Free Translator Free Translator
Translators Dictionaries Courses Other
Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




Mo   Listen
adjective
Mo  adj., adv., n.  (Written also moe)  More; usually, more in number. (Obs.) "An hundred thousand mo." "Likely to find mo to commend than to imitate it."






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"Mo" Quotes from Famous Books



... Exaltation of the Cross, the 14th September, 1666, as every effort was made to give a religious aspect to an army, intended to avenge the death of martyred missionaries, as well as to afford Canada some guarantees of peace. It took the expedition nearly a month to reach the first village of the Mo hawks, but only to find it deserted. It was the same result in three other villages visited by the French. The Mohawks had made preparations for defence, but their courage failed them as they heard of the formidable character of the force that had come ...
— Canada • J. G. Bourinot

... off the lit-tle bridge in-to the mill pond to fetch a stick that Hal Jones threw for him. The wheel was in full mo-tion, and Jack, for that was the dog's name, was drawn in toward it. Rob was a-fraid that Jack was go-ing to be drowned and was just a-bout to jump in af-ter him, when one of the mill hands held him fast. "Wait a bit," said ...
— Monkey Jack and Other Stories • Palmer Cox

... begine this year whith that which was a mater of great saddnes and mo[u]ring unto them all. Aboute y^e 18. of Aprill dyed their Reve^d Elder, and my dear & loving friend, M^r. William Brewster; a man that had done and suffered much for y^e Lord Jesus and y^e gospells sake, and had bore his parte in well and ...
— Bradford's History of 'Plimoth Plantation' • William Bradford

... going to be in a tree where Ah can watch to-morrow mo'ning and see if yo' are as brave as yo' talk," ...
— The Adventures of Prickly Porky • Thornton W. Burgess

... Massanutten in a 'Fod.' No, sah, yo ain't nebber gwine to ketch me goin' up dat frien'ly invitation to de open grave, in dat Fod. Man, Oh man! you-all don' know what chances you-all is takin. Look away out over the valley to de homes you am leaben for you sure'll nebber see dem any mo." With all the solicitous advise given by their fearful companion the occupants of the car were not to be stopped by this calamity-howler and the little Ford soon stood triumphant upon the very crown of old Massanutten. A lady also seen, walking down ...
— See America First • Orville O. Hiestand

... masters he had mo than thryis ten, That were of law expert and curious, Of which there were a dozen in that house, Worthy to ben stuards of house and londe, Of any lord that ...
— Real Life In London, Volumes I. and II. • Pierce Egan

... You're the only gugugu-girl that I adore; And when the mo-moon shines Over the cowshed, I'll be waiting ...
— Three Soldiers • John Dos Passos

... scratchin' at de kitchin do'? Done heah'n dat foh an hour er mo'! Tell you Mr. Niggah, das sho's yo' bo'n, Hit's mighty lonesome waitin' ...
— Afterwhiles • James Whitcomb Riley

... Miss Molly—(How-you-do, Mars' Frank?) I do declar', Miss Molly, you're enough to drive anybody crazy with you' wild tomboy ways. Me 'n' Miss Molly Belle, we've been jes' raisin' the plantation fo' you, and hyar you come home a-riding Mars' Frank Mo'ton's horse, gran' as you please, and nobody knowin' whar you been ever sence dinner-time. Miss Molly Belle 'll be mighty obleeged to you for fotchin' of her home, Mars' Frank. She'll be down pretty soon for to tell you so herself. Walk into the parlor, ...
— When Grandmamma Was New - The Story of a Virginia Childhood • Marion Harland

... hen, blame her fool soul! She's mo' bother'n she's wuf. I 'clare, ever' time I takes them er' chickens out fer a walk that ole Sar' Ann hen, she boun' fer to go off by herse'f somewheres, she's that briggotty; an' first thing I knows, dar she is in trouble again—low down, no ...
— The Girl at the Halfway House • Emerson Hough

... by which assistance was sent, but at other times my benefactors remained unknown. There was one good Christian, John Donaldson, who was always ready with his help. He not only aided me by many gifts, but busied himself to induce his friends to send mo aid. He gave the first subscription towards a steam press; and when the press was bought, he sent a sum to purchase the first load of coals to get up the steam, to put the ...
— Modern Skepticism: A Journey Through the Land of Doubt and Back Again - A Life Story • Joseph Barker

... heaven's name!" lamented poor Brigitta another day, "he is also quite a sugar-rat! Why, dear, gracious lady, he must put in at least twenty pieces of sugar into one cup of coffee, or he never could empty a sugar-basin as he does! I must beg you to give mo the key of the chest, that I may fill it again. God grant that all this may have ...
— The Home • Fredrika Bremer

... answered Honest Moses, and chuckled. "Mistah Sheldrake done sell me fo' cash, plunk down; I fugitives back to him, and he done sell me agin fo' mo' cash. I gits mo' money out o' speculatin' in dis heah darky, dan Scipio and Dan'l can git ahookin' watermillions fo' ...
— A Dream of Empire - Or, The House of Blennerhassett • William Henry Venable

... said the old man with easy generosity. "I bet he's killed a hun'ed men—maybe mo'n ...
— The Duke Of Chimney Butte • G. W. Ogden

... speaking rapidly, and waving his hands about, oriental fashion, the palms turned outward and the fingers twirling; this peculiar gesture seemed intended to indicate the cheapness of his wares. "Dey coss me mo'n that; heap mo', but I'm faih to lose um all now, en I'm driffin' ...
— Stories by American Authors, Volume 6 • Various

... Towanda cyclone," recommenced Seth, "that little Kansas town the cyclone got mad at and made way with, theah must have been a hundred knives or mo' flyin' around loose. They cut hogs half in two. You would have thought a butchah had done it. And the chickens were carved ready to be put on the table. It was wonderful ...
— The Way of the Wind • Zoe Anderson Norris

... steady diminution in forces of; offers promotion to any one who will capture or kill Forrest; odd mistake, resulting in promotion of General Mower; orders citizens to leave Atlanta; leaves of absence and furloughs freely granted; orders certain officers to report to governors of Indiana and Mo. for duty—on the stump; courteous treatment of subordinates; would have given Logan command of Army of Tennessee but for Thomas' opposition; praises L.'s handling of that army at battle of Atlanta; sends back troops to protect railroads ...
— Military Reminiscences of the Civil War V2 • Jacob Dolson Cox

... dignity of his family. He was called for on all sides, and appeared to be the only member of the household in perpetual request; but, though many liberties were taken with him personally, none were taken with his name, which was always given in full, "Ti-mo-the-us!" Wilkinson was too tired, thirsty and generally disgusted to do anything but sit, as he never would have sat elsewhere, on a chair tilted against the wall. Coristine would fain have had a talk with "The Crew's" brother, but that worthy was ever flitting about from bar-room to ...
— Two Knapsacks - A Novel of Canadian Summer Life • John Campbell

... amazed to see it troubled so, Like sudden brooks increased with molten snow, The billows fierce that tossed to and fro, The whirlpools sucked down to their bosoms low; But on he went to search for wonders mo, Through the thick trees there high and broad which grow, And in that forest huge and desert wide, The more he sought, more ...
— Jerusalem Delivered • Torquato Tasso

... all," answered Clementina. "I'm sorry we can't do the wo'k he'a; but I know mocha wouldn't like to. Good-mo'ning,'m!" ...
— Henry James, Jr. • William Dean Howells

