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Lave   Listen
verb
Lave  v. t.  To lade, dip, or pour out. (Obs.)






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Lave" Quotes from Famous Books



... thy sullen stream Been doomed the cheerless shores to lave; Long has the Suttee's baneful gleam Pale ...
— The Life of William Carey • George Smith

... sa montagne est un sainct lieu: Qui viendra done au mont de Dieu? Qui est-ce qui la tiendra place? Le homine de mains et coeur lave, En vanite non esleve Et qui n'a jure ...
— Sabbath in Puritan New England • Alice Morse Earle

... 's the happy lad, Though a' the lave sud try to rate him; Whan he steps up the brae sae glad, She disna ken maist whare to set him: Donald Scot is wooing at her, Courting her, will maybe get her; Bonny Lizzy Liberty, wow, sae mony ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volumes I-VI. - The Songs of Scotland of the Past Half Century • Various

... of hair Above the bosom of the wave, While 'mid its golden meshes fair The distant sunbeams stoop to lave. Sweet isle of fancy, far beyond The dark dim vales of human woe, My bark of love sails o'er the fond Blue waves that ever ...
— The Poets and Poetry of Cecil County, Maryland • Various

... Afton, how lovely it glides, And winds by the cot where my Mary resides; How wanton thy waters her snowy feet lave, As gathering sweet flow'rets she stems ...
— English Songs and Ballads • Various

... wide-flowing water lave The captive's dungeon cell, And the voice of its hoarse and sullen wave Breaks forth in a louder swell, And the night-breeze sighs in a deeper gust, For the flower ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction - Vol. 19, Issue 529, January 14, 1832 • Various

... "Why can't he stay Injun? What'll he do wid the greatest common divisor an' the indicative mood an' the Sea of Azov, an' the Zambezi River, when he's learned 'em, anyhow? Phil, begorra, I b'lave that cussed Redskin is in this town fur trouble, an' you jist remember he'll git it one av these toimes. He ain't natural Injun. Uncle Cam is right. He's not like them Osages that comes here annuity days. All that's Osage about ...
— The Price of the Prairie - A Story of Kansas • Margaret Hill McCarter

... ye'll lave home To thravel to Rome, For its bound to Canossa ye are. Persistin' to shtay When ye're ordered away— Bedad! that ...
— Shapes of Clay • Ambrose Bierce

... render his account," added Gahogan. "An' whativer he's done wrong, he's made it square to-day. Let um lave it to ...
— Short Story Classics (American) Vol. 2 • Various

... You wanted to chate me, you haythen! But Bridget McGuire ain't to be took in by such as you. You'd better lave before my man comes home from his work, or he'll give you lave of absence wid ...
— Phil the Fiddler • Horatio Alger, Jr.

... sorry I am to say it to ye, sur," he began, "but it's the handlin' of this stun that's desthroyin' me touch at the brick-makin', and it's better I should lave ye and find worruk at me own thrade. For it's worruk I am nadin'. It isn't meself, Captain, to ate the bread of oidleness here. And so good-by to ye, and if it's fifty cints ye can be givin' me ontil I'll find a ...
— Drift from Two Shores • Bret Harte

... Leghorn, from which I was sent to . . . to a religious house, where I was to be instructed in saggarting till they had made me fit to cut a decent figure in Ireland. We had a long and tedious voyage, Shorsha; not so tedious, however, as it would have been had I been fool enough to lave your pack of cards behind me, as the thaif, my brother Denis, wanted to persuade me to do, in order that he might play with them himself. With the cards I managed to have many a nice game with the sailors, winning from them ha'pennies and sixpences until the captain said that ...
— The Romany Rye - A Sequel to 'Lavengro' • George Borrow

... a dreaming wave Wafts me in gladness dim Through air just cool enough to lave With sense each conscious limb. But ah! the dream eludes the rhyme, As dreams break free from sleep; The dream will keep its own free time, In mazy ...
— A Hidden Life and Other Poems • George MacDonald

... pleughs, and kye. The youngster's artless heart o'erflows wi' joy, But, blate[22] an' laithfu',[23] scarce can weel behave; The mother, wi' a woman's wiles, can spy What makes the youth sae bashfu' an' sae grave; Weel pleas'd to think her bairn's respected like the lave.[24] ...
— The Ontario Readers: The High School Reader, 1886 • Ministry of Education

... y' ain't," declared One-Eye, admiringly. He was back at the sink once more, allowing Niagara to lave that injured eye, now a shining purplish-black. "Bully fer the gal! That's the stuff! Y' got backbone! And spirit, by thunder! And sand! Jes' paste that in yer sunbonnet! But, Cis, w'y don't y' skedaddle right now? Go whilst the goin's good! Gosh, I'm 'feard that some ...
— The Rich Little Poor Boy • Eleanor Gates

... ye villain, beating the poor darlints whinever I lave ye a minute." And pouring out a volley of Irish curses, she caught up the urchins, one under each arm, and kissed and hugged them till they were nearly choked. "Och, ye plague o' my life—as drunk as a baste; an' I brought home this darlint of a young ...
— Alton Locke, Tailor And Poet • Rev. Charles Kingsley et al

... Nothing that there was a loch seven miles long, and seven miles deep, and seven miles broad, and he must drain it the next day, or else he would have him for his supper. Nicht Nought Nothing began early next morning and tried to lave the water with his pail, but the loch was never getting any less, and he did no ken what to do; but the giant's dochter called on all the fish in the sea to come and drink the water, and very soon they drank it dry. When the giant saw the work done he was in a rage, and said, 'I've a worse job ...
— Custom and Myth • Andrew Lang

... murmuring voice, And from the ocean wave, Which Neptune in his choice sees fit Upon the shore to lave. ...
— A Leaf from the Old Forest • J. D. Cossar

... behind, and his surprise was the greater when he found that his enemy was offering him his arm, and ended by helping him down the remainder of the way to the river, where the injured lad gladly seated himself at the edge upon a stone, which enabled him to lave both feet at once in the clear cool current, to the great comfort and relief of his ...
— The Black Tor - A Tale of the Reign of James the First • George Manville Fenn

... gentian flowers Make mimic sky in mountain bowers; And vineyards steeped in ardent hours Slope to the wave Where storied Chillon's tragic towers Their bases lave; ...
— The Poems of William Watson • William Watson

... BURKE—[Shaking CHRIS off—furiously] Lave go of me, ye old ape! Marry her, is it? I'd see her roasting in hell first! I'm shipping away out of this, I'm telling you! [Pointing to Anna—passionately] And my curse on you and the curse of Almighty God and all the Saints! You've destroyed me this day and may you lie awake in the long nights, ...
— Anna Christie • Eugene O'Neill

