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Ma   Listen
noun
Ma  n.  
1.
A child's word for mother.
2.
In Oriental countries, a respectful form of address given to a woman; mother.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Ma" Quotes from Famous Books



... ma Tonkiki, ma Tonkinoise, Yen a d'autr's qui m' font les doux yeux, Mais c'est ell' que ...
— Dragon's blood • Henry Milner Rideout

... 'Why, ma'am,' said Sam, 'finding that Fate had a spite agin her, and everybody she come into contact vith, she never smiled neither, but read a deal o' poetry and pined avay, - by rayther slow degrees, for she ain't dead yet. It took a deal o' poetry to kill the ...
— Master Humphrey's Clock • Charles Dickens

... "appear among the allies." She is the leading power among them; it is her war, as Mr. Tsvolski, the Russian Ambassador to Paris, very properly remarked: "C'est ma guerre." She planned it, she gave Austria-Hungary no chance to live on peaceful terms with her neighbors, she forced it upon us, she drew France into it by offering her a bait which that poor country ...
— New York Times Current History; The European War, Vol 2, No. 2, May, 1915 - April-September, 1915 • Various

... pardon my questions, ma'am. Since we go on foot to the place to which you conduct me," added Fleur-de-Marie, sweetly, "I shall know what I so much desire ...
— The Mysteries of Paris V2 • Eugene Sue

... bewildered, that she did not know what to do: it was time for the dinner to be served, and she, therefore, for the look's sake, thought it best to send the soup in as it was, even if it were sent out again immediately, "because you know ma'am," said she, "that would prove you had ordered it. I always thought the monkey would do the kitten a mischief, he was so jealous of it, and hated it so because it scratched him, so he ...
— Anecdotes of the Habits and Instinct of Animals • R. Lee

... "Ma gia volgeva il mio disiro e il velle, Si come rota ch' egualmente e mossa, L'Amor che move il ...
— The Cell of Self-Knowledge - Seven Early English Mystical Treaties • Various

... confiants sont punis pour avoir cru que la nation Americaine avoit un pavilion, qu'elle avoit quelque egard pours ses loix, quelque conviction de ses forces, et qu'elle tenoit au sentiment de sa dignite. Il ne m'est pas possible de peindre toute ma sensibilite sur ce scandale, qui tend a la diminution de votre commerce, a l'oppression du notre, et a l'abaissement, a l'avilissement des republiques. Si nos concitoyens ont ete trompes, si vous n'etes point en etat de soutenir la souverainete de votre peuple, ...
— Memoir, Correspondence, And Miscellanies, From The Papers Of Thomas Jefferson - Volume I • Thomas Jefferson

... de vouloir bien soumettre tous les documents ci-joints a l'oeil de sa Majeste, et dans le cas heureux ou vous seriez d'avis que ma compatriote, Mlle. Mitchell, puisse avec justice revendiquer la recompense genereuse instituee par le Roi Frederic VI., alors, Monsieur, je prie votre Excellence de vouloir bien appuyer de ses propres estimables et puissantes recommandations l'application ...
— Maria Mitchell: Life, Letters, and Journals • Maria Mitchell

... doctrine or saying is corroborated by our own reason and consciousness. "For this," says he in concluding, "I taught you not to believe merely because you have heard, but when you believed of your own consciousness, then to act accordingly and abundantly." (See the K[a]l[a]ma Sutta of the Anguttara Nik[a]ya, and ...
— The Buddhist Catechism • Henry S. Olcott

... here she might mend) Little given to lend. "How spent you the summer?" Quoth she, looking shame At the borrowing dame. "Night and day to each comer I sang, if you please." "You sang! I'm at ease, For 'tis plain at a glance, Now, ma'am, ...
— The Talking Beasts • Various

... work, yet adding that she longs for rest and if we will only tell her where Campton is, whither we had gone, she would gladly join us. "I was a weary idiot," she continues, "by the time the wedding was over, and said 'yes ma'am' to the men and 'no sir' to ...
— Authors and Friends • Annie Fields

... could you tell him, ma'am? Mr. Arnold is hardly one to listen to your maid's suspicions. Dear Lady Emily, you must get ...
— David Elginbrod • George MacDonald

... dans la Grece, vol. i. P. 92, where a view of the spot is given of which the author candidly says,— "Je ne puis repondre d'une exactitude scrupuleuse dans la vue generale que j'en donne, car etant alle seul pour l'examiner je perdis mon crayon, et je fus oblige de m'en fier a ma memoire. Je ne crois cependant pas avoir trop a me ...
— The Iliad of Homer • Homer

... (865) The ma'itre-d'h'otel, who, during the visit which Louis XIV. made to the grand Cond'e at Chantilly, put an end to his existence, because he feared the sea-fish would not arrive in time ...
— The Letters of Horace Walpole Volume 3 • Horace Walpole

... guid to ye, ma'am!" he said in a rapt voice, which was little more than an awed whisper. But it was more his eyes, with the uncanny light in them making them shine like a dog's, that brought me to my feet. For I ...
— The Prairie Mother • Arthur Stringer

... man in him. I don't mean to alarm you; I dare say his lungs are sound enough, and that his heart would bear the stethoscope to the satisfaction of the College of Surgeons. But, my dear ma'am, Percival is to be a man; it is the man you are killing by keeping him tied to ...
— Lucretia, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... me to avoid telling of a very excellent gentleman whom I met before I had been in the United States a week, and who asked me whether lords in England ever spoke to men who were not lords. Nor can I omit the opening address of another gentleman to my wife. "You like our institutions, ma'am?" "Yes, indeed," said my wife, not with all that eagerness of assent which the occasion perhaps required. "Ah," said he, "I never yet met the down-trodden subject of a despot who did not hug his chains." The first ...
— Volume 1 • Anthony Trollope

... replied, knowing what was coming; "but your misfortunes are not my affair. We all have misfortunes, ma'am. But we must pay ...
— Little Classics, Volume 8 (of 18) - Mystery • Various

... Ma'moiselle! Luck! There is the little God who dominates us all. Look at this old! [He points to TIMSON.] He is finished. In his day that old would be doing good business. He could afford himself—[He maker a sign of drinking.]—Then come the motor cars. All goes—he has nothing left, only 'is ...
— Forsyte Saga • John Galsworthy

... sensible fellow," said the relator of the incident. "He had a family of his own and what he said was 'She looked such a poor little drowned rat of a thing I couldn't make up my mind to run her in, ma'am. This 'ere war's responsible for a lot more than what the newspapers tell about. Young chaps in uniform having to brace up and perhaps lying awake in the night thinking over what the evening papers said—and young women ...
— Robin • Frances Hodgson Burnett

