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Mister   Listen
noun
Mister  n.  A title of courtesy prefixed to the name of a man or youth. It is usually written in the abbreviated form Mr. "To call your name, inquire your where, Or what you think of Mister Some-one's book, Or Mister Other's marriage or decease."






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Mister" Quotes from Famous Books



... was the mister and missus an' Miss Jennie an' Miss Margaret. But Miss Jennie married an' moved away—she's travelin' now, ...
— The Mansion of Mystery - Being a Certain Case of Importance, Taken from the Note-book of Adam Adams, Investigator and Detective • Chester K. Steele

... get spacewise, mister! It's against the law to hold a weapon on an officer of the Solar Guard! I'm Captain Strong and I want to ...
— The Space Pioneers • Carey Rockwell

... o' Bass, gov'nor," responded Millwaters promptly, dropping into colloquial Cockney speech. He turned to Perkwite and winked. "Well, an' wot abaht this 'ere bit o' business as I've come rahnd abaht, Mister?" he went on, nudging his companion, in ...
— The Middle of Things • J. S. Fletcher

... to explain a number of other marine personalities, who are as lively to-day on shipboard as they were generations ago. There is, for instance, old Mister Storm-Along, of whom ...
— Storyology - Essays in Folk-Lore, Sea-Lore, and Plant-Lore • Benjamin Taylor

... stiff to fake the Choimun side, and then you go and stick up a goil agains' him that's got brains and makes a pacifis' argument that wins the case agains' the Choimuns like cuttin' through hog lard! But you ain't a-gunna git away with it, mister! Lemme tell you right here and now, I may be a mix blood, but I got some Choimun in me with the rest what I got, and before you vote on this here question you gotta hear a few woids from somebody that can talk! This whole war is a capitalis' ...
— Ramsey Milholland • Booth Tarkington

... do at all! If you're going to come over to Snowshoe Island with me, you've got to drop that Mister business. Plain Uncle Barney is ...
— The Rover Boys on Snowshoe Island - or, The Old Lumberman's Treasure Box • Edward Stratemeyer

... was softening. "Mister Ruben O'Khayam," he said, "it's me private opinion that ye nade lace-trimmed pantalettes and a sash to complate your costume, but barrin' clothes, I'm entangled in the thrid of your discourse. Bein' a Boston man meself, ...
— At the Foot of the Rainbow • Gene Stratton-Porter

... "O,—-ough, mister, don't do that! Don't, PLEASE! You don't know how it hurts. I ain't got no rhinoceros skin to stand such jabs as that. That came purty nigh goin' clean ...
— The Red Acorn • John McElroy

... said the doughboy, looking into Bok's face with the most unaffected astonishment. "Why, mister, that's a mother-pig, that is. She's going to have young ones in a few days. How ...
— The Americanization of Edward Bok - The Autobiography of a Dutch Boy Fifty Years After • Edward William Bok

... "Mister Cleggett," said Elmer gloomily and huskily, out of one corner of his mouth, "I ain't takin' a chance. D' youse get me? Not a chancet. Oncet youse reformed, Mr. Cleggett, youse can't be ...
— The Cruise of the Jasper B. • Don Marquis

... "Look here, now, Mister," said George, with an air of great superiority, as he got out, "I shall let father and mother know how ...
— Uncle Tom's Cabin • Harriet Beecher Stowe

... Fo' Gawd I ain't seen him since breakfas'. You might look into Jedge Ellicott's office if you is gwine downtown, whar dey do say he's studyin' law, an' if he ain't dar—an' I reckon he ain't—den you might drap in on Mister Crocker, whar Marse Oliver's paintin' dem pictures; an' if he ain't dar, den fo-sho he's wid some o' do young ladies, but which one de Lawd only knows. Marse Oliver's like the rabbit, sah—he don't leab no tracks," and Malachi would hold his sides in a chuckle of so suffocating ...
— The Fortunes of Oliver Horn • F. Hopkinson Smith

... without hesitation. "I don't know what you've been up to while you've been tagging us, mister, ...
— The Women-Stealers of Thrayx • Fox B. Holden

... they be, and hark through the cracks; like enough get a peep, and so learn something. But such things they expected of you, didn't they, Bart? Must be so, I think. Then suppose we throw the name and blame of it on the council, and try it, mister?" ...
— The Rangers - [Subtitle: The Tory's Daughter] • D. P. Thompson

... furniture may have been held together by string before nails came into use. Kharadi is literally a turner, one who turns woodwork on a lathe, from kharat, a lathe. Mistri, a corruption of the English Mister, is an ...
— The Tribes and Castes of the Central Provinces of India - Volume II • R. V. Russell

... hearing this address, seeing the covered cage, and remarking the malicious grins of the Squire and his whole posse, knew not what to think, and began to suspect there was mischief in the wind—'By the waunds! mister tythe taker,' continued the Squire, 'but you shall ha' your own! Here, lads, lift up the cage: put it on the table; let his reverence see what we ha' brought'n! Come, raise ...
— The Adventures of Hugh Trevor • Thomas Holcroft

... may have been a shed once, but it's more like a sieve now. There's more leaks to the roof than there is boards, enough sight. However, any port in a storm, and we've got the storm, sartin. All right, Mister What's-your-name, ...
— Thankful's Inheritance • Joseph C. Lincoln

... echoed the speaker at the end of some sort of practical talk concerning the newsboys' organization and its management. "Mister Harry Barnes"—he squinted at ...
— McClure's Magazine, Vol. XXXI, No. 3, July 1908. • Various

... That classic head revealed, She was to him Miss Katharine, He—naught but Mister Field; Decorum graced his upright brow And thinned his lips serene, And, though he wrote a poem each hour, Why should ...
— The Holy Cross and Other Tales • Eugene Field

... let 'en git wunnerful ontidy fur sure. 'Ere, Mister (to Stranger) can you tell us the name of ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 98, May 17, 1890. • Various