... In good sooth Madge, een so would I, if I were thou. But no more of this fond talke now, let vs go in, And see thou no more moue me folly to begin. Nor bring mee no mo letters for no mans pleasure, ...
— Roister Doister - Written, probably also represented, before 1553. Carefully - edited from the unique copy, now at Eton College • Nicholas Udall

... by our honour, said Lucifer, No devil in hell shall withhold her; And if thou wouldest have twenty mo, Wert not for justice, they should go. For all we devils within this den Have more to-do with two women Than with all the charge we have beside; Wherefore, if thou our friend will be tried, Apply thy pardons to women so That unto us there come ...
— The Growth of English Drama • Arnold Wynne

... soones' mended where she's 'cerned. I can't tell you on'y but jes' dis: She 'peared yere 'bout twenty year ago, or mo'. She built dat dere hut wid her own han's, an' she use to make baskets an' brackets an' sich, an' fetch 'em roun' to de people to sell. She made 'em out'n twigs an' ornimented 'em wid red rose berries an' hollies an' sich, an' mighty purty dey was, an' de young gals liked 'em, dey ...
— For Woman's Love • Mrs. E. D. E. N. Southworth

... value, in that the poison is used in certain affections of the heart. For details, I would refer you to the Denny Laboratories of St. Louis, Mo., which ...
— Average Jones • Samuel Hopkins Adams

... the State Department looking to the making of bribery an extraditable offense with foreign powers. The need of more effective treaties covering this crime is manifest. The exposures and prosecutions of official corruption in St. Louis, Mo., and other cities and States have resulted in a number of givers and takers of bribes becoming fugitives in foreign lands. Bribery has not been included in extradition treaties heretofore, as the necessity for it has not arisen. While there may have been as much official corruption ...
— Complete State of the Union Addresses from 1790 to the Present • Various

... to mandalin. Mandalin man put on heavy chain, kick flow in boat, put in plison, no give to eat, and then choppee off allee head. Makee hurt gleat deal mo'. Velly solly for plisoner. Bette' make big ...
— Blue Jackets - The Log of the Teaser • George Manville Fenn

... same way, mebbe cook us up some of them biscuits once in a while, why, it'll be fine! Then there's yore schoolin'. Yore dad 'ud wish you to have that. I don't suppose you've had a heap. An' you sabe, Molly, that you swear mo' often ...
— Rimrock Trail • J. Allan Dunn

... im-mo-ral women there are in the world! Ah, how immoral! And it's not as though they were working-class or middle-class people, but aristocratic ladies, priding themselves on their bon-ton! It was simply awful, I could not believe my own eyes! I shall remember it as long as I live! To think ...
— The Schoolmaster and Other Stories • Anton Chekhov

... the av'noo, another block up, is the finest in the city. You get mo—that is, you get everything 'way up in G there, with cakes on the side, and it don't cost no ...
— Different Girls • Various

... and a delightful love-story. The scene of the story is Wallaria, one of those mythical kingdoms in Southern Europe. Maritza is the rightful heir to the throne, but is kept away from her own country. The hero is a young Englishman of noble family. It is a pleasing book of fiction. Large 12 mo. size. Handsomely bound in cloth. White coated wrapper, with Harrison Fisher portrait in colors. Price ...
— The Plum Tree • David Graham Phillips

... where she stood facing the Council Rock, with one foot forward to preserve her balance and her right arm extended toward the councilors, looking for all the world as if she were separating the sheep from the goats, and counting "Eeny, meeny, miny, mo!" ...
— The Campfire Girls on Ellen's Isle - The Trail of the Seven Cedars • Hildegard G. Frey

... Mose feel mighty good, 'ca'se he ain' lak ghostes. He reckon' he gwine be a heap mo' comfortable in he mind sence he know' dey ain' no ghosts, an' he reckon' he ain' gwine be skeered of nuffin' never no more. He ain' gwine min' de dark, an' he ain' gwine min' de rain-doves whut ...
— The Best Ghost Stories • Various

... of the State of Tennessee," he said, "I forbid you-all to be a-defyin' of its laws and statutes. This co't is mo' than willin' and full of joy to see the clouds of discord and misunderstandin' rollin' away from two lovin' hearts, but it air the duty of the co't to p'eserve the morals and integrity of the State. The co't reminds you that you air no longer man and wife, but air divo'ced by regular decree, and ...
— Whirligigs • O. Henry

... 'count Reddy Fox right," chuckled Unc' Billy. "He done spoil mah hunting at Farmer Brown's, he raised such a fuss among the hens up there. 'Tisn't safe to go there any mo'! No, Suh, 'tisn't safe, and it won't be safe for a right smart while. Did yo' say ...
— The Adventures of Reddy Fox • Thornton W. Burgess

... nothing, sir,' cried Philpot, secretly delighted. 'I'll get that orf for yer in no time. You wait just 'arf a mo!' ...
— The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists • Robert Tressell

... heaving with short, hoarse noises which I guessed were due to some muscular action entirely, and that he was virtually dead. I lifted him and gave him some water, but it would not pass through his fixed teeth. In the pocket of his blouse was a New Testament with the name Fielder Dawson, Mo., scribbled in it in pencil. While I was writing it down for identification, a boy as young as himself came from behind ...
— Notes of a War Correspondent • Richard Harding Davis

... the G.L. of Mo. for 1823, p. 5. The report and resolution were on the petitions of two candidates to be initiated, one with only one arm, and the other much deformed in ...
— The Principles of Masonic Law - A Treatise on the Constitutional Laws, Usages And Landmarks of - Freemasonry • Albert G. Mackey

... pleasure, thought their freedom too small a return for such benefits. They seemed eager only to find out new modes of homage, and unusual epithets of adulation for their great enslaver. He was created, by a new title, Magis'ter Mo'rum, or Master of the Morals of the People. He received the title of Emperor and father of his country. His person was declared sacred; and, in short, upon him alone were devolved for life all the great dignities of the state. 16. It must be owned, that so much power could never ...
— Pinnock's Improved Edition of Dr. Goldsmith's History of Rome • Oliver Goldsmith

... their agricultural and other arts, their systems of worship by means of plumed and painted prayer-sticks; to have organized their medicine societies; and then to have disappeared toward his home in Shi-pae-pu-li-ma (from shi-pi-amist, vapor; u-linsurrounding; and i-mo-nasitting place of—"The mist-enveloped city"), and to have vanished beneath the world, whence he is said to have departed for the home of the Sun. He is still the conscious auditor of the prayers of his children, the invisible ruler of the spiritual Shi-pae-pu-li-ma, and of the lesser gods ...
— Zuni Fetiches • Frank Hamilton Cushing

... of Man'tu-a in the north of Italy. His father was the owner of a small estate, which he farmed himself. Though of moderate means, he gave his son a good education. Young Vergil spent his boyhood at school at Cre-mo'na and Milan. He completed his studies at Naples, where he read the Greek and Latin authors, and acquired a knowledge of mathematics, natural philosophy, and medical science. He afterwards returned to Mantua, and resided there for a ...
— Story of Aeneas • Michael Clarke

