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Mickle   Listen
adjective
Mickle  adj.  (Written also muckle and mockle)  Much; great. (Old Eng. & Scot.) "A man of mickle might."






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Mickle" Quotes from Famous Books



... said Jean. "Dinna ye deave her Grace with your speirings, my lammie. Ye'll have to learn to keep a quiet sough, and to see mickle ye canna ...
— Unknown to History - A Story of the Captivity of Mary of Scotland • Charlotte M. Yonge

... the son of Ecglaf, Who at the feet sat of the lord of the Scyldings, 500 Unloosed his war-secret (was the coming of Beowulf, The proud sea-farer, to him mickle grief, For that he granted not that any man else Ever more honor of this mid-earth Should gain under heavens than he himself): 505 'Art thou that Beowulf who strove with Breca On the broad sea in swimming-match, When ye two for pride the ...
— The Translations of Beowulf - A Critical Biography • Chauncey Brewster Tinker

... barren truisms, too obvious to instruct our thought, affect our feeling, or in any way change our conduct, though the accuracy with which the arrow is shot fixes our attention. Notice a few examples of this sort:—"A friend in need is a friend indeed"; "Many a little makes a mickle"; "Anger is a brief madness"; "It is an ill wind that blows nobody any good." Such affirmations are too general and obvious to be provocative awakeners of original reflection, sentiment, or will. Maxims, on the other hand, ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. XI., February, 1863, No. LXIV. • Various

... Christiant-e. They were twenty hundred spearmen good without any fail; They were borne along by the water of Tweed, i'th' bounds of Tividale. "Leave off the brittling of the deer," he said, "and to your bows look ye take good heed, For never sith ye were of your mothers born had ye never so mickle need." The doughty Douglas on a steed he rode all his men beforn, His armour glittered as did a glede, a bolder barn was never born. "Tell me whose men ye are," he says, "or whose men that ye be; Who gave you leave to hunt in this ...
— A Bundle of Ballads • Various

... cheerfully, nor too important for him to undertake confidently. A wisdom far older than his years was his. Poverty had been his teacher, exile and deprivation. When other children were in school, repeating mechanically that many a little made a mickle, that genius was an infinite capacity for taking pains, and that a man has no handicaps but those of his own making, Mark knew these things, he knew that the great forces of life were no stronger than his own two hands, and that any work of any sort must bring him to ...
— The Story Of Julia Page - Works of Kathleen Norris, Volume V. • Kathleen Norris

... Historical Poem"; written originally by Luis de Camoens. London, 1655, fol. From the many corrections in the Translator's copy, in the possession of the late Edm. Turnor, Esq., it appears to have been very negligently printed, which may in some degree account for the remarks of Mr. Mickle on Sir Richard's translation. After his decease, namely in 1671, two of his posthumous pieces in 4to were published, Querer per solo querer: "To love only for love's sake," a dramatic piece, represented before the King and Queen of Spain; and Fiestas de Aranjuez: ...
— Memoirs of Lady Fanshawe • Lady Fanshawe

... 'And ye ken mickle less of my hinnie, sir,' replied Maggie, 'that think he needs ony guiding; he's the best guide himsell that ye'll find between Criffell and Carlisle. Horse-road and foot-path, parish-road and kirk-road, high-road and cross-road, he kens ilka ...
— Redgauntlet • Sir Walter Scott

... how the king had fared; then was mickle sorrow spread to the folk. Then were the Britons busy in thought, they knew not through anything what they might have for king, for the king's two sons, little they were both. Ambrosie could scarcely ride on horse, and Uther, his brother, yet still sucked his mother; and Constance the ...
— Brut • Layamon

... silver Thames's gentle stream, In London town there dwelt a subtile wight; A wight of mickle wealth, and mickle fame, Book-learn'd and quaint; a Virtuoso hight. Uncommon things, and rare, were his delight; From musings deep his brain ne'er gotten ease, Nor ceasen he from study, day or night; Until (advancing onward by degrees) He knew whatever ...
— Poetical Works of Akenside - [Edited by George Gilfillan] • Mark Akenside

... not," answered Richie; "mickle better not. We are a' frail creatures, and can judge better for ilk ither than in our own cases. And for me—even myself—I have always observed myself to be much more prudential in what I have done in your ...
— On the Old Road, Vol. 2 (of 2) - A Collection of Miscellaneous Essays and Articles on Art and Literature • John Ruskin

... to severall government, And gives them leave to wear their Saphire crowns, And weild their little tridents, but this Ile The greatest, and the best of all the main He quarters to his blu-hair'd deities, And all this tract that fronts the falling Sun 30 A noble Peer of mickle trust, and power Has in his charge, with temper'd awe to guide An old, and haughty Nation proud in Arms: Where his fair off-spring nurs't in Princely lore, Are coming to attend their Fathers state, And new-entrusted Scepter, but their way Lies through the perplex't paths of this drear Wood, ...
— The Poetical Works of John Milton • John Milton