... has the exposure of this weakness instantly opened up an opportunity for asking questions about kindred customs and superstitions. I once asked an Irish peasant girl from County Roscommon if she could tell me any stories about fairies. "Do ye give in to fairies then, ma'am?" she joyously asked, adding, "A good many folks don't give in to them" (believe in them, i.e., the fairies). Apparently she was heartily glad to meet some one who spoke her own language. From ...
— Current Superstitions - Collected from the Oral Tradition of English Speaking Folk • Various

... went on a steamer down the river to meet him, the wife and child along, of course, and the story was told that, seated on the paternal knee curiously observant of every detail, the brat suddenly exclaimed, "Ah ha, pa! Now you've got on your store clothes. But when ma gets you up at Beech Grove you'll have to lay off your broadcloth and put on your jeans, like ...
— Marse Henry, Complete - An Autobiography • Henry Watterson

... to the touch of humanity, and bursting into tears: "No, ma'am, I can't. And everybody's blamin' me, as if I done it. What's my ...
— The Elevator • William D. Howells

... well-clothed, what kind of rations he was provided with, &c. I gave her my opinion on these points as far as I could go. She then asked how long I had been a soldier, and I said only a short time. "Then you cannot tell how you feel when your comrades are being slain on the battle-field?" "No, ma'am, I cannot; but there is a man lying down on the guard-bed who can. He went through the Crimean War." I then advanced to the old soldier's bed, and said, "Francis, there's a lady here wants to know how you feel when you are on the battle-field." "Tell her," said Francis, without looking up, "we ...
— Adventures and Recollections • Bill o'th' Hoylus End

... Maclachlan has 'em up and away the morn in fine style. He's getting a very attentive chiel is Maclachlan, and I wonder ma Ishbel disna like him better than she does. There's too damn few of us to be spitting ...
— The Yeoman Adventurer • George W. Gough

... Ma Jammes gave her opinion, while she emptied a glass of liqueur that happened to be standing on a table; the ghost must have something to do ...
— The Phantom of the Opera • Gaston Leroux

... premiers peuples celebres, J'ai plonge cent peuples fameux, Dans un abime de tenebres Ou vous disparaitrez comme eux. J'ai couvert d'une ombre eternelle Des astres eteints dans leur cours. —Ah! par pitie, lui dit ma belle, ...
— The Heavenly Father - Lectures on Modern Atheism • Ernest Naville

... the city of cities, the centre of art, fashion, and culture; and he took up the Emperor Napoleon's policy of beautifying and improving it by costly public works. "Je veux ma republique belle, bien paree" ("I want my republic beautiful and well dressed") was a sentence which brought him into trouble with the Radicals, who said he had no right to say "my republic," as if he were looking forward to being its dictator. He voted for the return of the Communists ...
— France in the Nineteenth Century • Elizabeth Latimer

... the poor little fellow to her bosom, and cried over him, till even old Fixem put on his blue spectacles to hide the two tears, that was a-trickling down, one on each side of his dirty face. "Now, dear ma," says the young lady, "you know how much you have borne. For all our sakes—for pa's sake," says she, "don't give way to this!"—"No, no, I won't!" says the lady, gathering herself up, hastily, and drying ...
— Sketches by Boz - illustrative of everyday life and every-day people • Charles Dickens

... regions (zobatat, singular - zoba); Anseba, Debub (Southern), Debubawi K'eyih Bahri (Southern Red Sea), Gash Barka, Ma'akel (Central), Semenawi Keyih Bahri ...
— The 2005 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency

... reprimer un mouvement dans l'interieur immediatement apres le depart de M. Jose Felix Burgos, ne fut signalee dans la ville d'Alcantara que par des desordres, les Etrangers meme n'y furent pas respectes dans cet endroit, qui n'etoit pas encore le theatre des hostilites. Un homme de ma Nation y exercant paisiblement son commerce fut attaque chez lui, eut les portes de sa maison enfoncees par les soldats, fut temoin deux fois du pillage de sa boutique et force pour sauver ses jours d'aller ...
— Narrative of Services in the Liberation of Chili, Peru and Brazil, - from Spanish and Portuguese Domination, Volume 2 • Thomas Cochrane, Tenth Earl of Dundonald

... Mort de ma vie! Had they beheld the Devil, St. Auban and Vilmorin could not have looked less pleased than they did when their eyes lighted upon me, standing there surveying ...
— The Suitors of Yvonne • Raphael Sabatini

... why there's others which is not given to blowin' their own horn, but which might at a pinch dash forward like Arnold—no relation to Benedict—among the spears. I may be rather a man or thought than action, ma'am, and at present far from my native heath, which is the financial centers of the country, but if I remember right it was Ulysses done the dome-work for the Greeks, while certain persons that was depended on sulked in their tents. Miss Higglesby-Browne, ...
— Spanish Doubloons • Camilla Kenyon

... servants into 'Ma'am,' and by Mrs. Gamp and her tribe into' Mum,' is in substance equivalent to' Your exalted,' or' Your Highness.' Ma Dame originally meaning high- born or stately, and being applied only to ladies ...
— Frost's Laws and By-Laws of American Society • Sarah Annie Frost

... Sarah!" cried my travelling companion. "What a lark! Collar him, you chaps. That's the idiot I was telling about. He came down in the train with his ma—" ...
— Tom, Dick and Harry • Talbot Baines Reed

... receive magnificent silk wraps from their uncle, trimmed with Russian fur; but the letter accompanying the gift must, we think, have rather spoiled their pleasure, or at any rate was likely to have hurt their mother's feelings. It was surely hardly necessary to inform "ma pauvre Sophie" that it was in vain for her to compete with the Countess Georges in proficiency on the piano, as the latter had "the genius of music, as of love"; and a long string of that wonderful young lady's perfections ...
— Honore de Balzac, His Life and Writings • Mary F. Sandars

... Ma had gone 'cross lots to Aunt Mari's, to stay till milking-time, to see the new things Aunt Mari had brought from Boston, and Polly and I were alone at home. Polly is our hired help, and she is Irish, and has got ...
— St. Nicholas Magazine for Boys and Girls, Vol. 5, January 1878, No. 3 • Various

... again, I laid my head well into the chamber; and there I hears a faint "ma-a-ah," coming through some ells of snow, like a plaintive, buried hope, or a last appeal. I shouted aloud to cheer him up, for I knew what sheep it was, to wit, the most valiant of all the wethers, who had met me when I came home from London, ...
— Lorna Doone - A Romance of Exmoor • R. D. Blackmore

