Free Translator Free Translator
Translators Dictionaries Courses Other
Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




Lift   Listen
noun
Lift  n.  
1.
Act of lifting; also, that which is lifted.
2.
The space or distance through which anything is lifted; as, a long lift.
3.
Help; assistance, as by lifting. Hence: A ride in a vehicle, given by the vehicle's owner to another person as a favor usually in "give a lift" or "got a lift"; as, to give one a lift in a wagon; Jack gave me a lift into town. (Colloq.) "The goat gives the fox a lift."
4.
That by means of which a person or thing lifts or is lifted; as:
(a)
A hoisting machine; an elevator; a dumb waiter. (Chiefly Brit.)
(b)
An exercising machine.
5.
A rise; a degree of elevation; as, the lift of a lock in canals.
6.
A lift gate. See Lift gate, below. (Prov. Eng.)
7.
(Naut.) A rope leading from the masthead to the extremity of a yard below; used for raising or supporting the end of the yard.
8.
(Mach.) One of the steps of a cone pulley.
9.
(Shoemaking) A layer of leather in the heel.
10.
(Horology) That portion of the vibration of a balance during which the impulse is given.
11.
A brightening of the spirits; encouragement; as, the campaign workers got a lift from the President's endorsement.
Dead lift. See under Dead.
Lift bridge, a kind of drawbridge, the movable part of which is lifted, instead of being drawn aside.
Lift gate, a gate that is opened by lifting.
Lift hammer. See Tilt hammer.
Lift lock, a canal lock.
Lift pump, a lifting pump.
Lift tenter (Windmills), a governor for regulating the speed by adjusting the sails, or for adjusting the action of grinding machinery according to the speed.
Lift wall (Canal Lock), the cross wall at the head of the lock.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"Lift" Quotes from Famous Books



... Hilda, as they approached him, "that is Signor Bruno. Yes, it is. Please pull up, Christian. We must give him a lift!" ...
— The Slave Of The Lamp • Henry Seton Merriman

... Salisbury, who was the most violent persecutor of any in that age, except Bonner. When they were brought to the stake, Parsons asked for some drink, which being brought him, he drank to his fellow-sufferers, saying, "Be merry, my brethren, and lift up your hearts to God; for after this sharp breakfast I trust we shall have a good dinner in the kingdom of Christ, our Lord and Redeemer." At these words Eastwood, one of the sufferers, lifted up ...
— Fox's Book of Martyrs - Or A History of the Lives, Sufferings, and Triumphant - Deaths of the Primitive Protestant Martyrs • John Fox

... as real instances of strength, sharp sight and quick hearing: Wu Huo, who could lift a tripod weighing 250 stone; Li Chu, who at a distance of a hundred paces could see objects no bigger than a mustard seed; and Shih K'uang, a blind musician who could hear the footsteps ...
— The Art of War • Sun Tzu

... grimly, "are coming to lunch in twenty minutes." She raised her voice. "All right, Mason. Miss Valerie's broken it to me. Stop the first vehicle that approaches and ask them to give us a lift." ...
— Anthony Lyveden • Dornford Yates

... (in the magazine he is Cleon), "give me a lift. I am on an assignment to find out the Voice of the city. You see, it's a special order. Ordinarily a symposium comprising the views of Henry Clews, John L. Sullivan, Edwin Markham, May Irwin and Charles Schwab would be about all. But this is a different matter. ...
— The Voice of the City • O. Henry

... for a single team, and this rise was of course the place where the balky animals stopped. The line of the road was enfiladed by the enemy's cannon, the morning fog in the valley was beginning to lift under the influence of the rising sun, and as soon as the situation was discovered we might reckon upon receiving the fire of the Cotton Mountain battery. The wagon-drivers realized the danger of handling an ammunition train under such circumstances and ...
— Military Reminiscences of the Civil War V1 • Jacob Dolson Cox

... the distant land, but could not find the way, And suddenly my boat capsized far out upon the bay. I shrieked in wildest agony amid the thunder shock, When I heard you saying unto me, "Beneath us is a Rock, Trust not to me, these waves are strong, but lift your tear-dimmed eye— That star will lead us to the rock that higher is than I." And through the drenching wave and surf, together on we passed, Till the bright green slopes of Hamilton shone clearly out at last. It seemed so strange, we stepped ashore, your garments were ...
— Victor Roy, A Masonic Poem • Harriet Annie Wilkins

... should have to carry about a portable crane! Well, my friends, let us be content with the moon for to-day. There, at least, we shall cut a great figure! Later on we shall see if we will go to the sun, where you can't drink without a crane to lift ...
— The Moon-Voyage • Jules Verne

... between the Dutch sailors, and was by Jensen's side. For the moment I thought that she had come to carry out her promise of forgiveness; but Jensen lifted his face, and I saw it, and saw that it was writhed with a great horror and a great fear. And then I saw her lift her hand, and saw a knife in her hand, and the next moment she had driven it once and twice into his breast by the heart, and Jensen dropped like a log, and his blood ran over the deck. Then she turned to me, and her face ...
— Marjorie • Justin Huntly McCarthy

... where the little sister climbed back into the motor car, leered at by the four New York club-men, he thought especially distasteful. Surely the skirt of her print dress was already short enough. She needed not to lift it under this evil regard as she put her foot up ...
— Merton of the Movies • Harry Leon Wilson

... news indeed!' cried Gondremark. 'I was mad to see you all last night and all this morning: for yesterday afternoon I brought my long business to a head; the ship has come home; one more dead lift, and I shall cease to fetch and carry for the Princess Ratafia. Yes, 'tis done. I have the order all in Ratafia's hand; I carry it on my heart. At the hour of twelve to- night, Prince Featherhead is to be taken in his bed and, like the bambino, whipped into ...
— Prince Otto • Robert Louis Stevenson

... cheek, they're all warm, you know," Beth explained; "and then they are good! And fuchsias are good too, but it isn't the same good. You know that one in the sitting-room window, white outside and salmon-coloured inside, and such a nice shape—the flowers—and the way they hang down; you have to lift them to look into them. When I look at them long, they make me feel—oh—feel, you know—feel that I could take the whole plant in my arms and hug it. But fuchsias don't ...
— The Beth Book - Being a Study of the Life of Elizabeth Caldwell Maclure, a Woman of Genius • Sarah Grand

... mint-master pointed was a huge square, iron-bound, oaken chest; it was big enough, my children, for all four of you to play hide-and-seek in. The servants tugged with might and main, but could not lift this enormous receptacle, and were finally obliged to drag it across the floor. Captain Hull then took a key from his girdle, unlocked the chest, and lifted its ponderous lid. Behold! it was full to the brim ...
— Short Stories and Selections for Use in the Secondary Schools • Emilie Kip Baker

... give it the most impressive character. When you enter within this stupendous circle of ruinous walls and arches, and grand terraces of masonry, rising one above another, you stand upon the arena of the old gladiatorial combats and Christian martyrdom; and as you lift your eyes to the vast amphitheater, you meet, in imagination, the eyes of a hundred thousand Romans, assembled to witness these bloody spectacles. What a multitude and mighty array of human beings; ...
— McGuffey's Sixth Eclectic Reader • William Holmes McGuffey

