Free Translator Free Translator
Translators Dictionaries Courses Other
Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




Musa   Listen
proper noun
Musa  n.  (pl. musae)  (Bot.) A genus of perennial, herbaceous, endogenous plants of great size, including the banana (Musa sapientum), the plantain (Musa paradisiaca of Linnaeus, but probably not a distinct species), the Abyssinian (Musa Ensete), the Philippine Island (Musa textilis, which yields Manila hemp), and about eighteen other species.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"Musa" Quotes from Famous Books



... hyberni menses quotcunque celebrant, Cuique locum et versum dat tua musa suum: Crispino ante omnes; neque enim sine carmine fas est Nobile ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 78, April 26, 1851 • Various

... of Law relating to land —— of leases, by Dr. Mackenzie —— of fixtures, French Manchester and Liverpool Agricultural Society's Journal, rev. Machinery, agricultural, by Mr. Mechi Mangold wurzel, by Mr. Watson Musa Cavendishi Pipes, to coat, by Dr. Angus Smith Potatoes, curl in Potato disease Preserves, bottles for, by Mr. Cuthill Rhubarb wine, by Mr. Cuthill Root, crops on clay, by Mr. Wortley Royal Botanic Society, report of exhibition Seeding, advantages ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 188, June 4, 1853 • Various

... length a soldier brought to Taric the head of a Christian warrior, on which was a cap decorated with feathers and precious stones. The Arab leader received it as the head of the unfortunate Roderick, and sent it, as a trophy of his victory, to Musa ben Nosier, who, in like manner, transmitted it to the caliph at Damascus. The Spanish historians, however, have always denied ...
— The Knickerbocker, or New-York Monthly Magazine, May 1844 - Volume 23, Number 5 • Various

... Charing Crosse shall haue a new coat too: but in the meane time while so many monuments are raised, either to the honour of the dead, or else for the profit and pleasure of the lyuing: Dic mihi musa virum, I pray Muse and shew me the man, who ioynes with that euer zealous, reuerend, learned Deane in founding a Colledge for a Societie of writers against the superstitious Idolatries of the Romane ...
— An Exposition of the Last Psalme • John Boys

... order. They are also known as Kulchor or thieves of the family, and appear to have been originally a branch of the Madari, who were perhaps expelled on account of their thieving habits. Their distinguishing mark is a double bag like a pack-saddle, which they hang over their shoulders. The Sada or Musa Sohag are an order who dress like women, put on glass bangles, have their ears and noses pierced for ornaments, and wear long hair, but retain their beards and moustaches. They regard themselves as brides of God or of Hussan, and beg in ...
— The Tribes and Castes of the Central Provinces of India - Volume II • R. V. Russell

... numina fletus Fundere, diuinas atque rigare genas, Galfridi vatis Chaucer crudelia fata Plangite; sit lacrimis abstinuisse nefas. Uos coluit viuens: at vos celebrate sepultum; Reddatur merito gracia digna viro. Grande decus vobis, en docti musa Maronis Qua didicit melius lingua latina loqui. Grande nouumque decus Chaucer famamque parauit; Heu quantum fuerat prisca britanna rudis. Reddidit insignem maternis versibus, vt iam Aurea splendescat, ...
— Fifteenth Century Prose and Verse • Various

... stay with Musa, the king at Kaze, who had shown himself friendly on a previous expedition, I underwent some trying experiences in trying to mediate between two rival rulers, Snay and Manua Sera, between whom there was continual wrangle and conflict. On one occasion Musa, ...
— The World's Greatest Books, Volume 19 - Travel and Adventure • Various

... of country permanently. Again operations were undertaken by Abdalmalek, the sixth of the Ommiade dynasty, A.D. 698; his lieutenant, Hassan, took Carthage by storm and destroyed it, the conquest being at last thoroughly completed by Musa, who enjoyed the double reputation of a brave soldier and an eloquent preacher. And thus this region, distinguished by its theological acumen, to which modern Europe owes so much, was for ever ...
— History of the Intellectual Development of Europe, Volume I (of 2) - Revised Edition • John William Draper

... and people are to be found at Velia and Salernum,—the one a town of Lucania, the other of Campania,—as he has been ordered by his doctor to give up his favourite watering-place, Baiae, as too relaxing. This doctor was Antonius Musa, a great apostle of the cold-water cure, by which he had saved the life of Augustus when in extreme danger. The remedy instantly became fashionable, and continued so until the Emperor's nephew, the young Marcellus, died under the treatment. Horace's inquiries are ...
— Horace • Theodore Martin

... vellere. [Greek: Aeeritrimma]; frippon To picke owt the Ravens eyes. Centones Improbitas musce (an importune that wilbe soone awnswered but straght in hand agayne). Argentangina, sylver mumpes Lupi illum videre priores Dorica musa. To looke a gyven horse in ...
— Bacon is Shake-Speare • Sir Edwin Durning-Lawrence