... to get in touch with it again. Thus egged on, he made a great effort to regain his courage, and at length succeeded in forcing himself to speak. Though his voice was weak and shaking he managed to pronounce the prescribed mode of address, viz.:—"Bara phonen etek mo," which being interpreted is, "Spirit from the Unknown, give ear to me." He then explained their earnest desire to pay homage to the Supernatural, and to be initiated into the mysteries of the Black Art. When Hamar ...
— The Sorcery Club • Elliott O'Donnell

... haunted by devils that, concealing themselves either in the water itself or on the banks, spring out upon the unwary and drown them. To warn people against these dangerous elementals, a stone or pillar called "The Fat-pee," on which the name of the future Buddha or Pam-mo-o-mee-to-foo is inscribed, is set up near the place where they are supposed to lurk, and when the hauntings become very frequent the evil spirit is exorcised. The ceremony of exorcism consists in the decapitation of a white horse by a specially selected executioner, ...
— Byways of Ghost-Land • Elliott O'Donnell

... in any part of the lung tissue, I order it rolled up in a blanket or sheet coming out of hot water, and in thirty minutes change it to warm, dry blankets, and soon the little fretful, worrying sufferer would rest in a quiet, peaceful sleep.—Peoria Med. Mo. ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 711, August 17, 1889 • Various

... "Moly" (mo'ly), by Edith M. Thomas (1850-), in the best possible presentation of the value of integrity. This poem ranks with "Sir Galahad," if not above it. It is a stroke of genius, and every American ought to be ...
— Poems Every Child Should Know - The What-Every-Child-Should-Know-Library • Various

... replied, in a voice whose tremulous tones betrayed the full extent of his agony and terrors. "Oh, no!" he exclaimed. "Spare me, whoever you are—spare my life, and if you will come to mo to-morrow, I promise, in the presence of God, to make you independent as long as you live. Oh, spare me, for the sake of the living God—for I am not fit to die. If you kill me now, you will have the perdition of my soul to answer for at the bar of judgment. If you spare me, ...
— The Black Baronet; or, The Chronicles Of Ballytrain - The Works of William Carleton, Volume One • William Carleton

... the Spitfire' is of deep interest to the bounding heart of an enthusiastic boy. The book leaves a good impression on a boy's mind, as it teaches the triumph of noble deeds and true heroism."—Kansas City (Mo.) Times. ...
— The Campaign of the Jungle - or, Under Lawton through Luzon • Edward Stratemeyer

... all right," he said, panting with the exertion, "but hit wuz a mouty loud call for ye. Gabriel's ho'n couldn't've made a much mo' powerful one." ...
— The Red Acorn • John McElroy

... Louis, Mo., a statue of Columbus has been erected as the gift of Mr. Henry D. Shaw. It consists of a heroic-sized figure of Columbus in gilt bronze, upon a granite pedestal, which has four bronze basso relievos ...
— Christopher Columbus and His Monument Columbia • Various

... with a cyclone years ago, the wind picked up loaded freight cars and carried them away off the track. It wrenched an iron bridge from its foundations, twisted it together and hurled it away. When a cyclone later visited St. Louis, Mo., it cut off telegraph poles a foot in diameter as if they had been pipe stems. It cut off enormous trees close to the root, it cut off the corner of brick buildings where it passed as though they had been cut by a knife; nothing could ...
— The Person and Work of The Holy Spirit • R. A. Torrey

... letter is, more properly, a postscript to one which Dr. Bruno had, by his orders, written to Mr. Hancock, with some particulars of their voyage; and the Doctor having begun his letter, "Pregiat'mo. Sig'r. Ancock," Lord Byron thus parodies his mode ...
— Life of Lord Byron, Vol. 6 (of 6) - With his Letters and Journals • Thomas Moore

... crawling along rather stiffly; "ben tied up in a knot all day, an feel so stiff dat I don't know as I'll git untied agin fur ebber mo. Was jest makin my will, any way, as you ...
— Lost in the Fog • James De Mille

... the Spitfire' is of deep interest to the bounding heart of an enthusiastic boy. The book leaves a good impression on a boy's mind, as it teaches the triumph of noble deeds and true heroism."—Kansas City (Mo.) Times. ...
— Seek and Find - or The Adventures of a Smart Boy • Oliver Optic

... well, Who is king of that countrie. Her a husband hath he found, Paynim lord that serves Mahound! Ne'er with him the maid will go, For she loves a damoiseau, Aucassin, that ye may know, Swears to God that never mo With a lover will she go Save with him she ...
— Aucassin and Nicolete • Andrew Lang

... their villages. He took us to deer licks and ambushes used by his people long ago. One day in passing the base of a great rock he scratched with his toe and dug up the bones of a bear's paw. Here, in years past, they had killed and roasted a bear. This was the camp of Ya mo lo ku. His own camp was called ...
— Hunting with the Bow and Arrow • Saxton Pope

... must be burdensome to their wearers. In the Big Cypress Swamp settlement one day, to gratify my curiosity as to how many strings of beads these women can wear, I tried to count those worn by "Young Tiger Tail's" wife, number one, Mo-ki, who had come through the Everglades to visit her relatives. She was the proud wearer of certainly not fewer than two hundred strings of good sized beads. She had six quarts (probably a peck of the beads) gathered about ...
— The Seminole Indians of Florida • Clay MacCauley

... communicated to Sherefeddin, or Cherefeddin Ali, a native of Yezd, who composed in the Persian language a history of Timour Beg, which has been translated into French by M. Petit de la Croix, (Paris, 1722, in 4 vols. 12 mo.,) and has always been my faithful guide. His geography and chronology are wonderfully accurate; and he may be trusted for public facts, though he servilely praises the virtue and fortune of the hero. Timour's attention to procure intelligence from his own and ...
— The History of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire - Volume 6 • Edward Gibbon

... by the Tibetans; their ancient capital is Li-kiang fu which was taken by their chief Meng-ts'u under the Sung Dynasty; the Mongols made of their country the kingdom of Chaghan-djang. Li-kiang is the territory of Yue-si Chao, called also Mo-sie (Moso), one of the six Chao of Nan-Chao. The Moso of Li-kiang call themselves Ho. They have an epic styled Djiung-Ling (Moso Division) recounting the invasion of part of Tibet by the Moso. ...
— The Travels of Marco Polo, Volume 2 • Marco Polo and Rustichello of Pisa

... food which was used for the maintenance of guerrilla bands was not new. There had been precedents even in the United States. One of these is the order issued on August 25, 1863, by Brigadier-General Ewing, commanding the district of the border, with headquarters at Kansas City, Mo., in which he ordered the inhabitants of a large part of three counties of that State to remove from their residences within fifteen days to the protection of the military stations which he had established. All grain and hay in that district was ordered to be taken to those military stations. ...
— The Philippines: Past and Present (vol. 1 of 2) • Dean C. Worcester

... Hasty, advising him with fine scorn "to get de tiger to chew off his laigs, so's he wouldn't have to walk no mo'." ...
— Polly of the Circus • Margaret Mayo

... in the contrey hauynge by his wyfe but one chylde and no mo, for the great affeccyon that he had to his sayd chylde founde hym at Oxforde to schole by the space of ii or iii yere. Thys yonge scoler, in a vacacyon[112] tyme, for his disporte came home to his father. It fortuned afterwarde on a nyght, the father, ...
— Shakespeare Jest-Books; - Reprints of the Early and Very Rare Jest-Books Supposed - to Have Been Used by Shakespeare • Unknown

