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La   Listen
interjection
La  interj.  
1.
Look; see; behold; sometimes followed by you. (Obs.)
2.
An exclamation of surprise; commonly followed by me; as, La me! (Low)






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"La" Quotes from Famous Books



... but large dances, if his wife were absent. Alexina knew that her invitations to all important and many small dinners, not avowedly bridge or poker parties, were as inevitable as crab in season; but there were too many young men whom girls would infinitely prefer to enliven the monotony of crab a la poulette, to any married man, particularly one who had as little to say as poor Morty. She had known debutantes who flatly refused to dance with married men or even ...
— The Sisters-In-Law • Gertrude Atherton

... the troops of Sir Walter and de Clisson pursuing him to the very gates of that city. Sir Walter marched back with his force to the ships, but finding the wind unfavourable returned to Hennebon by land, capturing by the way the castle of Goy la Foret. Their return was joyfully welcomed, not only for the victory which they had achieved, but because the enemy was again drawing near to the town. Auray had fallen. The brave garrison, after existing for some time upon the flesh of their horses, had endeavoured to cut their way through ...
— Saint George for England • G. A. Henty

... of Francis Henry De la Motte, (for High Treason;) containing all the Arguments of the Counsel, &c. Before Mr. Justice Buller, at the Sessions House in the Old Bailey, July ...
— The Trial of Charles Random de Berenger, Sir Thomas Cochrane, • William Brodie Gurney

... not reply as Richelieu did to a brother author, "Je ne vois pas la necessite," but this I do say, that if you are in future to live by supplying the public with such nonsense, the ...
— Olla Podrida • Frederick Marryat

... side street; the traveller and the pedestrian had conferred together for a moment, and then the former had evidently employed the latter as a guide. From that point on, the footsteps of a man went side by side with those of the horse. Both came to an end at the hotel de la Belle-Alliance. Roland remembered that the horse wounded in the attack at Les Carronnieres had been brought to this inn. In all probability there was some connivance between the inn-keeper and the Companion of ...
— The Companions of Jehu • Alexandre Dumas, pere

... my dinner hour of seven was long past, McKnight and I went to a little restaurant down town where they have a very decent way of fixing chicken a la King. Hotchkiss had departed, economically bent, for a small hotel where he lived on ...
— The Man in Lower Ten • Mary Roberts Rinehart

... ever read was by the Spanish poet, Martinez de la Rosa, and although I was a boy then, I can ...
— A Traveller in Little Things • W. H. Hudson

... got great joy out of what we considered "good" music, but which was evidently low-brow. And Wagner at first was too much for us. That night in Leipzig we heard the "Walkuere!"—utterly aghast and rather impatient at so much non-understandable noise. Then we would drop down to "Carmen," "La Boheme," Hoffman's "Erzaeblung," and think, "This is life!" Each night that we spared for a spree we sought out some beer-hall—as unfrequented a one as possible, to get all the ...
— An American Idyll - The Life of Carleton H. Parker • Cornelia Stratton Parker

... Gits, containing fourteen machines, was attacked, and at La Chapelette the ammunition factory with nineteen machines was also the object of an attempt by the Allies. Some sixteen British aeroplanes bombarded a stores depot at Miramont in the Somme district, and the aerodrome at ...
— The Story of the Great War, Volume IV (of 8) • Francis J. (Francis Joseph) Reynolds, Allen L. (Allen Leon)

... overlooked them in changing the act, two window balconies of closely carved old wood, of solidly screening mashrubiyeh wood, jutted out from one cream-tinted wall, and above a gilded sofa, upholstered in the delicate fabric of the Rue de la Paix, hung a green satin banner embroidered in silver with ...
— The Fortieth Door • Mary Hastings Bradley

... this reserve? Why should you pretend not to understand? Don't you see," he added, with a cunning leer, "that I can make these medals as perfectly as they can at the Hotel de la ...
— Jack Harkaway's Boy Tinker Among The Turks - Book Number Fifteen in the Jack Harkaway Series • Bracebridge Hemyng

... been captured a week before by a French corvette; and that he was on his way to Saint Domingo. He looked a little downcast on losing his command, but shrugged his shoulders, and observed that it was "la fortune de la guerre." I requested him and five of his white crew to accompany me on board my ship. He replied that he was ready, and begged that he might be allowed to carry ...
— Paddy Finn • W. H. G. Kingston

... belafe," he said, "that it does not belong to any of the people of the fort. My idea is that a party of white men have come over the Rocky Mountains by Jasper House, and have stopped here on their way eastward, intending to reach Fort a la Corne, or Fort Pelly, farther south, though I doubt, unless they can procure sleighs, if they will get there ...
— Snow Shoes and Canoes - The Early Days of a Fur-Trader in the Hudson Bay Territory • William H. G. Kingston

... do that required one who had seen the Vita Nuova before he saw the Inferno. In la sua volontade e nostra pace. So Dante thought: but not altogether so Milton. It is not a difference of theological opinion: it is a difference of temper. For Dante the "will of God" at once suggested both the apostolic and the apocalyptic ...
— Milton • John Bailey