... States burdens which nations must bear for themselves. We would rejoice to help rehabilitate currency systems and facilitate all commerce which does not drag us to the very levels of those we seek to lift up. ...
— Complete State of the Union Addresses from 1790 to the Present • Various

... dramatic poet as you are ... cannot ... since you do not know what my life meant before you touched it, ... and my angel at the gate of the prison! My wonder is greater than your wonders, ... I who sate here alone but yesterday, so weary of my own being that to take interest in my very poems I had to lift them up by an effort and separate them from myself and cast them out from me into the sunshine where I was not—feeling nothing of the light which fell on them even—making indeed a sort of pleasure and interest about ...
— The Letters of Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Barrett, Vol. 1 (of 2) 1845-1846 • Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Barrett

... the absurd that we should examine. Everything is possible. I would not take a thousand crowns for what I have learnt this evening. I shall kill two birds with one stone. I deliver up the criminal; and I give Noel a hearty lift up to recover his title and his fortune. There, at least; is one who deserves what he will get. For once I shall not be sorry to see a lad get on, who has been brought up in the school of adversity. But, pshaw! he will be like all the rest. Prosperity will turn his brain. Already he begins to ...
— The Widow Lerouge - The Lerouge Case • Emile Gaboriau

... me spade or me pick for fear that the goold would vanish from me sight. I threw myself upon me knees, and dug with me fingers, and hardly dared to breathe for fear that I should lose it; and when I had freed it from the dirt, and attempted to lift it up, O! didn't it seem good to have it howld back, as though it didn't like being dragged from its bed ...
— The Gold Hunter's Adventures - Or, Life in Australia • William H. Thomes

... Scotland," said Walter Belcanqual in one of his sermons in 1580 "there were either few or none that durst avow themselves Papists, neither yet publicly in the country, neither in the reformed cities, neither in the king's palace. But since that time, not only begin the Papists within the realm to lift up their heads, but also our Scottish Papists that were outside the realm swarm home from all places like locusts, and have taken such hardihood unto them that not only have they access to the French court, ...
— History of the Catholic Church from the Renaissance • Rev. James MacCaffrey

... warning given by the groom, "It's only sometimes, sir." And after what fashion should Phineas ride him at the obstacle? He did not like to strike a horse that seemed to be going well, and was unwilling, as are all good riders, to use his heels. So he spoke to him, and proposed to lift him at the ditch. To the very edge the horse galloped,—too fast, indeed, if he meant to take the bank as Chiltern's horse had done,—and then stopping himself so suddenly that he must have shaken every joint in his body, he planted ...
— Phineas Redux • Anthony Trollope

... when I was a girl," said Cassy, her dark eyes fixing themselves in an expression of mournful reverie; "but, he isn't here! there's nothing here, but sin and long, long, long despair! O!" She laid her land on her breast and drew in her breath, as if to lift a heavy weight. ...
— Uncle Tom's Cabin • Harriet Beecher Stowe

... what gave him his value to humanity, and hence his greatness, was the fact that his attention had been arrested by the sight of the lid of a saucepan of boiling water raised by the steam. "Steam is a force which could lift a piston as it lifts the cover of a saucepan, and become the motor power of a machine." Papin's famous saucepan is a kind of magic wand in the history of mankind, which thenceforth began to work and travel without fatigue. ...
— Spontaneous Activity in Education • Maria Montessori

... seems against us, that is when we often acquire wrong habits, and it is then, that we have to make a gigantic effort to think and speak as we should; and even though we may feel the very reverse at that moment the tiniest effort will be backed up by a tremendous Power and will lift us to a realization never felt before. It is not in the easy, contented moments of our life that we make our greatest progress, for then it requires, no special effort to keep in tune. But it is when we are in ...
— The Power of Concentration • Theron Q. Dumont

... you what," said the blacksmith, "now that we've found that we can do the job all right, we'll get up a Christmas for little Skeezucks that will lift the mountains clean up off ...
— Bruvver Jim's Baby • Philip Verrill Mighels

... Bun after doing a job; Mother of bright-headed boy, Think of the motherless Bob! High in the heavens august Providence saw him, and said— "Out of the pits of the dust Lift him, and cover ...
— The Poems of Henry Kendall • Henry Kendall

... was he—oh, I haven't told you. I must go back to that dreadful night when my cousin was shot. As I told you, the room was filled with people, and among them there was a young man—a Doctor, he told us—who made them lift poor Will on the bed, and proceeded to examine his wound. It ...
— Kate Danton, or, Captain Danton's Daughters - A Novel • May Agnes Fleming

... Greeks were even in the domain of pure inventions! They poetised reality, not yearning to lift themselves out of it. The raising of the present into the colossal and eternal, ...
— We Philologists, Volume 8 (of 18) • Friedrich Nietzsche

... bandit morality. It would have achieved its purpose had I possessed as weak moral fiber as those of my critics who announced that I ought to have confined my action to feeble scolding and temporizing until the opportunity for action passed. I did not lift my finger to incite the revolutionists. The right simile to use is totally different. I simply ceased to stamp out the different revolutionary fuses that were already burning. When Colombia committed flagrant wrong against us, I considered it no part of my ...
— Theodore Roosevelt - An Autobiography by Theodore Roosevelt • Theodore Roosevelt

... little later. Now I think, Aunt Grace, lovely, it would be nice for you to wear your lavender lace gown, and look delicate, don't you? A chaperoning auntie in poor health is so aristocratic. You must wear the lavender satin slippers and have a bottle of cologne to lift frequently to ...
— Prudence Says So • Ethel Hueston

... my money-box." He drew out the iron chest. "It is safe from thieves," said he, with self-complacency, "for no one in the town can stir it but I, and no one can open it, for the lock is the masterpiece of the father of my dear departed wife. Few besides me can lift the lid, and even if many of them came, they would find it too tough a job for them; so you may believe that the money is safe here from rogues, and swindlers, and the like," said he, triumphantly. ...
— Debit and Credit - Translated from the German of Gustav Freytag • Gustav Freytag

... they were out of sight up jumped Chippy, swung himself over the tail-board, and dropped into the road. He dived at once into the bushes which bordered the way, and the waggoner never knew that he had given anyone a lift. Now Chippy set himself to track the trackers. He followed them up as fast as he could go, taking advantage of every patch of cover, and holding his ball in ...
— The Wolf Patrol - A Tale of Baden-Powell's Boy Scouts • John Finnemore

... the chimneys. I'll bring help at once. I'll bring back men with me, and we'll lift him with ...
— Pixie O'Shaughnessy • Mrs. George de Horne Vaizey

... produced by burning sulphur or charcoal on braziers. At each period of training, the miners enter and walk a distance of about 1 mile, the average distance usually traveled from the mine mouth to the working face or point of explosion. They then remove a number of timbers; lift a quantity of brick or hard lump-coal into wheel-barrows; climb through artificial tunnels, up and down inclines, and over surfaces strewn with coal or stone; operate a machine with a device attached to it, ...
— Transactions of the American Society of Civil Engineers, vol. LXX, Dec. 1910 • Herbert M. Wilson

... ride to Ballarat," the inspector said, after feeling of his leg, and finding that the bleeding had nearly ceased; "at any rate, I cannot remain here through half of the night. Lift me on to one of the horses, and let me see how ...
— The Gold Hunter's Adventures - Or, Life in Australia • William H. Thomes