... toes, his elbows, and his nose, strikin' every single solitary key on that pianner at the same time. The thing busted and went off into seventeen hundred and fifty-seven thousand five hundred and forty-two hemi-demi-semi-quivers, and I know'd no mo'." ...
— Southern Literature From 1579-1895 • Louise Manly

... tho' that she poore be; But of her tongue a blabbing shrew is she, And yet she hath a heap of vices mo. ...
— English Literature, Considered as an Interpreter of English History - Designed as a Manual of Instruction • Henry Coppee

... being a baseball fan he will set there pop eyed with his mouth open as long as I want to talk. But now I can't hardly wait for him to get here Al and it seems funny to think that here I am a $30 dollar a mo. doughboy and maybe in a few days I will be on the staff and they don't have nobody only officers and even a lieut. gets 5 or 6 times as much as a doughboy and how is that for a fine nickname Al for men that all the dough they are getting is a $1 ...
— The Real Dope • Ring Lardner

... want REAL enjoyment, send ten cents for a copy of the best publication, HUMORIST. Address: Publisher Humorist, St. Louis, Mo. In ordering your reading matter, don't fail to include the ...
— Wholesale Price List of Newspapers and Periodicals • D. D. Cottrell's Subscription Agency

... should read Khubishna, and he places the country in Northern Syria, or perhaps further north in the western part of Taurus. The determinative proves that there was a town of this name as well as a district, and this consideration encourages mo to recognise in Khubushna or Khubishna the town of Kabissos-Kabessos, the Sis of the ...
— History Of Egypt, Chaldaea, Syria, Babylonia, and Assyria, Volume 8 (of 12) • G. Maspero

... is not ample, but from the fact that the sheep-dung now used is called, in the condition of fuel, ku ne a, while its name in the abstract or as sheep-dung simply is ma he. Dry-rot wood or spunk is known as ku me. In the shape of flat cakes it would be termed ku mo we or ku me a, whence I doubt not the modern word ku ...
— A Study of Pueblo Pottery as Illustrative of Zuni Culture Growth. • Frank Hamilton Cushing

... means at once a naked desert and a savannah. The word steppe, or step, is Russian, and not Tartarian. In the Turco-Tartar dialect a heath is called tala or tschol. The word gobi, which Europeans have corrupted into cobi, signifies in the Mongol tongue a naked desert. It is equivalent to the scha-mo or khan-hai of the Chinese. A steppe, or plain covered with herbs, is in Mongol, kudah; in Chinese, kouana.) It is from the effect of winds that have passed over the deserts situated to the east, that the little basin of the Red Sea, surrounded by plains which send forth ...
— Equinoctial Regions of America V2 • Alexander von Humboldt

... mother will say when I get there. I know she won't scold mo; I shouldn't mind that half so much, but I can't bear to ...
— A Peep Behind the Scenes • Mrs. O. F. Walton

... afternoon to picking and eating berries. Galloping furiously ahead until we had left the caravan several miles behind, we would lie down in a particularly luxuriant thicket by the river bank, tie our horses to our feet, and bask in the sunshine and feast upon yellow honeyed "moroshkas" (mo-ro'-shkas) and the dark purple globes of delicious blueberries, until our clothes were stained with crimson spots, and our faces and hands resembled those of a couple of Comanches ...
— Tent Life in Siberia • George Kennan

... a word," groaned Aleck, who had actually turned pale. "I vought shuah I was a goner, I did fo' a fac'! I don't want to meet no mo' snakes!" ...
— The Rover Boys in the Jungle • Arthur M. Winfield

... memorialists, respectfully represent that within the last two weeks there have come by steamboats up the Mississippi River, from chiefly the States of Louisiana and Mississippi, and landed at Saint Louis, Mo., a great number of colored citizens of the United States, not less than twenty hundred and composed of men and women, old and young, and with ...
— The Journal of Negro History, Volume 4, 1919 • Various

... happened to Buzz Werner in the next twelve months cannot be detailed here. They would require the space of what the publishers call a 12-mo volume. Buzz himself could never have told you. Things ...
— Cheerful—By Request • Edna Ferber

... week. Tuck his crap down; couldn't git shet o' the most uv it; hit wasn't no time for to sell, he say, so he 'fotch it back agin, 'lowin' to wait tell fall. Talks 'bout goin' to Mozouri—lots uv 'ems talkin' that-away down thar, Ole Higgins say. Cain't make a livin' here no mo', sich times as these. Si Higgins he's ben over to Kaintuck n' married a high-toned gal thar, outen the fust families, an' he's come back to the Forks with jist a hell's-mint o' whoop-jamboree notions, folks says. He's tuck an' fixed up the ole ...
— The Gilded Age, Complete • Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner

... her stepdaughter into a pie, and all that kind of thing. I suppose stepfathers have been a very estimable class, by the way, as it is the stepmother who always drops in for it in the story-books. You'll find mo very easy to deal with, Mr. Hawkehurst, always provided that you deal in a fair and ...
— Birds of Prey • M. E. Braddon

... worst. About five an urchin came along, looked at mo, grinned, and tried to put something in my box. Clumsy little beast, he trod on my foot. I sprang forward with a growl, and his offering, whatever it was, rolled on the pavement. Round turned an ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 147, November 4, 1914 • Various

... theh's a staihway down to th' watah whah Ah kin tie up mah ole catfish boat, an' a monst'ous big gyahden whah Ah kin keep mah fie'ce look on them mush an' watah melons. Ah don' want t' git into any mo' alterations with them boys, but Ah suttinly will weah 'em out if they don't mind theah cautions. Yes, seh,—we all go'n' a' have a ...
— The Boss of Little Arcady • Harry Leon Wilson

... dis nigger IS been blind for fo'ty year or mo', Dese ears, DEY sees de world, like, th'u' de cracks dat's in de do'. For de Lord has built dis body wid de ...
— Select Poems of Sidney Lanier • Sidney Lanier

... Wang Mo-k'i (699-759), poet, painter and critic. The great reformer of Chinese landscape painting. Considered as the founder of the Southern School and the originator of monochrome ...
— Chinese Painters - A Critical Study • Raphael Petrucci

... ax de fox. 'Is yo' granny old?' he say. 'Is yo' granny mighty pore? Is yo' granny tough?' An' he ain't been nigh so slick an' sof' an' easy any mo' by dis time—he ...
— Boys and Girls Bookshelf (Vol 2 of 17) - Folk-Lore, Fables, And Fairy Tales • Various

... bidding of the society at large." Compare for this use of [Greek: plaethos], Ignatius, Smyrna. 8; Trallian. 1, 8. A conjecture might be offered as to the solution of this difficulty, but it would lead mo into too ...
— The Christian Life - Its Course, Its Hindrances, And Its Helps • Thomas Arnold

... straight part is to hold the hook out far enough from the wall to make it easy to place the broom in the hook. The weight of the broom keeps it in position. —Contributed by Irl Hicks, Centralia, Mo. ...
— The Boy Mechanic: Volume 1 - 700 Things For Boys To Do • Popular Mechanics