... "Beg your pardon, Ma'am" (with an elaborate bow). "Merely admirin' the colors. Pretty sort of a thing, this 'ere! 'Most too light and fuzzy for a duster, a'n't it? Feathers ben dyed, most likely? Willin' to 'bleege the fair, however, especially ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 3, No. 18, April, 1859 - [Date last updated: August 7, 2005] • Various

... performance was so amusing that it was often repeated, and the little theologian was presented by them with a cap and feathers. Jeanie's glory was "putting him through the carritch" (catechism) in broad Scotch, beginning at the beginning with "Wha made ye, ma bonnie man?" For the correctness of this and the three next replies, Jeanie had no anxiety, but the tone changed to menace, and the closed nieve (fist) was shaken in the child's face as she demanded, "Of what are you made?" "DIRT," was the answer ...
— Stories of Childhood • Various

... di Guido in Brettinoro anche i nobili aravano le terre; ma insorsero discordie fra essi, e sparve la innocenza di vita, e con essa la liberalita. I brettinoresi determinarono di alzare in piazza una colonna con intorno tanti anelli di ferro, quanto le nobili famiglie ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 7, No. 43, May, 1861 • Various

... gravy. Now wipe the filets dry and roll them up with the skin side inward to make them stand firm; place the filets on a buttered baking tin, first rolling them into bread crumbs. When ready to cook, squeeze over each filet about a teaspoonful lemon juice and put on each a piece of Matre d'Hotel butter; cover with a buttered paper ...
— Favorite Dishes • Carrie V. Shuman

... enfans, Your wyf, your children, 32 Vostre mary, Your husbonde, Vostre fyltz et vous filles, Your sones and your doughtres, Toute vostre maisnye. Alle your meyne. Si me recomandes Also recommaunde me 36 A mon seigneur, To my lorde, A mes damoyseauls, To my yong lordes, A ma dame, To my lady, A ma damoyselle, To my yong ...
— Dialogues in French and English • William Caxton

... out before the rest," Mrs. Cooper broke forth in dolorous widowed accents. "And no wonder, pore dear young lady, was it, Mr. Patch? My heart bled for her, ma'am, that it did." ...
— Deadham Hard • Lucas Malet

... you ain't. Just you dare to touch me, that's all; and what's more, you ain't a-going to beat Master Tom, so there now. I wouldn't stand here and see him punished for what he don't deserve. It's all that Mr Sam, who's ma's spoilt him, and indulged him, till he's grown into a nasty, overbearing, cigarette-smoking wretch, as treats servants as if they was ...
— The Vast Abyss - The Story of Tom Blount, his Uncles and his Cousin Sam • George Manville Fenn

... general she fills the whole paper and crosses half. My mother often wonders that I can make it out so well. She often says, when the letter is first opened, 'Well, Hetty, now I think you will be put to it to make out all that checker-work'—don't you, ma'am?—And then I tell her, I am sure she would contrive to make it out herself, if she had nobody to do it for her—every word of it—I am sure she would pore over it till she had made out every word. And, indeed, though my mother's eyes are not so good as they were, she can see amazingly ...
— Persuasion • Jane Austen

... in sight whom you preefers, an' who's s'fficiently single an' yoothful to render him el'gible for wedlock,'—yere Enright takes in Boggs an' Texas with his gaze, wharat Texas grows as green-eyed as a cornered bobcat—'he's yours, Ma'am, on your ...
— Faro Nell and Her Friends - Wolfville Stories • Alfred Henry Lewis

... feelings ignored, and their instincts violated is enough to disaffect one with childhood. They are expected to kiss all flesh that asks them to do so. They are jerked up into the laps of people whom they abhor. They say, "Yes, Ma'am," under pain of bread and water for a week, when their unerring nature prompts them to hurl out, "I won't, you hideous old fright!" They are sent out of the room whenever a fascinating bit of scandal is to be rehearsed, packed off to bed just as everybody is settled down for a charming ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 11, No. 63, January, 1863 - A Magazine Of Literature, Art, And Politics • Various

... parfaite sauvete sans le moindre accident ou malheur. Mes petites soeurs couraient hors de la maison pour me rencontrer aussitot que la voiture se fit voir, et elles m'embrassaient avec autant d'empressement et de plaisir comme si j'avais ete absente pour plus d'an. Mon Papa, ma Tante, et le monsieur dent men frere avoit parle, furent tous assembles dans le Salon, et en peu de temps je m'y rendis aussi. C'est souvent l'ordre du Ciel que quand on a perdu un plaisir il y en a un ...
— The Life of Charlotte Bronte - Volume 1 • Elizabeth Gaskell

... "Ma che!" shouted Assunta scornfully, "she talks American. You couldn't expect them to speak like us over there. They are ...
— Daphne, An Autumn Pastoral • Margaret Pollock Sherwood

... Ploermel's wife than she is yours or mine, except in name alone; and that he does not dare to kiss her hand, much less her lips; and that they have separate apartments, and are, as it were, strangers altogether. And that the reason of all this is that Ma'mselle Melanie is never to be his wife at all, but that she is to go to Paris in a few days, and to become the king's mistress. Will you tell me that this is not strange, and more than strange, infamous, and dishonoring to the very name ...
— Graham's Magazine Vol XXXIII No. 2 August 1848 • Various

... Holy Table staring at him with round eyes full of amazement at this unusual act of devotion. Both the curate and the clerk spoke the broadest Yorkshire. Psalm xxxii. 4 was thus rendered by Kitty: "Ma-maasture is like t' doong i' summer." He was an old man and quite bald, and used to sit in his desk with a blue-spotted pocket-handkerchief spread over his head, occasionally drawing down a corner of it for use, and then pulling it straight again. If the squire happened to come late to church—a ...
— The Parish Clerk (1907) • Peter Hampson Ditchfield

... made as to who introduced George Sand to Balzac. In her Histoire de ma Vie, George Sand merely says it was a friend (a man). Gabriel Ferry, Balzac et ses Amies, makes the same statement. Seche et Bertaut, Balzac, state that it was La Touche who presented her to him, but Miss K. P. Wormeley, A Memoir of Balzac, and Mme. Wladimir Karenine, George Sand, ...
— Women in the Life of Balzac • Juanita Helm Floyd

... satisfaction, and arrives at him with greater facility than his consort. It is easy to see, that this property must strengthen the child's relation to the father, and weaken that to the mother. For as all relations are nothing hut a propensity to pass from one idea ma another, whatever strengthens the propensity strengthens the relation; and as we have a stronger propensity to pass from the idea of the children to that of the father, than from the same idea to that of the mother, we ought to regard the former relation as the closer and more considerable. ...
— A Treatise of Human Nature • David Hume