... as a shilling should be spent. I've fought for my country and my country has done darned little for me. I'll go to the Rooshians, so help me! I could show them how to cross the Himalayas so that it would puzzle either Afghans or British to stop 'em. What's that secret worth in St. Petersburg, eh, mister?" ...
— The Mystery of Cloomber • Arthur Conan Doyle

... just come out with me,—out of this hole. There's a fine big country out there you don't know anything about. Our home will reach from Corpus Christi to Deadwood, and from the Missouri clear over to Mister Pacific Ocean. We'll have the prairies for our garden, and the high plains will be our front yard, with the buffalo-grass thicker than hair on a dog's back. And, say, I don't know about it, but I believe they have a bigger God out there than you've got in this Salt Lake Basin. Anyway, ...
— The Lions of the Lord - A Tale of the Old West • Harry Leon Wilson

... man at hes a haase, Or happen two or three, They 'Mister' him, an' hand him aght Five times as mitch ...
— Revised Edition of Poems • William Wright

... other in blank surprise, and began to mutter among themselves, "What game is he agate of now?" "Aw, it's true." "True enough, you go bail." "I wouldn't trust, he's been so reckless." "Twenty thousands, they're saying." "Aw, he's been helped—there's that Mister Loviboy, a power of money the craythur must have had out of him." "Well, sarve him right; fools and their money ...
— Capt'n Davy's Honeymoon - 1893 • Hall Caine

... whey-faced drab, you dare to say the word door to me, a respectable woman, as Mister Tripes here knows me well, and have a score against me behind that there wery door as you disgraces, and as it's you as ought to be t'other side, you ought; for it's out of the streets as you come, well I knows, an' say another word, and ...
— M. or N. "Similia similibus curantur." • G.J. Whyte-Melville

... named ALL the magazines. She had contributed stories to most of them, but not one was known, even by name, to her inquisitors. One shy old lady asked faintly if she had ever heard of Mr. Tweed. She thought she had heard of a Mister Tweed ...
— Kilo - Being the Love Story of Eliph' Hewlitt Book Agent • Ellis Parker Butler

... the skipper, "they're havin' a wonderful mug-up in the forecastle. You go for'ard an' have a cup o' tea. 'Tis a cup o' tea that you wants, not the company o' me an' Mister Tumm, an' I knows it. You have a little scoff with the men, my son, an' then one o' the lads will put you ashore. You might come back for breakfast, too, an you is hungry again ...
— Harbor Tales Down North - With an Appreciation by Wilfred T. Grenfell, M.D. • Norman Duncan

... about ye yet, but I see it will take another voy'ge to wash it all out." For to my thinkin', mates, 'tis more of a land-lubber to come the rig over a few poor creatures that never saw blue water, than not to know the ropes you warn't told. "O Mister Jacobs!" says Missus Collins to me that night, before I went off, "d'ye think Edward's tired of that ere horridsome sea yet?" "Well, marm," I says, "I'm afeard not. But I'll tell ye, marm," says I, "if you want's to make him cut the consarn, the only thing ye can do is to get him bound apprentice ...
— The International Monthly Magazine, Volume 1, No. 1, August 1850 - of Literature, Science and Art. • Various

... drawn from the pockets of an impoverished and starving people; and that if elected I would move for the immediate reduction of all extravagant salaries, and the total abolition of all sinecures and unmerited pensions, &c. &c. The Sheriff, little Mister Brice, put it to the vote, in the usual way, by a skew of hands, which of us the freemen would have for their member. The shew of hands was in my favour by an immense majority. Mr. Davis then demanded a ...
— Memoirs of Henry Hunt, Esq. Volume 2 • Henry Hunt

... long manuka stick against the wall, thrust his hand inside his "jumper," looked at the goldsmith's rubicund face, drew out a long canvas bag which was tied at the neck with a leather boot-lace, and said, in a hoarse whisper, "There, mister, that's my pile." ...
— The Tale of Timber Town • Alfred Grace

... "so it's no use asking me. I only knows that Noaks is a-going to do it; 'drown 'em all in a bucket of water,' was what he said. Remember you promised to tell nothink about me, that's all. Good-night, mister!" ...
— The Triple Alliance • Harold Avery

... "Great Scott, mister, you don't know Palomitas! Widows in these parts don't set round moping their heads off all the rest of their lives. They wait long enough for politeness—same as I've done—and then they start in ...
— Santa Fe's Partner - Being Some Memorials of Events in a New-Mexican Track-end Town • Thomas A. Janvier

... writes.] — Six yards of stuff for to make a yellow gown. A pair of lace boots with lengthy heels on them and brassy eyes. A hat is suited for a wedding-day. A fine tooth comb. To be sent with three barrels of porter in Jimmy Farrell's creel cart on the evening of the coming Fair to Mister Michael James Flaherty. With the best compliments of this ...
— The Playboy of the Western World • J. M. Synge

... thought one," she asserted. "But, pshaw! I didn't come here to argue. I came up to tell you that the dance-hall girl will recover and has friends who will see that she doesn't starve, even if she no longer works in my place. Also, I came to see how Mister—what is your name, anyway?—is." ...
— The Plunderer • Roy Norton

... Mister Grannis?" inquired Maria, standing in the door, a very dirty, half-filled ...
— McTeague • Frank Norris

... hundred dollar! 'How much?' Five thousand! 'How much?' Fifty thousand! Nice old man say quite quiet: 'You no got fifty thousand in the world, you liar. Liars where go? To Hell, sure. That's where liars go. That's where you go, Mister. To Hell.' And he cut rope. Down he go, patatrac! round and round in air, like firework wheel, on to first rock—pa-pa-pa-paff! Six hundred feets. After that he arrive, all messy, in water. That so, gentlemens. Gone ...
— South Wind • Norman Douglas