... with indomitable resolution, but there must have been some yielding quality in the last words, for she suddenly found strength to lift her head again and turn her ...
— The Keeper of the Door • Ethel M. Dell

... heavy jaw and strong tiger-like teeth. He would not have looked well in a gathering of modern scientists, but they would have honoured him as their master. For he had used a stone to break a nut and a stick to lift up a heavy boulder. He was the inventor of the hammer and the lever, our first tools, and he did more than any human being who came after him to give man his enormous advantage over the other animals with whom ...
— The Story of Mankind • Hendrik van Loon

... of this cellar, over which is the Duchess' bedroom. At night an ingenious counterpoise acting as a lift raised me through the floor, and I saw the Duchess in her lover's arms. She threw me a piece ...
— The Muse of the Department • Honore de Balzac

... I'll—" But he paused at the lift of her brows and the extraordinarily frigid look she gave him. He stood in his tracks, watching her descend ...
— The Silver Horde • Rex Beach

... restlessness from which he had been suffering since the conclusion of his holiday. But the thought that she was so near yet so inaccessible produced in him a meditative melancholy which enveloped him like a cloud that would not lift. His manner ...
— The Man Upstairs and Other Stories • P. G. Wodehouse

... "Doesn't lift much here," the captain said. "But with this offshore wind, they ought to hear the seals three or four ...
— The Boy With the U. S. Fisheries • Francis Rolt-Wheeler

... a quiver, a little lift of the shoulders, a bunchin' of the fingers. Then she bites her lip and gets a grip on herself. "Well?" ...
— Shorty McCabe on the Job • Sewell Ford

... asleep—and asleep. Oh, bed! and he falls into it as if he were diving into butter and though he murmurs "Nancy" once to himself before his head sinks into pillows, in two seconds he is drugged with such utter slumber that it is only the blind stupefied face of a man under ether that he is able to lift from his haven when Ted comes in half an hour later and announces, in the voice of one proclaiming a new revelation, that Elinor is the finest person that ever lived and that everything is most wholly and completely ...
— Young People's Pride • Stephen Vincent Benet

... paces. Why, he's a two-laigged hold-up! That man would—" he stopped as a stranger entered the room. "Hey, stranger! Don't you leave that cayuse of yourn outside all alone or that coyote of a marshal will steal it, shore. He's the biggest thief I ever knowed. He'll lift yore animal quick as a wink!" Fisher ...
— Bar-20 Days • Clarence E. Mulford

... devastating war was going on. Our way led first through a park, then through a high-banked lane all blue with scabious, and then at last we got on to a main road, when the owner of a potato cart crawling slowly along, most kindly gave us a long lift on our way. ...
— Field Hospital and Flying Column - Being the Journal of an English Nursing Sister in Belgium & Russia • Violetta Thurstan

... some common means of expression, some common means of conveying their moods and their thoughts to themselves and their world. The band feels the moods and interprets the thoughts. A wise and sympathetic bandmaster—and the masters that I have met have been that—can lift a battalion out of depression, cheer it in sickness, and steady and recall it to itself in times of almost unendurable stress. [Cheers.] You may remember a beautiful poem by Sir Henry Newbolt, in which he describes how a squadron of weary big dragoons were led to renewed effort ...
— New York Times Current History: The European War, Vol 2, No. 1, April, 1915 - April-September, 1915 • Various

... still while the girl nestled against the birch logs close beside him under the same furs, for the wind went through the building and the cold was unbearable a few feet from the stove. The birch rafters shook above their heads, and every now and then it seemed that a roaring gust would lift the roof from them. Still the stove glowed and snapped, and close in about it there was a drowsy heat, while presently the girl's eyes grew heavy. Finally, for there are few who can resist the desire for sleep in the cold of the Northwest, her head sank back, and Winston, rising very slowly, ...
— Winston of the Prairie • Harold Bindloss

... boxes; and at eleven o'clock his work was almost done. He seated himself on the packing-case which had once held Waldo's books, and proceeded to examine the contents of another which he had not yet looked at. It was carelessly nailed down. He loosened one plank, and began to lift out various articles of female attire—old-fashioned caps, aprons, dresses with long pointed bodies such as he remembered to have seen his mother wear when he ...
— The Story of an African Farm • (AKA Ralph Iron) Olive Schreiner

... successor in the archbishopric of Dublin, Dr. Trench, has given us some thoughtful words on the subject: "So long as we abide in the region of nature, miraculous and improbable, miraculous and incredible may be allowed to remain convertible terms; but once lift up the whole discussion into a higher region, once acknowledge aught higher than nature—a kingdom of God, and men the intended denizens of it—and the whole argument loses its strength and the ...
— English Literature, Considered as an Interpreter of English History - Designed as a Manual of Instruction • Henry Coppee

... English nightingale sing, and winna harken to Mr. John Thomas till he calls himself Giovanni Thomasino; or do ye tak yourself for a singing-bird, to go all your days tweedle-dumdeeing out into the lift, just for the lust o' hearing your ain clan clatter? Will ye be a man or a lintic? Coral Islands? Pacific? What do ye ken about Pacifics? Are ye a Cockney or a Cannibal Islander? Dinna stand there, ye gowk, as fusionless as a docken, but tell ...
— Alton Locke, Tailor And Poet • Rev. Charles Kingsley et al

... Lift thy head, thou undaunted youth! Though some hope may now break, forsooth, Brighter a new one and higher Shall throe eye fill ...
— Poems and Songs • Bjornstjerne Bjornson

... be ready," said the mate; and he kept his word; while, as soon as he had let his two men lift out the second door, the major brought up the reserve, as he called it, the chests piled against the door by the captain, Mrs Strong, and the major's wife, were lifted over, and in an incredibly short time the opening, with the door bolted, was covered breast-high with the other doors, which ...
— Mother Carey's Chicken - Her Voyage to the Unknown Isle • George Manville Fenn

... and addresses, with a list of the presents most wanted by the children, who were there to tell where they lived. "Some of them have been here all day. That little lame fellow was among the first to come, and Santa Claus hasn't seen him yet. The crowd pushes him out so, and there's no one to lift him up high enough to be seen. He's held that piece of paper ...
— The Man in Lonely Land • Kate Langley Bosher

... Lord's gracious keeping I commit you. The Lord bless you and keep you. The Lord lift up the light of his countenance upon you, and give you peace—now, and ...
— Penshurst Castle - In the Days of Sir Philip Sidney • Emma Marshall

... that I even knew Mona Forester? I should not have done so, but you surprised the truth from me, and I will tell you nothing more. I hated the girl, and though I have never seen her, I hate the child on her account, and I would not lift even a finger to help her ...
— True Love's Reward • Mrs. Georgie Sheldon

... one another in a regular procession from south to north. The majesty of the wilderness and the illimitable covering of forest green appealed to Paul but little less than to Henry. He, too, felt the great lift of the ...
— The Keepers of the Trail - A Story of the Great Woods • Joseph A. Altsheler

... I had met on the farm lived in this city and in my neighbourhood; but I would have considered it a matter of gross discourtesy to call on her, or, indeed, do anything save lift my hat if I met her on the street, our social stations were so far apart. But she had told me the name of the church she attended, and, as I was thinking more about her at that time than about anybody else, I stole quietly into the church as soon as the doors were opened, and, ...
— From the Bottom Up - The Life Story of Alexander Irvine • Alexander Irvine

