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Lea   Listen
noun
Lea  n.  (Textile Manuf.)
(a)
A measure of yarn; for linen, 300 yards; for cotton, 120 yards; a lay.
(b)
A set of warp threads carried by a loop of the heddle.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Lea" Quotes from Famous Books



... there on the sea to float! Through mist and shade and stormy weather, That night we went to the icy Pole, And there on the rocks we stood together, And saw the ocean before us roll. No moon shone down on the hermit sea, No cheering beacon illumed the shore, No ship on the water, no light on the lea, No sound in the ear but the billow's roar! But the wave was bright, as if lit with pearls, And fearful things on its bosom played; Huge crakens circled in foamy whirls, As if the deep for their sport was made, And mighty whales through the crystal dashed, ...
— Poems • Sam G. Goodrich

... with sultry hum When all the world with heat lies dumb, Thou dronest through the drowsed lea, To lose ...
— The Poems of William Watson • William Watson

... her mantle green On every blooming tree, And spreads her sheets c' daisies white Out o'er the grassy lea; Now Phoebus cheers the crystal streams, And glads the azure skies; But nought can glad the weary wight That ...
— Language of Flowers • Kate Greenaway

... going to help run the thing, and Rena Jackson and Lea Adams are in it—and Annie Pilgreen. Her and Happy are down on the program for 'Under the Mistletoe', a tableau—the red fire, ...
— The Lonesome Trail and Other Stories • B. M. Bower

... and Mr. Polly stopped him neatly, as it were a miracle, with the head of the broom across his chest. Uncle Jim seized the broom with both hands. "Lea-go!" he said, and tugged. Mr. Polly shook his head, tugged, and showed pale, compressed lips. Both tugged. Then Uncle Jim tried to get round the end of the broom; Mr. Polly circled away. They began to circle about one another, both tugging hard, both intensely watchful of the slightest ...
— The History of Mr. Polly • H. G. Wells

... applied to the King, whom he did not recognize, for a punishment. Thereupon King Richard arose, rolled up his sleeve, and gave such a blow as Robin had never felt before. It was afterwards that Sir Richard of the Lea appeared upon the scene, and disclosed the identity of the powerful stranger. Then Robin Hood, Little John, Will Scarlet, and Alan-a-Dale followed the King to London at the royal wish, and left Sherwood ...
— John and Betty's History Visit • Margaret Williamson

... earnestly discussed by the two Yorkshire farmers, Roger and Willie. If the French effect a landing, Willy has decided to send Mally and the bairns away from the farm, while he will sharpen his old "lea" (scythe) and remain behind to defend his homestead. As long as wife and children are safe, he is prepared to lay down his life for ...
— Yorkshire Dialect Poems • F.W. Moorman

... about our land-boundaries:—Up the Thames, and then up the Lea, and along the Lea to her source, then straight to Bedford, then up the Ouse to ...
— Anglo-Saxon Literature • John Earle

... acres set apart for their use on the different sides of the Forest, as follows:—On the side next Lydney and Awre, 550 acres; towards Ruerdean and Lydbrook, 350 acres; near to St. Briavel's, 500 acres; towards Little Dean, Flaxley, Abenhall, and Mitcheldean, and the Lea, 876 acres; in Abbot's Wood, 76 acres; on the side nearest to Newland and the villages of Breme, Clearwell, and Coleford, 900 acres; towards Newland, 174 acres; next to Bicknor, 350 acres; and towards Rodley and Northwood, 100 acres. The Lea Bailey, containing ...
— The Forest of Dean - An Historical and Descriptive Account • H. G. Nicholls

... from the fire, but facing it. Above and directly before my eyes was a full-rigged ship, sailing among furious painted billows directly against the lofty cliffs of a lea-shore, the captain on the bridge regarding this manoeuvre with the utmost complaisance. Beneath was a china shepherdess without the head—opposite a parrot with a bunch of waxen cherries in ...
— The Dew of Their Youth • S. R. Crockett

... call him! call him over the lea, Thou sad forsaken lass, Never more he'll come back to thee Over the wild ...
— Tales from Many Sources - Vol. V • Various

... house on the Lea, about three miles north of Hatfield. Its construction was begun by Sir Matthew Lamb, and completed by his son, Sir Peniston, the first ...
— The Letters of Queen Victoria, Volume 1 (of 3), 1837-1843) • Queen Victoria

... goodly now the noon-tide hour, When from his high meridian tower The sun looks down in majesty, What time about, the grassy lea. The goat's-beard, prompt his rise to hail, With broad expanded disk, in veil Close mantling wraps its yellow head, And goes, as peasants ...
— The Folk-lore of Plants • T. F. Thiselton-Dyer

... are green on the Linden tree, And flowers are bursting on the lea; There is the daisy, so prim and white, With its golden eye and its fringes bright; And here is the golden buttercup, Like a miser's chest with the gold heap'd up; And the stitchwort with its pearly star, Seen on the hedgebank from afar; ...
— Country Walks of a Naturalist with His Children • W. Houghton

... your ideas of songs and ballads. I own that your criticisms are just; the songs you specify in your list have, all but one, the faults you remark in them; but how shall we mend the matter? Who shall rise up and say—Go to, I will make a better? For instance, on reading over "The Lea-rig," I immediately set about trying my hand on it, and, after all, I could make nothing more of it than the following, which, Heaven knows, ...
— The Letters of Robert Burns • Robert Burns

... dusty amphoras where I had stored The drippings of the winepress of my days. I think these eyes foresee, Now in their unawakened virgin time, Their mother's pride in me, And dream even now, unconsciously, Upon each soaring peak and sky-hung lea You pictured I should climb. Broken premonitions come, Shapes, gestures visionary, Not as once to maiden Mary The manifest angel with fresh lilies came Intelligibly calling her by name; But vanishingly, dumb, Thwarted and bright and wild, As heralding ...
— Gloucester Moors and Other Poems • William Vaughn Moody

... were where Helen lies; Night and day on me she cries: Oh, that I were where Helen lies, On fair Kirkconnel lea! ...
— Wilson's Tales of the Borders and of Scotland Volume 17 • Alexander Leighton

... hill and lea Merrily Rushed a mad-cap breeze at play, And the daisies, like the bright Stars at night, Danced and ...
— Pepper & Salt - or, Seasoning for Young Folk • Howard Pyle