... 295. MUSA CAVENDISHII.—This is a valuable dwarf species of the banana from southern China. It bears a large truss of fine fruit, and is cultivated to some extent in Florida, where it endures more cold than the West India ...
— Catalogue of Economic Plants in the Collection of the U. S. Department of Agriculture • William Saunders

... upon his eyes, and said, Of a truth let me see what hath come out of it (the mine) and what I have laid out upon it.' Then he deducted from them the expenses of working and returned to them the surplus. . . . And I was told by Musa'b el-Zubayri, from Malik ibn Anas, that the Apostle of Allah (upon whom be peace!) gave in feoff to Bill bin Hris mines in the district of Fara' (sic). There is no difference of opinion among our learned men on this subject, nor do I know any of our companions who contradicts (the statement) that ...
— The Land of Midian, Vol. 1 • Richard Burton

... Scouting parties, also, ranged the mountains behind Granada and captured every casual convoy of provisions. The Moors became more daring as their situation became more hopeless. Never had Ferdinand experienced such vigorous sallies and assaults. Musa[1], at the head of his cavalry, harassed the borders of the camp, and even penetrated into the interior, making sudden spoil and ravage, and leaving his course to be traced by the ...
— The Great Events by Famous Historians, Vol. 8 - The Later Renaissance: From Gutenberg To The Reformation • Editor-in-Chief: Rossiter Johnson

... into the affairs of his Ryots and fend off oppression from them. As for thee, O king, it behoveth thee that thy Wazir be virtuous and experienced in the requirements of the people and the peasantry; and indeed Allah the Most High hath named his name[FN459] in the history of Musa (on whom be the Peace!) when he saith, 'And make me a Wazir of my people, Aaron.' Now could a Wazir have been dispensed withal, Moses son of Imran had been worthier than any to do without a Minister. As for the Wazir, the Sultan discovereth unto him his affairs, private and public; and know, ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 2 • Richard F. Burton

... a valley at the southern base of Sinai, it seems very extraordinary that it should have escaped the notice of travellers. It must be visible from the summit of Sinai (Jebel Musa); but, seen only from that lofty summit, and running in an irregular line at the very base of the mountain, they must have overlooked it in their brief survey of the scenery, so grand, so gloomy and peculiar, ...
— The International Monthly, Volume 2, No. 4, March, 1851 • Various

... [Sidenote: Horace] If our poet is scored by Horace[10] it is probably due rather to Horace's affectation of contempt for the early poets than to his true convictions; or we may ascribe it to the sophisticated metricist's failure to realize the existence of a "Metrica Musa Pedestris." As Duff says (A Literary History of Rome, p. 197), "The scansion of Plautus was less understood in Cicero's day than that of Chaucer was in Johnson's." (Cf. Cic. ...
— The Dramatic Values in Plautus • Wilton Wallace Blancke

... mercies—no other mercy than that fatherly, forbearing, all-seeing, perfect goodness by which the Creator is ever adapting this world to the wants of His creatures, and rectifying the evils arising from their faults and follies? Sed quo Musa tendis? Such discourses of the gods as these are not to be fitly handled in ...
— Castle Richmond • Anthony Trollope

... of Lowth with some humour describes the last sentence of the "Enquiry on Prodigies" as "the Musa Pedestris got on horseback in a high prancing style." He printed it in measured lines, without, however, changing the place of a single word, and it produced blank verse. Thus ...
— Calamities and Quarrels of Authors • Isaac D'Israeli

... suspended in the form of cords and ribbons; whilst luxuriant creeping plants overran alike tree-trunks, roofs and walls, or toppled over palings in a copious profusion of foliage. The superb banana (Musa paradisiaca), of which I had always read as forming one of the charms of tropical vegetation, grew here with great luxuriance— its glossy velvety-green leaves, twelve feet in length, curving over the roofs of verandahs in the rear ...
— The Naturalist on the River Amazons • Henry Walter Bates

... got into the train; he had the compartment to himself, and he thought it likely he would remain alone until he arrived at Lala Musa, about eight o'clock, where he would have to change to get on to the main line, so he quickly spread his bedding, and, drawing the green-baize shade over the lamp, he was ...
— Adventures in Many Lands • Various

... tacite scommata quaeque feres. Frendeat, allatret, vacuas gannitibus auras Impleat, haud cures; his placuisse nefas. Verum age si forsan divertat purior hospes, Cuique sales, ludi, displiceantque joci, Objiciatque tibi sordes, lascivaque: dices, Lasciva est Domino et Musa jocosa tuo, Nec lasciva tamen, si pensitet omne; sed esto; Sit lasciva licet pagina, vita proba est. Barbarus, indoctusque rudis spectator in istam Si messem intrudat, fuste fugabis eum, Fungum pelle procul (jubeo) nam quid mihi fungo? ...
— The Anatomy of Melancholy • Democritus Junior

... Musa Cavendishii.—To be repotted in a compost of turfy loam, vegetable soil, or well-rotted manure, and a small portion of sand, with plenty of drainage. To be plunged in a brisk heat in a bark-bed, and to keep ...
— In-Door Gardening for Every Week in the Year • William Keane

... wild species of banana growing in the Philippine Islands, known also as Arbol de Canamo (hemp-tree), Musa textilis, Lin. It does not differ in appearance to any great extent from the edible banana (Musa paradisiaca), one of the most important plants of the torrid zone, and familiar to us as being one of our most ...
— The Former Philippines thru Foreign Eyes • Fedor Jagor; Tomas de Comyn; Chas. Wilkes; Rudolf Virchow.