... waiting their turn to be. What is their freight? Rather ask what it is not. For the present, Colorado imports everything except the most perishable commodities,—and that which pays for all. If you would see that, ask the express-messenger on the train going East in five minutes to lift the lid of one of those heavy iron trunks in his car. Your eyes are dazzled by the yellow gleam of a king's ransom. It is a day's harvest of ingots from the stamps of Central City, on its way to square accounts with New York for the contents of ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 14, No. 85, November, 1864 • Various

... added mournfully, "I remember the very words,—a new light broke upon me, struggling and dim, but light still. The ambition with which I had sought the truckling Frenchman revived, and took worthier and more definite form. I would lift myself above the mire, make a name, rise ...
— The Caxtons, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... character gave them; nor how that same estimate made every word of his prayer tell, and go home to her spirit with the sharpness as well as the gentleness of Ithuriel's spear. When Elizabeth rose from her knees, it was with a bowed head which she could in no wise lift up; and after Winthrop had left the room, Clam stood looking at her mistress and thinking her own thoughts, as long as ...
— Hills of the Shatemuc • Susan Warner

... in England the pleasures of smell were great—that in this inimitable island there was a certain mixture of fog and beer and soot which, however odd it might sound, was the national aroma, and was most agreeable to the nostril; and she used to lift the sleeve of her British overcoat and bury her nose in it, inhaling the clear, fine scent of the wool. Poor Ralph Touchett, as soon as the autumn had begun to define itself, became almost a prisoner; in bad weather he was unable to step out of the house, and he used sometimes ...
— The Portrait of a Lady - Volume 1 (of 2) • Henry James

... of wonder. Michael is extended on his bed in profound sleep. An angel at his head, and another at his feet, are about to lift him up; for, says the story, Michael was so jealous of his treasure, that not only he kindled a lamp every night in its honour, but, fearing he should be robbed of it, he placed it under his bed, which action, though suggested by his profound sense ...
— Legends of the Madonna • Mrs. Jameson

... a scene—who should bare the swords of the gentry and turn them against each other—who should give tower and cottage to the flames, and slake the embers with the blood of the indwellers?—What would he deserve who should lift up again that ancient Dagon of Superstition, whom the worthies of the time have beaten down, and who should once more make the churches of God the ...
— The Abbot • Sir Walter Scott

... these expeditions, he always gave the preference to those applications which came to him from poor, outlying, and sparsely peopled districts, where discouragements were greatest and the struggle to "maintain ordinances" was most severe. His visits helped to lift the burden from many a weary back, and never failed to leave happy and inspiring memories behind them. Among these summer engagements he always kept a place for his old congregation at Berwick, which he regularly visited ...
— Principal Cairns • John Cairns

... the song of the Highest Concourse, and by the melody of Abha's Kingdom lift ye up the ...
— The Reconciliation of Races and Religions • Thomas Kelly Cheyne

... appearance. The birds remained together in a more or less compact flock. They uttered a loud, clear chirp that was almost musical, and also piped a quaint trill that was almost as low and harsh as that of the little clay-colored sparrow, although occasionally one would lift his voice to a much higher pitch. What were these tenants of the dry and piney mountain side? They were pine siskins, which I had ample opportunity to study in my rambles among the ...
— Birds of the Rockies • Leander Sylvester Keyser

... pleasing England, he was confident she would, and that we should all be very happy under her." Such is the miniature of the queen which Burnet offers; we see nothing but her tranquillity, her simplicity, and her carelessness, amidst the important transactions passing under her eye; but I lift the curtain from a larger picture. The distracted state amidst which the queen lived, the vexations, the secret sorrows, the agonies and the despair of Mary in the absence of William, nowhere appear in history! and as we see, escaped the ken of the Scotch bishop! They were reserved for the curiosity ...
— Curiosities of Literature, Vol. 3 (of 3) • Isaac D'Israeli

... a waiter who put his thumb into things, was given up to the stifled laughter of the girl and boys, and to conversation between the other two guests, who were properly arch because of the occasion, but disappointed in their dinner, and anxious to shake their heads and lift shocked hands as soon as they could get out of their ...
— The Vehement Flame • Margaret Wade Campbell Deland

... there was much room given to the inhabitants of the Old World; an asylum was prepared for the persecuted of all nations to fly to for safety, and a grand theater was erected where Liberty might safely lift up her standard, and triumph over all the foes of freedom. America may be called the very birthplace of civil and religious liberty, which had never been known to mankind until since the discovery ...
— Christopher Columbus and His Monument Columbia • Various

... look down from. I wonder you did not observe them as you came. They say it had a silver bell in the days of its glory, which now lies in a deep hole under the basin, half-way between the top and bottom of the fall. But the old man says that nothing will make him look, or let anyone else lift the huge stone; for he is much better pleased to believe that it may be there, than he would be to know it was not there; for certainly, if it were found, it would not be left ...
— The Seaboard Parish Vol. 2 • George MacDonald

... clearly sublimed, that no Faeces remain after its sublimation, pound both together to a Powder, put them speedily into a pot, and stop it close immediately, or else it will run out; for so soon as the Tartar and Salt Armoniac come to the Vinegar, they lift themselves up, and would immediately run out of the mouth of the pot, wherefore stop the pot presently, set the pot in a Vessel of Water, they will cool speedily, otherwise if the cold and hot Matter should come together suddenly, they would contest ...
— Of Natural and Supernatural Things • Basilius Valentinus

... subconsciousI mean present to us in such a way that our consciousness, to become aware of it, need not go outside itself nor add anything foreign: to perceive clearly all that it contains, or rather all that it is, it has only to put aside an obstacle, to lift a veil."[3]* ...
— The Misuse of Mind • Karin Stephen

... core a dozen of the apples without dividing them, and stew them very gently in a lined saucepan with 1/2 lb. of sugar and 1/2 pint of water, and when tender, lift them carefully on to a dish. Have ready the remainder of the apples pared, cored, and cut into thin slices; put them into the same syrup with the lemon-peel, and boil gently until they are reduced to a marmalade: ...
— The Book of Household Management • Mrs. Isabella Beeton

... partner and stands opposite to her, so that two long lines are formed. Each couple holds a handkerchief between them, as high as they can lift their arms, so as to form an arch. The couple standing at the top of the lines run through the arch without letting go their handkerchief, and station themselves at the bottom of the lines, raising their handkerchief again so as to continue the arch. This is ...
— Games For All Occasions • Mary E. Blain

... or guilty, try to procure his release, or leave him to serve out his term. We should be much surprised if any parson in the three kingdoms would do any more Some of them, we believe, would see him condemned (new version) before they would lift a finger or spend sixpence ...
— Arrows of Freethought • George W. Foote

... oppress the weak therewith, yet it seems reasonable enough in my Opinion that the poor Man should remind him of that in Hosea, And the Knowledge of God more than burnt Offerings. No Man can be said to keep the Law of God, but he that keeps it according to the Mind of God. The Jews could lift up an Ass upon the Sabbath that was fallen into a Pit, and yet calumniated our Saviour for preserving a Man upon that Day. This was a preposterous Judgment, and not according to the Knowledge of God; for they did not consider that these Things were made for Man, and not Man for them. But I should ...
— Colloquies of Erasmus, Volume I. • Erasmus