... th' State, 'measurin' th' vat with gas,—an' I lave it to ye whether this is not th' on'y fair test,—an' supposin' that two feet acrost is akel to tin feet sideways, an' supposin' that a thick green an' hard substance, an' I daresay it wud; an' supposin' you may, takin' into account th' ...
— The Wit and Humor of America, Volume V. (of X.) • Various

... crowns; and it fairly staggered me when I found that it was full of gold pieces, and on counting them, found that there were a hundred louis. Never did I dream that I should be so rich. Why, your honour, when I lave the regiment, which will not be for many a long year, I hope, I shall be able to settle down comfortably, for the rest of my life, in a snug little shebeen, or on a bit of land with a cottage and some pigs, and maybe a cow or two; and it is all to your honour I owe it, for if you hadn't given ...
— In the Irish Brigade - A Tale of War in Flanders and Spain • G. A. Henty

... Patsy no more, and him as glad of it as Aunt Bridgie herself, just like she knew he would be, and what an awful time you do be havin' with gurrls, and a baby comin', I says to myself and to Aunt Bridgie, 'There's the lady I'm goin' to worrk for if she'll lave me do ut,' and Aunt Bridgie was readin' to me in the paper about your gran' dinner party last night and I says to her and to myself, 'There'll be a main lot of dishes to be washed th' day and I'd better step ...
— The Squirrel-Cage • Dorothy Canfield

... pipe. "Eh me," says Shortreed, "sic an endless fund o' humor and drollery as he then had wi' him! Never ten yards but we were either laughing or roaring and singing. Wherever we stopped, how brawlie he suited himsel' to everybody! He aye did as the lave did; never made himsel' the great man, or took ony airs in the company. I've seen him in a' moods in these jaunts, grave and gay, daft and serious, sober and drunk—(this, however, even in our wildest rambles, was but rare)—but, drunk or sober, he was aye the gentleman. He looked excessively ...
— Memoirs of the Life of Sir Walter Scott, Volume I (of 10) • John Gibson Lockhart

... to side upon the pillow. She wished she could do something to relieve him. She did not want to wake him up; but if she could only lave his face and hands with ...
— Janice Day, The Young Homemaker • Helen Beecher Long

... foight I want," responded Owen. "It's a foight I'm shpilin' for. Come out forninst the place, where the shlobberin' Frinch can lave a man be, ...
— The Cobbler In The Devil's Kitchen - From "Mackinac And Lake Stories", 1899 • Mary Hartwell Catherwood

... it's a lovely land fer a gravyince, an' I'll niver lave it.' He looked Jim up and down again. 'It's put th' good heart in you, Done.' Jim nodded smilingly. 'D'ye be hearin' iv th' little lady from off the ship?' continued Phil, as if ...
— In the Roaring Fifties • Edward Dyson

... do it; no I won't, Miss Nora; but there's thim as will have to suffer if Andy Neil is turned out of his hut. You spake for me, Miss Nora; you spake up for me, girleen. Why, the Squire, you're the light of his eyes; you spake up, and say, 'Lave poor Andy in his little hut; lave poor Andy with a roof over him. Don't mind the bit of a rint.' Why, then, Miss Nora, how can I pay the rint? Look at my arrum, dear." As the man spoke he thrust out his arm, pushing ...
— Light O' The Morning • L. T. Meade

... puts me in mind of a story," came from Shadow. "An old Irishman was dying and wanted to make his will. 'How do ye want to lave yer money, Pat' asked his friend. 'Sure,' says Pat; 'I want to lave it all to me woif an' me four childer, equal loike, so ivery wan gits ...
— Dave Porter and His Rivals - or, The Chums and Foes of Oak Hall • Edward Stratemeyer

... na, whyles, but thou may thieve; What then? poor beastie, thou maun live! A daimen icher in a thrave 'S a sma' request; I'll get a blessin' wi' the lave An' never miss't! ...
— The Continental Monthly, Vol. IV. October, 1863, No. IV. - Devoted to Literature and National Policy. • Various

... mainly from New Guinea, yet the immigration has not been a recent one, since there has been time for the greater portion of the species to have become changed. We find, also, that many very characteristic New Guinea forms lave not entered the Moluccas at all, while others found in Ceram and Gilolo do not extend so far west as Bouru. Considering, further, the absence of most of the New Guinea mammals from the Moluccas, we are led to the conclusion that these islands are not fragments which have been separated ...
— The Malay Archipelago - Volume II. (of II.) • Alfred Russel Wallace

... about the material fabric, the actual stone and mortar, of Trinity College, Dublin, which makes a vivid appeal to the imagination of the common man. The cultured sentimentalist will not indeed be able to lave his soul in tepid emotion while he walks through these quadrangles, as he may among the cloisters and chapels of the Oxford colleges. The amateur of the past cannot here stand at gaze before any single building as he does before the weather-beaten front of ...
— Hyacinth - 1906 • George A. Birmingham

... away also. "Very well. Now, captin dear, ye may get upon your feet; but—understand me—av ye attimpts to lay hands upon either ov us, the other'll shoot ye through the head widout waitin' to say, 'By your lave.' Arrah, now, it's kilt he is, I do belave!" as the fellow rose from my prostrate body and saw that I made no movement—for all this time he had kept so tight a hold upon my throat that he fairly strangled me, and, though I still, in a dreamy way, heard him speaking, my strength had entirely ...
— The Cruise of the "Esmeralda" • Harry Collingwood

... during one bright semicircle of the sun. Rowing our boat against the current, between wide meadows, we turned aside into the Assabeth. A more lovely stream than this, for a mile above its junction with the Concord, has never flowed on earth—nowhere indeed except to lave the interior regions of a poet's imagination.... It comes flowing softly through the midmost privacy and deepest heart of a wood which whispers it to be quiet; while the stream whispers back again from its sedgy borders, ...
— Hawthorne - (English Men of Letters Series) • Henry James, Junr.