... "Sure, Mister," Nick said, with great positiveness. "Sure. Before I speak English I know nobody but Greeks, and when I start learning English I got no time to learn Polish, or Italian, or whatever it is. English I got to speak, if I run a candy store, ...
— John Wesley, Jr. - The Story of an Experiment • Dan B. Brummitt

... acrost that way," said the boot-boy, pointing with his stumpy black forefinger, "and then acrost that way, an' Mister Jenks" Jenks was the gardener "'e've gone about in rings, 'e 'ave. And there ain't no sign nor token, mum, not ...
— Those Who Smiled - And Eleven Other Stories • Perceval Gibbon

... fit-out, Mister Lilee of the Vallee, which the same our dear friend Jim makes a present of and no charge, because he loves you so. You're allowed two minutes to change, an' it is to be hoped as how you won't force me ...
— Moran of the Lady Letty • Frank Norris

... replied Mr. Smith, in a drawling voice, as he pushed the two whiskies across to the waiting half-breeds. "Been here half an hour. Jest pass right through, mister. Maybe you'll find him ...
— The Story of the Foss River Ranch • Ridgwell Cullum

... a lot you city fellers with l'arnin' into you do know! Ten thousand dollars an acre! Ad-ver-ti-sin'! What an idee! I guess I'll buy the land on a morgidge right away. Hee, hee, hee—it's a first-rate notion—and I a-dopt it. Mister, if you want a drink o' cider, you can get it at that are red house you see ...
— Continental Monthly, Vol. II. July, 1862. No. 1. • Various

... gods!" he exclaimed sharply. "If it isn't the spy! I miss the red jacket, but I know the face, Mister Lieutenant Fortesque." ...
— My Lady of Doubt • Randall Parrish

... a 'Mister' before it?" said my uncle. For he felt, gentlemen, that for a guard he didn't know, to call him Jack Martin, was a liberty which the Post Office wouldn't have sanctioned if they had ...
— The Pickwick Papers • Charles Dickens

... over to the store to get a loaf of bread," said she, "and a picture of Old Faithful Geyser and a burnt-leather pillow. And lookit here, mister, here is a book I bought for Roweny to read. I can stand for most of it. But here it says that the geysers is run by hot water, and when they freeze up in the winter the men that live in the park cut the ice and use it for foot warmers, it's so hot. That might be true, and then again it might ...
— Maw's Vacation - The Story of a Human Being in the Yellowstone • Emerson Hough

... and hose, collecting at the same time an audience of brats who assisted me by shouting, "What ya goin a do, mister?" "What's at thing for, mister?" "You goin a water Mrs Dinkman's frontyard, mister?" "Do your teeth awwis look so funny, mister? My grampa takes his teeth out at night and puts'm in a glass of water. Do you take out your teeth at night, mister?" "You goin a put ...
— Greener Than You Think • Ward Moore

... come afore we have done with changes!" Ah! I said that to good Mister MOULD years agone; which 'ow memory ranges All over them dear "Good Old Times," as I wish them wos back agen, bless 'em! Which the new ones ain't much to my mind; there's too many fresh "monthlies" to mess 'em. ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 100, May 9, 1891 • Various

... old red house, Mister. The parson, he hated to have his trees gnawed, and Major here's a great horse for gnawing the bark offer trees. So I never go no nearer the house ...
— The Stolen Singer • Martha Idell Fletcher Bellinger

... ago a king gave it to a man who never cut one tree or laid one stone on another. The deeds say that we must pay a rent o' so many bushels o' wheat a year but the land is no good for wheat, an' ain't been for a hundred years. Why, ye see, mister, a good many things have happened in three hundred years. The land was willin' to give wheat then an' a good many folks was willin' to be slaves. By hokey nettie! they had got used to it. Kings an' magistrates an' slavery didn't look so bad to 'em as they do now. Our brains have changed—that's ...
— The Light in the Clearing • Irving Bacheller

... "Sure, Mister Ralph dear, we were returned as dead, and it would have been sore against our consciences to take sarvice under the circumstances. But your honour was axin' how we escaped. Sure, when I was hunting for the Redskin spy, didn't I find out the root-house. ...
— In the Rocky Mountains - A Tale of Adventure • W. H. G. Kingston

... us meal an' 'taters when dad broke his leg, and he fetched oranges in his pocket when marm had the fevers. He's one of 'em, he is.'—Don't interrupt me.—An old woman, whom I asked, said, 'Do I know Mister 'Olworthy? A blissed saint in the flesh; my poor ol' bones would 'ave hached many a cold night but for the blankets he brought me. God in 'eaven reward 'im for that same!' I spare you the rest of the answers. Oh, you are a ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Volume 3, Issue 17, March, 1859 • Various

... "Mister, I'm canvassing for the National Portrait Gallery; splendid work; comes in numbers, fifty cents apiece. Contains pictures of all the great American heroes from the earliest times to the present day. Everybody's subscribing for it, and I want ...
— Elbow-Room - A Novel Without a Plot • Charles Heber Clark (AKA Max Adeler)

... the same difficulty with English titles that the French do, and confuse the Sir at the commencement of our letters with Herr or Monsieur. Thus, they frequently address Englishmen as Sir, instead of mister or esquire. We have an instance of this in a publication of no less a learned body than the Royal Academy of Sciences of Munich, who issued in 1860 a "Rede auf ...
— Literary Blunders • Henry B. Wheatley

... "Well then, Mister Banion. The water and grass is free. The day's young. Drive in and light down. You said you saw our daughter, Molly—I know you did, for ...
— The Covered Wagon • Emerson Hough

... soul a mystic rose-tree, Or a curious incense tree: . . . . Come, eat the bread of idleness, Said Mister ...
— General William Booth enters into Heaven and other Poems • Vachel Lindsay

... never paid more than twenty-five cents for admission to an entertainment, went to a New York theatre where the play was "The Forty Thieves," and was charged a dollar and a half for a ticket. Handing the pasteboard back, he remarked, "Keep it, Mister; I don't want to see ...
— Elementary Guide to Literary Criticism • F. V. N. Painter