... not know what she was doing, she caught the dispatch from his hand, and tore it open. "Well," she said, "I knew it. He hasn't been there; now I shall go to Wellwater." She crumpled the telegram nervously in her hand, and made a motion to lift ...
— The Quality of Mercy • W. D. Howells

... their solemn symbolism, Prettiness of gentle slope, wealth, and splendor of hue, are not wanting, but they shine with veiled light. Mountains come down to meet the Great River. The mists of the night lift slowly away, and we are brought suddenly into the presence-chamber. One by one they stand out in all their rugged might, only softened here and there by fleecy clouds still clinging to their sides, and shining pink in the ruddy dawn. Bold bluffs that ...
— Choice Specimens of American Literature, And Literary Reader - Being Selections from the Chief American Writers • Benj. N. Martin

... sight, and the thought which his interpretation and words suggested, I marveled at his sullenness, for Blackana did not so much as lift his head to see ...
— Mr. World and Miss Church-Member • W. S. Harris

... as he walked away, thundering out the rollicking air of the "Soldier's Chorus", its naive exultance of victory, it seemed to Hollister, expressing well her mood,—a victory that might mean for him an abyss of sorrow and loneliness out of which he might never lift himself. ...
— The Hidden Places • Bertrand W. Sinclair

... he called to the gendarmes, who ran up, gesticulating violently. "Are we? Good! Hold those horses, if you please, gentlemen. There's a wounded man here. Carry him to one of those houses. Marche, lift him, if you can. Hello! his arm is broken at the wrist. Go easy—you, ...
— Lorraine - A romance • Robert W. Chambers

... steering she was sheering and yawing all over the place; whilst for ourselves, our canvas was trimmed with the utmost nicety; and we had a man at the wheel who never for a single instant removed his glance from the weather-leach of our main-topgallant—sail, which was kept the merest trifle a-lift—just sufficiently so, and no more, to show that the frigate was looking up as high as it was possible for her to go, whilst the remainder of her canvas was clean full and dragging her along at race-horse ...
— The Rover's Secret - A Tale of the Pirate Cays and Lagoons of Cuba • Harry Collingwood

... stared at the minister's lifted hand, not because he was overawed, simply because never before in the whole of his twenty-four years had any one dared lift voice to him in a tone of command or reproof. He could not believe his ears, and his anger rose hotly. He opened his mouth to tell this insignificant person who he was and where to get off, and a few other common arguments of gentlemen of his class, but the minister had a surprising ...
— The City of Fire • Grace Livingston Hill

... they never laughed before, nor have laughed since. We used at first to lose him at a quarter to twelve each night, as he had to get to the Charing Cross Hotel, where he lived on the fourth storey, before the lift had gone up for the last time. But later in the Session we managed to keep him till 1.15, for he made the brilliant discovery that the luggage lift, which just suited him, was available ...
— The Life of the Rt. Hon. Sir Charles W. Dilke V1 • Stephen Gwynn

... principle of construction is the same in all, the details varying somewhat with different makers. Injector kiers consist of a hollow, upright iron cylinder made of plates riveted together; the top is made to lift off, but can be fastened down tightly by means of bolts and nuts as shown in the drawing. From the bottom, and placed centrally, rises a pipe, known as the puffer pipe; this terminates at the top ...
— The Dyeing of Cotton Fabrics - A Practical Handbook for the Dyer and Student • Franklin Beech

... Goldthwaite came in. His eyes travelled straight to the Strongs' pew, and Lucy thought she saw a kindly gleam of recognition in his eyes. Carrie was at the harmonium. She, too, looked once or twice in their direction; and both children found her face so sweet and pleasant that they could not lift their eyes off it. The chapel was full, and the singing of the hymn was so hearty and so sweet, that Lucy felt her eyes dim, she could not tell why. But it seemed to remind her ...
— Thankful Rest • Annie S. Swan

... made no further efforts to get rid of me, but sat still watching the unlading with a gravity which gave me a vague uneasiness. I began to have a feeling that here was more than appeared on the surface, and my suspicion grew as I watched the sailors lift those boxes which were supposed to contain Mistress Mary's finery. In the first place there were enough of them to contain the wardrobe of a lady in waiting, in the second place they were of curious shape for such purposes, ...
— The Heart's Highway - A Romance of Virginia in the Seventeeth Century • Mary E. Wilkins

... because they have a good reward for their labor. For if they fall, the one will lift up his fellow: but woe to him that is alone when he falleth; for he hath not another to help him up. And if one prevail against him, two shall withstand him; and a threefold cord is ...
— Friendship • Hugh Black

... may be added a few bread crumbs if not sufficiently firm) into little sausages, dip them into the batter, lift out with a spoon and drop into boiling oil. When they have turned a golden brown lift them out on ...
— New Vegetarian Dishes • Mrs. Bowdich

... water, and keep on after the boys themselves were tired. He was so fond of hunting, anyway, that the sight of a gun would drive him about crazy; he would lick the barrel all over, and wag his tail so hard that it would lift his hind-legs ...
— A Boy's Town • W. D. Howells

... domains, Witig was obliged to enter Hermanric's service and become his man. And though Hermanric promoted him to great honour and made him a count, this was but a poor amends for the necessity which, as you shall soon hear, lay upon Witig, to lift up his sword ...
— Theodoric the Goth - Barbarian Champion of Civilisation • Thomas Hodgkin

... dinner. So nobody had to go to Sunday School, and I could keep out of it by not goin' home in time. A thought came to me and I said to Mitch, "You never saw my grandpa's farm—we can walk out there before noon and have dinner, and maybe get a lift on the way. And maybe grandpa or some one will drive us in in the morning in time for school." Mitch was crazy to go and see the farm; so we struck out, down through the town, under the trestle bridge, up the hill, past Bucky Gum's big brick house, past the fair grounds and along the straight ...
— Mitch Miller • Edgar Lee Masters

... trees something silver-bright. She watched it rise slowly from behind the trees, now hidden, now white through rifts in the foliage, until it soared lovely and grand above the black horizon. The ebony shadows of night seemed to lift, as might a sable mantle moved by invisible hands. But dark shadows, safe from the moon-rays, lay under the trees, and a pale, misty vapor hung below the brow ...
— The Last Trail • Zane Grey

... bigotry, these vast regions of the South were hardly visible above the horizon. But in our day there has been, as it were, a new creation. The southern hemisphere emerges from the sea. Its lofty mountains begin to lift themselves into the light of heaven; its broad and fertile plains stretch out, in beauty, to the eye of civilized man, and at the mighty bidding of the voice of political liberty the ...
— The Great Speeches and Orations of Daniel Webster • Daniel Webster

... Should foemen lift their haughty hand, And dare invade us where we stand, Fast by the altars of our land We'll gather every one; And he shall ring the loud alarm, To call the multitudes to arm, From distant field and forest brown, And teeming alleys of ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine - April 1843 • Various

... cage over her head, chirped vigorously by way of consolation, but Phronsie did not lift her head. Cherry seeing all his efforts in vain, stopped his song and rolled one black eye down at her in astonishment, and soon became ...
— Five Little Peppers Midway • Margaret Sidney