... country, always boding its ruin. Such a one then lived in Philadelphia; a person of note, an elderly man, with a wise look and a very grave manner of speaking; his name was Samuel Mickle. This gentleman, a stranger to me, stopt one day at my door, and asked me if I was the young man who had lately opened a new printing-house. Being answered in the affirmative, he said he was sorry for me, because it was an expensive undertaking, and the expense would ...
— Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin • Benjamin Franklin

... followed up the fleeing foe, and two battles more he fought before he beat them flat to earth; and then they craved for peace, and he went back to the city in mickle honour. ...
— Child Christopher • William Morris

... endeavour. I pray thee favour me with full instructions for the road even as thou favouredst my brother." Then said the Darwaysh, "An thou wilt not lend ear to my warnings and do as I desire thee, it mattereth to me neither mickle nor little. Choose for thyself and I by doom of Destiny must perforce forward thy attempt and albeit, by reason of my great age and infirmities, I may not conduct thee to the place I will not grudge thee a guide." Then Prince Parwez mounted his horse and the Darwaysh taking one of many balls from ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 3 • Richard F. Burton

... dayes three!" "For sooth, Thomas, as I thee tell, Thou hast been here three year and more; But longer here thou may not dwell;[56] The skill[57] I shall thee tell wherefore. 220 To-morn[58], of hell the foule fiend Among this folk will fetch his fee; And thou art mickle man and hend[59], I trow full well he would choose thee. For all the gold that ever may be 225 From hethen[60] unto the worldes end, Thou beest never betrayed for me; Therefore with me I rede[61] thou wend." She brought him again to Eildon tree, Underneath ...
— The Sources and Analogues of 'A Midsummer-night's Dream' • Compiled by Frank Sidgwick

... better off than some. He has six days a week upo th' moor, an' we'n 3s. a week fro th' Relief Committee. We'n 2s. 6d. a week to pay eawt on it for rent; but then, we'n a lad that gets 4d. a day neaw an' then for puttin' bobbins on; an' every little makes a mickle, yo known." "How is it that your clock's stopt?" said I. "Nay," said the little fellow; "aw don't know. Want o' cotton, happen,—same as everything else is stopt for." Leaving this house we met with another member of the Relief Committee, who was overlooker of a mill a little ...
— Home-Life of the Lancashire Factory Folk during the Cotton Famine • Edwin Waugh

... not unfrequent in Scotland. The one that suggested this sonnet lies on the banks of a small stream, called the Wauchope, that flows into the Esk near Langholme. Mickle, who, as it appears from his poem on Sir Martin, was not without genuine poetic feelings, was born and passed his boyhood in this neighbourhood, under his father, who was a minister of the Scotch Kirk. The Esk, both above and ...
— The Prose Works of William Wordsworth • William Wordsworth

... Joan called him, they all said that she was 'a thing enskied and sainted.' So on they rode, six men and a maid, through a country full of English and Burgundian soldiery. There were four rivers to cross, Marne, Aube, Seine, and Yonne, and the rivers were 'great and mickle o' spate,' running red with the rains from bank to bank, so that they could not ford the streams, but must go by unfriendly towns, where alone there were bridges. Joan would have liked to stay and go to church in every town, but this might not be. However, she heard mass thrice at ...
— The Red True Story Book • Various

... were a' his freends, and he wanted ye tae ken hoo yir trust wes mickle help tae him ...
— Beside the Bonnie Brier Bush • Ian Maclaren

... Shapcot, see The fairy court I give to thee; Where we'll present our Oberon, led Half-tipsy to the fairy bed, Where Mab he finds, who there doth lie, Not without mickle majesty. Which done, and thence remov'd the light, We'll wish both ...
— The Hesperides & Noble Numbers: Vol. 1 and 2 • Robert Herrick

... complayning his unhappie stound, 940 [Stound, plight, exigency.] At last againe with him in travell ioynd, And with him far'd some better chaunee to fynde. So in the world long time they wandered, And mickle want and hardnesse suffered; That them repented much so foolishly 945 To come so farre to seeke for misery, And leave the sweetnes of contented home, Though eating hipps and drinking watry fome. [Hipps, dog-rose berries.] Thus as ...
— The Poetical Works of Edmund Spenser, Volume 5 • Edmund Spenser

... as she had sung it to the end, Now farewell, quoth she, for I hence must wend; And, God of Love, that can right well and may, Send unto thee as mickle joy this day, As ever he to Lover yet ...
— The Poetical Works of William Wordsworth, Vol. II. • William Wordsworth

... sir, in thae waefu' times," continued Mrs. Maclure, "the hand of brother is against brother, and he fears as mickle almaist frae this Government as e'er he did frae ...
— Old Mortality, Complete, Illustrated • Sir Walter Scott

... visit we only read that "William Earl came from beyond sea with mickle company of Frenchmen, and the king him received, and as many of his comrades as to him seemed good, and let him go again." Another account adds that William received great gifts from the King. But William himself in several documents speaks ...
— William the Conqueror • E. A. Freeman

... though she is mickle," he said; and then he sighed and looked hard at the pieces of the deer set aside for the absent ones—a shabby, raggedly cut lot, though of ...
— Steve Young • George Manville Fenn