... Soon night Drew his murky curtains round The world, while a star of lustre bright Peep'd from the blue profound. Yet what cared we for darkening lea, Or warning bell remote? With rush and cry we scudded by, And seized the bliss ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine - Volume 55, No. 343, May 1844 • Various

... the fire: Now abroad, by many a light, Empty seats there are to-night— Empty seats that none may fill, For the storm grows louder still: How it surges and swells through the gorges and dells, Under the ledges and over the lea, Where a watery sound goeth moaning around— God ...
— The Poems of Henry Kendall • Henry Kendall

... be A Pagan suckled in a creed outworn; So might I, standing on this pleasant lea, Have glimpses that would make me less forlorn; Have sight of Proteus rising from the sea, Or hear old Triton blow ...
— Ten Great Religions - An Essay in Comparative Theology • James Freeman Clarke

... meaned[2] her of her song; The woodwale bered[3] as a bell, That all the wood about me rong. Alone in longing thus as I lay Underneath a seemly tree, 10 Saw I where a lady gay Came riding over a longe lea. If I should sit to Doomesday With my tongue to wrable and wry[4], Certainly that lady gay 15 Never be she described for me! Her palfrey was a dapple-gray,[5] Swilk[6] one ne saw I never none; As does the sun on summer's day, That fair lady herself she shone. 20 Her saddle ...
— The Sources and Analogues of 'A Midsummer-night's Dream' • Compiled by Frank Sidgwick

... 'em," cried Esau, "just over those shallows. Just like shoals of roach in the Lea or the New River. They must ...
— To The West • George Manville Fenn

... the days waxed on to weeks, It was a pretty sight to see These lambs with frisky heads and tails Skipping and leaping on the lea, 20 Bleating in tender, trustful tones, Resting on rocky crag or mound. And following the beloved feet That once had sought ...
— Goblin Market, The Prince's Progress, and Other Poems • Christina Rossetti

... him unaware, Caught him by the collar—there Gushed the little lady's glee Like a gush of golden bells: "Picklepip, why, that is me!" Town of Dae by the sea, Grammar's for great scholars—she Loved the summer and the lea. ...
— Shapes of Clay • Ambrose Bierce

... other matters, whereof no matter—is it not enough to have seen and heard her? But commend me, (not that I need your commendation) to Madame Sainton-Dolby, inasmuch as that lady sang Handel's 'Lascia ch'o pianga,' and sang it nobly, and sang Smart's 'Lady of the Lea,' and sang Claribel's 'Maggie's Secret,' and sang it divinely. You know what M. Sainton can do with his violin, but you do not know what he cannot do with it, nor do I. Il Signor Mario put forth his powers chivalrously, and broke many hearts among the fair York roses. La Diva was dressed ...
— English Caricaturists and Graphic Humourists of the Nineteenth Century. - How they Illustrated and Interpreted their Times. • Graham Everitt

... lookit o'er his left shoulder, To see what he could see, And there he spied her seven brethren bold Come riding o'er the lea. ...
— The Book of Old English Ballads • George Wharton Edwards

... Tennessee, including the veteran annalist, Ramsey, also failed to secure the desired information. It was not until months of time had been consumed and probable sources of information had been almost completely exhausted that, through the persevering inquiries of Hon. John M. Lea, of Nashville, Tenn., in conjunction with the present writer's own investigations, the line was satisfactorily identified as being the boundary line mentioned in the Cherokee treaty of July 2, 1791, and described as extending from ...
— Cessions of Land by Indian Tribes to the United States: Illustrated by Those in the State of Indiana • C. C. Royce

... and, looking round, Plucked a blue harebell from the ground,— "For me, whose memory scarce conveys An image of more splendid days, This little flower, that loves the lea, May well my simple emblem be; It drinks heaven's dew as blithe as rose That in the King's own garden grows, And when I place it in my hair, Allan, a bard, is bound to swear He ne'er saw ...
— The Widow's Dog • Mary Russell Mitford

... nicht passed 'at they h'ardna soons 'aneth them 'at there was no mainner o' accoontin' for nor explainin', as fowks sae set upo' duin' nooadays wi' a'thing. That explainin' I canna bide: it's jist a love o' leasin', an' taks the bluid oot o' a'thing, lea'in' life as wersh an' fusionless as kail wantin' saut. Them 'at h'ard it tellt me 'at there was NO accoontin', as I tell you, for the reemish they baith h'ard—whiles douf-like dunts, an' whiles speech o' mou', beggin' an' groanin' as gien the enemy war bodily ...
— Warlock o' Glenwarlock • George MacDonald

... women not elsewhere mentioned who have been helpful to woman suffrage are Mrs. Mary T. Challenger, Lea Pusey, George B. Miller, Lewis W. Brosius, Mrs. J. R. Milligan; the Reverends Frederick A. Hinckley, Thomas P. Holloway, Adam Stengle, Alexander T. Bowser, Joel S. Gilfillan; Mrs. John F. Thomas, Congressman Thomas ...
— The History of Woman Suffrage, Volume VI • Various

... Graemes of the Netherby clan; Fosters, Fenwicks, and Musgraves, they rode and they ran; There was racing and chasing on Cannobie lea, But the lost bride of Netherby ne'er did they see. So daring in love, and so dauntless in war; Have ye e'er heard of gallant ...
— The Literary World Seventh Reader • Various

... twoscore silver pennies; and for third a silver bugle, inlaid with gold. Moreover, if the King's companies keep these prizes, the winning companies shall have, first, two tuns of Rhenish wine; second, two tuns of English beer; and, third, five of the fattest harts that run on Dallom Lea. Methinks that is a princely wager," ...
— Robin Hood • J. Walker McSpadden

... rights have crazed thee? Would'st thou be A Winter Amazon, more fierce than he? Can Summer birds thy shrew-heroics sing? Wilt tend no more the daisies on the lea, Nor wake thy cowslips up ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 101. October 24, 1891 • Various

... milkmaids, who sing to them and give them a draft of the red cow's milk, and they never cease their praises of the angler's life, of rural contentment among the cowslip meadows, and the quiet streams of Thames, or Lea, or ...
— Brief History of English and American Literature • Henry A. Beers