... present bait to your deceitful lusts, and amity to God, your only lawful Husband! Affection is a transforming and conforming thing, Si terram amas terra es,(187) the love of God will purify thy heart, and lift it up to more similitude to him whom thou lovest, but the love of the world assimilates it unto the world, makes it such a base and ignoble piece, as the earth is. Do you think marriage affection can be parted? "My well beloved is mine," therefore the church is the ...
— The Works of the Rev. Hugh Binning • Hugh Binning

... attributed. The achievement was hailed with great satisfaction, and it somewhat raised the drooping spirits of the patriots after their severe losses at Grave and Venlo. "This victory hath happened in good time," wrote Thomas Cecil to his father, "and hath made us somewhat to lift up our heads." A garrison of eight hundred, under Colonel Pyron, was left in Axel, and the dykes around were then pierced. Upwards of two millions' worth of property in grass, cattle, corn, was thus immediately destroyed in the territory of ...
— The Rise of the Dutch Republic, 1555-1566 • John Lothrop Motley

... insist upon taking us to Mabille, the Closerie des Lilas, and the Chateaurouge, where he would indulge in the maddest pranks and antics, and somehow lead us to join in the wildest dances, and make us lift our legs as high as the highest lifter among ...
— A Stable for Nightmares - or Weird Tales • J. Sheridan Le Fanu

... dense red fog that lay so thick about her, frightened her when Hugh was not there to keep her mind busy with his talk to paint pictures for her, to command her with his magnetic presence. She stood still and strained her eyes. She must see again. If she tried hard, the red fog would surely lift. Happiness, and her new love, they would be strong enough to dispel the mist. There—already it was a shade lighter! She almost thought that she could make out the brightness of the fire. She went toward ...
— Snow-Blind • Katharine Newlin Burt

... mass. Thus to make the acquaintance of that grandest and most astonishing of old cathedrals, is to do so under the best and most suitable conditions: very different from the guide and cicerone business, which belongs to later hours of the day. I stand in the open place, under its shadow, and lift my eyes with wonder to the amazing and crowded cluster of spires and towers: its antique air, and even look of shattered dilapidation showing that the restorer has not been at his work. There was no smugness or trimness, or spick-and-spanness, but an awful and reverent austerity. ...
— A Day's Tour • Percy Fitzgerald

... exceed it," replied Solomon Eagle. "Lift a finger against either of these young persons, and I will reveal all. Yes," he continued, menacingly, "I will disclose such dreadful things against you, that you will assuredly be adjudged to a gibbet higher than the highest ...
— Old Saint Paul's - A Tale of the Plague and the Fire • William Harrison Ainsworth

... terminating the grand drama of Providence with universal felicity. We are not unmindful of the prophetic language of Isaiah, (49:22, 23,) together with a sublime passage from the book of the Revelation, (11:15,) with which the canon of Scripture concludes—"Thus saith the Lord God, Behold, I will lift up mine hand to the Gentiles, and set up my standard to the people. And kings shall be thy nursing fathers, and their queens thy nursing mothers, [they shall become good themselves, and be the protectors of religion and liberty,] and thou shalt know that I am the Lord, for they ...
— The Book of Religions • John Hayward

... from what I see of you,' said Lord Colambre, smiling, 'that you, Larry, would have offered an informer a lift.' ...
— The Absentee • Maria Edgeworth

... women giving the high and unpurchasable gift of service to the state; giving the fine example of self-sacrificing and simple living; giving the prowess won by years of hard mental and moral training; giving the gentle courtesy and kindly welcome of the patrician to the stranger, who lift a nation or a city to a worthy place in the world. Seek not for Germany's strength first in her fleet, her army, her hordes of workers, nay, not even in her philosophers, teachers, and musicians, though they glisten in the eyes ...
— Germany and the Germans - From an American Point of View (1913) • Price Collier

... the story of my Wonder-Woman—how a King, loving his Queen with all his soul, bowed himself in ecstasy, and 'took the dust off her feet' in presence of other wives who, from jealousy, cried: 'Shameless one, lift up the hands of the King to your head.' But the Queen stood erect, smiling gladly. 'Not so: for both feet and head are my Lord's. Can I have aught ...
— Far to Seek - A Romance of England and India • Maud Diver

... The feeble, uncertain light flickered upon the countenance, distinct in its mortal paleness, of her parent: the eyes recognized her, and a glance of infinite tenderness gleamed for an instant in the rapidly-darkening orbs: the right arm essayed to lift itself, as for one fast, last embrace. Vainly! Love, love only, was strong, stronger than death, in the expiring mother's heart, and the arm fell feebly back on the bedclothes. Mary Woodley bent down ...
— The Experiences of a Barrister, and Confessions of an Attorney • Samuel Warren

... a shy, shrinking creature, fearing to lift her eyes to a paleface's, but now they were raised clear ...
— The Spirit of the Border - A Romance of the Early Settlers in the Ohio Valley • Zane Grey

... the starns in a frosty night glancing, Whan a' the lift round them is cloudless an' blue; I looked again, an' my heart fell a-dancing, When I wad hae spoken, she glamour'd my mou'. O wae to her cantrips! for dumpish I wander, At kirk or at market there 's nought to be seen; For she dances afore ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volume II. - The Songs of Scotland of the past half century • Various

... sight of Barney at the bottom of the lawn sweeping leaves into a heap for his son to lift them between two boards into the ...
— Syd Belton - The Boy who would not go to Sea • George Manville Fenn

... up. The commercial lift fell behind them, and with it most of the crashing and booming. Soon they emerged on an observation platform, suspended on the side of the Tube, the vast tunnel leading to the surface, not more than half ...
— The Defenders • Philip K. Dick

... with its deepest and stillest hours. She lay listening to the drops of rain, that came down in monotonous succession, unswayed by a breath of wind; and a nervous impulse continually caused her to lift her head from the pillow, and gaze into Mary's chamber and the intermediate apartment. The cold light of the lamp threw the shadows of the furniture up against the wall, stamping them immovably there, except when they were shaken by a sudden flicker of the flame. Two vacant ...
— The Wives of The Dead - (From: "The Snow Image and Other Twice-Told Tales") • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... his foot to struggle But he could no longer lift it; Then he tried to lift the other, But as shod with ...
— Kalevala, Volume I (of 2) - The Land of the Heroes • Anonymous

... pointing, in the confusion and dusk of that shed, to a forgotten pole; ropes, anchors, harpoons, a blubber dipper of copper, green with years, a steering wheel, a tool chest with the vessel's name upon the top, the Asia: a whole curiosity-shop of sea curios, gross and solid, heavy to lift, ill to break, bound with brass and shod with iron. Two wrecks at the least must have contributed to this random heap of lumber; and as Herrick looked upon it, it seemed to him as if the two ships' companies were there on guard, ...
— The Ebb-Tide - A Trio And Quartette • Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne

... Shouter," he said, "and bind him. Lift the old woman on her mattress, and carry her. If she dies on the road we ...
— The Ghost Kings • H. Rider Haggard

... to scare us when we thought about it. Old Man Moccasin was seven feet long, and I judge about a half a foot thick. He could lift himself two feet out of the water when he was swimming, and with his far-sighted glasses on could see a mile. Mr. Eagle was fully twice as big as any of the Eagle family I know of nowadays, and didn't need any glasses to see an ...
— Hollow Tree Nights and Days • Albert Bigelow Paine