... "You may lave one lamp always burning, and that will be enough, as books are not allowed. When your dinner is brought, the officer on duty will open the pies and the poultry to see that they do not contain any documents; for here no letters are allowed to come ...
— The Memoires of Casanova, Complete • Jacques Casanova de Seingalt

... azure ring expand: I watch the foam-wreaths toss and swim In the wine that o'erruns the jewelled rim, Edges of chrysolite emerge, Dawn-tinted, from the misty surge; My thrilled, uncovered front I lave, My eager senses kiss the wave, And drain, with its viewless draught, the lore That warmeth the bosom's secret core, And the fire that maddens the poet's brain With wild sweet ardor and ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 2, Issue 12, October, 1858 • Various

... dainty ladies whose linen we lave, we laundress drudges, could look in here, Wouldn't their feet shrink back with sickness, and wouldn't their faces go pale with fear? White, well-ironed, all sheen and sweetness, that linen looks when it leaves our hands; But they little ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 100, June 20, 1891 • Various

... oor the tops o' sthools, the both forninst an' back! He'll lave yez pick the blessed flure, an' walk the straightest crack! He's liftin' barrels wid his teeth, and singin' "Garry Owen," Till all the house be strikin' hands, sence Chairley ...
— Pipes O'Pan at Zekesbury • James Whitcomb Riley

... of the island. In the same year, 1521, the survivors of Magellan's expedition met the son of the Rajah of Luzon, who, as captain-general of the Sultan of Borneo and admiral of his fleet, had conquered for him the great city of Lave (Sarawak?). Might this captain, who was greatly feared by all his foes, have been the Rajah Matanda whom the Spaniards afterwards encountered in ...
— The Indolence of the Filipino • Jose Rizal

... belly deep; the mule had lowered its head; the old man was kneeling at the brink. Wayland saw him lave the water up with his hand: then throw it violently back. All at once, the grip of life snapped. Matthews was lying motionless on the sand. The horse was chocking its head up and down; the mule was stamping angrily with fore feet roiling the pool bottom. It had been one of ...
— The Freebooters of the Wilderness • Agnes C. Laut

... light or grave, God's messenger sent down to thee. Do thou With courtesy receive him, rise and bow, And, ere his shadow pass thy threshold, crave Permission first his heavenly feet to lave, Then lay before him all thou hast. Allow No cloud of passion to usurp thy brow Or mar thy hospitality; no wave Of mortal tumult to obliterate Thy soul's marmoreal calmness. Grief should be, Like joy, majestic, equable, sedate; Confirming, cleansing, ...
— Poems with Power to Strengthen the Soul • Various

... mysilf, gostherin' wid you outside iv my own door,' says he, 'for it's plain to be seen,' says he, 'you don't know what your're sayin', an' no one ELSE knows what you mane, you unforthunate fool,' says he; 'so, onst for all, open the door quietly,' says he, 'or, by my sowkins, I'll not lave ...
— The Purcell Papers - Volume III. (of III.) • Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu

... and weel content, I hae nae mair to crave; And gin I live to keep him sae, I'm blest aboov the lave. And will I see his face again? And will I hear him speak? I'm downright dizzy wi' the thought, In troth I'm like to greet. For there's nae luck about the house, There's nae lack at a'; There's little pleasure in the house When ...
— The Universal Reciter - 81 Choice Pieces of Rare Poetical Gems • Various

... whether light or grave, God's messenger sent down to thee; do thou With courtesy receive him; rise and bow; And, ere his shadow pass thy threshold, crave Permission first his heavenly feet to lave; Then lay before him all thou hast; allow No cloud of passion to usurp thy brow, Or mar thy hospitality; no wave Of mortal tumult to obliterate The soul's marmoreal calmness: Grief shall be Like joy, majestic, equable, ...
— The Pleasures of Life • Sir John Lubbock

... brush wid him, mesilf. Con Murphy takes a hand in this game. We nade no lawyer-body—not yit. Lave it to me, Miss Ruthie, acushla! Sure I'll invite mesilf to supper wid youse, too. I'll come wid Neale, and he shall be prepared beforehand. Be sure he comes here first. Never weep a tear, me dear. I'll fix ...
— The Corner House Girls at School • Grace Brooks Hill

... Phoebus, going, cleanse Sarpedon, [withdrawn] from among the heap of weapons, of sable gore, and afterwards bearing him far away, lave him in the stream of the river, and anoint him with ambrosia, and put around him immortal garments, then give him in charge to the twin-brothers. Sleep and Death, swift conductors, to be borne away, who will quickly place him in the rich state of wide ...
— The Iliad of Homer (1873) • Homer

... Just as the sun had flung its earliest lance O'er towering treetops, Hercules drew near The spot where every dawn the brass-hoofed deer From out the grot came softly slipping down To drink and lave its limbs of glossy brown. Day after day the mighty man had sought In vain the stag's retreat; his mind was fraught With gathering fear lest he should find no trace Of royal covert in that wildwood ...
— The New England Magazine Volume 1, No. 6, June, 1886, Bay State Monthly Volume 4, No. 6, June, 1886 • Various

... dream for me A wild sweet dream of a foreign land, Whose border sips of a foaming sea With lips of coral and silver sand; Where warm winds loll on the shady deeps, Or lave themselves in the tearful mist The great wild wave of the breaker weeps O'er ...
— Riley Songs of Home • James Whitcomb Riley

... Next to the kitchen the family bed room where Poke Drury and his dreary looking spouse slept. Adjoining this was the one spare bed room, with a couple of broken legged cots and a wash-stand without any bowl or pitcher. If one wished to lave his hands and face or comb his hair let him step out on the back porch under the shoulder of the mountain and utilize the road house toilet facilities there: they were a tin basin, a water pipe leading from a spring and a broken comb stuck after the fashion of the country in the long ...
— Six Feet Four • Jackson Gregory

... lave it as it is. If we should go away and lave the spalpeens down there without the rope, they might never find the way out, and would starve to death, and it would always grieve me to think I had starved six Apaches to death, instead of affording ...
— The Cave in the Mountain • Lieut. R. H. Jayne

... to-day is ended. The "punctual sea" has risen, and, waking his dreaming waves, he gives to them their several tasks. Some, with gentle touch, lave the heated rock; these, swift of foot, bring drink to the thirsty sand; those carry refreshing coolness to the tepid pool. Charged with blessings come they all, and, singing 'mid their joyous labor, they ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Volume 2, Issue 11, September, 1858 • Various

... my hand within the wave; Ah! how impressionless and cold! I touch it with my lip, and lave My forehead in the gold. It is a trivial thought, but sweet, Perhaps the wave will kiss ...
— Poems of Henry Timrod • Henry Timrod