... our land from the sea, Its fields are all yellow with grain, Its meadows are green on the lea,— And now shall we give it to Spain? ...
— The Bow of Orange Ribbon - A Romance of New York • Amelia E. Barr

... of God! the evening fades On wave and hill and lea, And in the twilight's deepening shades We lift our souls to thee! In passion's stress—the battle's strife, The desert's lurking harms, Maid-Mother of the Lord of ...
— Pike County Ballads and Other Poems • John Hay

... Catholic bishop of my native city in America, must have been a Corkonian, for he it was, I believe, who put the cathedral of Charleston under the invocation of St. Finbar, the first bishop of Cork. The church stands charmingly amid fine trees on a southern branch of the river Lea. We visited also two fine Catholic churches, one of St. Vincent de Paul, and the other the Church of St. Peter and St. Paul, a grandly proportioned and ...
— Ireland Under Coercion (2nd ed.) (2 of 2) (1888) • William Henry Hurlbert

... in the absence of Capt. Jarrette, who had rejoined Shelby's command, I became, at 19, captain of the company. Joe Lea was first lieutenant and Lon ...
— The Story of Cole Younger, by Himself • Cole Younger

... and flower by flower Was cast upon the sunny stream; But when the shades of eve did lower, She woke up from her blissful dream. "Bring back my flowers!" she wildly cried; "Bring back the flowers I flung to thee!" But echo's voice alone replied, As danced the streamlet down the lea; And still, amid night's gloomy hours, In vain she cried, ...
— Reading Made Easy for Foreigners - Third Reader • John L. Huelshof

... send Mr. Cooper your shells. He knows more about fresh water shells than any naturalist in New York. By the way, have you seen Mr. Lea's splendid monograph (with colored plates) of Unios, in the Transactions of the American ...
— Personal Memoirs Of A Residence Of Thirty Years With The Indian Tribes On The American Frontiers • Henry Rowe Schoolcraft

... instant invasion of Yen,—a purpose which perhaps he had in view in his insult to the prince. The ruler of that state, to avert the emperor's wrath, sent him the head of Tan, whom he had ordered to execution. But as the army continued to advance, he fled into the wilds of Lea-vu-tung, abandoning his territory to the invader. In the same year the kingdom of Wei was invaded, its capital taken, and its ruler sent to ...
— Historic Tales, Vol. 12 (of 15) - The Romance of Reality • Charles Morris

... international importance was the death of Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, at the age of thirty-eight. He was the grandson of the philosopher Moses Mendelssohn, and the son of the gifted Lea Solomon-Bartholdy, from whom he received his first piano lessons. At the age of ten he joined the Singing Academy of Berlin, where a composition of his, the "Nineteenth Psalm," was performed shortly after his entry. In 1825 his father took him to Paris to consult ...
— A History of the Nineteenth Century, Year by Year - Volume Two (of Three) • Edwin Emerson

... where Helen lies, Night and day on me she cries; O that I were where Helen lies, On fair Kirkconnell lea! ...
— Lyra Heroica - A Book of Verse for Boys • Various

... wi' my last breath I lea'e my blessin wi' you baith: An' when you think upo' your mither, Mind to be kind to ...
— The Complete Works of Robert Burns: Containing his Poems, Songs, and Correspondence. • Robert Burns and Allan Cunningham

... the whale-boat for transmission to the Kearsarge. The surgeon of the Alabama, an Englishman, Mr. David Herbert Llewellyn, son of an incumbent of a Wiltshire parsonage, and godson of the late Lord Herbert of Lea, was offered a place in this boat. He refused it, saying that he would not peril the wounded men, and he sank with the Alabama. The rest of the crew, with their captain, were already in the waves. Mr. Lancaster meantime had steamed up to the Kearsarge, requesting permission to assist in saving ...
— The Cruise of the Alabama and the Sumter • Raphael Semmes

... of parting day, The lowing herd winds slowly o'er the lea, The plowman homeward plods his weary way, And leaves the world to darkness and ...
— McGuffey's Sixth Eclectic Reader • William Holmes McGuffey

... Lea in his "Studies of the Church History" says, "The Church held many slaves, and while their treatment was in general sufficiently humane to cause the number to grow by voluntary accretions, yet it had no scruple to assert vigorously their claim to ownership. ...
— The Necessity of Atheism • Dr. D.M. Brooks

... ye out to see O'er the rude, sandy lea, Where stately Jordan flows by many a palm, Or where Gennesaret's wave Delights the flowers to lave, That o'er her western slope breathe ...
— A Life of St. John for the Young • George Ludington Weed

... Swallows of the lea! Arabs of the whole wide girth Of the wind-encircled earth! In all climes we pitch our tents, Cronies of the elements, With the secret lords ...
— Songs from Vagabondia • Bliss Carman and Richard Hovey

... Lea. Heare me recreant, on thine allegeance heare me; That thou hast sought to make vs breake our vowes, Which we durst neuer yet; and with strain'd pride, To come betwixt our sentences, and our power, Which, nor our ...
— The First Folio [35 Plays] • William Shakespeare

... gate to bar out the rush of commercialism. See where she stands—quite out to the very curb, her warning finger pointing upward. 'Thus far shalt thou come, and no farther,' she cries out to the Four Per Cents. 'Hug up close to me, you old fellows asleep in your graves; get under my lea. Let us fight it out together, the living and the dead!' And now hear these abominable Four Per Cents behind their glass windows: 'No place for a church,' they say. 'No place for the dead! Property too valuable. Move it up town. Move it out ...
— Peter - A Novel of Which He is Not the Hero • F. Hopkinson Smith

... Her teeth resemble strings o' pearls, * Arrayed in line and fresh from sea: Her neck is like the neck of doe, * Pretty and carven perfectly: Her bosom is a marble slab * Whence rise two breasts like towers on lea: And on her stomach shows a crease * Perfumed with rich perfumery; Beneath which same there lurks a Thing * Limit of mine expectancy. A something rounded, cushioned-high * And plump, my lords, to high degree: To me 'tis likest royal ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 8 • Richard F. Burton

... bright and deep, Where the gray trout lies asleep, Up the river and over the lea, That's the way ...
— The Home Book of Verse, Vol. 1 (of 4) • Various