... and you will not then have so much cause to complain of hard times, heavy taxes, and chargeable families; for 'what maintains one vice would bring up two children.' Beware of little expenses. 'Many a little makes a mickle'; 'A small leak will sink a great ship.' Here you are all got together at this sale of fineries and knickknacks. You call them goods, but, if you do not take care, they will prove evils to some ...
— Elson Grammer School Literature, Book Four. • William H. Elson and Christine Keck

... Voltaire. Memoire de Literature. Liancourt. Oeuvres de Rousseau. Mass. Historical Collections. Trial and Triumph of Faith. Oeuvres de Pascal. Varenius' Geography. Mickle's Lucian. Dictionnaire des Sciences. Pamela. (Vols. I., II.) Life of Baxter. Tournefort's Voyage. Swift's Works. Hitt on Fruit-Trees. Bibliotheca Americana. Ames's Antiquities. Hamilton's Works. Gifford's Juvenal. Allen's Biographical Dictionary. Fenelon. Academie Royale des Inscriptions. ...
— A Study Of Hawthorne • George Parsons Lathrop

... nibbling forlornly at a worn-out broom, to the cow which has broken through the rail to reach the running water, there are numberless designs which reveal that faithful lover of the field and hillside, who, as he said, "would rather be herding sheep on Mickle bank top" than remain in London to be made premier of England. He loved the country and the country-life; and he drew them as one who loved them. It is this rural quality which helps to give such a lasting freshness to his quaint and picturesque fancies; and it is this which will continue ...
— The Library • Andrew Lang

... preference shown by certain lesions in general paralysis for particular localities; but only that he does not yet see his way to connect them with the abnormal symptoms present during life. The researches carried on by Dr. Mickle, contributed to our Journal (January, 1876), and those of Dr. Crichton Browne, published with illustrations in the "West Riding Reports," must be regarded along with M. Voisin's large work and Hitzig's article in Ziemssen's "Cyclopaedia," as placing before us whatever evidence can be adduced ...
— Chapters in the History of the Insane in the British Isles • Daniel Hack Tuke

... to the Point of Cash it self, till I see how you approve of these my Maxims in general: But, I think, a Speculation upon Many a Little makes a Mickle, A Penny sav'd is a Penny got, Penny wise and Pound foolish, It is Need that makes the old Wife trot, would be very useful to the World, and if you treated them with Knowledge would be useful to your self, for it would ...
— The Spectator, Volumes 1, 2 and 3 - With Translations and Index for the Series • Joseph Addison and Richard Steele

... he was in his twentieth year, while his brother Aethelred was King, Alfred married. His wife's name was Ealhswyth; she was the daughter of Aethelred called the Mickle or Big, Alderman of the Gainas in Lincolnshire, and her mother Eadburh was of the royal house of the Mercians. It is said that on the very day of his marriage he was smitten with a strange disease, which for twenty years never quite left him, and fits of which might come on at any ...
— Heroes Every Child Should Know • Hamilton Wright Mabie

... the Bible, and no the buik we wud hae made, tae judge by oor bit creeds and confessions. It's like a head o' aits in the harvest time. There's the ear that hauds the grain and keeps it safe, and that's the history, and there's often no mickle nutriment in it; then there's the corn lying in the ear, which is the Evangel frae Eden tae Revelation, and that is the bread o' the soul. But the corn maun be threshed first and the cauf (chaff) cleaned aff. It's a bonnie ...
— Beside the Bonnie Brier Bush • Ian Maclaren

... an urchin, who afterwards distinguished himself in fairs and markets as a builla batthah (* cudgel player) of the first grade, and from this circumstance he was nicknamed Parrah Rackhan. (* Paddy the Rioter) The potato was borne by little Mickle M'Phauden Murphy, who afterwards took away Katty Bane Sheridan, without asking either her own consent or her father's. They were all then boys, it is true, but they gave a tolerable promise of that eminence which they ...
— The Station; The Party Fight And Funeral; The Lough Derg Pilgrim • William Carleton

... hand as he remonstrated with his patron.—"This is a' very kindly meant, St. Ronan's—very kindly meant; and I wad be the last to say that Miss Clara does not merit respect and kindness at your hand; but I doubt mickle if she wad care a bodle for thae braw things. Ye ken yoursell, she seldom alters her fashions. Od, she thinks her riding-habit dress eneugh for ony company; and if you were ganging by good looks, so it is—if she had a ...
— St. Ronan's Well • Sir Walter Scott

... covered'; and, 'when the servant of Allah is resolved to leave sinning, victory cometh to him.' Also quoth he, 'Every worldly good which doth not draw one nearer to Allah is a calamity, for a little of this world distracteth from a mickle of the world to come and a mickle of the present maketh thee forget the whole of the future.' It was asked of Abu Hazim,[FN359] 'Who is the most prosperous of men?'; and he answered, 'Whoso spendeth ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 2 • Richard F. Burton

... 'No mickle o' that. The folk here are what they ca' Cabyles, a douce set, not forgathering with Arabs nor wi' Moors. I wad na gang among them till the search was over to-day; but yesterday I saw yon carle, and coft the boatie frae him for the wee blackamoor and the mule. The Moors at El Aziz are ...
— A Modern Telemachus • Charlotte M. Yonge