... I'm all of a pant, Sir. Twelve months ago we started, you know, and I've been on my feet ever since, Sir. And oh, if you please, I feel weak at the knees, and the pains in my back make me wince, Sir. Mister HOOD's "Lost Child" wasn't half as had, for he only strayed in the gutter, While this dreadful Maze is enough to craze; and my feeling of lostness is utter. Oh, my poor feet! This is worse than Crete, and old Hampton Court isn't in it. Oh ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 100, May 23, 1891 • Various

... "Mister, you will excuse me, but I jest thought I'd call in on you because I also thought I might be of ...
— Two Wonderful Detectives - Jack and Gil's Marvelous Skill • Harlan Page Halsey

... "Yes, Mister Sylvius," replied Joel. "I shall only have to wheel you out in your arm-chair when ...
— Ticket No. "9672" • Jules Verne

... his superior knowledge and ability in being able to enlighten a backward Britisher. "A blizzard's a hurricane and a tornader and a cyclone, all biled inter one all fired smash and let loose to sweep creation. We have 'em to rights out Minnesota way; and let me tell you, mister, when you've ten through the mill in one, you wouldn't kinder like to hev a share in another. Snakes and alligators! Why, a blizzard will shave you as clean as the best barber in Boston, and then friz the marrow in your bones an' blow you to Jericho. It's sarten death to be caught out ...
— The Wreck of the Nancy Bell - Cast Away on Kerguelen Land • J. C. Hutcheson

... listen to this from 'Liza, every one!" called out Betty. And she read: "'So I sez to yer Pa, yu've got two fine scouts in them girls, Mister Lee, and this proves it. Any girl what will climb the side of a house to save folkses from burning, is wuth a lot of lazy, good-fer-nothin' ...
— Girl Scouts in the Adirondacks • Lillian Elizabeth Roy

... beat a Rockport granite sloop. Ever hear of the Henry Clay Parker, Mister Billie Simms, and the little licking she gave this winner of yours? No? Well, you want to go around and have a drink or two with the boys next time you're ashore and get the news. It was like a dogfish and a mackerel—the Henry just eat her up. ...
— The Seiners • James B. (James Brendan) Connolly

... think you spent some time at Rippach[22] lately? You supped with Mister Hans not ...
— Faust • Goethe

... We must wurk on their feelins. Cum the moral on 'em strong. If it's a temperance community tell 'em I sined the pledge fifteen minits arter Ise born, but on the contery ef your peple take their tods, say Mister Ward is as Jenial a feller as we ever met, full of conwiviality, & the life an sole of the Soshul Bored. Take, don't you? If you say anythin abowt my show say my snaiks is as harmliss as the new-born Babe. What a interestin study it ...
— The Complete Works of Artemus Ward, Part 1 • Charles Farrar Browne

... rapidly between his teeth, "how fell this? Speak out, man, and do not Mister or Campbell me—my foot is on my native heath, and my name ...
— Red Cap Tales - Stolen from the Treasure Chest of the Wizard of the North • Samuel Rutherford Crockett

... I'll do it with pleasure...Mister musician, something in the light dances, if you please," he said, laying down his silver on ...
— Yama (The Pit) • Alexandra Kuprin

... are very absurd, I know," said Ronald, "but I think we are much more comfortable. For instance, we do not have niggers about who call us 'Mister.'" ...
— An American Politician • F. Marion Crawford

... illegitimate children in the manner you describe. The last time I was in New Orleans I met Henri Augustine at the depot, with two beautiful young girls. At first I thought that they were his own children, they resembled him so closely. But afterwards I noticed that they addressed him as 'Mister.' Before we parted he told me that his wife had taken such a dislike to their mother that she could not bear to see them on the place. At last, weary of her dissatisfaction, he had promised to bring them to New Orleans and sell them. Instead, he was going ...
— Iola Leroy - Shadows Uplifted • Frances E.W. Harper

... porter by calling him "Mister"—almost as much as her parents scandalized him the next day by eating their meals out of a filing-cabinet of shoe-boxes compiled by Mrs. Thropp. But it was all picnic to Kedzie. Fortunately for her repose, she never knew that there ...
— We Can't Have Everything • Rupert Hughes

... "She is with my wive at this moment. If I may ascort you? . . . We will not then drouble Mister Smid' who is ...
— Brother Copas • Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... Shucks, mister, I do' know. Hooligans moved out 'bout a week ago, an' then, a while after that, these guys moved in. I ain't seen nobody round, but a sorter middlin' ol' woman. Maybe Micky knows who they be—he lives in that next house. Hey, Micky; here's a guy ...
— The Case and The Girl • Randall Parrish

... mules to empty the required number for my teams. The teamsters obeyed by driving up, and when they had dismounted and were about to unhitch from the wagons, one of the wood-haulers at the stable door said: "You can save yourself the trouble, mister, of unhitching them mules, for you ain't a going to put them in this stable; and the first man that attempts ...
— The Great Salt Lake Trail • Colonel Henry Inman

... charges for a moment, lest some need of native help should arise. They watch hand and eye like faithful dogs, for their language is unintelligible to us as ours to them, and the only attempt at speech is "Chow-chow, mister!" when the dinner-bell rings, the mystic words accompanied by a realistic pantomime ...
— Through the Malay Archipelago • Emily Richings

... Civil-spoken i'deed! Why, Wilson, tha 'eaerd 'im thysen—the feller couldn't find a Mister in his mouth fur me, as farms ...
— Becket and other plays • Alfred Lord Tennyson

... answered, quickly. "In good company there's no higher rank. But if ye think me unworthy, I'll be content with 'Mister.'" ...
— Darrel of the Blessed Isles • Irving Bacheller

... niver seed nothing like it in all me thravels except yerself, and that only in regard to its muzzle, which was black and all kivered over with bristles, it wos. I'll throuble you for another steak, messmate; that walrus is great livin'.—We owe ye thanks for killin' it, Mister Ellice." ...
— The World of Ice • Robert Michael Ballantyne