... of Hertfordshire as indeterminate of feature, with hair obfuscated by the London smoke. Their eyes would be sad, and averted from their fate towards the Northern flats, their leader not Isis or Sabrina, but the slowly flowing Lea. No glory of raiment would be theirs, no urgency of dance; but they ...
— Howards End • E. M. Forster

... has left like a friend who is true in the sun And false in the shadows; He has found new delights in the land where he's gone, Greener woodlands and meadows. Let him go! what care we? let the snow shroud the lea, Let it drift on the heather; We can sing through it all: I have you, you have me. And ...
— Poems of Passion • Ella Wheeler Wilcox

... the homing hour is here, The task is done. Toilers, and they who course the deer Turn, one by one, At day's demise, Where dwells a deathless glow In loving eyes. I hear them hearthward go To castle, or to cottage on the lea; But him I love comes never ...
— Kansas Women in Literature • Nettie Garmer Barker

... wind on the Thames blew icy breath, The wind on the Seine blew fiery death, The snow lay thick on tower and tree, The streams ran black through wold and lea; As I sat alone in London town And dreamed a dream ...
— Winning a Cause - World War Stories • John Gilbert Thompson and Inez Bigwood

... The Peak her Dove, whose banks so fertile be; And Kent will say her Medway doth excel. Cotswold commends her Isis to the Tame; Our northern borders boast of Tweed's fair flood Our western parts extol their Wily's fame; And the old Lea brags of the Danish blood. Arden's sweet Ankor, let thy glory be That fair Idea only lives ...
— A History of English Literature - Elizabethan Literature • George Saintsbury

... merry lark was up and singing, And the hare was out and feeding on the lea; And the merry merry bells below were ringing, When my ...
— Andromeda and Other Poems • Charles Kingsley

... honor of Mr. Thomas G. Lea, who was the first man to study mycology in the Miami Valley. This is a very beautiful plant growing on decayed beech logs in rainy weather. The pileus is fleshy, very viscid, bright orange, the margin slightly striate as will be seen in ...
— The Mushroom, Edible and Otherwise - Its Habitat and its Time of Growth • M. E. Hard

... trouble and toil no more. Whither away wi' the sail and the oar? Drop the oar, Leap ashore, Fly no more! Whither away wi' the sail? whither away wi' the oar? Day and night to the billow, etc. ... over the lea; They freshen the silvery-crimson shells, And thick with white bells the cloverhill swells High over the full-toned sea. Merrily carol the revelling gales Over the islands free: From the green seabanks the rose downtrails To the happy brimmed sea. Come hither, come hither, ...
— The Early Poems of Alfred Lord Tennyson • Tennyson

... I were where Helen lies; Night and day on me she cries; O that I were where Helen lies On fair Kirconnell lea. ...
— The Golden Treasury - Of the Best Songs and Lyrical Poems in the English Language • Various

... said, "How fair art thou!" I vow that not one bitter word in answer did I say, But, looking ever on the ground, went silently my way. The heifer's voice, the heifer's breath, are passing sweet to me; And sweet is sleep by summer-brooks upon the breezy lea: As acorns are the green oak's pride, apples the apple-bough's; So the cow glorieth in her calf, the cowherd in his cows." Thus the two lads; then spoke the third, ...
— Theocritus • Theocritus

... follow me, While glowworms light the lea, I'll show ye where the dead should be— Each in his shroud, While winds pipe loud, And the red moon peeps dim through the cloud. Follow, follow me; Brave should he be That treads by ...
— Waverley, Or 'Tis Sixty Years Hence, Complete • Sir Walter Scott

... proceedings of church and town-house, but time was soon to show the value of such demonstrations. Meantime, the "muzzle" had been fastened with solemnity and accepted with docility. The terms of the treaty concluded at Plessis lea Tours and Bordeaux were made public. The Duke had subscribed to twenty-seven articles; which made as stringent and sensible a constitutional compact as could be desired by any Netherland patriot. ...
— The Rise of the Dutch Republic, 1555-1566 • John Lothrop Motley

... shue, and thinkin naething o' the risk til a human sowl, but only o' the risk til the puir horse, the fule fallow stoppit at a smithy nae farrer nor the neist door frae a public, and tuik the horse intil the smithy, lea'in the smith's lad at the held o' the ither horse. Sae what suld my leddy but oot upo' the side frae the smithy, and awa roon the back o' the cairriage to the public, and in! Whether she took onything there ...
— Heather and Snow • George MacDonald

... Lea, in his History of the Inquisition in the Middle Ages, analyzes the development of the Satanic doctrine from a superstition into its acceptance as a ...
— The Witchcraft Delusion In Colonial Connecticut (1647-1697) • John M. Taylor

... to express my indebtedness to Messrs. Lea and Febiger, the J. B. Lippincott Co., and to the editors of the American Journal of Insanity, and the Journal of the American Institute of Criminal Law and Criminology, for their kind permission to reprint some ...
— Studies in Forensic Psychiatry • Bernard Glueck

... produce our store—only paying for the ale that you must call for—and speculate upon the looks of the landlady, and whether she was likely to allow us a tablecloth—and wish for such another honest hostess as Izaak Walton has described many a one on the pleasant banks of the Lea, when he went a fishing—and sometimes they would prove obliging enough, and sometimes they would look grudgingly upon us—but we had cheerful looks still for one another, and would eat our plain food savorily, scarcely grudging ...
— English Prose - A Series of Related Essays for the Discussion and Practice • Frederick William Roe (edit. and select.)