... Davies helps us, as we perambulate York to-day, to mark where the old pageants were performed in 1399, at twelve stations, which were fixed and stated beforehand. The first station was at the gates of the Priory of the Holy Trinity in Mickle Gate, and the pageants were moved on them in turn to places at Skelder Gate end, North Street, Conyng Strete, Stane Gate and the gates of the Minster, so to the end of Girdler Gate; while the last of all was "upon the pavement." But the stations were ...
— Everyman and Other Old Religious Plays, with an Introduction • Anonymous

... elder, "I wot not for sure that they have so much as a false God; though I have it from them that they worship a certain woman with mickle worship." ...
— The Wood Beyond the World • William Morris

... children.' You may think, perhaps, that a little tea, or a little punch now and then, diet a little more costly, clothes a little finer, and a little entertainment now and then can be no great matter; but remember, 'Many a little makes a mickle.' Beware of little expenses; 'A small leak will sink a great ship,' as Poor Richard says; and again, 'Who dainties love, shall beggars prove'; and moreover, 'Fools makes feasts, and wise men eat them.... If you would know the value of money, go and try to borrow ...
— The Best of the World's Classics, Restricted to Prose, Vol. IX (of X) - America - I • Various

... Tanner, "The Province of New Jersey" (1908) and by E. J. Fisher, "New Jersey as a Royal Province, 1738-1776" (1911) in the Columbia University "Studies." Several county histories yield excellent material concerning the life and times of the colonists, notably Isaac Mickle's "Reminiscences of Old Gloucester" (1845) and L. T. Stevens's "The History of Cape May County" (1897) which are real histories written in scholarly fashion and not to be confused with the vulgar county histories ...
— The Quaker Colonies - A Chronicle of the Proprietors of the Delaware, Volume 8 - in The Chronicles Of America Series • Sydney G. Fisher

... a Persian tale." However, Goldsmith—no doubt after he had spent the five hundred guineas—tackled the work in earnest. When Boswell subsequently went out to call on him at another rural retreat he had taken on the Edgware Road, Boswell and Mickle, the translator of the Lusiad, found Goldsmith from home; "but, having a curiosity to see his apartment, we went in and found curious scraps of descriptions of animals scrawled upon the wall with a black-lead pencil." Meanwhile, this Animated ...
— Goldsmith - English Men of Letters Series • William Black

... from out your store Give an alms to one that's poor, That your mickle may have more. Black I'm grown for want of meat, Give me then an ant to eat, Or the cleft ear of a mouse Over-sour'd in drink of souce; Or, sweet lady, reach to me The abdomen of a bee; Or commend a cricket's hip, Or his huckson, to my scrip; Give for bread, a little bit Of a pease that 'gins to ...
— A Selection From The Lyrical Poems Of Robert Herrick • Robert Herrick

... I was returning from Hampton upon Allhallowmas eve, between the hours of ten and eleven at night, in company with Master Euseby Treen; and when we came to the bottom of Mickle Meadow, we heard several men in discourse. I plucked Euseby Treen by the doublet, and whispered in his ear, 'Euseby! Euseby! let us slink along in the shadow of ...
— Citation and Examination of William Shakspeare • Walter Savage Landor

... body and valiant in heart, and courageous enough in their own wild way of fighting, which is as remote from the usages and discipline of war as ever was that of the ancient Scythians, or of the salvage Indians of America that now is, They havena sae mickle as a German whistle, or a drum, to beat a march, an alarm, a charge, a retreat, a reveille, or the tattoo, or any other point of war; and their damnable skirlin' pipes, whilk they themselves pretend to understand, are unintelligible to the ears of any cavaliero accustomed to civilised ...
— A Legend of Montrose • Sir Walter Scott

... poor,' meaning thereby not the mendicant, but the peasant owner of a little plot, yielded the bulk of the 'food.' The wholesome old proverb, 'many littles make a mickle,' is as true about the influence brought to bear in the world to arrest evil and to sweeten corruption as it is about anything besides. Christ has a great deal more need of the cultivation of the small patches that He gives to the most of us than He has even of the cultivation of the large estates ...
— Expositions Of Holy Scripture - Volume I: St. Luke, Chaps. I to XII • Alexander Maclaren

... is mickle right that we should praise with words, love with our hearts, the Lord of the heavens, the glorious King of the people. He is the mighty power, the chief of all exalted ...
— Halleck's New English Literature • Reuben P. Halleck

... He was the ten'erest-heartit man! But he was far frae stoot, an' was a heap by himsel', nearhan' as mickle as his lordship the present yerl. An' the lady was that prood, an' that dewotit to the man she ca'd her ain, that never a word o' what gaed on cam to the ears o' his brither, I daur to say, or I s' warran' ye there wud hae been a fine ...
— Donal Grant • George MacDonald

... vice would bring up two children. You may think, perhaps, that a little tea or a little punch now and then, diet a little more costly, clothes a little finer, and a little entertainment now and then, can be no great matter; but remember, Many a little makes a mickle. Beware of little expenses; A small leak will sink a great ship, as Poor Richard says; and again, Who dainties love shall beggars prove; and, moreover, Fools make feasts and wise men ...
— True to His Home - A Tale of the Boyhood of Franklin • Hezekiah Butterworth