... over everything in a hurry. 'I did not think of the smocks,' she say. 'But they must be here. Everything was unpack in this room.' She lift all up, piece by piece. The girls help and so do I. La Tulita sit still but begin to look more interested. We ...
— The Splendid Idle Forties - Stories of Old California • Gertrude Atherton

... thought her different, had admired that difference, and to Miss Le Pettit, as supreme arbiter, her heart turned now. There was still that doorway to her future whose latch the fair Flora's hand could lift, and this door, ajar for her, would open wide if she were but fitly garbed to pass ...
— The White Riband - A Young Female's Folly • Fryniwyd Tennyson Jesse

... when Desmond came to himself in his old bunk on board the Hormuzzeer. He was alone. Lying on his back, feebly trying to adjust his thoughts to his surroundings, he heard the faint boom of guns. What was happening? He tried to rise, but all power was gone from him; he could hardly lift an arm. Even the slight effort was too much for ...
— In Clive's Command - A Story of the Fight for India • Herbert Strang

... rode away, he was conscious that as soon as his back was turned Eric's arm would again be about Beulah, and Beulah's head would be on Eric's shoulder. And that he would lift her over the threshold as ...
— Mistress Anne • Temple Bailey

... discipline: Then spake a priest, "Brother, thy will is good, Yet rude thou art of learning as a beast; Fare thee to great Germanus of Auxerres, Who lightens half the West!" I heard, and went, And to that Saint was subject fourteen years. He from my mind removed the veil; "Lift up," He said, "thine eyes!" and like a mountain land The Queenly Science stood before me plain, From rocky buttress up to peak of snow: The great Commandments first, Edicts, and Laws That bastion up man's life: ...
— The Legends of Saint Patrick • Aubrey de Vere

... patent medicines through the side of the packing-case, to discover there was a better way in than by the lid. Our cases packed themselves, practically; had only to be put into position on a little wheeled tray and when full pulled to the lift that dropped them to the men downstairs, who padded up the free space and nailed on top and side. Our girls, moreover, packed with corrugated paper and matchbook-wood box partitions when everybody else was using expensive young ...
— Tono Bungay • H. G. Wells

... and smote thee silent at his warning, Change and darkness fell on men that fell from thee; Dark thou satest, veiled with light, behind the morning, Till the soul of man should lift up eyes and see. Till the blind mute soul get speech again and eyesight, Man may worship not the light of life within; In his sight the stars whose fires grow dark in thy sight Shine as sunbeams on the night of death ...
— Poems & Ballads (Second Series) - Swinburne's Poems Volume III • Algernon Charles Swinburne

... crash, some girls catch hold of me and cry, others make most awful screamings, and because the boat is fast filling with water all try quickly to climb upon the rocks, only I am left in Boat at last, and am much too afraid to move. Suddenly one Coolie lift me by arm and throw me over on rocks with sacks of rice ...
— Seven Maids of Far Cathay • Bing Ding, Ed.

... commotion and hubbub. I alone stood still, leaning against the side scene, overwhelmed by what had happened, not understanding and not knowing what to do. I saw them lift her up and lead her away. I saw Anyuta Blagovo come up to me; I had not seen her in the room before, and she seemed to have sprung out of the earth. She was wearing her hat and veil, and, as always, had an air of having come only ...
— The Chorus Girl and Other Stories • Anton Chekhov

... flats two minutes before the clock struck half-past seven, Carrissima went up to the second floor in the lift, pressed the bell button and was at once admitted by Jimmy's man. A tall parlour-maid met her in the hall, and took her to a bedroom, where Carrissima removed ...
— Enter Bridget • Thomas Cobb

... give you a lift if you are going down-town?" she said quickly, for Ridgway, having detached himself from the group, was working toward her, and she felt an instinctive sympathy for the man who had lost. Furthermore, she had something ...
— Ridgway of Montana - (Story of To-Day, in Which the Hero Is Also the Villain) • William MacLeod Raine

... my Satan—see how I tremble. Strength is departed from me. Youth is dead. Help thy faithful servant, aid him to lift up ...
— The Black Douglas • S. R. Crockett

... America, the problem is plain before you. Here is a race transplanted through the criminal foolishness of your fathers. Whether you like it or not the millions are here, and here they will remain. If you do not lift them up, they will pull you down. Education and work are the levers to uplift a people. Work alone will not do it unless inspired by the right ideals and guided by intelligence. Education must not simply teach work—it must teach Life. The Talented Tenth of the Negro race must be made ...
— The Negro Problem • Booker T. Washington, et al.

... not a doubt that your extraordinary voice will lift you to the highest pinnacle of musical celebrity; and, because your career on the stage promises to prove so brilliant, I shudder in anticipating the temptations that will ...
— Vashti - or, Until Death Us Do Part • Augusta J. Evans Wilson

... melodies, many of them, that had come over from France with his ancestor, and been sung down through the generations since. And with these she played soft, tender airs,—I never knew what they were, but they could wile the heart out of one's breast. I sometimes would lift my head from my pillow, and look through the open door at the warm, light kitchen beyond (for my mother Marie could not bear to shut me into the cold, dark little bedroom; my door stood open all night, and if I woke in the night, the coals would always wink me a friendly greeting, and I could ...
— Rosin the Beau • Laura Elizabeth Howe Richards

... to a second fruit-tree, to which a multitude were in vain lifting up their hands, just as children lift them to a man who tantalises them with shewing something which he withholds; but a voice out of a thicket by the road-side warned the travellers not to stop, telling them that the tree was an offset from that of which Eve tasted. "Call to mind," said ...
— Stories from the Italian Poets: With Lives of the Writers, Volume 1 • Leigh Hunt

... be a coward with my lips Who dare to question all things in my soul; Some men may find their wisdom on their knees, Some prone and grovelling in the dust like slaves; Let the meek glow-worm glisten in the dew; I ask to lift my taper to the sky As they who hold their lamps above their heads, Trusting the larger currents up aloft, Rather than crossing eddies round their breast, Threatening with every puff ...
— The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (The Physician and Poet not the Jurist)

... orders. "Withdraw ships' crews from lines and prepare to lift. Get wounded aboard transports and prepare to evacuate troops. Set up fire control network ...
— Tulan • Carroll Mather Capps

... possession of my boat, and at once availed myself of the local information in regard to the chances of a passage through Bayou Manchac, which was only fifteen miles below the town. Each told a different story. One gentleman said, "You will have to get four niggers to lift your boat over the levee of Mr. Walker's plantation, and put it into Bayou Manchac, which is about one hundred yards from the banks of the Mississippi. Its mouth was filled up a long time ago, but when once in the bayou you can ...
— Four Months in a Sneak-Box • Nathaniel H. Bishop

... engaged in destroying the railroad, and saw the well which my negro informant had seen "burnt." It was a square pit about twenty-five feet deep, boarded up, with wooden steps leading to the bottom, wherein was a fine copper pump, to lift the water to a tank above. The soldiers had broken up the pump, heaved in the steps and lining, and set fire to the mass of lumber in the bottom of the well, which ...
— Memoirs of Three Civil War Generals, Complete • U. S. Grant, W. T. Sherman, P. H. Sheridan