... market, to mild loves And modest hates, and still the sight Of brown kind faces, and when night Draws dark around with age and fear Theirs is the simple hope to cheer.— A land of peace where lost romance And ghostly shine of helm and lance Still dwell by castled scarp and lea, And the last homes of chivalry, And the good fairy folk, my dear, Who speak for cunning souls to hear, In crook of glen and bower of hill Sing ...
— The Moon Endureth—Tales and Fancies • John Buchan

... swings the lash on the high mountain trail, And the pipe of the packer is scenting the gale; For the trails are all open, the roads are all free, And the highwayman's whistle is heard on the lea." ...
— Down the Mother Lode • Vivia Hemphill

... Lea and Blanchard, Philadelphia, have republished Impressions and Experiences of the West Indies and North America in 1849, by ROBERT BAIRD, an intelligent Scotchman, apparently of the legal profession, but with little of the talent essential to the composition of a popular book of travels. His remarks ...
— Harper's New Monthly Magazine, Volume 1, No. 3, August, 1850. • Various

... by landside streamlets gush, And clear in the greenwood quires the thrush, With sun on the meadows And songs in the shadows Comes again to me The gift of the tongues of the lea, The gift of ...
— New Poems • Robert Louis Stevenson

... barracks and hospitals; and in spite of the lapse of time, the reports repay close study by any one interested in sanitary science as applied to the construction and improvement of such buildings. The names of Sidney Herbert (afterwards Lord Herbert of Lea), Captain (afterwards Sir Douglas) Gallon, R.E., and John Sutherland, M.D., stand out prominently among those who contributed to the work. The commission was constituted a standing body in 1862, and continues its ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 3, Part 1, Slice 3 - "Banks" to "Bassoon" • Various

... sing o'nights, to heed again the words Of my poor pleading! For I swear to thee My love is deeper than the bounding sea, And more conclusive than a wedding-bell, And freer-voiced than winds upon the lea. ...
— A Lover's Litanies • Eric Mackay

... the spring, and through the summer, when the flowers are on the lea; Through the Autumn when the blossoms fade ...
— Eidolon - The Course of a Soul and Other Poems • Walter R. Cassels

... And see my cities gleam by slope and strand, What joy have I in this transcendent dower— The strength and beauty of my sea-girt land That holds the future royally in fee! And lest some danger, undescried, should lower, From my far height I watch o'er wave and lea. ...
— The Mountain that was 'God' • John H. Williams

... LEA. To betray me after that fashion! A rascal who for so many reasons should be the first to keep secret what I trust him with! To go and tell everything to my father! Ah! I swear by all that is dear to me not to let such ...
— The Impostures of Scapin • Moliere (Poquelin)

... tolls the knell of parting day, The lowing herd wind slowly o'er the lea, The ploughman homeward plods his weary way, And leaves the world ...
— Poetical Works of Johnson, Parnell, Gray, and Smollett - With Memoirs, Critical Dissertations, and Explanatory Notes • Samuel Johnson, Thomas Parnell, Thomas Gray, and Tobias Smollett

... I see the lily fair— The meadow's beauteous queen— Surrounded by her myriad friends All dressed in Nature's green, My heart goes out in ecstasy, And naught on earth to me Seems fairer type of loveliness, Than this daughter of th' lea. ...
— Our Profession and Other Poems • Jared Barhite

... third night after leaving lea we had ample proof of their desperate straits. We had left the sandy deserts behind, and were toiling along painfully, sustained only by Castro's assurance that he ...
— At the Point of the Sword • Herbert Hayens

... there appeared within sight of the deserted walls a company of East Saxons. They were hunting: they were armed with spears: they followed the chase through the great forest afterwards called the Middlesex Forest, Epping Forest, Hainault Forest, and across the marshes of the river Lea, full of sedge and reed and treacherous quagmires. And they saw before them the gray walls of a great city of which they had ...
— The History of London • Walter Besant

... sun! a rainbow in the sky! A young man will be wiser by and by; An old man's wit may wander ere he die. Rain, rain, and sun! a rainbow on the lea! And truth is this to me, and that to thee; And truth or clothed or naked let it be. Rain, sun, and rain! and the free blossom blows: Sun, rain, and sun! and where is he who knows? From the great deep to the great deep ...
— Idylls of the King • Alfred, Lord Tennyson

... of the wilderness, Blithesome and cumberless, Sweet be thy matin o'er moorland and lea! Emblem of happiness, Blest is thy dwelling-place— Oh to abide in ...
— Birds and Poets • John Burroughs

... Westminster. A little to the left of this cross, now a gateway to Theobald Park, stands Temple Bar, stone for stone intact as it was in the days when traitors' heads were raised above it in Fleet Street, although the original wooden gates are missing. Waltham Abbey is situated on the River Lea, near the point where King Alfred defeated the Danes in one of his battles. They had penetrated far up the river when King Alfred diverted the waters from beneath their vessels and left them stranded in a ...
— British Highways And Byways From A Motor Car - Being A Record Of A Five Thousand Mile Tour In England, - Wales And Scotland • Thomas D. Murphy

... At that time Stamford Hill was crowned with a grove of trees, and its eastern declivity was overgrown with brushwood. The whole country, on the Essex side, was more or less marshy, until Epping Forest, some three miles off, was reached. Through a swampy vale on the left, the river Lea, so dear to the angler, took its slow and silent course; while through a green valley on the right, flowed the New River, then only just opened. Pointing out the latter channel to Jocelyn, Dick Taverner, who had now ...
— The Star-Chamber, Volume 1 - An Historical Romance • W. Harrison Ainsworth

... traveller on a dusty road Strewed acorns on the lea; And one took root and sprouted up, And grew into a tree. Love sought its shade at evening-time, To breathe its early vows; And Age was pleased, in heights of noon, To bask beneath its boughs. The dormouse loved its dangling twigs, The birds ...
— Poems Every Child Should Know - The What-Every-Child-Should-Know-Library • Various

... rested likewise, half-tired man and horse, And homeward went for food and courage new; Whereby refreshed, they turned again to toil, And lived in labour all the afternoon. Till, in the gloaming, once again the plough Lay like a stranded bark upon the lea; And home with hanging neck the horses went, Walking beside their master, force by will. Then through the deepening shades ...
— A Hidden Life and Other Poems • George MacDonald

... her head and fixed upon Parsifal her prayerful wet eyes. Either from his recent contemplation of the flowery lea, or some occult association of her personality with the past, the flowers of Klingsor's garden come into his mind. "I saw them wither who had smiled on me. May they not also be hungering for redemption now?... Your tears, too, are turned ...
— The Wagnerian Romances • Gertrude Hall

... tree-tops stood forth in the red glow of evening, the charming light was spread out over the fields, the forest and the leaves of the trees were motionless, the clear sky looked like an open paradise, and the evening bells of the villages rang out with a strange mournfulness across the lea. My young soul now got its first presentment of the world and its events. I forgot myself and my guide; my spirit and my eyes were wandering ...
— The German Classics of The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Vol. IV • Editor-in-Chief: Kuno Francke