... altogether—cela a du bon et du mauvais, like ours. When I said 'my husband' Omar blushed and gently corrected me; when my donkey fell in the streets he cried with vexation, and on my mentioning the fall to Hekekian Bey he was quite indignant. 'Why you say it, ma'am? that shame'—a faux pas in fact. On the other hand they mention all that belongs to the production of children with perfect satisfaction and pleasure. A very pleasing, modest and handsome Nubian young woman, ...
— Letters from Egypt • Lucie Duff Gordon

... of the world. Hunt at p. 6 of his introduction to the Romances and Drolls of the West of England says, "Uncle is a term of respect, which was very commonly applied to aged men by their juniors in Cornwall. Aunt ... was used in the same manner when addressing aged women." "Mon oncle" and "ma tante" are sometimes used in the same way in France. Fiske in his Myths and Mythmakers, pp. 166, 167, tells how the Zulu solar hero Uthlakanyana outwits a cannibal: in this story the hero addresses the cannibal as "uncle," and the cannibal in return calls him ...
— Indian Fairy Tales • Anonymous

... so spoonily into her deep blue eyes, playing so daintily with her golden curls, sucking honey so frequently from her ruby lips, beware! beware! BEWARE! Remember, when she wants stamps, you can't put her off as your pa did your ma. You can't say, "Business is awful dull," because she'll do the business, and make you her book-keeper or porter or ...
— Punchinello, Vol. 2, No. 29, October 15, 1870 • Various

... believe; but I have been so often in the same case that I know pleurisy and pneumonia are in vain against Scotsmen who can write. (I once could.) You cannot imagine probably how near me this common calamity brings you. Ce que j'ai tousse dans ma vie! How often and how long have I been on the rack at night and learned to appreciate that noble passage in the Psalms when somebody or other is said to be more set on something than they "who dig for hid treasures—yea, than those who long for the morning"—for all the world, as ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 25 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... at our house and have all sorts of fun, An' there's always a game when the supper is done; An' at our house there's marks on the walls an' the stairs, An' some terrible scratches on some of the chairs; An' ma says that our house is really a fright, But pa and I say that our house ...
— The Path to Home • Edgar A. Guest

... seems like rum, Or peel myself an orange that Reminds me of a plum, Or if I come across a peach With flavour like a bilberry, I weep, for it reminds me so Of Chiswick's Grape and Dahlia Show, And that 'cute man I used to know, Who could at will transform a sloe Into a thing with the aro- -ma of all fruits known here below, ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 99, October 4, 1890 • Various

... my breast Can't hinder my return; Your conduct, ma'am, has set my blood A-boiling in ...
— The Haunted Hour - An Anthology • Various

... "No, ma'am!" declared the broad-hatted man. "She'll be as chipper as a blue-jay in a minute. That was a near shot, Wonota. For an Injun you're some shot, I'll ...
— Ruth Fielding in the Great Northwest - Or, The Indian Girl Star of the Movies • Alice B. Emerson

... born in Spartanburg County, S.C., near Glenn Springs. I can't 'member slavery or de war, but my ma and pa who was Green Foster and his wife, Mary Posey Foster, always said I was a big gal when the war stopped, ...
— Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves • Works Projects Administration

... e Lombardia Degno assai, ricca e galante. Ma di gioie la Soria E di fructi e piu abbondante Tanta fama e per il mondo Del gran vostro alto Milano, Che solcando il mar profondo; Siam venuti da lontano, Gran paese soriano, Per veder se cosi sia, ...
— Beatrice d'Este, Duchess of Milan, 1475-1497 • Julia Mary Cartwright

... can sen it to Me i have tol them direc to yor care for Ed. t. Smith Philadelphia i hope it may be right i promorst to rite to hear Please rite to me sune and let me know ef you do sen it on write wit you did with that ma a bught the cappet Bage do not fergit to rite tal John he mite rite to Me. I am doing as well is i can at this time but i get no wagges But my Bord but is satfid at that thes hard time and glad that i am Hear and in good helth. Northing ...
— The Underground Railroad • William Still

... to help.' He states that Lord John told him that he had encountered Carlyle one day in Regent Street. He stopped, and asked him if he had seen a paragraph in that morning's 'Times' about the Pope. 'What!' exclaimed Carlyle, 'the Pope, the Pope! The back of ma han' ...
— Lord John Russell • Stuart J. Reid

... good servant, ma'am, but I cannot put on those things and make a fool of myself. I hope you won't insist, for I am very anxious ...
— The Potiphar Papers • George William Curtis

... Margaret; pa' frets and bustles about, nearly runs over me upon the stairs, and then goes down the street as if 'Change were on fire. Ma' yawns, and will not hear of our going shopping, and grumbles about money—always money—that horrid money! Ah! dear Margaret, our shopping excursion is ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, No. CCCXLV. July, 1844. Vol. LVI. • Various

... again, and then, with an excellent imitation of Patterson's lugubrious accents, said, "Mr. Spencer Tucker's wife that is, allow me to introduce you to Mr. Spencer Tucker's sweetheart that was! Hold on! I said that was. For true as I stand here, ma'am—and I reckon I wouldn't stand here if it wasn't true—I haven't set eyes on him since the day ...
— Frontier Stories • Bret Harte

... conducted as nearly as possible in the foreign fashion. We smoked cigarettes, and a bottle of champagne was served. Finally the interview was brought to a close by a health from the viceroy to "Ta-ma-quo" (the great ...
— Across Asia on a Bicycle • Thomas Gaskell Allen and William Lewis Sachtleben

... time to compose yourself ma'am," I said. "If you don't see the doctor again soon, under the gallows, you will probably not have the pleasure of meeting with him ...
— A Rogue's Life • Wilkie Collins

... makest light to be in thy mother Nut (i.e., the sky); thou art crowned king of the gods. Thy mother Nut doeth an act of homage unto thee with both her hands. The laud of Manu (i.e., the land where the sun sets) receiveth thee with satisfaction, and the goddess Ma[a]t embraceth thee both, at morn and at eve. [Footnote: i.e., Ma[a]t, the goddess of law, order, regularity, and the like, maketh the sun to rise each day in his appointed place and at his appointed time with absolute and ...
— Egyptian Ideas of the Future Life • E. A. Wallis Budge

... "With the greatest pleasure, ma'am," answered the young man, filled with curiosity, and they all listened with courteous attention while she related the history of the ...
— The Motor Maids at Sunrise Camp • Katherine Stokes

... "Bon jour, ma belle fille." It was M. Riel who had addressed her. He drew closer, and she, in a very low voice, her olive face stained with a faint flush of ...
— The Story of Louis Riel: The Rebel Chief • Joseph Edmund Collins