... those who ask an alms, is, Where is your badge? I have in several years met with about a dozen who were ready to produce them, some out of their pockets, others from under their coat, and two or three on their shoulders, only covered with a sort of capes which they could lift up or let down upon occasion. They are too lazy to work, they are not afraid to steal, nor ashamed to beg; and yet are too proud to be seen with a badge, as many of them have confessed to me, and not a few in very injurious terms, particularly the females. They all look ...
— The Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, D.D., Vol. VII - Historical and Political Tracts—Irish • Jonathan Swift

... been a failure." Both the politicians and the preacher had failed to lift the masses. "It is a time for a wiser statesmanship and a more certain means of grace." He admitted that there had been recent progress in North Carolina, owing largely to the work of McIver and Alderman, but taxes for educational purposes were still low. What was the solution? ...
— The Life and Letters of Walter H. Page, Volume I • Burton J. Hendrick

... must nedes be confessed (saith Plato) That [Geometrie] is learned, for the knowyng of that, which is euer: and not of that, which, in tyme, both is bred and is brought to an ende. &c. Geometrie is the knowledge of that which is euerlastyng. It will lift vp therfore (O Gentle Syr) our mynde to the Veritie: and by that meanes, it will prepare the Thought, to the Philosophicall loue of wisdome: that we may turne or conuert, toward heauenly thinges [both ...
— The Mathematicall Praeface to Elements of Geometrie of Euclid of Megara • John Dee

... cautiousness on his face, which for the moment made me think that perhaps he was looking a trifle older than when I last saw him; but all this was scattered to the winds when I met him an hour afterward swinging up Wall Street with that cheery lift of the heels so peculiarly his own, a lift that the occupants of every office window on both sides of the street knew to be Peter's even when they failed to recognize the surtout and straight-brimmed high hat. Had ...
— Peter - A Novel of Which He is Not the Hero • F. Hopkinson Smith

... cleared the fence and was running toward Norton. Two men from the judge's stand were ahead of us, but except for them we were the first to reach him. The men were tearing frantically at the tangled framework, trying to lift it off Norton, who lay pale and motionless, pinned under it. The machine was not so badly damaged, after all, but that together we could lift it ...
— The Silent Bullet • Arthur B. Reeve

... Lift up your heads heed not the words of scorning, From those whose earnest life is not begun, Blessed are they who on the judgment morning Hear from the Master, ...
— Verses and Rhymes by the way • Nora Pembroke

... could not do better for these distinguished guests who do him so much honor by coming, and how this is the first time the city has ever honored a foreign scholar by this kind of entertainment. Then Papa does his best to make a reply, and after he sits down we lift the cover of a lovely lacquer soup bowl and lift the chop sticks. You take a drink of soup, lift a thin slippery slice of raw fish from its little dish, dip it in the sauce and put it in your mouth. To-night this first soup is a rich and rare green turtle, delicious. ...
— Letters from China and Japan • John Dewey

... vain! 'Tis time your faltering hands should disentomb us yet, And lift us on the planks, begirt with many a bayonet; Not to the palace-court, as then, that he may near us stand— No; to the tent, the market-place, and through the wakening land! Out through the broad land bear ...
— The German Classics of The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Vol. VII. • Various

... flats, with a restaurant attached. The restaurant is little more than a kitchen from whence meals are served to residents in their rooms. Frank's suite was on the third floor, and Mr. Mann, paying his cabman, hurried into the hall, stepped into the automatic lift, pressed the button, and was deposited at Frank's door. He knocked with a sickening sense of apprehension that there would be no answer. To his delight and amazement, he heard Frank's firm step in the tiny hall of his flat, and the door was opened. Frank ...
— The Man Who Knew • Edgar Wallace

... he got the curt reply to his note, threw away his cigar, put on his hat, took the lift, passed through the long corridor, ...
— A Woman Intervenes • Robert Barr

... woods, and wild boars have occasionally been seen. The Senoritas Y——, when children, two or three years ago, wandering among these mountain-paths, saw an immense rattlesnake coiled up, and tempted by its gaudy colours, were about to lift it, when it suddenly wakened from its slumber, uncoiled itself, and swiftly glided up the path before them, its rattles sounding all the ...
— Life in Mexico • Frances Calderon De La Barca

... who had nursed with such devotion her husband and her child. For a whole long week Olive wandered about the shut-up house, the formal solemnities of death, now known for the first time, falling heavily on her young heart. Alas! that there was no one to lift it beyond the terrors of the grave to the ...
— Olive - A Novel • Dinah Maria Craik, (AKA Dinah Maria Mulock)

... then at the other, perplexedly. Then she understood. Like lightning, a terrible temptation flashed into her mind. The Italian loved her, would shield, protect, honor her. Norman must hate her, would always despise her. Should she lift her little weak woman's hand and place it in the man's hand ready to claim it, or stand still and be crushed by that ...
— Mae Madden • Mary Murdoch Mason

... one finds in the words of the naive Ingersoll the squeaking timber of the soapbox, yet even a soapbox does lift a man a few inches above ...
— Mince Pie • Christopher Darlington Morley

... very swiftly, and, in a few minutes, were at the edge of the inlet, where the boat lay, just in time to see Paul pick up the old schoolmaster, who had fallen with exhaustion, and lift him into the boat. The three sprang ...
— The Border Watch - A Story of the Great Chief's Last Stand • Joseph A. Altsheler



Words linked to "Lift" :   loom, skyrocket, rising, kick up, go, jack, operate on, lift off, rescind, abstract, transferral, plastic surgery, let out, steal, remove, travel, lift up, snarf, boost, transportation, bed, swipe, raising, facelift, moving ridge, trice, countermand, surge, lower, raise, face lift, building, sneak, underlay, purloin, ascent, face lifting, lift out, strike down, transport, amend, ski tow, dignify, heel, chin up, heft, shoulder, ski lift, food elevator, scalp, meliorate, reconstructive surgery, withdraw, move up, look, pinch, levitate, wave, bubble, pay off, help, get up, rise, rhytidectomy, end, leaven, propulsion, ride, ascension, trice up, chandelle, appear, heave, lift bridge, seem, elevation, rocket, renege on, terminate, rustle, fork, Alpine lift, assistance, hoist, let loose, offence, transfer, run up, ascend, send for, wind, nip and tuck, drive, cabbage, pump, elevator, chairlift, filch, hike up, locomote, rope tow, anaplasty, skid, overturn, dig out, repeal, heighten, cosmetic surgery, aid, soar, law-breaking, hike, bring up, go back on, paternoster, displace, come up, liquidate, tower, rear, crib, cancel, pick up, layer, operate, elevator car, aerodynamic force, uprise, better, heave up, buckle, assist, face-lift, alter, rhinoplasty, car, plagiarize, warp, nose job, renege, ground effect, emit, change, criminal offence, call, aerodynamic lift, pitchfork, climb up, take away, move, lifting device, gather up, renegue on, dumbwaiter, exalt, hulk, annul, criminal offense, jack up, freight elevator, weight-lift, revoke, top lift, arise, ameliorate, airlift, pilfer, utter, fly, pinnacle, prove, steam, plagiarise, chair lift, edifice, reverse, vacate, offense, predominate, nobble, chin, service elevator, crime, uplift, mount, rhytidoplasty, erect, climb, hook, soar upwards, elevate, zoom, go up, fall, actuation, device, soar up



Copyright © 2019 Free-Translator.com