... mister Zip Zip Zip, With your hair cut just as short as, With your hair cut just as short as, With your hair cut just ...
— Three Soldiers • John Dos Passos

... slowly, to the moneyed chechaquo who had purchased Jan, "tha' Jan, hee's ther bes' lead dog ever I see, an' I've handled some. But ef you take my word, Mister Beeching, you won' ask Jan to take no other place than lead in your team. Eef you do, your leader 'll hear about it, en he might lose some hide over it, too, I guess. But tha' Jan, hee's a great lead dog, all right, an' I'm tellin' you. Well, so long, boss; I'll be gettin' along. ...
— Jan - A Dog and a Romance • A. J. Dawson

... business there. He was head and shoulders taller than any of us and years older. It was a disgrace to him that he was not in the Upper Fourth. The Doctor would tell him so before us all twenty times a week. Old Waterhouse (I call him "Old Waterhouse" because "Mister Waterhouse, M.A.," would convey no meaning to me, and I should not know about whom I was speaking) who cordially liked him, was honestly grieved. We, his friends, though it was pleasant to have him among us, suffered ...
— Paul Kelver • Jerome Klapka, AKA Jerome K. Jerome

... name "A. Louer" being conspicuous on millions of dollars' worth of their real estate. This family, he said, must be like the Rothschilds. Of course the poor soul was absurdly wrong. I mean to say, the letter "M" merely indicates "Monsieur," which is their foreign way of spelling Mister, while "A Louer" signifies "to let." I resolved to explain this to him at the first opportunity, not thinking it right that he should spread such gross error among ...
— Ruggles of Red Gap • Harry Leon Wilson

... my perplexity at not being able to understand her signs. In spite of his extreme deformity, he seemed to possess no inconsiderable share of vanity, gazing with great satisfaction at his face in the looking glass. When I asked his name, he replied, "Indian name Maquin, but English name 'Mister Walker,' very good man;" this was the ...
— The Backwoods of Canada • Catharine Parr Traill

... "Say, Mister Parloe," said Tom, sharply, "you've been hinting something about the miller every time you've seen ...
— Ruth Fielding of the Red Mill • Alice B. Emerson

... the drink put forth his hand; Blood drawed his knife, with accent bland, "I ax yer parding, Mister Phinn— ...
— The Wit and Humor of America, Volume IX (of X) • Various

... started up, smitten by a pang straight through his heart. He sprang to his feet. "Mister," he cried in the darkness, not knowing how else to address his protector. "I mun ...
— The Fortunate Youth • William J. Locke

... I am compelled to Mister him and to Sir him with every speech. One reason for this is that Wolf Larsen seems to have taken a fancy to him. It is an unprecedented thing, I take it, for a captain to be chummy with the cook; but this is certainly what Wolf Larsen is doing. Two or three times he put his head into ...
— The Sea-Wolf • Jack London

... for the next few weeks; sixty per cent. of the city's railroad business came to Comer & Mathison; the clerks began to treat Mitchell as if he were an equal; even Gross lost his patronizing air and became openly hateful, while Murphy—Louis no longer called him Mister—increased his assistant's expense account and confided some of his family affairs to the latter. Mr. Comer, the senior partner, began to nod familiarly as he passed the quotation ...
— Laughing Bill Hyde and Other Stories • Rex Beach

... country's taken the 'ouse," the man grumbled, "and wants to move in before the blooming paint's dry. Nobody can't do impossibilities, mister," he continued, "leaving out the Unions, which can't bear to see us over-exert ourselves. They've always got a particular eye on me, knowing I'm a bit too rapid for most of them ...
— The Double Life Of Mr. Alfred Burton • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... while, an' then I sez gently, "Now look here, Mister, I ain't no hero, an' if you happen to have any more college festivities to introduce, why I'll own up to a yellow streak a foot wide; but I don't recollect just what day it was that any livin' man accused me of bein' down-right pale-blooded. If you got any hair-raisin' projec' in your head, don't ...
— Happy Hawkins • Robert Alexander Wason

... fifteen hundred pounds to the acre, but where they run the tobacco rows beyond the manured land so's to be sure and not lose any manure, why the stuff won't grow six inches high and it just turns yellow and seems to dry up, no matter if it rains every day. Say, Mister, would you mind telling me if ...
— The Story of the Soil • Cyril G. Hopkins

... "That may be, mister, but ye see you don't own it, and may be I'd get myself into trouble if I were to run my sled agin it purposely. Should like to oblige ye, neighbor, but guess I'd better not. Charcoal! Charcoal! Hard and soft charcoal!" he shouted, jerking the reins for ...
— Daughters of the Revolution and Their Times - 1769 - 1776 A Historical Romance • Charles Carleton Coffin

... just crossed the top of another and narrower lane, which joined at right angles that along which he was walking, and had passed the opening about a hundred yards, when he was startled by hearing a voice behind him shouting out, "Hi! Hi! Hi! Mister!" He looked back, and the sight that met his eye was not reassuring. A tall figure, bare- headed and without a coat, was striding after him, tossing its arms about, and brandishing in the right hand ...
— Working in the Shade - Lowly Sowing brings Glorious Reaping • Theodore P Wilson

... 'Oh, mister, that's the thing. It didn't affect me. It affected everybody but me. The neighbours looked down on me. Even the posters, on the walls, of the woman saying, "Go, my boy," leered at me. I sometimes cried by myself in the dark. You won't have ...
— Echoes of the War • J. M. Barrie

... going to fight Bony at last, Mister Conway," Ralph's servant said to him. "We've never had that luck before. He has always sent his generals against us, but, by jabbers, he will find that he has not got Roosians and ...
— One of the 28th • G. A. Henty