... that the law oft obeys; K is a Key, that no secret betrays. L is a Lamb, often freaks o'er the lea; M is a Mermaid, that ...
— Banbury Chap Books - And Nursery Toy Book Literature • Edwin Pearson

... anxious peer, Towards the distant lea; A courser feebly nears the throng— Ah! 'tis ...
— First footsteps in East Africa • Richard F. Burton

... bees upon the flower, and a silence hangs that only breaks in distant innuendo of the rivers or the low of cattle on the Cowal shore. The great bays lapse into hills that float upon a purple haze, forest nor lea has any sign of spring's extravagance or the flame of the autumn that fires Dunchuach till it blazes like a torch. All is in the light sleep of the year's morning, and what, I have thought, if God in His pious whim should never awake ...
— John Splendid - The Tale of a Poor Gentleman, and the Little Wars of Lorn • Neil Munro

... gold against the dark angry water as they fluttered out to sea, unmindful of the leaden clouds banked up along the west, and all the symptoms of an approaching gale. The next morning it was upon us; but brought up as we were under the lea of a high rock, the tempest tore harmlessly over our heads, and left us at liberty to make the ...
— Letters From High Latitudes • The Marquess of Dufferin (Lord Dufferin)

... and, though he could not see them now, he knew where they were: the sedge-warbler was flitting among the rushes of the low-land mere; the wheatear was perched on the crevice of gray rock in which it had laid its pale-blue eggs; the sheep were bleating on the fells, and he knew their haunts by the lea of the bowlders and along the rocky ledges where grew the freshest grasses. Down the corries of Blencathra, long drifts of sheep were coming before the dogs, and he knew that the shepherds had been out on the fells during the short summer night, numbering the sheep for ...
— A Son of Hagar - A Romance of Our Time • Sir Hall Caine

... cut the shining heavens thro', That skim along the meadow grass, Among the flowers sweet and fair, That croon upon the pointed roof, Or, quiv'ring, balance in the air; Ye heralds of the summer days, As quick ye dart across the lea, Tho' other birds be fairer, yet The dearest of all ...
— St. Nicholas Magazine for Boys and Girls, Vol. V, August, 1878, No 10. - Scribner's Illustrated • Various

... can be none to whom the last volume of W. W. has come more welcome than to me. I have traced the Duddon in thought and with repetition along the banks (alas!) of the Lea—(unpoetical name); it is always flowing and murmuring and dashing in my ears. The story of Dion is divine—the genius of Plato falling on him like moonlight—the finest thing ever expressed. Then there is Elidure and Kirkstone ...
— The Works of Charles and Mary Lamb, Vol. 5 • Edited by E. V. Lucas

... hat and mantle off I threw, And scoured across the lea; Then cried the beng with loud halloo, 'Where does the ...
— Library Of The World's Best Literature, Ancient And Modern, Vol. 5 • Various

... sang the souls of the jolly, jolly mariners, Crying: "Under Heaven, here is neither lead nor lea! Must we sing for evermore On the windless, glassy floor? Take back your golden fiddles and we'll beat ...
— The Seven Seas • Rudyard Kipling

... Lea. Born at Winskill, near Settle, Yorkshire, England, 9th November, 1847. Arrived in New Zealand, September, 1876; since then engaged in bush work and teaching. At present teacher at Te Awaite, near Picton, N.Z. 'Poems in the Craven ...
— An Anthology of Australian Verse • Bertram Stevens

... rode forth over hill and lea Full seven mile broad and seven mile wide, But no one living discovered he Who a joust ...
— Ulf Van Yern - and Other Ballads • Thomas J. Wise

... blow as many blasts as he liked, and in an instant the forest echoed with his horn; it was but a few minutes before 'half a hundred yeomen were racing over the lea.' The friar stared when he saw them; then, turning to Robin, he begged of him a boon also, and leave being granted he gave three whistles, which were followed by the noise of a great crashing through the trees, as fifty great dogs ...
— The Book of Romance • Various

... falls the heavy shower That drenches deep the furrow'd lea; Nor do continual tempests pour On the vex'd [2]Caspian's billowy sea; Nor yet the ice, in silent horror, stands Thro' all the passing months on pale ...
— Original sonnets on various subjects; and odes paraphrased from Horace • Anna Seward

... Scott was accustomed to make his journeys up to London. The driver, who might have answered to Washington Irving's description, pointed out to me Netherby Hall, the mansion of the Grahams, on "Cannobie lea," over which the young Lochinvar bore away his stolen bride. We passed also Branksome Tower, the scene of the "Lay of the Last Minstrel," and reached Selkirk in the early evening. The next day I spent at Abbotsford. The Great Magician had been dead only ten ...
— Recollections of a Long Life - An Autobiography • Theodore Ledyard Cuyler

... each turn, and slake Thy thirst by every fountain's brink, Where less wise men would pause to shrink: Sometimes, 'mid stately avenues With Cowley thou, or Marvel's muse, Dost walk; or Gray, by Eton's towers; Or Pope, in Hampton's chesnut bowers; Or Walton, by his loved Lea stream: Or dost thou with our Milton dream, Of Eden and the Apocalypse, And hear the words from ...
— The Works of Charles and Mary Lamb (Vol. 6) - Letters 1821-1842 • Charles and Mary Lamb

... thou in the cauld blast On yonder lea, on yonder lea, My plaidie to the angry airt, I'd shelter thee, I'd shelter thee: Or did Misfortune's bitter storms Around thee blaw, around thee blaw, Thy bield should be my bosom, To share it ...
— Spare Hours • John Brown

... ho! is t' song o' t' gales, As they sweep ower fell an' lea; And Eastward ho! is t' song o' t' dales, That winnd frae t' moors to t' sea. Coom winter frost, coom summer druft, Their watters munnot bide; An' t' rain that's fall'n when bould winds soughed Sal ...
— Songs of the Ridings • F. W. Moorman

... I fix'd my eye, All over the wide lea; My horse trudg'd on, and we drew nigh Those paths so dear ...
— Lyrical Ballads with Other Poems, 1800, Vol. 2 • William Wordsworth

... has caused be made, All such as high born damsels wear; Then away rode he o'er hill and lea To seek King Siward's ...
— Hafbur and Signe - a ballad • Thomas J. Wise

