! Also, dolt, she would know you if you escaped the others. She stood within a yard of you when Nash expelled ...
— Monsieur Beaucaire • Booth Tarkington

... differentiation into Mullerian and Wolffian ducts are just the same in both sexes in the Amphibia, as in the mammal embryos (Figures 2.392 and 2.396). In the female Amphibia the Mullerian duct develops on either side into a large oviduct (Figure 2.393 od), while the Wolffian duct acts permanently as ureter (u). In the male Amphibia the Mullerian duct only remains as a rudimentary organ without any functional significance, as Rathke's canal (Figure 2.394 c); the Wolffian duct serves ...
— The Evolution of Man, V.2 • Ernst Haeckel

... "Od wite it!" replies the girl impatiently, "who's daft or dreamin' noo? I'd a bin dead wi' fear, if 'twas any such thing. It cudna be; all was sa luvesome, and bonny, ...
— J.S. Le Fanu's Ghostly Tales, Volume 5 • J.S. Le Fanu

... had od[TR:?] led us together and told us what to say. "Now you beg for me. If they ask you whether I've been good to you, you tell 'em 'yes'. If they ask you if we give you meat, you say 'yes'." Now de res' didn't git any meat, but I did, ...
— Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States - From Interviews with Former Slaves - Florida Narratives • Works Projects Administration

... ''Od rot 'em!' said she; 'they're always a-coming at ill-convenient times; and they have such hearty appetites, they'll make nothing of what would have served master and you since our poor lass has been ill. ...
— Cousin Phillis • Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell

... boneddwr iddo chware' match o gardiau gydag e. 'Nid oes genyf gardian,' meddai Bob. 'Oes, y mae genyt ddau ddec yn dy bocet,' meddai'r boneddwr. Ag fe gytunwyd i chware' match ar Bont Rhyd-y-Cae, gan ei bod yn oleu lleuad braf. Bu y boneddwr yn daer iawn arno dd'od i Blas Iolyn, y caent ddigon o oleu yno, er nad oedd neb yn byw yno ar y pryd. Ond nacaodd yn lan. Aed ati o ddifrif ar y bont, R. Ll. yn curo bob tro. Ond syrthiodd cardyn dros y bont, ac fe edrychodd ...
— Welsh Folk-Lore - a Collection of the Folk-Tales and Legends of North Wales • Elias Owen

... the preceding; born Celeste Lemprun, in 1794; only daughter of the oldest messenger in the Bank of France, and, on her mother's side, granddaughter od Galard, a well-to-do truck-gardener of Auteuil; a transparent blonde, slender, sweet-tempered, religious, and barren. In her married life, Madame Thuillier was swayed beneath the despotism of her sister-in-law, Marie-Jeanne-Brigitte, ...
— Repertory Of The Comedie Humaine, Complete, A — Z • Anatole Cerfberr and Jules Franois Christophe

... Beldar, [254] Od, Sonkar, Raj, Larhia, Karigar, Matkuda, Chunkar, Munurwar, Thapatkari, Vaddar, Pathrot, Takari.—The term Beldar is generically applied to a number of occupational groups of more or less diverse origin, who work as masons or navvies, build the earthen embankments of ...
— The Tribes and Castes of the Central Provinces of India - Volume II • R. V. Russell

... thoze taught tu read in this maner akweir the art ov ordinari speli[n] more redili than thoze instr[u]kted on the old me[t]od." ...
— Chips From A German Workshop, Vol. V. • F. Max Mueller

... Movit Amphion lapides canendo: Tuque Testudo, resonare septem Callida nervis; Nec loquax olim, neque grata &c. Carm. Lib. III. Od. 11. ...
— An Essay on the Lyric Poetry of the Ancients • John Ogilvie

... Thetes appear very early in the Grecian History.—kai tines auto kouroi epont'Ithakes exairetoi; he eoi autou thentes te Dmoes(?) te; Od. Homer. D. 642. They were afterwards so much in use that, "Murioi depou apedidonto eautous ose douleuein kata sungraphen," till Solon ...
— An Essay on the Slavery and Commerce of the Human Species, Particularly the African • Thomas Clarkson

... "Od, but for as queer as it is, it's a' the voucher I have for my rent," said my gudesire, who was afraid, it may be, of losing the benefit of Sir ...
— Stories by English Authors: Scotland • Various