... such irregular vowel changes as Flinders for Flanders, and conversely Packard for Picard. Pottinger (see below) sometimes becomes Pettinger as Portugal gives Pettingall. The general tendency is towards that thinning of the vowel that we get in mister for master and Miss Miggs's mim for ma'am. Littimer for Lattimer is an example of this. But in Royle for the local Ryle we find the same broadening which has given boil, a swelling, for ...
— The Romance of Names • Ernest Weekley

... 'madam,' says he, 'if such dinners you give, You'll ne'er want for parsons as long as you live. I ne'er knew a parson without a good nose; But the devil's as welcome, wherever he goes: G—d d—n me! they bid us reform and repent, But, z—s! by their looks, they never keep Lent: Mister curate, for all your grave looks, I'm afraid You cast a sheep's eye on her ladyship's maid: I wish she would lend you her pretty white hand In mending your cassock, and smoothing your band: (For the Dean was so shabby, and look'd like a ninny, That the captain supposed he was curate to ...
— Poems (Volume II.) • Jonathan Swift

... "Excuse me, Mister," he said, without turning (and the speech betrayed his nationality), "would you mind keeping away from these garments? I've been elected janitor—on ...
— Traffics and Discoveries • Rudyard Kipling

... did the young child say, mister?" said Aunt M'riar; like a woman's curiosity, to know. But those other two, they was curious ...
— When Ghost Meets Ghost • William Frend De Morgan

... Now, Mister Macliver, you knows him quite well, He comes upon deck and he cuts a great swell; It's damn your eyes there and it's damn your eyes here, And straight to the gangway he takes a broad sheer. ...
— Blow The Man Down - A Romance Of The Coast - 1916 • Holman Day

... Tick, tock! Forty 'leven by the clock. Tick, tock! Tick, tock! Put your ear to Grandpa's ticker, Like a pancake, only thicker. Tick, tock! Tick, tock! Catch a squirrel in half a minute, Grab a sack and stick him in it. Tick, tock! Tick, tock! Mister Bunny feeds on honey, Tea, and taters—ain't it funny? Tick, tock! Tick, tock! When he goes to bed at night, Shoves his slippers out of sight; That is why Old Fox, the sinner, Had to go without his dinner. Tick, tock! Tick, ...
— The Peter Patter Book of Nursery Rhymes • Leroy F. Jackson

... Registered at the Hotel and Swelled Up properly when addressed as "Mister" by the Clerk, he wanted to know if there was a Lively Show in Town. The Clerk told him to follow the Street until he came to all the Electric Lights, and there he would find a Ballet. Uncle Brewster found the Place, and looked in through the Hole ...
— More Fables • George Ade

... Dave des lack yer did befo' dis thing happen', en mine w'at he preach ter yer; fer Dave is a good nigger, en has had a hard row ter hoe. En de fus' one I ketch sayin' anythin' 'g'in' Dave, I'll tell Mister Walker ter gin 'im forty. Now take ernudder drink er cider all roun', en den git at dat cotton, fer I wanter git dat Persimmon Hill ...
— The Conjure Woman • Charles W. Chesnutt

... could hardly understand how it was, as I explained, that the Brazilians had freed the slaves and had no war, Mr. Anderson often exclaiming, "Well, well, I d'clar. Freed the niggers, and had no wah. Mister," said he, turning to me after a long pause, "mister, d'ye know the South were foolish? They had a wah, and they had to free the ...
— Voyage of the Liberdade • Captain Joshua Slocum

... laughed. "Haw, haw!" he guffawed, "I should say you had! I tell you what you done, Mister; you walked right past that crossroad Nelse told you to turn in at. THAT would have fetched you to the Centre. Instead of doin' it you kept on as you was goin' and here you be 'way out in the fag-end of nothin'. The Centre's three ...
— Galusha the Magnificent • Joseph C. Lincoln

... regard you so highly. And I couldn't believe this big girl was little Prue Girnway that I remembered. It seemed like you two would have to be a great big man and a little bit of a baby girl with yellow hair; and now I find you're—say, Mister, honestly, you're such a poor, broke-down, little coot it seems a'most like a shame to put a bullet through you, in spite ...
— The Lions of the Lord - A Tale of the Old West • Harry Leon Wilson

... it," Perk shouted. "Jest wanted to exchange a few words with you, if you're Oscar Gleeb, an' it's true that you was a live-wire over there in France an' the Argonne—say, is that all to the good, Mister Pilot?" ...
— Eagles of the Sky - With Jack Ralston Along the Air Lanes • Ambrose Newcomb

... steward. The friendship between them was established almost instantly, for Michael, from a merry puppy, had matured into a merry dog. Far beyond Jerry, was he a sociable good fellow, and this, despite the fact that he had known very few white men. First, there had been Mister Haggin, Derby and Bob, of Meringe; next, Captain Kellar and Captain Kellar's mate of the Eugenie; and, finally, Harley Kennan and the officers of the Ariel. Without exception, he had found them all different, and delightfully different, from the hordes ...
— Michael, Brother of Jerry • Jack London

... Luke's strange friendship with Mr. Northrup began. After they had become quite chummy Luke, who was a little fellow, asked the old gentleman if he couldn't call him Uncle Henry. You see, Luke liked him so much that he wanted to say something warmer than Mister. ...
— The Corner House Girls Growing Up - What Happened First, What Came Next. And How It Ended • Grace Brooks Hill

... he will. He has known me for some time," I answered earnestly. The lieutenant smiled; he was not accustomed to hear a topman have a mister put to his name. "I mean Joe Merton—beg pardon, sir," said I, "he was ...
— Will Weatherhelm - The Yarn of an Old Sailor • W.H.G. Kingston

... night, this week, I received a mysterious note, signed by a Mister "X" who proposed to sell me your signals and plays. I was advised to leave one hundred dollars under a ...
— Interference and Other Football Stories • Harold M. Sherman