... in a very thick cloud of official mist. In 1831 Congress sought to inquire into the final disposition of the slaves. The information given was never printed; but as late as 1836 a certain Calvin Mickle petitions Congress for reimbursement for the slaves sold, for their hire, for their natural increase, for ...
— The Suppression of the African Slave Trade to the United States of America - 1638-1870 • W. E. B. Du Bois

... ever read him? The Lusiad, I mean? It's the man-of-war epic of the world, my lad. Give me Gama for a Commodore, say I—Noble Gama! And Mickle, White-Jacket, did you ever read of him? William Julius Mickle? Camoens's Translator? A disappointed man though, White-Jacket. Besides his version of the Lusiad, he wrote many forgotten things. Did you ever see his ballad of Cumnor Hall?—No?—Why, ...
— White Jacket - or, the World on a Man-of-War • Herman Melville

... And I will fare to Avalon, to the fairest of all maidens, to Argante the queen, an elf most fair, and she shall make my wounds all sound, make me all whole with healing draughts. And afterwards I will come to my kingdom, and dwell with the Britons with mickle joy.' Even with the words there approached from the sea that was a short boat, floating with the waves; and two women therein, wondrously formed; and they took Arthur anon, and bare him quickly, and laid ...
— Tales of the Enchanted Islands of the Atlantic • Thomas Wentworth Higginson

... goeth about the field, rejoicing mickle To see a sword that so surpass'd his sickle." Harrington's Ariosto, B. xiii: see Singer's Shak., Vol. ii, ...
— The Grammar of English Grammars • Goold Brown

... 'We have seen the fiend sailing in a bottomless ship; let us go home and pray;' but one young and wilful man said, 'Fiend! I'll warrant it's nae fiend, but douce Janet Withershins the witch, holding a carouse with some of her Cumberland cummers, and mickle red wine will be spilt atween them. Dod I would gladly have a toothfu'! I'll warrant it's nane o' your cauld sour slae- water like a bottle of Bailie Skrinkie's port, but right drap-o'-my-heart's-blood stuff, that would waken a body ...
— Folk-Lore and Legends - Scotland • Anonymous

... "'It waur na mickle of a head, but it is the only head the puir body ha' got.'"—(Assured, in substance, by L. ...
— The Lincoln Story Book • Henry L. Williams

... other tribe, aghast, with sore dismay, Attend, and conn their tasks with mickle care: By turns, astonied, every twig survey, And, from their fellow's hateful wounds, beware; Knowing, I wist, how each the same may share; Till fear has taught them a performance meet, And to the well-known chest the dame ...
— English Poets of the Eighteenth Century • Selected and Edited with an Introduction by Ernest Bernbaum

... lists the tuck of drum." "I list no more the tuck of drum, No more the trumpet hear; But when the beetle sounds his hum My comrades take the spear. And O! though Brignall banks be fair, And Greta woods be gay, Yet mickle must the maiden dare, Would ...
— The Golden Treasury - Of the Best Songs and Lyrical Poems in the English Language • Various

... queen high throned across the sea, that had not her like, beyond measure fair and of mickle strength, and her love was for that knight only that could pass her at the spear. She hurled the stone and leapt after it to the mark. Any that desired the noble damsel's love must first win boldly in these three games. If he failed but in one, he ...
— The Fall of the Niebelungs • Unknown

... or to molest this public Fair, they shall be ta'en by order of the Bailie and Toun Council, and their lugs be nailed to the Tron wi' a twal-penny nail, and they shall sit doun on their bare knees and pray seven times for the King, and thrice for the Mickle Laird o' Ralton, and pay a groat to me, Jemmy Ferguson, Bailie o' the aforesaid Manor, and I'll awa' hame and ha'e a bannock and a ...
— From John O'Groats to Land's End • Robert Naylor and John Naylor

... with infinitely more indulgence, because with more pleasure than I can now do—the more shame for me now to refuse the complaisance which I have had so often to solicit."[311] Similarly he speaks in the preface to Kenilworth of having once been delighted with the poems of Mickle and Langhorne: "There is a period in youth when the mere power of numbers has a more strong effect on ear and imagination than in after-life." With these comments we may put Lockhart's sagacious ...
— Sir Walter Scott as a Critic of Literature • Margaret Ball

... O mickle yeuks the keckle doup, An' a' unsicker girns the graith, For wae and wae! the crowdies loup O'er jouk an' hallan, braw an' baith Where ance the coggie hirpled fair, And blithesome poortith toomed the loof, There's nae a burnie giglet rare But ...
— The Book of Humorous Verse • Various

... In Mickle's translation of the "Lusiad" occurs the following allusion to the story of Pyramus and Thisbe, and the metamorphosis of the mulberries. The poet is describing the Island ...
— Bulfinch's Mythology • Thomas Bulfinch

... bairnie she swyl'd in linen so fine, In a gilded casket she laid it syne, Mickle saut and light she laid therein, Cause yet in God's house ...
— Folk Lore - Superstitious Beliefs in the West of Scotland within This Century • James Napier