... department of the subject which I might call grace swearing. 'Od's fish,' cried the king, when he saw the man climbing Salisbury spire; 'he shall have a patent for it—no one else shall do it.' One might call such little things Wardour Street curses. 'Od's bodkins' is a ladylike form, and 'Od's possles' a variety I met in the British Museum. ...
— Certain Personal Matters • H. G. Wells

... you presume to set your wits at me?"—Nothing was more common than to see him make a head-long entry into the school-room, from his inner recess, or library, and, with turbulent eye, singling out a lad, roar out, "Od's my life, Sirrah," (his favourite adjuration) "I have a great mind to whip you,"—then, with as sudden a retracting impulse, fling back into his lair—and, after a cooling lapse of some minutes (during which all but the culprit had totally forgotten the context) drive headlong out again, piecing ...
— The Works of Charles and Mary Lamb, Volume 2 • Charles Lamb

... Pallas from alwayes at his elbow, that is Gods speciall grace // heauen. from heauen, to kepe him in Gods feare, in all his doynges, in all his ieorneye. For, he shall not alwayes in his absence out of England, light vpon a ientle Alcynous, and walke in his faire gardens // | Alcynous. od. 2. full of all harmelesse pleasures: but he shall // | sometymes, fall, either into the handes of some // | cruell Cyclops, or into the lappe of some wanton // | Cyclops. od. 1. and dalying Dame Calypso: and so ...
— The Schoolmaster • Roger Ascham

... I tarry too long—Od's me! Qu'ay j'oublie? Dere is some simples in my closet dat I vill not for the varld I shall ...
— The Merry Wives of Windsor • William Shakespeare [Craig, Oxford edition]

... ye at the match? 'Od man, he has a nice bit divot o' Fife corn-land, I can tell ye, and some Bordeaux wine in his cellar! But I needna speak o' the Bordeaux; ye'll ken the smack o't as weel's I do mysel'; onyway it's grand wine. Tantum et tale. I ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson, Volume XV • Robert Louis Stevenson

... od wite it! no story, ouer true for that, I sid it a wi my aan eyen. But the barn here, would not like, at these hours, just goin' to her bed, to hear tell ...
— Madam Crowl's Ghost and The Dead Sexton • Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu

... CAR. Od's precious, come away, man, what do you mean? an you knew him as I do, you'd shun him as you would ...
— Every Man Out Of His Humour • Ben Jonson

... dependance, and mutuall relation, discover'd either from the resemblance of words, the proportion of their scope or compasse, and the conformity of their expressions. Tis true that this agreement, and relation is not a little obscur'd by the severall od constitutions of mens minds, that checque at, and satisfie themselves with the first, and naked appearance without any farther inquirie, but withall its presently, and easily perceiv'd by those who are happy enough, ...
— A Philosophicall Essay for the Reunion of the Languages - Or, The Art of Knowing All by the Mastery of One • Pierre Besnier

... Od. xii. 69: Tyro the daughter of Salmoneus, having two sons by Poseidon, Neleus and Pelias, married Cretheus, and had by him three sons, Aeson, Pheres and Amythaon. And of Aeson and Polymede, according to Hesiod, Iason was born: 'Aeson, who begot a son Iason, shepherd of the people, whom Chiron brought ...
— Hesiod, The Homeric Hymns, and Homerica • Homer and Hesiod

... 37 yeeres, and 10 or 11 od moneths, [Sidenote: Inas went to Rome and there died.] he renounced the rule of his kingdome, togither with all worldlie pompe, and went vnto Rome as a poore pilgrime, and there ended his life: but before this, during ...
— Chronicles (1 of 6): The Historie of England (6 of 8) - The Sixt Booke of the Historie of England • Raphael Holinshed

... fellow. And therefore, to ease the anger I sustain, I'll be so bold to open it. Whats here? Sir Robert greets you well? You, Mastries, his love, his life? Oh amorous man, how he entertains his new Maistres; and bestows on Lubeck, his od friend, a horn night cap to keep ...
— Fair Em - A Pleasant Commodie Of Faire Em The Millers Daughter Of - Manchester With The Love Of William The Conquerour • William Shakespeare [Apocrypha]