... "Mornin', mister," said he. "You'll be all right in here—there's nobody about just now, and if my missis or any o' t' servant lasses sees yer, they'll tak' yer for a brewer's traveller, or summat o' that sort. Come to hev ...
— The Talleyrand Maxim • J. S. Fletcher

... "It's no use, Mister Bacchus," said she, addressing the old man, who looked rather the worse for wear, "it's no use to be flinging yer imperence in my face. I'se worked my time; I'se cooked many a grand dinner, and eat 'em too. You'se a lazy ...
— Aunt Phillis's Cabin - Or, Southern Life As It Is • Mary H. Eastman

... aloud. "Mister schoolmaster," said she, "I am very desirous to have a taste of your skill, and I desire you to give a ballet display this afternoon upon the great meadow. So far as you are concerned, Mr. Mayor," she said, with a laughing nod, "I desire you to exercise a ...
— Marie Antoinette And Her Son • Louise Muhlbach

... "Now, mister, you shall see what Walter and I can do with that fish," cried the skipper to me. "And when we've settled him, and the other boats are towing him off to the ship, Walter and I will come on shore again and hev something to ...
— The Call Of The South - 1908 • Louis Becke

... something about a Brown Bess musket, mister?" A cold sharp voice—a gutter voice but with the masking tag of official behind it. Like the voice of someone behind a desk writing something on a blotter—a ...
— The Very Black • Dean Evans

... matters were at a low ebb. Mr. Elton instituted a service on Saints' Days, which was quite an innovation at that time, and the first of these was held on St. Stephen's Day. The old clerk came into the vestry after the service and said, "I be sorry, sir, to hear the unkid ( awful) tale of poor Mussar (Mister) Stephens. He be come to a sad end surely." He had evidently confounded the first martyr, St. Stephen, with the late curate of the parish, having apparently ...
— The Parish Clerk (1907) • Peter Hampson Ditchfield

... I have beaten my sword into a ploughshare now, and am only plain mister," said Capt. Karl, ...
— Outpost • J.G. Austin

... plain enough that both of you plebes need a good deal of practice in the use of the word, sir. Therefore, in your next answers, you will be careful to employ 'sir' after each word that you utter in your reply. Mister," to Dave, "what did you come ...
— Dave Darrin's First Year at Annapolis • H. Irving Hancock

... as I states prior, it makes me think of how Jedge Chinn lavishes that Berkshire shoat on blacksmith Bill Hatfield. Confessin' that aforetime he's a nullification pig on Mink Run, he sets yere at this barbecue an' without color of shame declar's himse'f a union pup. Mister Cha'rman, all I can say is, it shore ...
— Wolfville Days • Alfred Henry Lewis

... was upon end. He rode to me in the middle of the night and woke me up in the arms of Morpheus. I was most truly concerned, Finlinson, so I came too. My head-priest he is very angry just now. We will go quick, Mister Hitchcock. I am due to attend at twelve forty-five in the state temple, where we sanctify some new idol. If not so I would have asked you to spend the day with me. They are dam-bore, these religious ceremonies, ...
— The Day's Work, Volume 1 • Rudyard Kipling

... princes, earls, countesses, and baronets; and when the people of the house heard from R——-'s nurse that I too was a man of office, and held the title of Honorable in my own country, they greatly regretted that I entered myself as plain "Mister" in the book. We found this hotel very comfortable, and might doubtless have made it luxurious, had we chosen to go to five times the expense of similar luxuries in America; but we merely ordered comfortable things, and so came off at no very extravagant rate,—and with great honor, at all ...
— Passages From the English Notebooks, Complete • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... meditation would be of service to me, and I always allowed myself to be guided by prudential instincts. Eventually, seated by my window, as before stated, Melons asserted himself, though our conversation rarely went further than "Hello, Mister!" and "Ah, Melons!" a vagabond instinct we felt in common implied a communion deeper than words. In this spiritual commingling the time passed, often beguiled by gymnastics on the fence or line (always with an eye to my window) until dinner ...
— Urban Sketches • Bret Harte

... thought how all that engineer would have to do was pull a handle and—g—o—o—d night! He was sitting, looking out of the window, sort of calm and easy, smoking a pipe. Connie called up to him and said, "Hey, Mister, have a heart and don't start anything." The engine just went, "pff, pff, pff," very slow. We could even ...
— Roy Blakeley's Camp on Wheels • Percy Keese Fitzhugh

... two things: one is that every man has a right of passage in, but not a title to, any highway. The next, that the judge would not suffer Mr. Crow, who hath fined for Alderman, to be called so, but only Mister, and did eight or nine times fret at it, and stop every man ...
— Diary of Samuel Pepys, Complete • Samuel Pepys

... gratin' acrost me window how could I poke me head out? Besides, it's dark. Say, mister, if you're on the level what's the matter with you comin' down here and not be standin' ...
— The Life of the Party • Irvin Shrewsbury Cobb

... formal bow. "There is a gentleman here who'd like to meet you." And he presented me with some grave phrases commendatory of my general character, addressing the child as "Mister Swift"; whereupon Mister Swift gave me a ghostly little hand and professed himself glad ...
— Beasley's Christmas Party • Booth Tarkington

... Mister stuck-up flunkey, they ain't. I s'pose yet proud of yet 'ands. I'll 'ave yer wait at table on me." He seemed to like the notion: for he repeated it many times, while he dug out hunks of cold ham with his file, from the meat which I had ...
— Martin Hyde, The Duke's Messenger • John Masefield

... "Look here, mister," said Ben, impatiently; "you know well enough what I mean. You took a letter with money in it out of my pocket. Just hand it back, and I won't say ...
— Ben, the Luggage Boy; - or, Among the Wharves • Horatio Alger

... he arrived at a farmer's yard, Where the ducks and the geese declared it was hard, That their nerves should be shaken and their rest should be marred By the visits of Mister Fox-o! ...
— More English Fairy Tales • Various