... Rowing our boat against the current, between wide meadows, we turned aside into the Assabeth. A more lovely stream than this, for a mile above its junction with the Concord, has never flowed on earth, nowhere, indeed, except to lave the interior regions of a poet's imagination. It is sheltered from the breeze by woods and a hillside; so that elsewhere there might be a hurricane, and here scarcely a ripple across the shaded ...
— The Old Manse (From "Mosses From An Old Manse") • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... downward by her dying doves; Vulcan, spun on a wheel, shall track The circle of the zodiac; Silver Artemis be lost, To the polar blizzards tossed; Heaven shall curdle as with blood; The sun be swallowed in the flood; The universe be silent save For the low drone of winds that lave The shadowed great world's ashen sides As through the rustling void she glides. Then shall there be a whisper heard Of the Grave's Secret and its Word, Where in black silence none shall cry Save those who, dead-affrighted, spy How from the ...
— Georgian Poetry 1916-17 - Edited by Sir Edward Howard Marsh • Various

... urns his flood; First the famed authors of his ancient name, The winding Isis and the fruitful Thame: The Kennet swift, for silver eels renown'd; The Loddon slow, with verdant alders crown'd; 340 Cole, whose dark streams his flowery islands lave; And chalky Wey, that rolls a milky wave; The blue, transparent Vandalis appears; The gulfy Lee his sedgy tresses rears; And sullen Mole, that hides his diving flood; And silent ...
— The Poetical Works Of Alexander Pope, Vol. 1 • Alexander Pope et al

... Dand. "Only I think ye're mair like me than the lave of them. Ye've mair of the poetic temper, tho' Guid kens little enough of the poetic taalent. It's an ill gift at the best. Look at yoursel'. At denner you were all sunshine and flowers and laughter, and now you're like the star of ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. XIX (of 25) - The Ebb-Tide; Weir of Hermiston • Robert Louis Stevenson

... a shock unable to withstand, Admits the sea: in at the gaping side The crowding waves gush with impetuous rage Resistless, overwhelming; horrors seize The mariners; Death in their eyes appears, They stare, they lave, they pump, they swear, they pray (Vain efforts!) still the battering waves rush in, Implacable, till, delug'd by the foam, The ship sinks foundering in the ...
— The Book of Humorous Verse • Various

... not bring me wealth or fame, 'Tis very little that they brought me. But one, the crossest of the crew, The ugly old one, uninvited, Said, "I shall be avenged on YOU, My child; you shall grow up short-sighted!" With magic juices did she lave Mine eyes, and wrought her wicked pleasure. Well, of all gifts the Fairies gave, HERS is the ...
— Ballads in Blue China and Verses and Translations • Andrew Lang

... chastity. Come clad in white, And lave your palms at some clear fountain's brim! Then watch the mild lamb at the altar bright, Yon ...
— The Elegies of Tibullus • Tibullus

... flypapers of a boy's kite? I do not seek to be dragged back to the ground, I prefer to mount without a string. Everything we attempt to do falls short of its conception in its fulfilment. All glory is disappointment,—all success is failure; how acutely bitter, only the hero himself can know!" "You lave no regrets, then, Herr Ritter?" said 'Lora, with her clear earnest gaze full upon his face. "None," he answered, simply. "And will you always keep silence?" "Always, so far as I can see," said the old German. "There are quarrels enough in the world without my intervention, ...
— Dreams and Dream Stories • Anna (Bonus) Kingsford

... bidding, swore To tell thee nought in twelve whole days to come, Or till, enquiry made, thou should'st thyself Learn his departure, lest thou should'st impair Thy lovely features with excess of grief. But lave thyself, and, fresh attired, ascend To thy own chamber, there, with all thy train, To worship Pallas, who shall save, thenceforth, Thy son from death, what ills soe'er he meet. Add not fresh sorrows to the present woes 910 Of ...
— The Odyssey of Homer • Homer

... with her eyes open to the darkness, letting it lave over her as if it were water and she had drowned in it with ...
— Star-Dust • Fannie Hurst

... plunged boldly, No matter how coldly The rough river ran,— Over the brink of it, Picture it—think of it, Dissolute Man! Lave in it, drink of it, Then, ...
— The Poetical Works of Thomas Hood • Thomas Hood

... montagne, dis-je, dont la forme est conique, et qui est isolee par des vallees, dont le sol lui etoit sur-abaisse de 3 ou 400 toises, a sa base calcaire. Sur cette premiere assise repose une couche volcanique, ensuite une autre tranche volcanique calcaire, a laquelle succede un sommet forme d'une lave dure. Une autre montagne aupres du fief de la Copodia, egalement conique, est toute volcanique, a l'exception d'une couche de pierre calcaire dure et blanche, qui la tranche a moitie hauteur parallelement a sa base. Quelques montagnes ou les couches volcaniques ou calcaires ...
— Theory of the Earth, Volume 2 (of 4) • James Hutton

... heavens forbid! Is it me stay here all night? No, your honor: I tether the boat at siven o'hlyock, and lave Brimstone Billy—God forgimme!—to take care ...
— The Miraculous Revenge - Little Blue Book #215 • Bernard Shaw

... daisies thick and white, Above her head that wanst lay on my breast, I had no tears, but took the childhers' hands, An' says, "We'll lave the mother to her rest," An' och! the sod was green that summers day; An' rainbows crossed the low hills, blue an' fair; But black an' foul the blighted furrows stretched, An' sent their cruel poison through ...
— Old Spookses' Pass • Isabella Valancy Crawford

... Gineral, Kurnel?" said he, with the utmost apparent deference; "av coorse ye can, sir, only it'll be necessary for you to lave your carriage an' the horses and the nagur here in the care of these gintlemen, while I takes ...
— Bricks Without Straw • Albion W. Tourgee

... front parlor ever so permanently rented out, the motion-picture theater has brought to thousands of young city starvelings, if not the quietude of the home, then at least the warmth and a juxtaposition and a deep darkness that can lave the sub-basement throb of temples and is filled with music with a hum ...
— Gaslight Sonatas • Fannie Hurst

... or grieve, or pine. Ich bin dein! Go, lave once more thy restless hands Afar within the azure sea,— Traverse Arabia's scorching sands,— Fly where no thought can follow thee, O'er desert waste and billowy brine: Ich ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 5, No. 32, June, 1860 • Various

... "'tis a rocky road to Dublin, but a shorter wan to hell! Did you want f'r to shoot, Jack? Look at Dave Elerson an' th' thrigger finger av him twitchin' all a-thremble! Wisha, lad! lave the red omadhouns go. Arre you tired o' the hair ye wear, Jack Mount? Come on out o' this, ...
— The Maid-At-Arms • Robert W. Chambers