... yours; a man like me is not made to support repulses from door-keepers." Having got his quotation safely into print, Ibn Khallikan adds: "I since discovered that these verses are attributed to Ibn Musa 'l-Makfuf. God knows best!" It is a charming way of writing biography. The grass does not grow upon the weir more easily. With such a rectifying or excusatory phrase as "God knows best" one can hazard all. And how difficult it is to be the ...
— A Boswell of Baghdad - With Diversions • E. V. Lucas

... como argolla de bronce, contra un clavo sujetan de la America un pie; y la America debe, si pretende ser libre, imitarles primero, e igualarles despues. page lxxx Imitemos ioh Musa! las crujientes estrofas que en el Norte se arrastran con la gracia de un tren, y que giren las rimas como ruedas veloces y que caigan los versos como varas de riel. (La epopeya ...
— Modern Spanish Lyrics • Various

... Catalepton may belong to this period. The very first,[1] addressed to Vergil's lifelong friend Plotius Tucca, is an amusing trifle in the very vein of Philodemus. The fourth, like the first in elegiacs, is a gracious tribute to a departing friend, Musa, perhaps his fellow-townsman Octavius Musa.[2] It closes with a generous expression of unquestioning friendship that asks for ...
— Vergil - A Biography • Tenney Frank

... boy, whom they called Musa. He was dark, slim, with timorous great eyes, and attired in red as a devil beneath his student's cloak. He apologised slowly in English for not being able to speak English. He said he was very French, and Tommy and Nick smiled, and he smiled back at them rather wistfully. ...
— The Lion's Share • E. Arnold Bennett

... his morals were pure. He had founded an academy of which he was the president. Its design was a fly, in allusion to his name Mosca, with the words 'de me ce', that is to say, take away 'c' from 'musca' and you have 'musa'. ...
— The Memoires of Casanova, Complete • Jacques Casanova de Seingalt

... one occasion he writes, "-Quintiforis Clodii foria ac poemata ejus gargaridians dices; O fortuna, O fors fortuna-!" And elsewhere, "-Cum Quintipor Clodius tot comoedias sine ulla fecerit Musa, ego unum libellum non 'edolem' ut ait Ennius?-" This not otherwise known Clodius must have been in all probability a wretched imitator of Terence, as those words sarcastically laid at his door "O fortuna, O fors fortuna!" are found occurring in ...
— The History of Rome (Volumes 1-5) • Theodor Mommsen

... the king at Kaze, who had shown himself friendly on a previous expedition, I underwent some trying experiences in trying to mediate between two rival rulers, Snay and Manua Sera, between whom there was continual wrangle and conflict. On one occasion Musa, who was suffering from a sharp illness, to prove to me that he was bent on leaving Kaze the same time as myself, began eating what he called his training pills—small dried buds of roses with alternate bits of ...
— The World's Greatest Books, Volume 19 - Travel and Adventure • Various

... he said, "By Allah, I long to look upon some of these Solomonic vessels, which must be a warning to whoso will be warned." "O Commander of the Faithful," replied Talib, "it is in thy power to do so, without stirring abroad. Send to thy brother Abd al-Aziz bin Marwan, so he may write to Musa bin Nusayr,[FN107] governor of the Maghrib or Morocco, bidding him take horse thence to the mountains whereof I spoke and fetch thee therefrom as many of such cucurbites as thou hast a mind to; for those mountains adjoin the frontiers of his province." The Caliph ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 6 • Richard F. Burton

... rising by appeals to popular sympathy, and by the more practical argument of lavish distribution of treasure. The flame spread, tribesmen and disbanded soldiers sprang to arms, the banner of the Prophet was unfurled, and the nation heaved with the impulse of fanaticism. Musa Khan, the boy heir of Yakoub, was in the hands of the Mushk-i-Alum, and the combination of fighting tribes found a competent leader in Mahomed Jan, a Warduk general of proved courage and capacity. The plan ...
— The Afghan Wars 1839-42 and 1878-80 • Archibald Forbes



Words linked to "Musa" :   Jebel Musa, banana family, Musa paradisiaca sapientum, Musa acuminata, Musa textilis, banana tree, monocot genus, Musa ensete, Musa paradisiaca, family Musaceae, genus Musa, liliopsid genus, Musa basjoo, banana, Musaceae



Copyright © 2020 Free-Translator.com