... makin' poor Mike Flannery pay good money for thim rascal fleas he kilt, and him with his ankles so bit up they look like the small-pox, to say nothin' of other folks which is th' same?" she cried. "'Tis ashamed ye should be, Mister Professor, bringin' fleas into America and lettin' them run loose! Ye should muzzle thim, Mister Professor, if ye would turn thim out to pasture in the boardin'-house of a poor widdy woman, and no end of trouble, ...
— Mike Flannery On Duty and Off • Ellis Parker Butler

... "Please, Mister, don't talk dat a-way," pleaded Drusilla, "kase I'll be constant a-projeckin' wid dat tappin', an' de fus' time you come I'll ...
— Little Mr. Thimblefinger and His Queer Country • Joel Chandler Harris

... to the side of the road, or rather the remains of what had once been a smart Daimler of some 7 or 8 h.p. A stonebreaker was at work on an adjacent pile of flints, and when I alighted to examine the wreck, he nailed me with, 'Hoy, mister! Ye'd better leave thick thur car alone. The p'lice be comin' to tek un ...
— The Motor Pirate • George Sidney Paternoster

... I was a traitor?" exclaimed Kelsey, as soon as he could speak. "Mister Marcy, the man who told you that told you a plumb lie, kase I ain't. I whooped her up fur ole Car'liny when she went out, I done the same when our gov'ner grabbed the forts along the coast, an' I yelled fit to split when our folks licked ...
— Marcy The Blockade Runner • Harry Castlemon

... to get out, mister," said the deputy. He tapped his rifle menacingly, betraying a quick accession of rage that he caught, no doubt, from Corrigan. Trevison smiled coldly, and backed Nigger a little. For an instant he meditated ...
— 'Firebrand' Trevison • Charles Alden Seltzer

... Ought to call you Mister March, I reckon, but you know I never baptized you Mister." They moved ...
— John March, Southerner • George W. Cable

... with you, mister," drawled the typical specimen of the genus cowboy. And then, as though suddenly remembering his manners, he leaped to the ground and strode awkwardly forward, one hand outstretched in greeting, the other holding fast to Stranger's bridle rein, while the horse danced and ...
— When A Man's A Man • Harold Bell Wright

... our new master, don't we? Haven't forgotten our blooming gruellin', eh? Better take care we don't get some more o' the same sort, Mister Wolfhound, ...
— Finn The Wolfhound • A. J. Dawson

... "Mister," said the boy suddenly, "I know how you feel. Lots feel the same way. You want her bad, but she ain't worth her feed. A skunk put a bur under the saddle when she was bein' broke, and since then anybody can ride her bareback, but nothin' in the mountains ...
— Way of the Lawless • Max Brand

... looked up and said, Oh, Mister, beg your pardon! Or, if you will not answer that, Say, sonny, ...
— Our Young Folks at Home and Abroad • Various

... a wicked girl. I have knone things all the time which I had ought to have told but I didn't dare to he said he would kill me if I did I mene the tall splendud looking gentulman with the black mustash who I met coming out of Mister Levenworth's room with a key in his hand the night Mr. Levenworth was murdered. He was so scared he gave me money and made me go away and come here and keep every thing secret but I can't do so no longer. I seem to see Miss Blenor all the time crying and asking me ...
— The Leavenworth Case • Anna Katharine Green

... and solemn procession, as though each and all of us was stalking slowly onward to his tomb. Some murmurs of regret reached my ears; but I was prepared for more than that. Whenever we camped, Saleh would stand before me, gaze fixedly into my face and generally say: "Mister Gile, when you get water?" I pretended to laugh at the idea, and say. "Water? pooh! There's no water in this country, Saleh. I didn't come here to find water, I came here to die, and you said you'd come and die too." Then he would ponder awhile, and say: "I think ...
— Australia Twice Traversed, The Romance of Exploration • Ernest Giles

... Mister Tom?" she asked. "Truly, you look as colicky as Amos Dodge—an' they do say he lived on ...
— Ruth Fielding in Moving Pictures - Or Helping The Dormitory Fund • Alice Emerson

... 'awkin' dead bodies out o' their graves yet, Bill Bush," answered Peke. "Unless my old dad's corpsy's turned to yerbs, which is more'n likely, I aint got 'im. This 'ere's a friend o' mine,—Mister David—e's out o' work through the Lord's speshul dispensation an' rule ...
— The Treasure of Heaven - A Romance of Riches • Marie Corelli

... friends don't call each other miss an' mister. I'll agree ter call you Frank, ef ...
— Frank Merriwell Down South • Burt L. Standish

... didn' have many slaves. His place was right whar young Mister Lampton Reid is buildin' his fine house jes east of de town. My mammy had to work in da house an' in de fiel' wid all de other niggers an' I played in de yard wid de little chulluns, bofe white an' black. Sometimes we played 'tossin' ...
— Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves - Mississippi Narratives • Works Projects Administration

... book, but for writing a helpful one too. I am sure that "Sylvie and Bruno" has given me many thoughts that will help me all life through. One cannot know "Sylvie" without being the better for it. You may say that "Mister Sir" is not consciously meant to be yourself, but I cannot help feeling that he is. As "Mister Sir" talks, I hear your voice in every word. I think, perhaps, that is why I like the ...
— The Life and Letters of Lewis Carroll • Stuart Dodgson Collingwood

... a heap careful right now you won't have a thing to do with 'later,'" she parried. "You do like I say, Mister Man. I ain't a bit anxious to see you ...
— The Heart of the Range • William Patterson White

... not it'll be rainin' soon," she announced. "The swallers is flyin' low and the wind he've turned to sou-east, so belike it'll be pourin' in a while. How's yer leg feelin' the night, Mister, an' is there anythin' else I might be doin' ...
— Sweetapple Cove • George van Schaick

... the drink put forth his hand; Blood drawed his knife, with accent bland, "I ax yer parding, Mister Phinn - ...
— Pike County Ballads and Other Poems • John Hay



Words linked to "Mister" :   Mr, Mr.



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