... at it. Thence to the Exchange, and so home to dinner, and then to my office, where a full board, and busy all the afternoon, and among other things made a great contract with Sir W. Warren for 40,000 deals Swinsound, at L3 17s. od. per hundred. In the morning before I went on the water I was at Thames Street about some pitch, and there meeting Anthony Joyce, I took him and Mr. Stacy, the Tarr merchant, to the tavern, where Stacy told ...
— Diary of Samuel Pepys, Complete • Samuel Pepys

... kindly meant, St. Ronan's—very kindly meant; and I wad be the last to say that Miss Clara does not merit respect and kindness at your hand; but I doubt mickle if she wad care a bodle for thae braw things. Ye ken yoursell, she seldom alters her fashions. Od, she thinks her riding-habit dress eneugh for ony company; and if you were ganging by good looks, so it is—if she had a thought mair ...
— St. Ronan's Well • Sir Walter Scott

... the hatch to the wheelhouse and the Captain slipped in, closing it tight behind him. It was pitch black and it took his eyes a few moments to adjust to it. When they had, he could make out the shadowed forms of the OD, the first class quartermaster at the wheel, and the radarman hunched over the repeater, the scope a ...
— Decision • Frank M. Robinson

... A collection of poems by this author recently appeared under the title Pownenky no cestach Zivota, od Waclawa Stulce, Prague 1845, which has been translated into German: Errinnerungsblumen auf dem Lebenswege, aus den Neuczechischen, von J. Wenzig, ...
— Historical View of the Languages and Literature of the Slavic - Nations • Therese Albertine Louise von Jacob Robinson

... three syllables, the accent is usually on the first syllable, especially if the second syllable is weak and the last syllable no weaker if not indeed stronger. Thus we have pe'-ri-od, per'-son-ate, ...
— The Art Of Writing & Speaking The English Language - Word-Study and Composition & Rhetoric • Sherwin Cody

... glad to do as much for you and me." "That is no odds to me," said the knight; "he is God's lieutenant on earth, and, as for having him put to death in such sort, I will never consent to it." The duke shrugged his shoulders, and spitting on the ground, said, 'Od's body, Sir Bayard, I would like to get rid of all my enemies in that way; but, since you do not think it well, the matter shall stand over; whereof, unless God apply a remedy, both you and I will ...
— A Popular History of France From The Earliest Times - Volume III. of VI. • Francois Pierre Guillaume Guizot

... on the high seas, each wearing an air of evident pride in the catch. Had the exalted feelings that swelled the hearts of all on board the gallant freight coach, the Hamburg, been transferred into od-rays, the steamer would have sailed up New York Harbour surrounded, even at high noon, by an ...
— Atlantis • Gerhart Hauptmann

... I hear that G[od] has shot an arrow into the midst of this Town. The small pox is in an ordinary ye sign of the Swan, the ordinary Keepers name is Windsor. His daughter is sick of the disease. It is observable that this disease begins at an alehouse, to testify God's displeasure agt the sin of drunkenness ...
— Public Opinion • Walter Lippmann

... my prayer! Let all those instruments of music sweet, That in great nature's hymn bear burthen meet, Sing round this mossy pillow, where my head From the bright noontide sky is sheltered. Thou southern wind! wave, wave thy od'rous wings; O'er your smooth channels gush, ye crystal springs! Ye laughing elves! that through the rustling corn Run chattering; thou tawny-coated bee, Who at thy honey-work sing'st drowsily; And ye, oh ye! who greet the ...
— Poems • Frances Anne Butler

... This Seuerus as then emperour of Rome, began to rule this Ile (as authors affirme) in the yeare of our Lord 207, and gouerned the same 4 yeares and od moneths. At length hearing that one Fulgentius as then a leader of the Picts was entred into the borders of his countrie on this side Durham, he raised an host of Britains and Romans, with the which he marched ...
— Chronicles (1 of 6): The Historie of England (4 of 8) - The Fovrth Booke Of The Historie Of England • Raphael Holinshed

... "'Od's blood, M'sieu," he would laugh, oddly mixing his dialect, "but this is seeing the wilderness with a vengeance! Though there is no lack of variety to speed the days, yet I would I were back in my post of Brisac on the Saskatchewan, ...
— The Maid of the Whispering Hills • Vingie E. Roe