... her pinnafaw, wathn't she, Ma?' says Hugh, quite unabashed; which question Lady Hawbuck turned away with a sudden query regarding her dear darling daughters, and the ENFANT TERRIBLE was ...
— The Book of Snobs • William Makepeace Thackeray

... and had had a conference both with the cook and with the gardener. The cook was of opinion that not a word should be said, or an unusual bolt drawn, or a thing removed till the Wednesday. 'She can't carry down her big box herself, ma'am; and the likes of Miss Hester would never think of going without her things;—and then there's the baby.' A look of agony came across the mother's face as she heard her daughter called Miss Hester;—but ...
— John Caldigate • Anthony Trollope

... head. "No, you don't, ma'am!" she declared cheerfully, and Mary was too exhausted to argue the question. She felt deliciously drowsy and the freedom from pain made her tearfully happy. Vague, dreamy thoughts were wandering through her brain, and one of them was that Nan had been ...
— The Governess • Julie M. Lippmann

... me, ma'am. Folk speak more freely when they don't know my business. But you will excuse me," he added, glancing at his watch, "I am in a hurry. You say you know something about ...
— A Coin of Edward VII - A Detective Story • Fergus Hume

... ma'am, to the best of my ability; one of the panes with the old pillow-case, and the other with a piece of the old stage green curtain. Sure I was as careful as possible all the time you were away, and not a drop of ...
— Castle Rackrent • Maria Edgeworth

... "Noonsense, noonsense, Raymoond, ma deer fallow; do na' heed the queeps of the hair-breened deevils. Ye see a neever tak any nootice o' them, but joost leet ...
— The Canadian Brothers - or The Prophecy Fulfilled • John Richardson

... Flaubert, in Salammbo (1862) made his heroine homosexual. Zola has described sexual inversion in Nona and elsewhere. Some thirty years ago a popular novelist, A. Belot, published a novel called Mademoiselle Giraud, ma Femme, which was much read; the novelist took the attitude of a moralist who is bound to treat frankly, but with all decorous propriety, a subject of increasing social gravity. The story is that of a man whose bride will not allow his approach on account ...
— Studies in the Psychology of Sex, Volume 2 (of 6) • Havelock Ellis

... didn't say nothin'. But sometimes the older ones 'd git settin' 'round, talkin' an' laughin', havin' pop corn an' apples, an' that, an' I'd kind o' sidle up, wantin' to join 'em, an' some on 'em 'd say, 'What you doin' here? time you was in bed,' an' give me a shove or a cuff. Yes, ma'am," looking up at Mrs. Cullom, "the wust on't was that I was kind o' scairt the hull time. Once in a while Polly 'd give me a mossel o' comfort, but Polly wa'n't but little older 'n me, an' bein' the youngest girl, was chored most to ...
— David Harum - A Story of American Life • Edward Noyes Westcott

... Sioux tribe had moved over to Ammons. While the men unhitched and unsaddled, the squaws—for the most part large shapeless creatures totally unlike the slim Indian maid of fiction, and indescribably dirty—started small fires with twigs they had brought with them. By now Ma Wagor, the gray-haired woman from Blue Springs, was in the store every day, helping out, and she was as terrified as Ida and I. It seems there were no Indians in Blue Springs. They were among the few contingencies for which Ma Wagor was not ...
— Land of the Burnt Thigh • Edith Eudora Kohl

... teasing you, ma, dear," cried Gwyn, laughing. "But I say, father, what were you going to say about my being a Tyre ...
— Sappers and Miners - The Flood beneath the Sea • George Manville Fenn

... chaque jour courbant plus bas ma tete Je passe—et refroidi sous ce soleil joyeux, Je m'en irai bientot, au milieu de la fete, Sans que rien manque ...
— The Kasidah of Haji Abdu El-Yezdi • Richard F. Burton

... have you heard that Boswell is going to publish a life of your friend Dr. Johnson?' 'No, ma'am!' 'I tell you as I heard, I don't know for the truth of it, and I can't tell what he will do. He is so extraordinary a man that perhaps he will devise something extraordinary.' Mme. D'Artlay's Diary, ii. 400. 'Dr. Johnson's ...
— Life Of Johnson, Vol. 1 • Boswell, Edited by Birkbeck Hill

... was, was she? The little ——-!" Mr. Swipes used a word concerning that young lady which would have insured his immediate discharge, together with one from the Admiral's best toe. "And pray, what was her observations, ma'am?" ...
— Springhaven - A Tale of the Great War • R. D. Blackmore

... they had all their proper equipment, and whether each had passed his standard test. As the needle was inserted into his arm, "Move to the left in fours," he ordered them; "form fours—left—in succession of divisions—number one leading—quick-ma-harch." (It was the same humorist who recently took a strong line about protective colouring, and put in an application for a set of ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 147, October 14, 1914 • Various

... 'Lethe," said the Colonel, turning to the disappointed lady at his side, after having completed his inquiries, "that there is no good hotel heah. If there were a good hotel heah, I would take you to it, ma'am, and make you comfortable. Then, ma'am, I would search this country and I'd find him in short order. He probably did not receive my letter saying that we would arrive to-day ...
— In Old Kentucky • Edward Marshall and Charles T. Dazey

... no room for doubt, ma'am, but I'm about to send the man, the valet, over to see him. Do you wish any one ...
— Vicky Van • Carolyn Wells

... Station, where we find our comfortable log house of one room ready to receive us. Though we reach the house at eleven o'clock at night, a full half dozen come to greet us, saying, "Catka, winyau waste luha, lila caute ma waste." "Left Hand, (Mr. Cross) you have a good woman, so I am happy." Sunday comes; at eleven o'clock we go to the neat little room, chapel and schoolroom. Here fifty men and women with children of all ages, listen with eagerness and attention ...
— American Missionary, Volume 44, No. 1, January, 1890 • Various

... last, ma'am. Don't be hard on us. 'Tis only a night of our lives, an' we'll be all dead ...
— Duty, and other Irish Comedies • Seumas O'Brien

... Kebeck," answered Jacques, passing his hand lightly over the instrument, as he always did when any one spoke of it. "Vair' nice VIOLON, hein? W'at you t'ink? Ma h'ole teacher, to de College, he was gif' me dat VIOLON, w'en Ah was gone away to ...
— The Ruling Passion • Henry van Dyke

... as a sword. "Joomp into t'mizzen-chains, and pick off yon chap at the helm, as he cooms under ma counter." ...
— The Gentleman - A Romance of the Sea • Alfred Ollivant

... still holding on to baby, who seemed to have an idea that she was creating a sensation of some sort, without requiring to yell, "forgive my rudeness, ma'am, but I really couldn't help it, for this ...
— Dusty Diamonds Cut and Polished - A Tale of City Arab Life and Adventure • R.M. Ballantyne