... pirates' vessel, Capt. Bute had given chase, and pursued her so sharply, that, under cover of the night, he had got the H. into safe anchorage on the lea side of the island without the pirates' knowledge. The rest of the tale has ...
— Yr Ynys Unyg - The Lonely Island • Julia de Winton

... the nymphs of Corot, or the laveuses bending at the margin of the lake, the plowman homeward plodding o'er the lea, the shepherd on the distant moor, the woodsman in the forest, the farmer among his fields. We associate our vision of the scene with theirs. When as mere dots they are discerned, the vastness of their surroundings is realized at their expense and the exclamation of the psalmist is ...
— Pictorial Composition and the Critical Judgment of Pictures • Henry Rankin Poore

... plant we in the apple-tree? Buds, which the breath of summer days Shall lengthen into leafy sprays; Boughs, where the thrush with crimson breast Shall haunt and sing and hide her nest. We plant upon the sunny lea A shadow for the noontide hour, A shelter from the summer shower, ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 13, No. 75, January, 1864 • Various

... the subduing force Of wisdom on her mid-way measured course Gliding;—not torrent-like with fury spilt, Impetuous, o'er Himalah's rifted side, To ravage blind and wide, And leave a lifeless wreck of parching silt;— Gliding by thorpe and tower and grange and lea In tranquil transit ...
— The Visions of England - Lyrics on leading men and events in English History • Francis T. Palgrave

... Morven's mossy mead. Wild thoughts and vain ambitions circle near, Whilst I, at peace, the abbey chimings hear. Loud shakes the surge of Life's unquiet sea, Yet smooth the stream that laves the rustic lea. Let others feel the world's destroying thrill, As 'midst the kine I haunt the verdant hill. Rise, radiant sun! to light the grassy glades, Whose charms I view from grateful beechen shades; O'er spire and peak diffuse th' expanding gleam That gilds the grove, ...
— Writings in the United Amateur, 1915-1922 • Howard Phillips Lovecraft

... the knell of parting day, the curfew from the tower of Hamelsham: the "lowing herd wound slowly o'er the lea" from the Dicker, when two friars came in sight, who wore the robe of Saint Francis, and approached ...
— The House of Walderne - A Tale of the Cloister and the Forest in the Days of the Barons' Wars • A. D. Crake

... girl you!" her mother broke in with a laugh. "Vere you lea'n such nasty things? By your mamma? The gentleman ...
— The Rise of David Levinsky • Abraham Cahan

... power the giftie gie us To see oursels as others see us! It wad frae mony a blunder free us And foolish notion: What airs in dress and gait wad lea'e us And even devotion!" ...
— Analyzing Character • Katherine M. H. Blackford and Arthur Newcomb

... southern England, Ronmey Marsh, reinforced by the Wealden Forest, fixed the western boundary of the ancient Saxon kingdom of Kent by blocking expansion in that direction, just as the bordering swamps of the Lea and Colne rivers formed the eastern and western boundaries of Middlesex.[729] The Fenland of the Wash, which extended in Saxon days from the highland about Lincoln south to Cambridge and Newmarket, served to hem in the Angles ...
— Influences of Geographic Environment - On the Basis of Ratzel's System of Anthropo-Geography • Ellen Churchill Semple

... soul of chivalry, Put trust in plighted word; By starlight on the broad brown lea, To ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... intelligent bookseller, came in, to whom Mr. Bird at once ceded the right of pre-emption. Stark betrayed such visible anxiety that the vendor, Smith, declined setting a price. Soon after Sir C. Anderson, of Lea (author of Ancient Models), came in and took away the book to collate, but brought it back in the morning having found it imperfect in the middle, and offered L5 for it. Sir Charles had no book of reference ...
— Enemies of Books • William Blades

... brace herself to the occasion. "Father," she said, "was drowned. I know—I hadn't told you that before. He was drowned in the Lea. It's always been a distress and humiliation to us there had to be an Inquest. And they threw out things.... It's why we moved to Haggerston. It's the worst that ever happened to us in all our lives. Far worse. Worse than having the things sold or the children with scarlet fever and having to burn ...
— The Wife of Sir Isaac Harman • H. G. (Herbert George) Wells

... The streams worth his attention, and also within his reach, are few, and either preserved so that he cannot approach them, or harried by poachers as well as anglers. How much happier were men in Walton's day who stretched their legs up Tottenham Hill and soon found, in the Lea, trout which would take a worm when the rod was left to fish for itself! In those old days Hackney might be called a fishing village. There was in Walton's later years a writer on fishing named W. Gilbert, "Gent." This gent produced a small work called the "Angler's Delight," and if the ...
— Lost Leaders • Andrew Lang

... unassuming; without affectation, full of pathos, and gently sensitive. He was a man who knew no guile, and his sweet and artless nature is faithfully portrayed in the outpourings of an impressionable, poetic soul. To dance with rustic maidens on the lea; to sing by moonlight to the piper's strain; to be happy, always happy, such is the theme, delicate and refined, of these ...
— Pastoral Poems by Nicholas Breton, - Selected Poetry by George Wither, and - Pastoral Poetry by William Browne (of Tavistock) • Nicholas Breton, George Wither, William Browne (of Tavistock)

... at night, greatly to my satisfaction, we got under the lea of this island, into quite smooth water—for I had been very sick and uncomfortable, and had eaten scarcely anything since the preceding morning. We were slowly nearing the shore, which the smooth dark water told us we could safely approach; and were congratulating ...
— The Malay Archipelago - Volume II. (of II.) • Alfred Russel Wallace

... sun rose on the lea, and the bird sang merrilie, And the steed stood ready harness'd in the hall, And he left his lady's bower, and he sought the eastern tower, And he lifted cloak ...
— Poems • Adam Lindsay Gordon

... prizes all in a row: Surely a hint of fame. Now he's finished with,—nothing to show: Doesn't it seem a shame? Look from the window! All you see Was to be his one day: Forest and furrow, lawn and lea, And he goes and ...
— Rhymes of a Red Cross Man • Robert W. Service

... and the houseless dales and drear. Then lo, a mighty water, a rushing flood and wide, And no ferry for the shipless; so he went along its side, As a man that seeketh somewhat: but it widened toward the sea, And the moon sank down in the west, and he went o'er a desert lea. ...
— The Story of Sigurd the Volsung and the Fall of the Niblungs • William Morris