... matter, a raid was made by the Kansas Jayhawkers upon the livery stable and stage line for several miles out into the country, the robbers also looting his store and destroying his property generally. When my father returned from Washington and learned of these outrages he went to Kansas City, Mo., headquarters of the State Militia, to see if anything could be done. He had started back to Harrisonville in a buggy, but was waylaid one mile south of Westport, a suburb of Kansas City, and brutally murdered; falling out of his buggy into ...
— The Story of Cole Younger, by Himself • Cole Younger

... inquiring why she was being pestered and intermediated by a low-down black nigger that didn't have no mo' brains than he had manners. Her feelings was likely to git the better of her at any moment; in which event Mr. Travis had better watch out, that was all—jest ...
— O. Henry Memorial Award Prize Stories of 1920 • Various

... mouth, and the surface of the plaine Land (for riuers commonly arise at foot of hills) which is (BXF) swell vp aboue the surface of the Sea (BWC) or (BY) which hight of the Land aboue the Sea although it bee greater then is the height of the highest mo[u]taines aboue the plaine Land, yet it is nothing in comparison of the whole Earth. And this being granted (as with most probabilitie of reason it may) it will appeare that God in the beginning of the world imposed noe perpetuall violence vpon nature, ...
— A Briefe Introduction to Geography • William Pemble

... ride on fuhthah. It ain't mo' than fifteen miles to Frankfort. The place is plum full of the Johnnies. I seed 'em thah myself. Ki'by Smith, an' a sma't gen'ral he is, too, is thah, an' so's Bragg, who I don't know much 'bout. They's ...
— The Sword of Antietam • Joseph A. Altsheler

... de way you feel 'bout um, 'taint no use fer ter pester wid um. It done got so now dat folks don't b'lieve nothin' but what dey kin see, an' mo' dan half un um won't b'lieve what dey see less'n dey kin feel un it too. But dat ain't de way wid dem what's ol' 'nough fer ter know. Ef I'd 'a' tol' you 'bout de fishes swimmin' ag'in fallin' water, you wouldn't 'a' b'lieved me, would you? No, you ...
— Types of Children's Literature • Edited by Walter Barnes

... mala! (Con afectado abatimiento.) Ni s yo cmo hay una sola mujer con vida. (Con repentina clera.) Qu hombres! Qu hombres tan malditos! (Hacindose aire con un abanico de chimenea, que ...
— Ms vale maa que fuerza • Manuel Tamayo y Baus

... say. For, when he wist it might none other be, He patiently took his adversity: Save out of doubte he may not foregon That he was jealous evermore-in-one:* *continually Which jealousy was so outrageous, That neither in hall, nor in none other house, Nor in none other place never the mo' He woulde suffer her to ride or go, *But if* that he had hand on her alway. *unless For which full often wepte freshe May, That loved Damian so burningly That she must either dien suddenly, Or elles she must have him as her lest:* *pleased She waited* when her hearte woulde brest.** *expected ...
— The Canterbury Tales and Other Poems • Geoffrey Chaucer

... in Banda: Moovia and Belgio, each one with one hundred and twenty soldiers. Although the natives are hostile, those presidios are kept up with the hope of reducing them, and because of the nutmeg which is gotten ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898 (Vol 27 of 55) • Various

... themselves musical," she continued: "they are well behaved and considerate enough in the day, but as soon as it is a nice, quiet, calm night, or a bit of a moon is in the sky, they make night hideous to everyone within earshot—'Mo-poke! mo-poke!' Oh! ...
— Dot and the Kangaroo • Ethel C. Pedley

... yo' lissen. Yo' is not to make a squawk until the end of de Ashlan' Oaks. Yo's to sabe yo' bref to honuh ouah Queen Bess. If she wins, yo' staht in playin' 'Dixie' as yo' nevuh played afo'. If she loses yo's to play, real slow an' mo'nful, 'Massa's in de Col', ...
— In Old Kentucky • Edward Marshall and Charles T. Dazey

... Muabo's men came over to bring on a parley; one told us that he had been on the south side of the village before, and heard one man say to another "mo pige" (shoot him). Mpamari gave them a long oration in exculpation, but it was only the same everlasting, story of fugitive slaves. The slave-traders cannot prevent them from escaping, and impudently think that the country people ought to catch them, and thus ...
— The Last Journals of David Livingstone, in Central Africa, from 1865 to His Death, Volume I (of 2), 1866-1868 • David Livingstone

... Chesterfield.—"Histe yo' heels, ole Mrs. Satan," cried one.—"You ain't no better'n a free nigger!" said another.—"Yo' wheel done skotch for good, ole skeer-face! hyar! hyar! You better not come foolin' 'long o' Mas' Ned's niggers no mo'!" ...
— Lippincott's Magazine Of Popular Literature And Science, April 1875, Vol. XV., No. 88 • Various

... looked at him coldly, eye to eye. "I'd say you got a license to be. If she's lost out to-night she's liable to be frozen to death before mo'ning." ...
— The Fighting Edge • William MacLeod Raine

... When de ham juice begins to git sunburned you makes some ham gravy. Ah spec' ham gravy's de fondest thing Ah is of. I says 'Howdy, ham gravy!' an' afteh me an' de vittles gits acquainted, mah appetite won't need grub no mo'n a ...
— Lady Luck • Hugh Wiley

... CAR COUPLING.—S.O. Campbell, Tipton, Mo.—This invention relates to a new car coupling, which is so arranged that it will be self-coupling and retain the coupling pin ready to lock as long as the ...
— Scientific American, Vol.22, No. 1, January 1, 1870 • Various

... well known, however, is the fact that some of them—the rhymes, I mean—that very common one in particular, beginning—"One-ery, two-ery, tickery, seven," and its fellow in like respect, with the opening line—"Eeny, meeny, manny, mo"—have, in almost identical form, been in active use by the wee folks for hundreds of years, as they are still, in nearly every country of Europe, Asia, Africa, and America. That the pastime has been common among the children of civilized and semi-civilized races alike is certainly of curious ...
— Children's Rhymes, Children's Games, Children's Songs, Children's Stories - A Book for Bairns and Big Folk • Robert Ford

... in his business, strictly moral, never asked for money, and never gave any either, visited his mother regularly every Sunday, stayed an hour, and only talked about himself, boasting about himself, his firm, and everything that concerned him, never asking about the others, and taking mo interest in them, and going away when the hour was up, quite satisfied with having done his duty. Christophe could not bear him. He always arranged to be out when Rodolphe came. Rodolphe was jealous of him: he despised artists, and Christophe's success ...
— Jean-Christophe, Vol. I • Romain Rolland

... come midnight he couldn't stan' it no mo'; so he git up, he did, en tuck his lantern en shoved out thoo de storm en dug her up en got de golden arm; en he bent his head down 'gin de 'win, en plowed en plowed en plowed thoo de snow. Den all on a sudden he stop (make a considerable pause here, and look startled, and take a listening attitude) ...
— The $30,000 Bequest and Other Stories • Mark Twain

... mo' in de ub'n now—jes' like I use ter hab 'fo' dat—" Here an appalling idea seemed to strike her. "War dat Chow-chow nigger?" she exclaimed, and made a dash toward the door. As she reached it Chang-how quietly glided in and handed Mr. Smith the ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Volume 22. July, 1878. • Various