... alarming; There heroes plow With keel and bow, And blood-rain showers In oaken bowers. The good steel blade Is seed-corn made. The fields bring yearly Not honor merely, But gold as well. Oh, kindly swell, Thou ocean billow! Thee will I follow. My father's grave Calm waters lave (How still he sleepeth Where green grass creepeth). Mine blue shall be, Flecked like the sea; Forever floating, On tempest gloating, And fathoms deep Draw men to sleep; To me thou'rt given For life a haven; My grave thou'lt be, ...
— Fridthjof's Saga • Esaias Tegner

... the way down-stairs. In the bathroom he paused to lave his much abused features; and by the time he had finished, my own features had had a chance to ...
— Mr. Hawkins' Humorous Adventures • Edgar Franklin

... on in the hills of Circassia as in all the rest of the world beside. Sunshine and shadow glance athwart its crowning peaks, the waves of the Black Sea lave its shores, its daughters still dream of a home among the Turks, and the secret cargoes are yet run from Anapa up the Golden Horn. The slave bazaar of the Ottoman capital still presents its bevy of fair creatures ...
— The Circassian Slave; or, The Sultan's Favorite - A Story of Constantinople and the Caucasus • Lieutenant Maturin Murray

... hundred of my women dance the Grecian Dances silently before me, the while I lave myself with roses in a bath of porphyry. Then let them circle me, with interlacing arms, that I may see on all sides alabaster forms in graceful evolution, swaying like tall reeds bending over an ...
— Three short works - The Dance of Death, The Legend of Saint Julian the Hospitaller, A Simple Soul. • Gustave Flaubert

... to the Creole heart—jambolaya. There it was, steaming and smelling,—a delicious confusion of rice and red pepper, chicken legs, ham, and tomatoes. Mike, on her opposite arm, was struggling to lave ...
— Dr. Sevier • George W. Cable

... the ape. "Lave me at 'im, the dirty villain! I'll have the rube's loife, or me name ...
— Toaster's Handbook - Jokes, Stories, and Quotations • Peggy Edmund & Harold W. Williams, compilers

... a tremendous one, and had it alighted fairly on the top of his head, would assuredly Lave cleft the skull, in spite of the protection afforded by the hat. It had, however, fallen somewhat on one side, and had shorn off the scalp, ear, and part of the cheek. It was three weeks before the ...
— Friends, though divided - A Tale of the Civil War • G. A. Henty

... I know him?" cried Mr O'Gallagher; "it's the young gentleman who bit a hole in his grandmother; Master Keene, as they call him. Keen teeth, at all events. Lave him with me; and that's his dinner in the basket I presume; lave that too. He'll soon be a good boy, or it will end ...
— Percival Keene • Frederick Marryat

... in the rain, in the days that are gane, In the rain and the wind and the lave; They shoutit in the ha' and they routit on the hill, But they're a' ...
— Stories of the Border Marches • John Lang and Jean Lang

... you be a lady, even if you are here with the likes of me—I had to lave me father, we was so poor and the taxes is so high, and the rint so big intirely, and the landlord a-threatenin' of us to set us in the road any foine mornin'; and so I'm goin' to Ameriky to take a place; me cousin left to be married, and if I does well—an' sure I'll try me best—I ...
— Bessie's Fortune - A Novel • Mary J. Holmes

... went to bury our dead, for we wud not lave thim to the Paythans, an' in movin' among the haythen we nearly lost that little orf'cer bhoy. He was for givin' wan divil wather and layin' him aisy against a rock. "Be careful, Sorr," sez I; "a wounded Paythan's worse than a live wan." My troth, before the words was out of my mouth, the man ...
— Soldier Stories • Rudyard Kipling

... "there's good and bad in this world of ours. When tenants kick and labourers clare out, an' a boycott's put on a man, they'd lave yer cattle to die an' yer crops to rot for all they care. It's what they want. Well, there happens to be a few dacent people left in Ireland yet, and they have got up an organization they call the Emergency men; they go to any part of the country and ...
— Stories by English Authors: Ireland • Various

... he pulled off his rough blue flannel shirt and stooping over the well-filled tub of hot water, he began to lave the water over his arms, and the upper part ...
— The Underworld - The Story of Robert Sinclair, Miner • James C. Welsh

... ask me what the trouble is, and I don't want a soul to know. Of course, we can't go to the matinee to-morrow. We can't ever go anywhere together again." Once more the tears threatened to fall. She shut her eyes and forced them back, then went dejectedly down the hall to the bathroom to lave her flushed face ...
— Marjorie Dean High School Freshman • Pauline Lester

... the scene of excitement, when one morning Biddy, our domestic, entered the sitting-room, her head bobbing, her hair flying, and her cap perched upon the top of her head, and exclaimed: "Wurrah! I have seen a ghoust, and it's lave the hoose I must. Sich a night! I'd niver pass anither the like of it for the gift o' the hoose. Bad kick to ye, an' the hoose is ...
— ZigZag Journeys in Northern Lands; - The Rhine to the Arctic • Hezekiah Butterworth

... Thee to the wave, At noon where Lesbia loved to lave? Who named the bower alone where Daphne lay? And who, when Caelia shrieked for aid, Bad you with kisses hush the Maid? What other was't than Love, ...
— The Monk; a romance • M. G. Lewis

... na, whiles, but thou may thieve; What then? poor beastie, thou maun live! A daimen icker in a thrave 'S a sma' request: I'll get a blessin wi' the lave, An' ...
— The Golden Treasury - Of the Best Songs and Lyrical Poems in the English Language • Various

... Kate, of snaw-white webs, Made o' your linkum twine, But, ah! I fear our bonny burn Will ne'er lave web o' ...
— Library Of The World's Best Literature, Ancient And Modern, Vol 3 • Various

... But I pay fur his kape in the hotel, out o' me wages, as if he was a Christian, and so he is, pretty near. There's nothin' he doesn't know; but I don't suppose ye'd allow him to travel in the trains—and I couldn't lave him." ...
— The Port of Adventure • Charles Norris Williamson and Alice Muriel Williamson

... At length the hoary victim, freed from chains, Las Casas gently leads to safer plains; Soft Zilia's yielding soul the joy opprest, She bath'd with floods of tears her father's breast. 130 Las Casas now explores a secret cave Whose shaggy sides the languid billows lave; "There rest secure, he cried, the Christian God "Will hover near, will guard the lone abode." Oft to the gloomy cell his steps repair, 135 While night's chill breezes wave his silver'd hair; Oft in the tones of love, the words of peace, He bids the bitter tears of ...
— Poems (1786), Volume I. • Helen Maria Williams

... murmuring, flowing river, Where the shore the waters lave, Now the moon beams fall and quiver On a green ...
— Lays from the West • M. A. Nicholl