... luve the tiny kickshaw, an' I smack my lips wi' glee, Aye mickle do I luve the taste o' sic a luxourie, But maist I luve the luvein' han's that could the giftie gie O' the little tiny kickshaw ...
— Pipes O'Pan at Zekesbury • James Whitcomb Riley

... with a triumphant look. "Afore twa mair hours are o'er he'll spak to ye." "I hope so, I'm sure," said I, still almost doubting her. "Oh, trust to me," said she, "he'll come about—I've seen mony a chiel in a mickle worse state nor him recovered. Pray, is the ould gintleman your ...
— Jorrocks' Jaunts and Jollities • Robert Smith Surtees

... Greekish sea; They grette,[FN574] and were full wo! As they stood upon the land, They saw a fleet sailand,[FN575] Three hundred ships and mo.[FN576] With top-casters set on-loft, Richly then were they wrought, With joy and mickle[FN577] pride: A heathen king was therein, That Christendom came to win; ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 2 • Richard F. Burton

... Sir, said Merlin, this is my desire: the first night that ye shall lie by Igraine ye shall get a child on her, and when that is born, that it shall be delivered to me for to nourish there as I will have it; for it shall be your worship, and the child's avail, as mickle as the child is worth. I will well, said the king, as thou wilt have it. Now make you ready, said Merlin, this night ye shall lie with Igraine in the castle of Tintagil; and ye shall be like the duke her husband, Ulfius shall be like Sir Brastias, ...
— Le Morte D'Arthur, Volume I (of II) - King Arthur and of his Noble Knights of the Round Table • Thomas Malory

... are words of mickle worth, Fit for the master of so great a mind. Now Rome must stoop, for Marius and his friends Have left their arms, and trust unto ...
— A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. VII (4th edition) • Various

... but a stroke with a feather compared with mine. Art still betters nature.' 'But look, e'en now blood trickleth from your nose,' said I. 'Ay, ay, pricked my nostrils with a straw.' 'But ye foamed at the lips.' 'Oh, a little soap makes a mickle foam.' And he drew out a morsel like a bean from his mouth. 'Thank thy stars, Bon Bec,' says he, 'for leading thee to a worthy master. Each day his lesson. To-morrow we will study the cul de bois and other branches. To-day, own me ...
— The Cloister and the Hearth • Charles Reade

... intellectual desire to cut open the pages! The neglect of this nobleman reduced the poet to a state of despondency. This patron was a political economist, the pupil of Adam Smith! It is pleasing to add, in contrast with this frigid Scotch patron, that when Mickle went to Lisbon, where his translation had long preceded his visit, he found the Prince of Portugal waiting on the quay to be the first to receive the translator of his great national poem; and during a residence of six months, Mickle was warmly regarded ...
— Curiosities of Literature, Vol. 1 (of 3) • Isaac D'Israeli

... every half hour, both night and day, until he be able to take the breast. If, then, a puny, feeble babe is only able to take but little at a time, and that little by tea-spoonfuls, he must have little and often, in order that "many a little might make a mickle." ...
— Advice to a Mother on the Management of her Children • Pye Henry Chavasse

... keep thee." "The sleeping fox catches no poultry." "Diligence is the mother of good luck." "Constant dropping wears away stones." "A small leak will sink a great ship." "Who dainties love shall beggars prove." "Creditors have better memories than debtors." "Many a little makes a mickle." "Fools make feasts and wise men eat them." "Many have been ruined by buying good pennyworths." "Rather go to bed supperless than rise in debt." "For age and want save while you may; No morning ...
— Four Great Americans: Washington, Franklin, Webster, Lincoln - A Book for Young Americans • James Baldwin

... post-chaises. He said, he believed the farmer's family thought him an odd character, similar to that in which the Spectator appeared to his landlady and her children: he was The Gentleman[538]. Mr. Mickle, the translator of The Lusiad[539], and I went to visit him at this place a few days afterwards. He was not at home; but having a curiosity to see his apartment, we went in and found curious scraps of descriptions of animals, scrawled ...
— Life Of Johnson, Vol. 2 • Boswell

... chivalry? Fly, to revenge my death when I am dead: The help of one stands me in little stead. O, too much folly is it, well I wot, To hazard all our lives in one small boat! If I to-day die not with Frenchmen's rage, To-morrow I shall die with mickle age: By me they nothing gain an if I stay; 'Tis but the short'ning of my life one day: In thee thy mother dies, our household's name, My death's revenge, thy youth, and England's fame: All these and more we ...
— King Henry VI, First Part • William Shakespeare [Aldus edition]

... kisses for them that likes them. The young man's no landlouper ony mair nor yersel'—no as mickle indeed, but a very proper young man, wi' a face as ...
— The Lilac Sunbonnet • S.R. Crockett

... children, and the mother who leaves the health, and mind, and temper, and purity of her offspring in the keeping of a hired nurse takes especial care of the color and cut of the frocks and petticoats; and always with the same strain after show, and the same endeavor to make a little look a mickle. The children of five hundred a year must look like those of a thousand; and those of a thousand must rival the tenue of little lords and ladies born in the purple; while the amount of money spent in the tradesman-class is a matter of real amazement ...
— Modern Women and What is Said of Them - A Reprint of A Series of Articles in the Saturday Review (1868) • Anonymous