... eodem cogimur, omnium Versatur urna, serius, ocius Sors exitura, et nos in aeternum Exilium impositura cymbae, [Footnote: Hor. I. iii. Od. iii. 25.] ...
— Literary and Philosophical Essays • Various

... after departed to God in a chamber of the abbats of Westminster called Ierusalem, the twentith daie of March, in the yeare 1413, and in the yeare of his age 46, when he had reigned thirteene yeares, fiue moneths and od daies, in great perplexitie and little pleasure [or fourtene yeares, as some haue noted, who name not the disease whereof he died, but refer it to sicknesse absolutelie, whereby his time of departure did approach ...
— Chronicles (3 of 6): Historie of England (1 of 9) - Henrie IV • Raphael Holinshed

... patient, holding his hands or thumbs, or pointing the extended hands towards his forehead, and slowly moving them in passes down his face, shoulders, and arms. It is now clear that the force brought into operation on this occasion, is the Od force of Von Reichenbach. So the patients sometimes speak of seeing the luminous aura proceeding from the finger-points of the operator, which Von Reichenbach's performers described. There are many who are utterly insensible to this agency. Others are sensible of it in slight, and ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 62, No. 382, October 1847 • Various

... 'Upon my heart and life such trifling is trying to any man's temper, Baptista! Sending me about from here to yond, and then when I come back saying 'ee don't like the place that I have sunk so much money and words to get for 'ee. 'Od dang it all, 'tis enough to—But I won't say any more at present, mee deer, though it is just too much to expect to turn out of the house now. We shan't get another quiet place at this time of the evening—every ...
— Victorian Short Stories, - Stories Of Successful Marriages • Elizabeth Gaskell, et al.

... hyacinth girl." - Yet when we came back, late, from the Hyacinth garden, Your arms full, and your hair wet, I could not Speak, and my eyes failed, I was neither Living nor dead, and I knew nothing, 40 Looking into the heart of light, the silence. Od' und leer ...
— The Waste Land • T. S. Eliot

... she heard him cry. "'Od's heart, Tony! Is this a time for trafficking with doxies?" She crimsoned an instant at the coarse word and set her teeth, only to pale again the next. The voices were lowered so that she heard not what was said; one sharp exclamation she recognized to be in Wilding's voice, but caught not the ...
— Mistress Wilding • Rafael Sabatini

... this build-up of reports in mind one Sunday night, June 15 to be exact, when the OD at ATIC called me at home and said that we were getting a lot of reports from Virginia. Each report by itself wasn't too good, the OD told me, but together they seemed to mean something. He suggested that I come out and take a look at ...
— The Report on Unidentified Flying Objects • Edward Ruppelt

... to thee our good Queen Bess, 1558-1603 Garbed in the puffed and padded dress, Farthingale and starched up frills, Meaning heavy laundry bills. Od's Bodikins; what monstrous ruffs, What gowns of rich embroidered stuffs Piped and scolloped, trimmed with furs, And shaped like huge gasometers. Now we've warfare of the Creeds, For their thoughts all Europe bleeds; Each party seeks ...
— A Humorous History of England • C. Harrison

... the British Druids we are told that it was "the profligacy of mankind" that caused God to send the great disaster. So, in the Bible narrative, we read that, in Lot's time, God resolved on the destruction of "the cities of the plain," Sodom, (Od, Ad,) and Gomorrah, (Go-Meru,) because of the ...
— Ragnarok: The Age of Fire and Gravel • Ignatius Donnelly

... and reserve the remen{au}nt w{i}t{h}out in the table, as thus .30.; other sette w{i}t{h}out thus .{d[-i]}: that kepeth{e} none ordre of place, Nathelesse it hath{e} signyficacio{u}n. And yf the other figure signyfie any other digital nombre fro vnyte forth{e}, o{er} the nombre is od{e} or even{e}. If it be even, write this ...
— The Earliest Arithmetics in English • Anonymous

... as soon as he comes, and you will make me the happiest man in the world, and I will make you the happiest woman; you shall have the finest cloaths in London, and the finest jewels, and a coach and six at your command. I promised Allworthy already to give up half my estate—od rabbet it! I should hardly stick at giving up the whole." "Will my papa be so kind," says she, "as to hear me speak?"—"Why wout ask, Sophy?" cries he, "when dost know I had rather hear thy voice than the musick of the best ...
— The History of Tom Jones, a foundling • Henry Fielding