... mette wyth an hasardour or dyse-player/ whiche sayd to hym/ thou goddes man wilte thou playe at dyse wyth me thyn hors ayenst my sowle/ to whom saynt Bernard answerd/ yf thou wilt oblige thy sowle to me ayenst my hors/ I wolle a lighte doun & playe wyth the/ and yf thou haue mo poyntes than I on thre dyse I promyse the thou shalt haue myn hors/ And than he was glad/ and an[o]n cafte. iii. dyse/ And on eche dyse was a fyfe/ whiche made. xviii. poynts And anone he toke the hors by the brydell/ as he that was ...
— Game and Playe of the Chesse - A Verbatim Reprint Of The First Edition, 1474 • Caxton

... Gilian at last, a lump somewhere at his throat. "It seems as if this place had been waiting on us tenantless since the start of time. Where have we been to be so long and so far away from it? Mo chridhe, mo chridhe!" ...
— Gilian The Dreamer - His Fancy, His Love and Adventure • Neil Munro

... same stilted tone as before; "an' las' night you came to me in a dream, an' tol' me you was dead. I done specks he'll cry like everything, when he reads dat," she interpolated, with a nod of triumph. "Sometimes I reckon we sha'n' never see each other no mo'; but you mus' never forget your Janey. Um-mm," she went ...
— In Blue Creek Canon • Anna Chapin Ray

... mo-moment, sir," stuttered Baker. "It was this young lady we were after. We had no intention at all of interfering ...
— The Lost Despatch • Natalie Sumner Lincoln

... stumbled and fell, and growled and tried to follow the flying shadow that was skipping and leaping and begging, "Oh, Mars Debbil! Oh, please, Mars Debbil, lemme go dis time, an' I nevah do so no mo'. Nevah do no mo' hoo-doo, Mars Debbil; oh, ...
— The Arkansaw Bear - A Tale of Fanciful Adventure • Albert Bigelow Paine

... and queens poor sheep-cotes have, And mate with everybody; The honest now may play the knave, And wise men play at noddy. Some youths will now a mumming go, Some others play at Rowland-ho, And twenty other gameboys mo, Because ...
— In The Yule-Log Glow—Book 3 - Christmas Poems from 'round the World • Various

... he suah did use up all mah lime." complained Eradicate, as he picked up the overturned pail. "I's got t' make mo'. But I doan't mind," he added cheerfully, and then, as he saw the woe-begone figure of Andy shuffling along, he laughed heartily, fitted the brush on the handle and went to tell Tom and Ned what had happened, and make ...
— Tom Swift in the City of Gold, or, Marvelous Adventures Underground • Victor Appleton

... troop, through the whole town, above a quarter of a mile, till they came to the castle; where both parties did, to their mutual grief, become sensible of their mistake. In this skirmish there were several killed on both sides, and Captain Palmer himself dangerously wounded, with many mo wounded in each troop, who did peaceably dwell together afterward for a time, untill their wounds were cured, in Sanquhar castle."—Account of Presbytery ...
— Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border, Vol. II (of 3) • Walter Scott

... the schul with stones prowe And the winde the schul ouer blow, And wirche the ful wo; Thou no schalt for all this unduerd, Bot gif thou falle a midwerd, To our fewes [1] mo. ...
— Purgatory • Mary Anne Madden Sadlier

... ye hoyden, gossips scofft, Ffor that a romping wench was shee— "Now marke this rede," they bade her oft, "Forsooken sholde your folly bee!" But Madge, ye hoyden, laught & cried, "Oho, oho," in girlish glee, And noe thing mo replied. ...
— A Little Book of Western Verse • Eugene Field

... a thing I fain would know, As Age doth make Wines better; Whether to Papers it doth so, And what's Writ on't with Letter, And what Age gives a Reverence To Papers, I would know: If Authors Credits got by Tense Of Hundred Years or mo? An Ancient currant Author then, And Hundred Years is Old? Or is he of the Slight Gown men, That Writ then as 'tis told? Set down the time that strife may cease: And hundred Years is good, If one Month short, or Year he bears, Doth he slick in the Mud? No, for one Month or Year, we grant, ...
— Magazine, or Animadversions on the English Spelling (1703) • G. W.

... steer who is doing the honors, "is the stateroom occupied by old Brindle, who is being shipped from St. Joseph, Mo. Brindle weighs 1,600 on foot—Brindle, get up and ...
— Peck's Sunshine - Being a Collection of Articles Written for Peck's Sun, - Milwaukee, Wis. - 1882 • George W. Peck

... now, jes de quarest ting ob 'bout all dis matter o' freedom is de way dat it sloshes roun' de names 'mong us cullud folks. H'yer I lib ober on de Hyco twenty year er mo'—nobody but ole Marse Potem an' de Lor', an' p'raps de Debble beside, know 'zackly how long it mout hev been—an' didn't hev but one name in all dat yer time. An' I didn't hev no use for no mo' neither, kase dat wuz de one ole Mahs'r gib me hisself, an' nobody on de libbin' ...
— Bricks Without Straw • Albion W. Tourgee

... buy come from Boonville, Mo., and we don't see why we shouldn't blow a little whiff of affection and gratitude toward that excellent town. Moreover, Boonville celebrated its centennial recently: it was founded in 1818. If the map is to be believed, ...
— Mince Pie • Christopher Darlington Morley

... 1864, the whole line of the Overland Stage from St. Joseph, Mo., to Salt Lake City, was subject to Indian depredations, so much so, that Ben Holliday, its proprietor, asked the Government for five soldiers at each of the stage stations, and two to accompany each coach. Without these, he stated, ...
— The Story of the First Trans-Continental Railroad - Its Projectors, Construction and History • W. F. Bailey

... Dr. Stebbins went to Portland to consult with and encourage them. A society was formed to prepare the way for a church. A few consecrated women worked devotedly; they bought a lot in the edge of the woods and finally built a small chapel. Then they moved for a minister. In St. Louis, Mo., Rev. William Greenleaf Eliot had been for many years a force in religion and education. A strong Unitarian church and Washington University resulted. He had also founded a family and had inspired sons to follow in ...
— A Backward Glance at Eighty • Charles A. Murdock

... Bhalbha suairce cuin. 'S e mo rn dol a dh'iarraidh na mn, Theid mi fein mo ghille s mo chu Nar triuir 'g a sireadh gun dil Theid ...
— Memories of Canada and Scotland - Speeches and Verses • John Douglas Sutherland Campbell

... had the printed copies of my life here, I would gladly sell you one, but I left them all behind. My name is Walker Sheldrup. I am registered from Springfield, Mass., but I am from Dubuque, Iowa. I was born in Sedalia, Mo., where my father was a prominent citizen. It was he who led the company of men who, with five ox teams, hauled the courthouse away from Georgetown and laid the foundations of Sedalia's greatness. Had he lived, Sedalia would not have tried in vain ...
— The Strange Adventures of Mr. Middleton • Wardon Allan Curtis

... a short popular form of the longer proverb, Hotoke no kao mo sando nazureba, hara wo tatsu: "Stroke even the face of a Buddha three times, and his ...
— In Ghostly Japan • Lafcadio Hearn

... which darkened the air and covered the ground for a long distance is the reported result of a recent rainstorm at Kansas City, Mo." ...
— The Book of the Damned • Charles Fort

... he was thrown next day from his au-to-mo-bile, And although rather lonesome it did make his widow feel, It made her glad to know that she had paid that prem-i-um, And oftentimes in after years these words ...
— Tobogganing On Parnassus • Franklin P. Adams