... Bareacres are fair upon the lea, Where the cliffs of bonny Diddlesex rise up from out the sea: I stood upon the donjon keep and view'd the country o'er, I saw the lands of Bareacres for fifty miles or more. I stood upon the donjon keep—it is a sacred place,—Where floated for eight hundred years the banner ...
— Burlesques • William Makepeace Thackeray

... With every curl a-quiver; Or leaping, light of limb, O'er rivulet and river; Or skipping o'er the lea On daffodil and daisy; Or stretched beneath a tree, All languishing and lazy; Whatever be her mood - Be she demurely prude Or languishingly lazy - My lady drives me crazy! In vain her heart is ...
— Songs of a Savoyard • W. S. Gilbert

... no thy lane, In providing foresight may be vain; Gang aft agley,* An' lea'e us nought but grief ...
— English Literature For Boys And Girls • H.E. Marshall

... in the night I saw the sea, And overhead, the round moon white; Its steel cold gleam lay on the lea, And seemed my sword of life and light, Broke in that war death waged ...
— Stories in Verse • Henry Abbey

... most surprising features of the general election in Ireland is the complete collapse of the Liberal party. Not a single Liberal has returned for any constituency. Saturday's dispatches announced the defeat of Mr. Thomas Lea in West Donegal, and Mr. William Findlater in South Londonderry. That settles it. The list is closed. Every Liberal candidate who tried his fortune with an Irish constituency has suffered a signal discomfiture ...
— Donahoe's Magazine, Volume 15, No. 1, January 1886 • Various

... whole time to a favorite pursuit. Grote was a banker until he reached the age of forty-nine when he retired from the banking house and began the composition of the first volume of his history. Henry C. Lea was in the active publishing business until he was fifty-five, and as I have already frequently referred to my own personal experience, I may add that I was immersed in business between the ages of twenty-two ...
— Historical Essays • James Ford Rhodes

... of our chieftain, That echoed over river and lea; And the stars of our banner shone brighter When Sherman marched ...
— The Memoirs of General W. T. Sherman, Complete • William T. Sherman

... promised to send Mrs. Carruthers a basket of trout when the season came round. In order to give a classical turn to the conversation, the dominie mentioned the name of Isaac Walton and referred to his poor opinion of the chub in the river Lea. "I know the Lea like a book," said Mr. Bigglethorpe, "and a dirty, muddy ditch it has got to be since old Isaac's time. When I was a schoolboy I went there fishing one afternoon with some companions, and caught ...
— Two Knapsacks - A Novel of Canadian Summer Life • John Campbell

... the inky darkness as though our march was to last eternally, and poor Blackie would step out as if his natural state was one of perpetual motion. On the 4th November we rode over sixty miles; and when at length the camp was made in the lea of a little clump of bare willows, the snow was lying cold upon the prairies, and Blackie and his comrades went out to shiver through their supper in the bleakest scene my ...
— The Great Lone Land - A Narrative of Travel and Adventure in the North-West of America • W. F. Butler

... your whistle! Sing a sang to please the wean; Let it be o' Lady Summer Walking wi' her gallant train! Sing him how her gaucy mantle, Forest-green, trails ower the lea, Broider'd frae the dewy hem o't Wi' the field flowers to ...
— The Child and Childhood in Folk-Thought • Alexander F. Chamberlain

... necessary orders, and the Richard bounded away from her pursuer and raced into the shadows of the cliff. When they arrived at the point near the Hell-Hole Isthmus, the speed-craft motor began to miss and Bronson guided the Richard in the lea of the promontory and threw out ...
— El Diablo • Brayton Norton

... diamond tears adorning Thy low mound on the lea, Those are the tears of morning, That ...
— Last Poems • A. E. Housman

... led to reconsider a design which he had made in 1841 for a road bridge over the river Lea at Ware, with a span of 50 feet,—the conditions only admitting of a platform 18 or 20 inches thick. For this purpose a wrought-iron platform was designed, consisting of a series of simple cells, formed of boiler-plates riveted together with angle-iron. ...
— Lives of the Engineers - The Locomotive. George and Robert Stephenson • Samuel Smiles

... the Franciscan habit in Youghal. He left his successor so powerful, that in the year 1264, there being a feud between the Geraldines and de Burghs, he seized the Lord Justice and the whole de Burgh party at a conference at Castledermot, and carried them to his own castles of Lea and Dunamase as prisoners. In 1272, on the accidental death of the Lord Justice Audley, by a fall from his horse, "the council" elected this the third Baron of Offally ...
— A Popular History of Ireland - From the earliest period to the emancipation of the Catholics • Thomas D'Arcy McGee

... proposal to bring over the Utrecht Psalter. Mr. Disraeli thought the scheme absurd. "Of course," he said, "you won't get it." He was told that, nevertheless, such things are, that public manuscripts had even been sent across the Atlantic in order that Mr. Lea might write a history of the Inquisition. "Yes," he replied, "but they never came back again." The work which has been awaited so long has come over at last, and will assuredly be accepted as the most important ...
— The History of Freedom • John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton

... Swannes,' a view of the banks of the River Lea, published in 1590, I have ventured to borrow the verses that close an address ...
— Devon, Its Moorlands, Streams and Coasts • Rosalind Northcote

... quantity of grain was imported for food about that period. Isolated cases of the Curl were not unfrequent in this country long after it ceased to cause alarm to the farmer. I have seen many such cases, especially where potatoes were planted on lea. On examining the set beneath a plant affected with Curl, I invariably found it had not rotted away as was usual with those sets that produced healthy plants. There were as many remedies propounded for the Curl as for the blight of 1846-7 with a like result—none ...
— The History of the Great Irish Famine of 1847 (3rd ed.) (1902) - With Notices Of Earlier Irish Famines • John O'Rourke

... evening broods quiescent Over mountain, vale and lea, And the moon uplifts her crescent Far above the peaceful sea, Little Rose, the fisher's daughter, Passes in her cedar skiff O'er the dreamy waste of water, To the ...
— Hesperus - and Other Poems and Lyrics • Charles Sangster



Words linked to "Lea" :   commons, linear unit, grazing land, pace, cow pasture, yard, rural area, country, linear measure, pasture, common land



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