... Edward departed this life. Simon Dun.] Finallie, after that this courteous prince king Edward had reigned three and twentie yeeres, seuen moneths, and od daies, he departed this life at London the fourth of Ianuarie, and was buried in the church of Westminster, which he had in his life time roiallie repared, after such a statelie sort as few churches in those daies were like [Sidenote: K. Edvard his maners and ...
— Chronicles (1 of 6): The Historie of England (8 of 8) - The Eight Booke of the Historie of England • Raphael Holinshed

... "'Od rot thee!" exclaimed George: "if I'd known thou'd been flitting too I wadn't ha' stirred a peg. Nay, nay,—it's to no use, Mally," he continued, turning to his wife, "we may as weel turn back again to th' owd house as be tormented in ...
— Traditions of Lancashire, Volume 1 (of 2) • John Roby

... vim promovet insitam, Rectique cultus pectora roborant: Utcunque defecere mores, Dedecorant bene nata culpae. HOR. Od. iv. ...
— The Coverley Papers • Various

... surgeod at work od be," protested Captain Flanger, whose speech was badly affected by the injury to his nasal organ, or by the pressure he applied to it ...
— Stand By The Union - SERIES: The Blue and the Gray—Afloat • Oliver Optic

... me? Forsooth! Od's bodkins! Hast turned liar on top of everything else, Good Saint? Good to see me, indeed! 'From such a face and form as mine, the noblest sentiments sound like the black utterances of a depraved imagination.' No, dear old holy pillar-sitter, no indeed! It may be ...
— Anchorite • Randall Garrett

... good prefernt it is ye readiest way you can take to fright all sober men from ever thinking of matching thmselves with women that live above thyr fortune, & if this be a wise way of spending money judge you! & besides, doe but reflect what an od sight it will be to a stranger that comes to our house to see yr Grandmothr yr Mothr & all yr Sisters in a plane dress & you only trickd up like a bartlemew-babby—you know what sort of people those are tht can't faire well but they must cry rost meate now what effect could you ...
— Memoir of Jane Austen • James Edward Austen-Leigh

... Corayus viderunt; quorum ille legere voluit [Greek: host' entakenai], hic vero [Greek: host' embalein]. Sed neuter rem acu tetigit. Euripides scripsit: [Greek: host' en ge phynai], uti patet ex Hom. Il. [Greek: Z]. 253, [Greek: en t' ara hoi phy cheiri], Od. [Greek: P]. 21, [Greek: panta kysen periphys], Theocrit. Id. xiii. 47, [Greek: tai d' en cheri pasai ephysan], et, quod rem conficit, ex Euripidis ipsius Ion. 891, [Greek: leukois d' emphysas karpois cheiron]." ...
— The Tragedies of Euripides, Volume I. • Euripides

... knowledge of this system is derived from the works of Homer, He'si-od, and other ancient writers, who have gathered the floating legends of which it consists into tales and epic poems, many of them of great power and beauty. Some of these legends are exceedingly natural and pleasing, while others shock and disgust us by the gross ...
— Mosaics of Grecian History • Marcius Willson and Robert Pierpont Willson

... reader will here be reminded of that beautiful passage of Horace, commencing with "Justum et tenacem propositi virum."—Lib. iii. od. 3. ...
— The Symbolism of Freemasonry • Albert G. Mackey

... gan wawr Wyneb udyn ysgorva ysgwydawr Crei kyrchynt kynnullynt reiawr En gynnan mal taran twryf aessawr Gwr gorvynt gwr etvynt gwr llawr Ef rwygei a chethrei a chethrawr Od uch lled lladei a llavnawr En gystud heyrn dur arbennawr E mordei ystyngei a dyledawr Rac erthgi ...
— Y Gododin - A Poem on the Battle of Cattraeth • Aneurin

... "Od, lassie, I wis thinkin' lang," he began wearily as soon as he realized her apparition. Baubie did not wait for him to finish: with a peremptory nod she signified her will, and he turned round and followed her a little way down Hanover street. Then Baubie ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Vol. XXVI., December, 1880. • Various

... "Go-od night! The subject of Europe is again on the table for the seventh evening this week. Nix for mine! Good night! Good night!" And he fell to burrowing his head ...
— Every Soul Hath Its Song • Fannie Hurst