... dow, but the hullyhoo in the auld castle wa's," answered the pretty girl. "I heard nor sid nowt that's dow, but mickle that's conny and gladsome. I heard singin' and laughin' a long way off, I consaited; and I stopped a bit to listen. Then I walked on a step or two, and there, sure enough in the Pie-Mag field, under the castle wa's, not twenty steps away, I sid a grand company; silks and satins, and men ...
— J.S. Le Fanu's Ghostly Tales, Volume 5 • J.S. Le Fanu

... village of Cumnor, about six miles from Oxford, and alighted at the entrance of the church. Here, while waiting for the keys, we looked at an old wall of the churchyard, piled up of loose gray stones which are said to have once formed a portion of Cumnor Hall, celebrated in Mickle's ballad and Scott's romance. The hall must have been in very close vicinity to the church,—not more than twenty yards off; and I waded through the long, dewy grass of the churchyard, and tried to peep over ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Volume 8, No. 48, October, 1861 • Various

... both mine office and my name; The one ne'er got me credit, the other mickle blame. Comedy of Errors, ...
— The World's Best Poetry — Volume 10 • Various

... and brought the news. A message war-token was there split, and sent out to Skurbagar, where there happened to be a joint ale-drinking feast, and many men were assembled. A bonde called Olver Miklimun (Mickle Mouth) was there, who immediately sprang up, took helmet and shield, and a great axe in his hand, and said, "Stand up, brave lads, and take your weapons. Let us go help the townspeople; for it would appear shameful to every man who heard of it, if we sit here sipping our ale, while ...
— Heimskringla - The Chronicle of the Kings of Norway • Snorri Sturluson

... vice would bring up two children." You may think, perhaps, that a little tea or a little punch now and then, a diet a little more costly, clothes a little finer, and a little more entertainment now and then, can be no great matter; but remember what Poor Richard says, "many a little makes a mickle"; and further, "beware of little expenses; a small leak will sink a great ship"; ...
— Journeys Through Bookland, Vol. 6 • Charles H. Sylvester

... Good there was said to be another land, Whiteman's Land—or Ireland the Mickle, as some called it. For these Norse traders from Limerick had found Ari Marson, and Ketla of Ruykjanes, supposed to have been long since drowned at sea, and said that the people had made him and Ketla chiefs, and baptised Ari. ...
— Lectures Delivered in America in 1874 • Charles Kingsley

... words, The law from beginning forth to the end. 590 He is before earth of noble race, Wise in word-craft and son of a prophet, Bold in council. To him 'tis inborn That he the answers clever may have, Knowledge in heart. He to thee shall declare 595 'Fore the crowd of men the gift of wisdom Through mickle might, as thy mind desires." In peace she permitted each one to seek His own [dear] home, and him alone took, Judas, as hostage, and earnestly prayed 600 That he of the rood would rightly teach, Which of old in its bed was long concealed, And she himself apart to her called. Helena spake to him ...
— Elene; Judith; Athelstan, or the Fight at Brunanburh; Byrhtnoth, or the Fight at Maldon; and the Dream of the Rood • Anonymous

... Mab and her light Maydes the while, Amongst themselues doe closely smile, To see the King caught with this wile, With one another testing: 700 And to the Fayrie Court they went, With mickle ioy and merriment, Which thing was done with good intent, And thus I ...
— Minor Poems of Michael Drayton • Michael Drayton

... of it, I. ii. 26. The beautiful poem of the Lusiad by Camoens, the Portuguese Homer, is dedicated to the celebration of this important transaction, and is well known through an elegant translation into English by Mickle. In the present chapter, the curious and rare work of Castaneda, so far as his first book extends, is given entire; and the only freedom employed in this version, besides changing the English of 229 years ago into the modern and ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. II • Robert Kerr

... whence had issued forth The first fruit of Christ's vicars on the earth, Toward us mov'd a light, at view whereof My Lady, full of gladness, spake to me: "Lo! lo! behold the peer of mickle might, That makes ...
— The Divine Comedy, Complete - The Vision of Paradise, Purgatory and Hell • Dante Alighieri

... my father and mother got wit, And my bold brethren three, O mickle wad be the gude red blude This day wad ...
— Book of English Verse • Bulchevy

... I was born, Both in one Town together; Not past Seven years of Age, Since one did Love each other: Our Daddies and our Mammies both, Were cloath'd with mickle Joy, To think upon the Bridal Day, ...
— Wit and Mirth: or Pills to Purge Melancholy, Vol. 5 of 6 • Various

... mickle white monie As gane my men and me, And I brought a half-fou o' gude red goud Out-o'er the sea ...
— Lyra Heroica - A Book of Verse for Boys • Various

... accompanies some forms of nervous disturbance. Mickle has discussed unilateral sweating in the general paralysis of the insane. Ramskill reports a case of sweating on one side of the face in a patient who was subject to epileptic convulsions. Takacs describes a case of unilateral sweating with ...
— Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine • George M. Gould