... which we sat speechless, awaiting a resumption of the clamour. At last Abner broke the heavy silence by saying: "I doan' see the do'way any mo' at all, sir." He was right. The tide had risen, and that half-moon of light had disappeared, so that we were now prisoners for many hours, it not being at all probable that we should be able to ...
— The Ontario Readers: Fourth Book • Various

... Military Division of the Missouri.} "St. Louis, Mo., February 17, 1868. } "Dear Brother:— . . . I have not yet got the order for the Atlantic division, but it is coming by mail, and when received I must act. I have asked the President to let me make my headquarters ...
— Recollections of Forty Years in the House, Senate and Cabinet - An Autobiography. • John Sherman

... brood'ja) between the Danube River and the Black Sea. She had to agree to a new boundary line with Turkey by which the Turks kept Adrianople. She had to give Kavala and the surrounding country to Greece and the territory around Monastir (mo na stir') to Serbia, although these districts were inhabited largely ...
— The World War and What was Behind It - The Story of the Map of Europe • Louis P. Benezet

... Consolation Cottage were long—long with the weight of six thousand miles from home. Then, with the suddeness of answered prayer, a light came into her darkness. He was named Shenton. Mammy's broad, homesick face broke into an undying smile. "Sho is mo' lak ole times, Mis' Ann, havin' a young Marster abeout." And when, two years later, on a Christmas day, Natalie was born, Mammy mixed smiles with tears and sobbed, "Oh, Mis' Ann, sho is mo' an' mo' ...
— Through stained glass • George Agnew Chamberlain

... method of sorting data, this IBM file would give us a modus operandi file. Our MO file would be similar to the MO files used by police departments to file the methods of operations of a criminal. Thus when we received a report we could put the characteristics of the reported UFO on an IBM punch card, put it into the IBM machine, and compare it with the characteristics ...
— The Report on Unidentified Flying Objects • Edward Ruppelt

... out the back,' replied Joe, jerking his thumb over his shoulder and winking at Hunter. ''E'll be back in 'arf a mo.' And indeed at that moment Harlow was ...
— The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists • Robert Tressell

... Nothin' in de roun' worl' but what been happenin' sence greens an' sparrer-grass wuz planted in de groun'. Dey look fine an' dey tas'e fine, an' long to'rds de shank er de mornin', Brer Rabbit 'ud creep thoo de crack er de fence an' nibble at um. He'd take de greens, but leave his tracks, mo' speshually right atter a rain. Takin' an' leavin'—it's de way er ...
— Uncle Remus and Brer Rabbit • Joel Chandler Harris

... relinquish the chase. The exhausted piper had a sad tale to tell to the mothers of his two hapless friends. Next day a company of mourners went to the scene of the infernal dance, and, amid much mourning, they sang a weird wail with the sad refrain, Airidh mo Dhubhaich, which, being interpreted, ...
— Literary Tours in The Highlands and Islands of Scotland • Daniel Turner Holmes

... manie of those that were strong and able to serue for drudges and slaues, were reserued, and carried into Scotland as prisoners, where they remained manie yeares after; in so much that there were few houses in that realme, but had one or mo English slaues and captiues, whom they gat at this vnhappie voiage. Miserable was the state of the English at that time, one being consumed of another so vnnaturallie, manie of them destroied by the Scots so cruellie, and the residue kept vnder by ...
— Chronicles of England, Scotland and Ireland (2 of 6): England (1 of 12) - William the Conqueror • Raphael Holinshed

... witnessed by a soldier attached to headquarters. The only practical history of the war telegraphers in the field. A full account of the mysteries of Signaling by Flags, Torches and Rockets. Thrilling scenes of Battles, Captures and Escapes. Fully illustrated by True Williams. Large 12 mo. Price, $1.00 ...
— The Young Oarsmen of Lakeview • Ralph Bonehill

... b. Kansas City, Mo., Jan. 28, 1873. Ed. Kansas City High School and private tutors. Contributor of poems, translations from French and German dramas and lyrics, prose articles on Art, Architecture, Music, Biblical Literature, Philosophy, etc., for papers ...
— The California Birthday Book • Various

... think, sir. I never noticed it till dis evenin' about an hour by sun. He's been complainin' of his stomach fer mo'n a week, but dat is ...
— The Desired Woman • Will N. Harben

... wouldn't have had to shoot him. You see, the old devil murdered Sturm to-night, for some reason I daresay you understand better than I: we found a paper on the beggar, written in Chinese, apparently an order for his assassination signed by you. Half a mo': I'll read ...
— Red Masquerade • Louis Joseph Vance

... and nyste what to rede; Bot he with softe wordes milde Conforteth hire and seith, with childe He wolde hire make in such a kynde That al the world schal have in mynde The worschipe of that ilke Sone; For he schal with the goddes wone, 920 And ben himself a godd also. With suche wordes and with mo, The whiche he feigneth in his speche, This lady wit was al to seche, As sche which alle trowthe weneth: Bot he, that alle untrowthe meneth, With blinde tales so hire ladde, That all his wille of hire he hadde. And whan ...
— Confessio Amantis - Tales of the Seven Deadly Sins, 1330-1408 A.D. • John Gower

... succession of preserves and jellies. For dessert there were the most fragrant red raspberries conceivable, with golden sponge cake. The colored man who served the table seemed to enjoy himself immensely. He condescended to make suggestions as he moved about. "A little mo' of the cold ham, Cap'n?" or, "I 'membah you like the sparrograss, Mis' Marian," he murmured. "The co'n bread's extra fine, Mis'"—to Sylvia. "The hossis is awdahed for ...
— A Hoosier Chronicle • Meredith Nicholson

... "Alf a mo!" said Eliza's gentleman friend next morning. He was waiting for her when she opened the door with pail and hearthstone in her hand. "Sorry you ...
— The Enchanted Castle • E. Nesbit

... time, for the benefit of his health. He is one of the most distinguished members of the perlitikel partis, called Anti-Monopolists. I admire a man wot praktices wot he preaches. Now, this Mr. McNamee has never been known to contribute a cent to surportin our grate ralerode mo-noperlists, altho he has travilled all over the United States by rale. Beside that, he wouldn't axcept any accommodashuns short of a green-line sleeper. Wen I arst him y he didn't ware his gold watch-chain and silk hat, like all other pollytishuns, he sed his partie was endevourin to ...
— The Bad Boy At Home - And His Experiences In Trying To Become An Editor - 1885 • Walter T. Gray

... everybody said he screamed all night," continued Unc' Billy Possum. "He sat up all of one night just to make sho' that he didn't scream in his sleep, and he didn't make a sound the whole night long. The next mo'ning everybody said that he had been screaming just the same, and po' Sammy Jay just moved away. Yo' ought to be ashamed to play such jokes." Unc' Billy grinned ...
— The Adventures of Mr. Mocker • Thornton W. Burgess

... a mean ting, no matter how much money de debbil 'greed to pay him for't. Fus' time I ebber see him war down in Lousianny. My ole marster had sole me away from my husband an' from John Brown: she war a little ting den, only six mo'ths, an' oughtn't to have been weaned, but I don't s'pose he cared whether she libbed or died, and de ...
— Lippincott's Magazine, Vol. 20, August 1877 • Various