... un esches, Un gin k'il aprist des Daneis, Od lui juout Elstruat lu bele, Sus ciel ...
— Chess History and Reminiscences • H. E. Bird

... principle is finely exemplified in the faithful Penelope, when she sheds tears over the bow of Ulysses. Od. xxi. 55. ...
— Poems • Samuel Rogers

... make an agreement to work for me till Lady-Day, I'll see that you carry it out," he growled. "'Od rot the women—now 'tis one thing, and then 'tis another. But I'll put up ...
— Tess of the d'Urbervilles - A Pure Woman • Thomas Hardy

... so says t' Church an' t' law, Aah b'lieve, but 'od rabbit him, Aah says, who knaws the clumsiness o' the creature. Just fit for nowt else but cuttin' up t' bait ...
— Border Ghost Stories • Howard Pease

... your limbs underneath are shrouded in night; and the voice of lamentation bursts forth, and your cheeks are wet with tears. And the vestibule is full, and the court is full, of ghosts descending into the darkness of Erebus, and the sun has perished out of heaven, and an evil mist is spread abroad (Od.).' ...
— Ion • Plato

... in song, cf. fabulosus Hydaspes. Hor. Od. 1, 227. Ulysses having wandered westward gave plausibility to alleged traces of him in Gaul, Spain and Germany—Asciburgium. ...
— Germania and Agricola • Caius Cornelius Tacitus

... so well, "you are, if I mistake not, Sir Jasper Killigrew?" "Nay, your Majesty," I answered, "I am Sir Jacob Clancing, formerly of Snellaby Hall, in Staffordshire;" and with that I reminded him of Worcester fight and of many passages which had occurred to us in common. "Od's fish!" he cried, "how could I be so forgetful! And how are all at Snellaby?" I then explained to him that the Hall had passed out of my hands, and told him in a few words the state to which I had been reduced. His face clouded over and his manner ...
— Micah Clarke - His Statement as made to his three Grandchildren Joseph, - Gervas and Reuben During the Hard Winter of 1734 • Arthur Conan Doyle

... experience of our author may shield some of our readers from 'obsessions, delusions, magnetic streams of Od,' be they angelic, human, demoniac, or Koboldic ...
— Continental Monthly , Vol V. Issue III. March, 1864 - Devoted to Literature and National Policy • Various

... "Od, he's Eppie Guthrie's son. Her man was William Geogehan, but he died afore you was born, an' as Jeames was their only bairn, the name o' Geogehan's been a kind o' lost sicht o'. Hae ye seen him, Hendry? Is't true 'at he made a fortune ...
— A Window in Thrums • J. M. Barrie

... Od drat, who cares fur kings or queens, Mix'd in a nation's broil, They nivver benefit the poor— The poor mun ollas toil. An' thou gilded spectre, royalty, That dazzles folks's een, Is nowt to me when I'm wi thee, Sweet Lass o' ...
— Revised Edition of Poems • William Wright

... the quarry to the neighbouring town, was overtaken by a series of rippling seas, and suddenly sank, leaving him standing on one of the thwarts submerged to the throat, he merely said to his partner, on seeing his favourite snuff-mull go floating past, "Od, Andro man, just rax out your han' and tak' in my snuff-box." On another, when a huge mass of the boulder clay came toppling down upon us in the quarry with such momentum, that it bent a massive iron lever like a bow, and crushed into minute fragments ...
— My Schools and Schoolmasters - or The Story of my Education. • Hugh Miller

... all; because he was a man of good understanding, and so old that his birth was as far back as the year after Harald Sigurdson's fall. He wrote, as he himself says, the lives and times of the kings of Norway from the report of Od Kolson, a grandson of Hal of Sida. Od again took his information from Thorgeir Afradskol, who was an intelligent man, and so old that when Earl Hakon the Great was killed he was dwelling at Nidarnes—the same place at which King Olaf Trygvason afterwards laid the foundation ...
— Heimskringla - The Chronicle of the Kings of Norway • Snorri Sturluson