... a fair, stately woman, taller than any of her girls, and with half the mind to hate them all because they were none of them a son. More or less the three were like her, lofty brows and shining hair and skin like morning light, the lave of them,—but as for me, I was my father's child. There's a portrait of him now, hangs on the chimney-pier: a slight man, and not tall,—the dark hair waves away on either side the low, clear brow,—the eyes deep-set, and large ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 11, No. 63, January, 1863 - A Magazine Of Literature, Art, And Politics • Various

... and eucalyptus scrub, amid huge fragments of rocks. It rises like an island from the midst of the ocean, and as I looked upon it from the plains below, I could without any great stretch of the imagination, picture to myself that it really was such. Bold and precipitous, it only wanted the sea to lave its base; and I cannot but think that such must at no very remote period have been the case, and that the immense flat we had been traversing, ...
— Two Expeditions into the Interior of Southern Australia, Complete • Charles Sturt

... his native stream, the Guadalquivir, Juan to lave his youthful limbs was wont; And having learnt to swim in that sweet river, Had often turn'd the art to some account: A better swimmer you could scarce see ever, He could, perhaps, have pass'd the Hellespont, As once (a feat on which ourselves ...
— Don Juan • Lord Byron

... Abbotsford.—Corrected my proofs and the lave of it till about one o'clock. Then started for a walk to Chiefswood, which I will take from station to station,[399] with a book in my pouch. I have begun Lawrie Todd, which ought, considering the author's undisputed ...
— The Journal of Sir Walter Scott - From the Original Manuscript at Abbotsford • Walter Scott

... ocean spaces, Of hearts that are wild and brave, Of populous city places, Of desolate shores they lave, Of men who sally in quest of gold To sink ...
— The Spell of the Yukon • Robert Service

... hour before the officers arrived. The service was commenced with prayer at the time appointed, the preacher and hearers had their Bibles in their hands to read the text, when the constable and his attendants came in, and, exhibiting the warrant, ordered him to lave the pulpit and come down; but he mildly told him that he was about his Master's business, and must rather obey his Lord's voice than that of man. Then a constable was ordered to fetch him down, who, coming up and taking hold of his coat, was about ...
— The Works of John Bunyan • John Bunyan

... bade Cupid on fair Baiae's side Plunge with his torch into the glassy tide; As the boy swam the sparks of mischief flew And fell in showers upon the liquid blue; Hence all who venture on that shore to lave Emerge love-stricken ...
— The Greville Memoirs - A Journal of the Reigns of King George IV and King William - IV, Volume 1 (of 3) • Charles C. F. Greville

... and nurses in the hospital could tell him what would make all clear." She went through many of the houses, inquiring for Ellen Montgomery, but could not find her, and she was finally obliged to go to a hotel and rest. "I will take the lave of the houses in the morning," she thought, "it is aye the last thing that is the right thing; ...
— A Knight of the Nets • Amelia E. Barr

... be, indade! But if yez be afther eatin' thim now, ye'll shpoil yer supper,—thot ye will! Here's one a piece to ye, and now run away, and lave me do me worruk. ...
— Marjorie's Maytime • Carolyn Wells

... cite la maison de la courtisane Raab; dans la vallee de Mambre, les tombeaux d'Adam, d'Abraham, d'Isaac, de Jacob, de Sara, de Rebecca, de Lia; a Nazareth, l'endroit ou l'ange vint annoncer a Marie qu'elle seroit mere en restant vierge; a Bethleem, la pierre sur laquelle Jesus fut lave a sa naissance; les tombeaux de Rachel, de David, de saint Jerome, de trois des bergers ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, - and Discoveries of The English Nation, Volume 10 - Asia, Part III • Richard Hakluyt

... kin' o' a custom amo' the fishers. There's some gey puir fowk amon' 's, ye see, an' when a twa o' them merries, the lave o' 's wants to gie them a bit o' a start like. Sae we a' gang to the weddin' an' eats an' drinks plenty, an' pays for a' 'at we hae; and they mak' a guid profit out o' 't, for the things doesna cost them nearhan' sae muckle ...
— Malcolm • George MacDonald

... there's a good sprinkling of our own boys as well. I was doing a wee bit of pot-shot-and-be-damned-to-you work in the other side of the slack, and my eyes open all the time for an enemy's back. There was one near me, but I'm beggared if I could find him. 'I'll not lave this place (p. 078) till I do,' I says to meself, and spent half the nights I was there prowlin' round like a dog at a fair with my eyes open for the sniper. I came on his post wan night. I smelt him out because he didn't bury his sausage skins as we do, and they stunk like the hole of ...
— The Red Horizon • Patrick MacGill

... in a garden at Wuertemberg—for there might have been met successively a wild boar, a hermit, several sepulchres, and a barque detaching itself from the shore of its own accord, in order to lead you into a boudoir where water-spouts lave you when you are settling yourself down upon ...
— Bouvard and Pecuchet - A Tragi-comic Novel of Bourgeois Life • Gustave Flaubert

... lessons had not been thrown away on his attentive listener. She opened every door in the room, "by your lave," as she said. She looked all over the walls to see if there was any old stovepipe hole or other avenue to eye or ear. Then she went, in her excess of caution, to the window. She saw nothing noteworthy except Mr. Gifted Hopkins and the charge he convoyed, large and small, in ...
— The Guardian Angel • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

... had long studied the art of war, and during his stay in New York had doubtless seen or heard of the floating battery, determined to construct two such batteries, and accordingly built the Lave and Tonnerre. With one of these, the Lave, during the Russian War, he assailed and destroyed in the brief space of one hour the strong fortress of Kinburn, near Sebastopol; and in striking contrast to this success, a large British steamship, heavily armed, but constructed ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 8, No. 46, August, 1861 • Various

... pain of what was coming upon you; and I fear, though long threatening, it has come at last with a weight which you could hardly have anticipated. May God sustain and comfort you! You are supported, I well know, while you are afflicted, in every recollection of what you lave lost. Surely the greatness of your trial argues the Kindness of Heaven, for it proves the greatness of the blessing you ...
— Autobiography and Letters of Orville Dewey, D.D. - Edited by his Daughter • Orville Dewey

... been here this morning," said the Highlander, "and I've tell't him mair than I've tell't you. And he's jest directed me to put my sinful trust in the Father of us a'. I've sinned heaviest against Him, laddie, but His love is stronger than the lave." ...
— Tales from Many Sources - Vol. V • Various

... from thy cool, distant hall, And lave the parched brow of the feverish earth, The little drooping flow'rets on thee call, Come, with thy cool touch wake them up to mirth They will lift up glad faces to the sky, Drinking in gladness from the warm moist air, Now, thirsty, hot, and faint they droop and die, Thou ...
— Verses and Rhymes by the way • Nora Pembroke