... there is such delicacy, such minute accuracy in the portrayal of a woman's feelings in "Are ye sure the news is true?" that one cannot help thinking it must have been written by Jean Adams, or some woman, rather than by Mickle:— ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volume III - The Songs of Scotland of the Past Half Century • Various

... the "full twelve holy days," he would not have been defeated by the Danes in the year 878. It was just after Twelfth-night that the Danish host came suddenly—"bestole," as the old Chronicle says—to Chippenham. Then "they rode through the West Saxons' land, and there sat down, and mickle of the folk over sea they drove, and of others the most deal they rode over; all but the King Alfred; he with a little band hardly fared after the woods and on the moor-fastnesses." But whether or not Alfred's preparations for the battle just referred to were hindered by his ...
— Christmas: Its Origin and Associations - Together with Its Historical Events and Festive Celebrations During Nineteen Centuries • William Francis Dawson

... Arthur's Court Tom Thumb did live; A Man of mickle Might, The best of all the Table round, And eke a doubty Knight, In Stature but an Inch in Height, Or quarter of a Span; Then think you not this worthy Knight Was prov'd a ...
— Parodies of Ballad Criticism (1711-1787) • William Wagstaffe

... the gude wife answered, "When nane anither wod befriend me, Gainst mickle woes and muckle foes, Braw Donald ...
— Eugene Field, A Study In Heredity And Contradictions - Vol. I • Slason Thompson

... Bailie, Will's Jock Grame, Fargue's Willie Grame, Muckle Willie Grame, Will Grame of Rosetrees, Ritchie Grame, younger of Netherby, Wat Grame, called Flaughtail, Will Grame, Nimble Willie, Will Grahame, Mickle Willie, ...
— Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border, Vol. II (of 3) • Walter Scott

... was not for wrong when he told me that this bargain would draw mickle misfortune after it. But there's no good in troubling one's self about a thing that's ...
— The story of Burnt Njal - From the Icelandic of the Njals Saga • Anonymous

... Margaret to Dolcino Charles Kingsley Dolcino to Margaret Charles Kingsley At Last Richard Henry Stoddard The Wife to Her Husband Unknown A Wife's Song William Cox Bennett The Sailor's Wife William Julius Mickle Jerry an' Me Hiram Rich "Don't be Sorrowful, Darling" Rembrandt Peale Winifreda Unknown An Old Man's Idyl Richard Realf The Poet's Song to his Wife Bryan Waller Procter John Anderson Robert Burns To Mary Samuel Bishop The Golden Wedding David Gray Moggy and Me James Hogg "O, Lay Thy Hand in Mine, ...
— The Home Book of Verse, Vol. 1 (of 4) • Various

... "my mother was buried long ago, She left me to thy keeping, none else my griefs shall know; I fain would have a husband, 'tis time that I should wed,— Forgive the words I utter, with mickle shame they're said."— ...
— Mediaeval Tales • Various

... large occasions of trial and conflict in our career; and, if God's fighting for us is not available in regard to the small annoyances of home and daily life, I know not for what it is available. 'Many littles make a mickle,' and there are more deaths in skirmishes than in the field of a pitched battle. More Christian people lose their hold of God, their sense of His presence, and are beaten accordingly, by reason of ...
— Expositions of Holy Scripture - Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus and Numbers • Alexander Maclaren

... drew the magic circles, Kindled the mysterious fire, Placed the herbs and bones in order, Spoke the incantation dire. And I sought the buried metal With a spell of mickle might— Sought it as my master taught me; Black and ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 56, Number 348 • Various

... two returned post-chaises. He said he believed the farmer's family thought him an odd character, similar to that in which the Spectator appeared to his landlady and her children; he was The Gentleman. Mr. Mickle, the translator of the Lusiad, and I, went to visit him at this place a few days afterwards. He was not at home; but having a curiosity to see his apartment, we went in, and found curious scraps of descriptions of animals scrawled upon the wall ...
— Henry Esmond; The English Humourists; The Four Georges • William Makepeace Thackeray

... we escaped" (Miss Irma went on), "and I will tell you how—what I have not told to any here—not even to your good grandmother or the clergyman. It was through our nurse, a Kirkbean woman and her name Kate Maxwell, called Mickle Kate o' the Shore. Her father and all her folk were smugglers, as, I understand, are the most of the farmers along the Solway side. Some of these she could doubtless have married, but Kate herself had always looked higher. The son of a farmer over the ...
— The Dew of Their Youth • S. R. Crockett

... honored still through width of the world by wise men all. To thy lord and liege in loyal mood we hasten hither, to Healfdene's son, people-protector: be pleased to advise us! To that mighty-one come we on mickle errand, to the lord of the Danes; nor deem I right that aught be hidden. We hear — thou knowest if sooth it is — the saying of men, that amid the Scyldings a scathing monster, dark ill-doer, in dusky nights shows terrific his rage ...
— Beowulf • Anonymous



Words linked to "Mickle" :   mass, slew, stack, wad, plenty, batch, mountain, lot, spate, hatful, tidy sum, great deal, raft, mint, pot, peck, muckle, torrent



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