... Aylmer always called his mother 'ma'am'. 'She will have that fifteen hundred pounds that I ...
— The Belton Estate • Anthony Trollope

... he returned and, as he was this time alone, he bestowed his conversation upon us with great liberality. He prided himself on his intelligence; asked us if we knew the school-ma'am. He didn't think much of her, anyway. He had tried her, he had. He had put a question to her. If a tree a hundred feet high were to fall a foot a day, how long would it take to fall right down? She had not been able to solve the problem. "She don't know nothing," he opined. He told us how ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition - Vol. 2 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... ma'am, and nothing take it away? Why, if it had been five hundred, I have something in my pocket will fetch it out in five minutes. D'ye see this elixir, ma'am? I will show you the stain ...
— The Fair Maid of Perth • Sir Walter Scott

... "No, ma'am, he said he did not. All the gentlemen looked as if they—looked as if they might have—" Alfred hesitated delicately. "It was Mr. Berry Stokes' ...
— The Heart of Rachael • Kathleen Norris

... broke away from the folks up state and they've heard things, there ain't any more letters coming to me with an Oswego postmark. Ma's gone, and the rest don't care. You're all I've got in the world, Laura, and what I'm asking you to do is because I want to see you happy. I was afraid this thing was coming off, and the thing to do now is to grab your happiness, no matter how you get ...
— The Easiest Way - Representative Plays by American Dramatists: 1856-1911 • Eugene Walter

... may, because, horrible to relate, it is in the shop windows), will you have the kindness, for my sake, not to fancy like Robert?—it being, as he says himself, the very image of 'a young man at Waterloo House, in a moment of inspiration—"A lovely blue, ma'am."' It is as like Robert as Flush. And now I am going to tell you of Vallombrosa. You heard how we meant to stay two months there, and you are to imagine how we got up at three in the morning to escape the heat (imagine me!)—and with all our possessions ...
— The Letters of Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1 of 2) • Frederic G. Kenyon

... AND CONSTITUTIONS; like him who, being in good health, lodged himself in a physician's house, and was over-persuaded by his landlord to take physic (of which be died) for the benefit of his doctor. "Stavo ben," was written on his monument, "ma, per ...
— Discourses on Satire and Epic Poetry • John Dryden

... upside down, but in the lecture of which he seemed absorbed, he heard at one hand the mirthful laughter that circled round young Ardworth, or, in its pauses, caught, on the other side, muttered exclamations from the grave whist-players: "If you had but trumped that diamond, ma'am!" "Bless me, sir, it was the best heart!" And somehow or other, both the laughter and the exclamations affected him alike with what then was called "the spleen,"—for the one reminded him of his ...
— Lucretia, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... Donovan murmured helplessly. "Will you come down to my rooms, ma'am," she said to Mrs. Black, as she tried to remember her manners and not think how she was to tell Larry the truth. Why, this child was undersized rather than over. Her mother might have weighed a hundred and ...
— Mary Rose of Mifflin • Frances R. Sterrett

... up the kitchen-stairs whenever a bell was heard to tingle. I put it to her "O Sophy Sophy for goodness' goodness' sake where does it come from?" To which that poor unlucky willing mortal—bursting out crying to see me so vexed replied "I took a deal of black into me ma'am when I was a small child being much neglected and I think it must be, that it works out," so it continuing to work out of that poor thing and not having another fault to find with her I says "Sophy what ...
— Mrs. Lirriper's Lodgings • Charles Dickens

... brooded, chewing straws. What a clear colour that girl had, to be sure! What a lissom rascal it was! A fine long girl like that should be married; by all accounts she would make a man a good wife. If he were a dozen years the better of four and fifty he might—Then came a shrug, and a "Ma!" to conclude in true Veronese Baldassare's ruminations. Shrug and explosion signalled two stark facts: Baldassare was fifty-four, and ...
— Little Novels of Italy • Maurice Henry Hewlett

... to do my work to-morrow if I did, ma'am." And Miss Farrow quite understood that that was Pegler's polite way of saying that she most definitely did refuse to sleep in the ...
— From Out the Vasty Deep • Mrs. Belloc Lowndes

... canna ma' up my mind, when she's just cut out for thee; an' nought shall ma' me believe as God didna make her an' send her there o' purpose for thee. What's it sinnify about her bein' a Methody! It 'ud happen wear out ...
— Adam Bede • George Eliot

... even allowed the elderly lady, who drove the hardest of hard bargains with him, to lessen by one guinea the house-rent paid for each week. He took his revenge by means of an ironical compliment, addressed to Mrs. Presty. "What a saving it would be to the country, ma'am, if you were Chancellor of the Exchequer!" With perfect gravity Mrs. Presty accepted that well-earned tribute of praise. "You are quite right, sir; I should be the first official person known to the history of England who took proper care ...
— The Evil Genius • Wilkie Collins

... were gathering in the messroom, where a fire was going. Some one started the phonograph. Fritz Kreisler was playing the "Chansons sans Paroles." This was followed by a song, "Oh, movin' man, don't take ma baby grand." It was a strange combination, and to hear them, at that hour of the morning, before going out for a first sortie over the lines, gave me a "mixed-up" feeling, which it was ...
— High Adventure - A Narrative of Air Fighting in France • James Norman Hall

... this Prince escaped three miles from Paris and its democrats, when, on putting his hand into his waistcoat-pocket, in order to take a consoling pinch, he missed his snuff-box, which, in his hurry, he had left upon his toilette, at the discretion of the mob. "Mon Dieu, ma tabatiere!" was his horrified exclamation, as he deliberated for a moment upon ...
— Twenty-Seven Years in Canada West - The Experience of an Early Settler (Volume I) • Samuel Strickland

... shaking his head, and saying things in English, which I cannot understand, but I am sure they are sad things and angry things. And he would not eat any dinner,—no, not that much," (Annunziata measured off an inch on her finger), "he who always eats a great deal,—eh, ma molto, molto," and, separating her hands, she measured off something like twenty inches in ...
— My Friend Prospero • Henry Harland

... "This way, ma'am," called Dr. Oleander, striding straight, to the kitchen; "we'll find a fire here, at least. It's worse than ...
— The Unseen Bridgegroom - or, Wedded For a Week • May Agnes Fleming

... Whatever could she do? She tried to think of something else to say, but Frances Purdy was speaking now and the bursts of laughter all about were too infectious to withstand. Frances was describing the woes of her first week. She had been told that she must say "ma'am" to all the Sixth-Form girls, and that new girls must get up before the others and have their baths before the bell rang, and she convulsed her audience by a description of her first ecstatic experience ...
— Judy of York Hill • Ethel Hume Patterson Bennett