... late Abodes, The green Reed trembles, and the Bulrush nods. Waste sandy Vallies, once perplexd with Thorn, [8] The spiry Fir and shapely Box adorn: To leafless Shrubs the flow'ring Palms succeed, And od'rous Myrtle to the noisome Weed. The Lambs with Wolves shall graze the verdant Mead [9] And Boys in flow'ry Bands the Tyger lead; The Steer and Lion at one Crib shall meet, And harmless Serpents Lick the Pilgrim's Feet. The smiling Infant in his Hand ...
— The Spectator, Volumes 1, 2 and 3 - With Translations and Index for the Series • Joseph Addison and Richard Steele

... their mixed descent. Some of them are as follows: Dube (a Brahman title), Chalak Bansi (of the Chalukya royal family), Chhit Karan (belonging to the Karans or Uriya Kayasths), Sahani (a sais or groom), Sudh (the name of an Uriya caste), Benet Uriya (a subdivision of the Uriya or Od mason caste), and so on. It is clear that members of different castes who became Paiks founded separate families, which in time developed into exogamous septs. Some of the septs will not eat food cooked ...
— The Tribes and Castes of the Central Provinces of India - Volume IV of IV - Kumhar-Yemkala • R.V. Russell

... councilwoman, warden, constable, portreeve^; lord mayor; officer &c (executive) 965; dewan^, fonctionnaire [Fr.]. [Naval authorities] admiral, admiralty; rear admiral, vice admiral, port admiral; commodore, captain, commander, lieutenant, ensign, skipper, mate, master, officer of the day, OD; navarch^. Phr. da locum melioribus [Lat.]; der Furst ist der erste Diener seines Staats [G.], the prince is the first servant of his state; lord of thy presence and ...
— Roget's Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases: Body • Roget

... To what epistle of St. James does the eloquent bishop refer? If to the canonical epistle, to what part? To the words (above quoted) "forbidden records" there is a foot-note, which contains only the well-known passage in Horace, lib. i. od. xi., and two others ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 188, June 4, 1853 • Various

... tarry too long. —Od's me! 55 Qu'ai-j'oublie! dere is some simples in my closet, dat I vill not for the varld ...
— The Merry Wives of Windsor - The Works of William Shakespeare [Cambridge Edition] [9 vols.] • William Shakespeare

... Misther Jew Mike," said Pat, placing himself between the Corporal and his gigantic antagonist—"be asy, and lave the owld gintlman alone; he's a brave little man intirely, and it's myself that'll fight for him. Whoop! show me the man that 'od harm my friend, and be the holy poker, and that's a good oath, I'll raise a lump on his head as big as the hill of Howth, and ...
— Venus in Boston; - A Romance of City Life • George Thompson

... mistress of Od, the patroness of Othere the homely, the sister of Frey-Frode, and daughter of Niord-Fridlaf, appears as Gunwara Eric's love and Syritha Ottar's love and the hair-clogged maiden, ...
— The Danish History, Books I-IX • Saxo Grammaticus ("Saxo the Learned")

... "'Od rabbit it all!" said Mr. Penny, interrupting with a flash of his spectacles, and at the same time clawing at something in the depths of a large side-pocket. "If so be I hadn't been as scatter-brained and thirtingill as a chiel, I should have ...
— Under the Greenwood Tree • Thomas Hardy

... 10 The lofty cedar, which to heaven aspires, The prince of trees! is fuel to their fires; The smoke by which their loaded spits do turn, For incense might on sacred altars burn; Their private roofs on od'rous timber borne, Such as might palaces for kings adorn. The sweet palmettos a new Bacchus yield,[2] With leaves as ample as the broadest shield, Under the shadow of whose friendly boughs They sit, carousing where their liquor grows. 20 Figs there unplanted ...
— Poetical Works of Edmund Waller and Sir John Denham • Edmund Waller; John Denham

... find her out for shame Gentlemen; and do not stand idle thus, Od's bobs, when I was a Young fellow and invited to a Wedding, I used to frisk and Jump, and so bestir my self, that I made all the Green-sickness Girles in the Room blush like Rubies. Ah, hah! I was a brisk Fellow in those Days, I'faith, and used to Cut Capers a Yard high: Nor am I yet so Old, ...
— The City Bride (1696) - Or The Merry Cuckold • Joseph Harris