... taint gointer hurt him. I don't b'lieve uh cord uh wood would lay heavy on Walter's belly. He kin eat mo' ...
— De Turkey and De Law - A Comedy in Three Acts • Zora Neale Hurston

... that it grieves mo most deeply," said the officer—"most exquisitely. I know all this—all, and so does Captain Ducrot; but there is no mistake, and it ...
— The Lily and the Cross - A Tale of Acadia • James De Mille

... tro,— Er angeu'r gair fu rhyngom, 'R amodau, rhwymau fu rho'm: Pan roddo Gymro y gair, Hwnnw erys yn wir-air; Ei air fydd, beunydd heb ball, Yn wir, fel llw un arall: Ein hynys hon i estron aeth, A chyfan o'n gwiw uchafiaeth; Ond ni throes awch loes, na chledd, Erioed mo ein hanrhydedd; A'n hurddas a wnawn arddel, Y dydd hwn, a doed a ddel: Ein hiawn bwys yn hyn, O bid, Ar Dduw a'i wir addewid. Duw a'n cyfyd ni, cofiwn, Y diwedd, o'r hadledd hwn; Heddyw, oedwn ddywedyd Ein barn, yn gadarn i gyd; ...
— Gwaith Alun • Alun

... intractable old Spartan, with his dictation of party principles that meant the loss of policy, power, and profits, had angered him to his marrow. He was ready to declare himself now, Thornton or mo Thornton. He ...
— The Ramrodders - A Novel • Holman Day

... first place belongs to Benjamin Mandelstamm (died 1886). Among his works is a history of Russia, but his most important production, Hazon la-Mo'ed, is a narrative of his travels and the impressions he received in the "Jewish zone", chiefly Lithuania. In certain respects, he must be classified with Mordecai A. Ginzburg, with whom he shares clarity of ...
— The Renascence of Hebrew Literature (1743-1885) • Nahum Slouschz

... never owned they own home, but always been renters. That don' sound zactly lak quality, but since the war, that ain't sich a sho sign as it uster be. You see plenty er po' white trash now a-ownin' fine homes and de quality rentin' nothin' mo' than cabins." ...
— Molly Brown's Orchard Home • Nell Speed

... a handkerchief from his pocket, proposed a game of Blindman's-Buff, and the girls, delighted, counter Eener-Meener-Meiner-Mo to find the Blindman. And Joyce was He. So Martin tied the ...
— Martin Pippin in the Apple Orchard • Eleanor Farjeon

... reading, especially to pages 1 to 147 of Vol. I, we urgently recommend the unique, thorough, and reliable work of our sainted colleague Dr. A. Graebner: "Geschichte der Lutherischen Kirche in Amerika. Erster Teil. St. Louis, Mo. Concordia Publishing House, 1892." ...
— American Lutheranism - Volume 1: Early History of American Lutheranism and The Tennessee Synod • Friedrich Bente

... rauenyng beastes, but otherwise he is a right profitable member, to all [Sidenote: Wealth, pro- fit, and riches riseth of the Wolles of Shepe.] partes of the common wealth. For, dailie we fele the co[m]mo- ditie, wealth and riches, that riseth of theim, but the losse we fele not, except flockes perishe. In the body of man God hath created & made diuerse partes, to make vp a whole and abso- lute man, ...
— A booke called the Foundacion of Rhetorike • Richard Rainolde

... pony! Here, come in out of the rain till I'm ready. What blasted nuisances you are! That's brandy. Drink some; you want it. Hang on to my stirrup and tell me if I go mo fast." ...
— The Works of Rudyard Kipling One Volume Edition • Rudyard Kipling

... Thunder and lightning and blazes! Haid homa gfresa beim Herr Doll. Das is a deutscha Compositor, und a browa Mo. [Footnote: "Today we dined with Herr Doll, he is a good composer and a worthy man" [Vienna Patois]] Now I begin to describe my course of life.—Alle 9 ore, qualche volta anche alle dieci mi svelgio, e poi andiamo fuor ...
— The Letters of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, V.1. • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

... couldn't stan' it no mo'; so he git up, he did, en tuck his lantern en shoved out thoo de storm en dug her up en got de golden arm; en he bent his head down 'gin de 'win, en plowed en plowed en plowed thoo de snow. Den all on a sudden he stop (make a considerable pause here, and look startled, and ...
— The $30,000 Bequest and Other Stories • Mark Twain

... rending sorrow and degradation awaited him. He was earnestly invited by a white decoyer to relinquish his former design and accompany him to Missouri and join him in speculation and become wealthy. As partners, they embarked on board a schooner for St. Charles, Mo. On the passage, my grandfather was seized with a fever, and for a while was totally unconscious. When he regained his reason he found himself, near his journey's end, divested of his free papers and all others. On his arrival at St. Charles ...
— The Story of Mattie J. Jackson • L. S. Thompson

... of Estill, Mo., passed through Chicago, a few days ago, with forty head of Angus-Aberdeen and Hereford cattle. Estill & Elliott now own one of the best ...
— Prairie Farmer, Vol. 56: No. 4, January 26, 1884 - A Weekly Journal for the Farm, Orchard and Fireside • Various

... are many Compound Active Verbs ending in puguan or puuan, which signify to pluck, as begut, skin, genitive; behte, accusative; behta, whence beuhpuuan, tear off the skin is formed, and from mo, hair of the human head comes mpuuan, pluck the hair, etc.; sequt, flower, genitive, sehte; accusative, sehta gives sehpuuan, to pluck flowers; ngua; root, genitive, nahte; accusative, nahta, when nahpuuan, eradicate, is formed, their ...
— Grammatical Sketch of the Heve Language - Shea's Library Of American Linguistics. Volume III. • Buckingham Smith

... of ——, Mo., advertises to cure deafness, catarrh, asthma and head noises. He offers to send two months' medicine free to prove his ability to cure. In reply to inquiry he practically informs every applicant that ...
— The Eugenic Marriage, Vol. 3 (of 4) - A Personal Guide to the New Science of Better Living and Better Babies • W. Grant Hague

... one 'roun' dis town evah got in a thousum mile o' you! Fer looks, an' de way you walk an' ca'y yo'self; an' as fer de clo'es—name o' de good lan', honey, dey ain' nevah SEE style befo'! My ole woman say you got mo' fixin's in a minute dan de whole res' of 'em got in a yeah. She say when she helpin' you onpack she must 'a' see mo'n a hunerd paihs o' slippahs alone! An' de good Man knows I 'membuh w'en you runnin' roun' ...
— The Conquest of Canaan • Booth Tarkington



Words linked to "Mo" :   blink of an eye, wink, St. Francis, Saint Francis River, midwestern United States, St. Louis, time, second, White River, trice, Missouri, Dixieland, white, Jefferson City, Saint Joseph, bit, St. Joseph, Show Me State, dixie, Confederate States of America, middle west, US, metal, St. Francis River, jiffy, Saint Louis, U.S.A., flash, independence, New York minute, instant, Cape Girardeau, Springfield, American state, molybdenum, minute, USA, Columbia, Little Mo Connolly, twinkling, Gateway to the West, Kansas City, Osage River, Midwest, Britain, metallic element, Hannibal, split second, United States of America, U.S., confederacy, United States, heartbeat, atomic number 42, Sedalia, Poplar Bluff, moment, America, south, Confederate States, capital of Missouri



Copyright © 2020 Free-Translator.com