... "Never, Ma'am, nor did I ever see any other ghost in this country that I was sure was a ghost, but—Ireland, dear old Ireland, oh, that's an ancient land, and they have both ghosts and fairies and banshees too, and many's the story I've heard over there, and from my own dear mother's lips, and ...
— Adopting An Abandoned Farm • Kate Sanborn

... roaming restlessly about there many minutes before Williams appeared "He's come, himself, ma'am," said he. "I told him I didn't know whether you'd be able to ...
— The Fashionable Adventures of Joshua Craig • David Graham Phillips

... if you could have seen your son, With the regiment"—sang Camarade Duclos, another old-eyed youngster. There was amiable adventure with an amiable "blonde" (oh, if you could have seen your son); another with a "jolie brune" (oh, ma mere, ma mere); and still another lecon d'amour. The refrain had a catchy lilt to it, and ...
— A Volunteer Poilu • Henry Sheahan

... de mes flancs, sous pretexte qu'elle empechait mon mariage, celle avec qui j'avais coutume de dormir, depuis si longtemps, la ou mon coeur etait attache au sien, il se dechira, et je trainais mon sang avec ma blessure. ...
— Saint Augustin • Louis Bertrand

... "Joe Hollman, ma'am," he answered; and the girl gave an involuntary start. The two men who caught the name closed up the gap between the horses, with ...
— The Call of the Cumberlands • Charles Neville Buck

... gradually subsiding, a voice from the end of the room was heard [Footnote: The speaker on this occasion was the actor Mackay, who had attained considerable celebrity by his representation of Scottish characters, and especially of that of the famous Bailie in "Rob Roy."] exclaiming in character,' Ma conscience! if my father the Bailie had been alive to hear that ma health had been proposed by the Author of Waverley,' etc., which, as you may suppose, had ...
— A Publisher and His Friends • Samuel Smiles

... the voice of Bennet Ma., known—strictly out of earshot—as Scab Major. Is any school, at any period, quite free of the type? It sounded more like a rough than an ill-natured rag; but the whimpering unseen victim seemed to have no kick in him: and Roy could only sit there wondering helplessly what people were made of ...
— Far to Seek - A Romance of England and India • Maud Diver

... an envelope, ma'am. But Cook is sure she heard no knock—not while I was out. So Dr Ferguson must have come in ...
— The Return • Walter de la Mare

... also as a term of respect in addressing any older man not related in any degree, even though he be of a different tribe or race. They use the word INAI for aunt as well as for mother, and some have adopted the Malay term MA MANAKAN for aunt proper. The same is true of the words for nephew and niece — the Malay term ANAK MANAKAN being ...
— The Pagan Tribes of Borneo • Charles Hose and William McDougall

... "Laws, Ma'am, HE don't know nothin' about it—HE don't. Why, I've seen them poor critters, beat an' 'bused an' hunted, brought in all torn,—ears hangin' all in rags, where the dogs been ...
— The Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, 1995, Memorial Issue • Various

... a smell o' musk into a draw An' it clings hold like precerdents in law: Your gran'ma'am put it there,—when, goodness knows,— To jes' this-worldify her Sunday-clo'es; But the old chist wun't sarve her gran'son's wife, (For, 'thout new funnitoor, wut good in life?) An' so ole clawfoot, from the precinks dread O' the spare-chamber, slinks into the shed, ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 9, No. 56, June, 1862 • Various

... recevoir Dimanche prochain, rue Racine, 3. C'est le seul jour que je puisse passer chez moi; et encore je n'en suis pas absolument certaine—mais je ferai tellement mon possible, que ma bonne etoile m'y aidera peut-etre un peu. Agreez mille remerciments de coeur ainsi que Monsieur Browning, que j'espere voir avec vous, pour la sympathie que vous m'accordez. George Sand. Paris: ...
— Life and Letters of Robert Browning • Mrs. Sutherland Orr

... after I had quitted M. le Duc d'Orleans, whilst he was walking at Montmartre ma garden with his 'roues' and his harlots, some letters had been brought to him by a post-office clerk, to whom he had spoken in private; that afterwards he, Biron, had been called by the Duke, who showed him a letter from the Marquis de Ruffec to his master, dated "Madrid," and charged ...
— The Memoirs of Louis XIV., His Court and The Regency, Complete • Duc de Saint-Simon

... was well informed. He knew what the gangway man of the steamer had seen: "A lady in a black dress and a black veil, wandering at midnight alongside, on the quay. 'Are you going by the boat, ma'am,' he had asked her encouragingly. 'This way.' She seemed not to know what to do. He helped her on board. She ...
— The Secret Agent - A Simple Tale • Joseph Conrad

... ma. I will wrap up close and have my feet well protected. There is not the least danger of my ...
— Words for the Wise • T. S. Arthur

... wanted her for himself. He got her to marry him. Then he lost his arm and they were poor and her voice went. I've seen where love goes. If I married Johnny I'd go and live at Deutra's and I'd have kids, and old Ma Deutra would hate me and scream at me just like my mother used to. It would be going back, right back in the trap I've just come ...
— The Best Short Stories of 1921 and the Yearbook of the American Short Story • Various

... in 1846. Soon after, Queen Victoria, naturally interested in the oncoming generation of statesmen, said to the Premier, "Pray tell me, Lord John, whom do you consider the most promising young man in your party?" After due consideration Lord John replied, "George Byng, ma'am," signifying thereby a youth who eventually became the ...
— Prime Ministers and Some Others - A Book of Reminiscences • George W. E. Russell

... babyish form of "papa" and "mama" is a matter of parental choice, but the preference in some circles is for the former. A blunt "yes" or "no" is not thought polite from a child; he should say "yes, father," "no, mama," "yes, Mrs. Smith." "Ma'am" as a form of address ...
— Mother's Remedies - Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remedies from Mothers - of the United States and Canada • T. J. Ritter

... pretending, nor any such a thing," replied Jennie, with a great show of candor; "it's you that are making up a story, Dotty Dimple. I didn't say I'd give you my ring. No, ma'am; if 'twas the last words I ...
— Dotty Dimple at Her Grandmother's • Sophie May

... "No, no, ma'am, there is no news of that sort. I fear it will be long before we hear of him. Indeed, it is but a chance that he is out in the East Indies at all. We did but hear a rumour that he had been ...
— Athelstane Ford • Allen Upward

... Margery under the affliction she was in for the loss of her brother but the pleasure she took in her two shoes. She ran to Mrs. Smith as soon as they were put on, and stroking down her ragged apron, cried out: "Two Shoes, Ma'am! see Two Shoes!" And so she behaved to all the people she met, and by that means obtained the name of ...
— Bo-Peep Story Books • Anonymous