... of them, "what made Mrs. Sunderland's cook and chamber maid go aff and lave her right in ...
— Trials and Confessions of a Housekeeper • T. S. Arthur

... bright, Two loved ones flee beyond yon failing light, No more to droop within this gloomy world, Their angel pinions next God's throne were furled; There now—for aye forgot this earthly night— They lave those bright wings ...
— Lays of Ancient Virginia, and Other Poems • James Avis Bartley

... hating the sight of blood and rating our skins a hantle higher nor our lives; and as for hanging, while she is a fixing of the nail and a making of the noose she has time t' alter her mind. But a jump into a canal is no more than into bed; and the water it does all the lave, will ye, nill ye. Why, look at me, the mother o' nine, wasn't I agog to make a hole in ...
— The Cloister and the Hearth • Charles Reade

... remembering prayer, Mr Pittle put up a few words for criminals under sentence of death, there being two at the time in the Ayr jail, at the which petition I happened to look at Captain Armour, who, with the lave of the officers, were within the magistrates' loft, and I thought he had, at the moment, a likeness to poor Jeanie Gaisling, that was executed for the murder of her ...
— The Provost • John Galt

... "Just like all the lave of them," said another, "snurling up her neb at a man for lack of gear. Why didna he brag of some rich uncle ...
— A Son of Hagar - A Romance of Our Time • Sir Hall Caine

... the wife of Siegfried / was come unto the grave, With water from the fountain / full oft her face they lave, So struggled with her sorrow / the faithful lady fair. Great beyond all measure / was the ...
— The Nibelungenlied - Translated into Rhymed English Verse in the Metre of the Original • trans. by George Henry Needler

... the young, the loved, the brave, The death barge came for them, And where the seas yon black rocks lave Is heard their requiem They buried them and threw the sand ...
— American Prisoners of the Revolution • Danske Dandridge

... beget My earliest, youngest woe. The tears are streaming yet Which first thou madest flow. Quenchless this source is found Which thou hast first unsealed. It issues from a wound That never may be healed. But in the bitter wave I shall be clean restored, And from my soul shall lave ...
— The Poems of Emma Lazarus - Vol. II. (of II.), Jewish Poems: Translations • Emma Lazarus

... throb and thrill of new life, and experience the swing and sweep of spiritual impulses. He makes them to know that the man who aspires recks not of cold, of storm, or of snow, if only he may reach the summit and lave his soul in the glory that crowns the marriage of earth and sky. They feel that the aspirant is but yielding obedience to the behests of his better self to scale the heights where ...
— The Vitalized School • Francis B. Pearson

... the hospital was not a very clear one, and she did not consider it much better than a prison; at least, it was to her a place where sick people who had neither home nor friends were sent; a place where other hands than her own would lave her father's fevered brow, and administer the cooling draught. To her it was sacrilege to permit any but herself to nurse him; and she felt that it was a privilege to stand day and night by his bed, and hold his hand, and anticipate all his wants. Her womanly instincts were strong, and she ...
— Make or Break - or, The Rich Man's Daughter • Oliver Optic

... y'are, Dermot? because if so ye may go away! Shure, 'tis all the blarney the bhoys does be givin' me is dhrivin' me away from me home. Maybe ye'll get sinse whin I lave ye all, as ...
— The Empire Annual for Girls, 1911 • Various

... your darling is not dead," said another kind voice—little Bertha Bryant's mother. "Give him to us and we will wash and lave his wounds and bind them up with healing salves. See how freely they bleed. That could not be the case if ...
— The Red Moccasins - A Story • Morrison Heady

... wash in a stable bucket of fresh water, and it amused me to see George use the big stable sponge to lave and cool Patty's excited parts. She was in a nervously lost kind of state, sobbing and whimpering: "Oh! oh! oh! You have quite done for me—my poor, poor bottom is so hot and so stretched—I shall never be right again. Oh! oh! oh! Kiss me, Mr. Percy. ...
— Forbidden Fruit • Anonymous

... I don't know how to account f'r it. Very few people were sea-sick on th' v'yage, but sivral hundherd who were injyin' paddlin' a spoon in a cup iv beef tea on deck spoke iv havin' th' same sinsation. I didn't speak iv it to th' ship's doctor. I'd as lave carry me ailments to a harness maker as to a ship's doctor. But there it was, an' fr'm me pint iv view it was th' most important ivint iv ...
— Mr. Dooley Says • Finley Dunne

... pain of poison. The prince walked on, wise in his thought, to the wall of rock; then sat, and stared at the structure of giants, where arch of stone and steadfast column upheld forever that hall in earth. Yet here must the hand of the henchman peerless lave with water his winsome lord, the king and conqueror covered with blood, with struggle spent, and unspan his helmet. Beowulf spake in spite of his hurt, his mortal wound; full well he knew his portion now was past and gone of earthly bliss, and all had fled ...
— Beowulf • Anonymous

... they have many strange ceremonies. The bramins, who are their priests, come to the water having a string about their necks, and with many ceremonies lave the water with both their hands, turning the string with both their hands in several manners; and though it be never so cold, they wash themselves regularly at all times. These gentiles eat no flesh, neither do they kill any thing, but live on rice, butter, milk, and fruits. They ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume VII • Robert Kerr

... come before, only the day afther the young lady took me to saw wood for the ould nagur, I got the pleurisy, and didn't lave my bed these five weeks," said the man, lingering ...
— May Brooke • Anna H. Dorsey

... telegraph district. This proved advantageous on many occasions, and once, at Auli-eta, was even necessary. We were surveyed with suspicious glances as soon as we entered the station-house, and when we asked for water to lave our hands and face, we were directed to the irrigating ditch in the street. Our request for a better room was answered by the question, if the one we had was not good enough, and how long we intended ...
— Across Asia on a Bicycle • Thomas Gaskell Allen and William Lewis Sachtleben

... they are quick, certain, and easily obtained. I leave those which I am told arise from patient study, length of time, and severe application, to the fools who think time given to be so wasted. Roses grow for me to gather: rivers roll for me to lave in. Let the slave dig the mine, but for me let the diamond sparkle. Let the lamb, the dove, and the life-loving eel writhe and die; it shall not disturb me, while I enjoy the viands. The five senses are my deities; to them I pay worship and adoration, and ...
— Anna St. Ives • Thomas Holcroft