... on Quantity; for, of his twelve words, exemplifying syllabic time so regulated, no fewer than nine are monosyllables. It is observable, however, that, in some instances, it is not one letter, but two, that he marks; as in the words, "mood, house."—Ib., p. 239; 12mo, 192. And again, it should be observed, that generally, wherever he marks accent, he follows the old mode, which Sheridan and Webster so justly condemn; so that, even when he is speaking of "the accent ...
— The Grammar of English Grammars • Goold Brown

... on to enyboddy what I did—witch wos to turn over some of the quarts what I thought was likely and Orrifferus. Doing this I kem uppon some pay ore which them Palmetto fellers had overlookt, or more likely had kaved in uppon them from the bank onknown. Workin' at it in od times by and large, sometimes afore sun up and sometimes after sundown, and all the time keeping up a day's work on the clame for a show to the boys, I emassed a honist fortun in 2 years of 50,000 dolers and still am. But it will be askd by the incredjulos Reeder How did ...
— Cressy • Bret Harte

... seen twa or three of their priests that were chased ower here some score o' years syne. They just danced like mad when they looked on the friars' heads, and the nuns' heads, in the cloister yonder; they took to them like auld acquaintance like.—Od, he is not stirring yet, mair than he were a through-stane! [Footnote: A tombstone.] I never kend a Roman, to say kend him, but ane—mair by token, he was the only ane in the town to ken—and that was auld Jock of the Pend. It wad hae been lang ere ...
— The Monastery • Sir Walter Scott

... ane accident befell me; for thogh it was not a very strange one, yet it was a very od one in all its parts. My tuo brigads lay in a village within halfe a mile of Applebie; my own quarter was in a gentleman's house, ho was a Ritmaster, and at that time with Sir Marmaduke; his wife keepd her chamber readie to be brought to bed. The castle being over, ...
— A Legend of Montrose • Sir Walter Scott

... of Cumberland Sound and Akkolead, near North Bay. The finest quality of kossegear skins I have seen were killed in Hudson's Strait. They are much superior in texture and color to those of the tributaries to Hudson's Bay. The next skin in quality is that of the ki-od-del-lik, or "jumping" seal, or, as it is sometimes called, "spotted" seal. This is very similar in color and texture to the fresh-water seal, except that the black in the back and sides is in great splotches that are odd, but very ...
— Schwatka's Search • William H. Gilder

... tak my word for that," said he, "'Od, it was a place! Sic a sight o' fechtin' as they had about it! But gin ye'll gan up the trap- stair to the laft, an' open Jenny's kist, ye'll see sic a story about it, printed by ane o' your learned Aberdeen's fouk, Maister Keith, I think; she coft it ...
— Folk-Lore and Legends - Scotland • Anonymous

... fiftie, or an hundred poundes, yet will the farmer as another palme or date tree, thinke his gaines verie small toward the end of his terme, if he had not six or seven yeares rent lieing by him, therewith to purchase a new lease, beside a faire garnish of pewter on his cupboard, with so much in od vessell going aboute the house, three or four feather beds, so manie coverlids and carpets of tapestrie, a silver salt, a bowle for wine * * * and a dozzen of spoones to furnish up the sute."[42] The ...
— A History of English Prose Fiction • Bayard Tuckerman

... the admiring stranger's steps explore The subject-lands that 'neath Vesuvius be, Whether he wind along the enchanting shore To Portici from fair Parthenope, Or, lingering long in dreamy reverie, O'er loveliest Ischia's od'rous isle he stray, Wooed by whose breath the soft and am'rous sea Seems like some languishing sultana's lay, A voice for very sweets that scarce can win ...
— Poems • Victor Hugo

... of his showing such a mood). 'Upon my heart and life such trifling is trying to any man's temper, Baptista! Sending me about from here to yond, and then when I come back saying 'ee don't like the place that I have sunk so much money and words to get for 'ee. 'Od dang it all, 'tis enough to—But I won't say any more at present, mee deer, though it is just too much to expect to turn out of the house now. We shan't get another quiet place at this time of the ...
— Victorian Short Stories, - Stories Of Successful Marriages • Elizabeth Gaskell, et al.

... alluded to in Homer does not mean that dawn 'ends' the day, but 'when the fair-tressed Dawn brought the full light of the third day' (Od., ...
— Custom and Myth • Andrew Lang



Words linked to "Od" :   eye, oculus, Doctor of Optometry, doctorate



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