... fence; the junco, with his pretty brown bantling and his charming little trilling song; the crow baby, with its funny ways and queer cry of "ma-a-a;" the redstart, who ...
— Little Brothers of the Air • Olive Thorne Miller

... "No, ma'am," Paterson said with more than her ordinary gravity and formality: "I did not know where to send for him. He left London some days ago. Perhaps you would read ...
— Lippincott's Magazine. Vol. XII, No. 33. December, 1873. • Various

... time," said the night-watchman; "them that go down in big ships see the wonders o' the deep, you know," he added with a sudden chuckle, "but the one I'm going to tell you about ought never to have been trusted out without 'is ma. A good many o' my skippers had fads, but this one was the worst ...
— Many Cargoes • W.W. Jacobs

... "Ah, ma foi, no!" replied Poirot frankly. "This time it is an idea gigantic! Stupendous! And you—you, my friend, ...
— The Mysterious Affair at Styles • Agatha Christie

... surface of the plaster. Some of the largest subjects are made of pieces of glass joined together and retouched with the chisel, in imitation of bas-relief. Thus the face, hands, and feet of the goddess Ma are done in turquoise blue, her headdress in dark blue, her feather in alternate stripes of blue and yellow, and her raiment in deep red. Upon a wooden shrine recently discovered in the neighbourhood of Daphnae,[58] and upon a fragment of mummy-case in the ...
— Manual Of Egyptian Archaeology And Guide To The Study Of Antiquities In Egypt • Gaston Camille Charles Maspero

... Tonkiki, ma Tonkinoise, Yen a d'autr's qui m' font les doux yeux, Mais c'est ell' que ...
— Dragon's blood • Henry Milner Rideout

... "No, ma'am," replied the boy, looking up brightly, as if he were telling a piece of good news; "I am not wanted any longer. Mr. Spicer's own man has got well ...
— Hidden Hand • Emma Dorothy Eliza Nevitte Southworth

... Mammy timidly on this subject, and was assured positively by her that "they ain't no nigger in the whole university whar I would marry. No, ma'm. I done got 'nough ...
— Southern Lights and Shadows • Edited by William Dean Howells & Henry Mills Alden

... master spoke kindly, "'Rab, ma man, puir Rabbie,'" "the stump of a tail rose up, the ears were cocked, the eyes filled, and were comforted"; Rab showed pride and ...
— Journeys Through Bookland, Vol. 10 - The Guide • Charles Herbert Sylvester

... had like to have happened to you and Charles(5) ma fait glacer le sang. I hope it was not Robert that was so heedless. But that, the wild boars, the Alps, precipices, felouques, changes of climate, are all to me such things as, besides that they grossissent de loin, that if I allowed my imagination its full scope, I ...
— George Selwyn: His Letters and His Life • E. S. Roscoe and Helen Clergue

... dear ma'am; and look at me—sixty-two, and as brisk as a bee. I don't know the meaning of the word illness. In a good hour be it spoken,' added Miss Whichello, thinking she was tempting the gods. 'By the way, what is this about his ...
— The Bishop's Secret • Fergus Hume

... he answered, "but it sure makes me terrible sorry, ma'am, that I got your little girl in trouble. Mostly, it was ...
— The Seventh Man • Max Brand

... master's house, which stood by the roadside. ga:t a't owr ma'ster'z hows, hwich stood ...
— The Art Of Writing & Speaking The English Language - Word-Study and Composition & Rhetoric • Sherwin Cody

... about Ma, or me you were thinking?" she asked. "You looked so sober, that I know it was about someone ...
— Princess Polly At Play • Amy Brooks

... the word in any invidious sense, ma'am,' replied Mr. Benjamin Allen, growing somewhat uneasy on ...
— The Pickwick Papers • Charles Dickens

... "You'll excuse me, ma'am," continued the seaman, "if I appear something inquisitive, I want to make sure that I've boarded the right craft d'ee see—I mean, that ...
— Rivers of Ice • R.M. Ballantyne

... M. de la Ferronays—a great party—and was desired to hand out Madame la Comtesse de Maistre, wife to the Comte Xavier de Maistre, author of the 'Voyage autour de ma Chambre' and 'Le Lepreux,' to which works I gave a prodigious number of compliments. The Dalbergs and Aldobrandinis dined there, and some French whom I did not know. The Duc de Dalberg and his wife are a perpetual source of amusement to me, she with her devotion and believing ...
— The Greville Memoirs - A Journal of the Reigns of King George IV and King William - IV, Volume 1 (of 3) • Charles C. F. Greville

... the south side of the river was laid down, passengers who wished to reach Jarrow had to alight at Howdon and cross the river; and a racy dialect song—"Howdon for Jarrow" with its refrain of "Howdon for Jarra—ma hinnies, loup oot"—commemorates the fact. Willington Quay and Howdon carry on the line of shipbuilding yards to Northumberland Dock and the staithes of the Tyne Commissioners, where the waggon ways from various ...
— Northumberland Yesterday and To-day • Jean F. Terry

... She's awa'? Weel, ma wumman, I thocht that mysel', When I saw your blind doon frae our corner, An', says I, "I'll juist tak' a step upbye an' tell Twa or three things its better to warn her." 'Twas the doctor's negleck o'r, the auld nosey-wax! There's naethin' to dae noo, but beery her, Tammy Chips mak's ...
— The Auld Doctor and other Poems and Songs in Scots • David Rorie

... arms fell languidly on the counterpane. 'I shall not live, but promise me that. Let me die happy. Tu sais, cheri, que ma mere est morte. Je voudrais encontrer ma mere au ciel, comme fille honnete, ne c'est pas? Ah! pour l'amour de ...
— Despair's Last Journey • David Christie Murray

... in the house who are perfect idiots. They can't remember to say "yes, my lady" and "no, my lady" and "very good, my lady" whenever Lady Filson speaks to them. One of them actually addressed her yesterday as "ma'am." I wonder the roof didn't ...
— The Big Drum - A Comedy in Four Acts • Arthur Pinero



Words linked to "Ma" :   Berkshires, mommy, Springfield, mother, Worcester, Boston, United States of America, mum, Salem, mamma, Taconic Mountains, Hub of the Universe, Artium Magister, Housatonic River, mummy, Cape Cod, Pittsfield, Plymouth, the States, concord, Medford, Williamstown, mama, USA, momma, Berkshire Hills, Gloucester, US, ampere, Massachusetts, Beantown, current unit, mammy, Housatonic, United States, Cambridge, America, Old Colony, amp, mom, Charles, milliampere, Charles River, A, Cape Cod Canal, ma'am, am, Lexington and Concord, U.S.A., Bean Town, American state, New England



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