... bakes Fine flour well kneaded in unleaven'd cakes. The Guests ethereal quaff the lucid flood, Smile on their hosts, and taste terrestrial food; And while from seraph-lips sweet converse springs, Lave their fair feet, and ...
— The Temple of Nature; or, the Origin of Society - A Poem, with Philosophical Notes • Erasmus Darwin

... issued thence. Not so, if Dame from heaven, as thou sayst, Moves and directs thee; then no flattery needs. Enough for me that in her name thou ask. Go therefore now: and with a slender reed See that thou duly gird him, and his face Lave, till all sordid stain thou wipe from thence. For not with eye, by any cloud obscur'd, Would it be seemly before him to come, Who stands the foremost minister in heaven. This islet all around, there far beneath, Where the wave beats it, on the oozy bed Produces store ...
— The Divine Comedy • Dante

... that,' returned Yusuf, 'the meneester and Beacon Shortcoats, and my auld auntie, and the lave of them, aye ca'ed me a vessel of destruction. That was the best name they had for puir Tam. So what odds culd it mak, if I took up with the Prophet, and I was ower lang leggit to row in a galley? Forbye, here they say that a man who prays and gies awmous, and keeps frae wine, is sicker to ...
— A Modern Telemachus • Charlotte M. Yonge

... reflect. reflejo m. light, gleam, glimmer. refregar rub. refulgente adj. resplendent, brilliant. regalar make merry, cheer, entertain, delight; —se feast, make merry, fare sumptuously. regar lave, water. regio, -a royal, regal, magnificent. regin f. region, realm. registrar examine, scan. regocijar gladden, brighten. reina f. queen. reinar reign. rer laugh; —se laugh; —-se de laugh at. relmpago m. lightning flash. relinchar whinny, neigh. ...
— El Estudiante de Salamanca and Other Selections • George Tyler Northup

... I'll lave the chapel on the spot, and maybe you won't see me agin." She pulled up her shawl, ...
— My New Curate • P.A. Sheehan

... themselves insulted, and extending my mouth on either side nearly as far as the ears, I took down my haversack and departed, singing as I went the song of the ancient Demos, who, when dying, asked for his supper, and water wherewith to lave his hands— ...
— The Pocket George Borrow • George Borrow

... refreshment! Soon shall its waters in my bosom still Life's fitful fever; and my spirit then Adown oblivion's stream shall glide to you, Ye spirits, shrouded in eternal mist. With tranquil pleasure in your deep repose A weary son of earth may lave his soul!— What whisp'ring sounds pervade the dreary grove? What hollow murmurs haunt its twilight gloom?— They gather round to view the stranger guest! Who are yon troop in high communion met, Like an assembl'd family of princes? They mingle peacefully, ...
— Iphigenia in Tauris • Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

... of his ballast train, persistently refused to expose one little car to "the crazy conthraption ye have the nerve to call a threstle. Sure I'd as lave tie down me gauge and sit on the biler as put a foot on that skinny doodle." And Murphy never made a mistake with ...
— The Return of Blue Pete • Luke Allan

... te perdon. Perdona Tu ancora, al corpo no che nulla pave All'alma si: deh per lei prega; e dona Battesme a me, ch'ogni mia colpa lave; In queste voci languide risuona Un non so che di flebile e soave Ch'al cor gli scende, ed ogni sdegno ammorza, Egli occhi a lagrimar ...
— Travels in France during the years 1814-1815 • Archibald Alison

... man 'at 's in ony sense a king o' men is bun' to reign ower them in that sense. I ken little aboot things mysel', an' I ha'e no feelin's to guide me, but I ha'e a wheen cowmon sense, an' that maun jist stan' for the lave." ...
— The Marquis of Lossie • George MacDonald

... Burke, with a toss of his head, "'tis little I bother meself along wid the likes o' Sir John. Lave him poke his nose into the Sacandagy an' dhrown there, bad cess to him! We've a thrick to match his, an' wan f'r ...
— The Reckoning • Robert W. Chambers

... of ye. Dismount and come in here. Lave your gun behind. Give your reins to your pal there," ...
— Foes in Ambush • Charles King

... where fair Isis rolls her purer wave, The partial muse delighted loves to lave; On her green banks a greener wreath she wove, To crown the bards that haunt her classic grove; Where Richards[428] wakes a genuine poet's fires, And modern Britons ...
— A Budget of Paradoxes, Volume II (of II) • Augustus de Morgan

... Lave Britain alone; if she won't pay, mavrone, She's puttin' her head into debt. If I know the books, the way the thing looks, She'll pay us, wid intherest, yet! Ay, faith he did say, so wise in his day— That noble ould Graycian, PHILANDER— That sauce for the goose, if well kept ...
— Punchinello, Vol. 1, No. 2, April 9, 1870 • Various

... that I found out from a man who run a still, and knew the Red Captain well, that he had made up his mind to lave Galway and come down south, where he had some friends; so I just shut up the house and walked down here. Now you know, your honor, that I don't come here for the sake of the reward. Not a penny of it would I touch if I were dying of hunger, and sooner than be pointed at as an informer I would ...
— One of the 28th • G. A. Henty

... sweet giblet pie—such a whack of pies do try a man, to be sure. Likewise junkets an' heavy cake be a responsibility, for if not eaten quick, they perish. But let it be mine to pass my days with a cheek o' pork like the present instance. Ruby, my dear, the young man here wants to lave us." ...
— I Saw Three Ships and Other Winter Tales • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... must be permitted," sighed Father Higgins. "Go on wid yer sacrifice, me dear felly. I presume, av coorse, that it will be in ordher for me to ate some av it. Let the fishes be well cooked, by-the-way, and sarved wid some kind av sauce. I'd almost as lave be devoured meself as ...
— Humorous Masterpieces from American Literature • Various

... in the sullen heat Of Summer's passion: In the sluggish stream The panting cattle lave their lazy feet, ...
— Green Fields and Running Brooks, and Other Poems • James Whitcomb Riley

... little that they had, and chatted, said the night-prayers, and went, aching, all of them, with unsatisfied hunger, to bed. You may conjecture the orderly, modest method of retiring, each Sister vanishing in turn behind a curtained screen to disrobe, lave, and vest herself for sleep, emerging in due time in the loose, full conventual night-garment of thick white twilled linen, high-throated, monkish-sleeved, and girdled with a thin cotton cord, her face, ...
— The Dop Doctor • Clotilde Inez Mary Graves



Words linked to "Lave" :   refresh, cleanse, wash, sponge down, freshen, lap, wash up, refreshen, flow, scrub up, freshen up, clean, scrub, lavage, hush, rinse, shampoo, lavation, gargle



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