... general law of religious evolution traced so fully by Herbert Spencer. And there is reason to believe that the early forms of Shinto public worship may have been evolved out of a yet older family worship—much after the manner in which M. Fustel de Coulanges, in his wonderful book, La Cite Antique, has shown the religious public institutions among the Greeks and Romans to have been developed from the religion of the hearth. Indeed, the word ujigami, now used to signify a Shinto parish temple, and also its deity, means 'family God,' and in its present form is a corruption ...
— Glimpses of an Unfamiliar Japan • Lafcadio Hearn

... the people in the southern part of the country were called Spar-tans, and they were noted for their simple habits and their brav-er-y. The name of their land was La-co'ni-a, and so they were sometimes ...
— Fifty Famous Stories Retold • James Baldwin

... La.Ma. Two hot Sheepes marie: And wherefore not Ships? Boy. No Sheepe (sweet Lamb) vnlesse we feed ...
— The First Folio [35 Plays] • William Shakespeare

... in the duration and in the loss of life, the battle of La Tuna was not important, but its effect upon Mexico and the Central American Republics was ...
— Philip Dru: Administrator • Edward Mandell House

... la patrie!" but for the rest he fought in silence, as did the others, having other uses for their breath. All that could be heard was a loud and laborious panting, as of wrestlers in a match, the clang of rifle crossing rifle, the rattle of bayonet ...
— Ensign Knightley and Other Stories • A. E. W. Mason

... President went out to say a few words to them, but at the first sentence his voice failed him, and he could only stand and look down upon them, convulsive sobs rising in his throat. Suddenly a little red-legged Turco, weeping too, snatched off his fez and shouted "Vive la France!" and the cheer was taken up and repeated and repeated, until it swelled to a vast roar. As the train rolled out of the station, the crowd, bareheaded, ...
— The Destroyer - A Tale of International Intrigue • Burton Egbert Stevenson

... some 200 birds of La Plata actually known to the Author, arranged under species, and characterised by that intimate personal touch which constitutes the chief charm of his writing. Originally published in 1888 under the title Argentine ...
— Dead Man's Plack and an Old Thorn • William Henry Hudson

... squatted a la Turk, not on the cushion, but on the floor, in front of his master, and, with earnest voice and gesture, related the story which Peter the Great ...
— The Middy and the Moors - An Algerine Story • R.M. Ballantyne

... I used to think at first that the fresh light and soft air, impregnated with the odour of herbs and leaves, would instill new blood into my veins and impart fresh energy to my heart. I turned into a broad ride in the wood, and then I turned toward La Bouille, through a narrow path, between two rows of exceedingly tall trees, which placed a thick, green, almost black roof between the ...
— Masterpieces of Mystery, Vol. 1 (of 4) - Ghost Stories • Various

... parties, while La Rousseil, recently converted, howled a hymn, Durtal, sitting in a corner having a quiet smoke, had been struck by the physiognomy and bearing of Des Hermies, who stood out sharply from the motley throng of defrocked priests and grubby poets packed ...
— La-bas • J. K. Huysmans

... Squire, than the Cries of London. My good Friend Sir ROGER often declares, that he cannot get them out of his Head or go to Sleep for them, the first Week that he is in Town. On the contrary, WILL. HONEYCOMB calls them the Ramage de la Ville, and prefers them to the Sounds of Larks and Nightingales, with all the Musick of the Fields and Woods. I have lately received a Letter from some very odd Fellow upon this Subject, which I shall leave with my Reader, without saying ...
— The Spectator, Volume 2. • Addison and Steele

... CITIES: Mount Vernon, county seat, Burlington, Sedro Woolley and La Conner are important centers in the Skagit Valley, famous both for its beauty and because it has some of the richest farm land in the world, extending for miles and level as a table. Dykes are built to protect the country from being overflowed. Oat yields ...
— The Beauties of the State of Washington - A Book for Tourists • Harry F. Giles

... Contents as in first edition of 1889, but omitting Aesthetic Poetry and including a paper on Feuillet's "La Morte" ...
— Miscellaneous Studies: A Series of Essays • Walter Horatio Pater

... revolution of July, which destroyed so many aristocratic fortunes dependent on the court, Madame la Princesse de Cadignan was clever enough to attribute to political events the total ruin she had caused by her own extravagance. The prince left France with the royal family, and never returned to it, leaving the princess in Paris, protected ...
— The Secrets of the Princesse de Cadignan • Honore de Balzac

... "La, sir!" she said. "Fancy you walking from the station! You must please to excuse Simpkins being out. He has some Christmasing on at ...
— The Upas Tree - A Christmas Story for all the Year • Florence L. Barclay

... "La! ma'am, without the bonnet, of course. It may perhaps be rather heavy, but I an't quite sure yet. I'll let you know in an ...
— Shifting Winds - A Tough Yarn • R.M. Ballantyne

... master the awful intelligence that the daughter he had denounced was now beyond his relentless anger; but the old man, having grown old and feeble, had retired with a pension to the French Hospital which then stood in St. Luke's, and was called La Providence: a refuge founded to receive poor Protestant emigres, mostly aged men and women, who had their little rooms quaintly furnished with their own poor household goods; and who walked daily in the quadrangle, laid out ...
— Miss Grantley's Girls - And the Stories She Told Them • Thomas Archer

... side. It had stood about 60 feet high, and had been topped with a lean-to tiled roof resting against the uppermost beam in the cave and thereby masking it. [Footnote: "Le Roc d'Aucour," in Bulletin de la Soc. des Antiquaires de ...
— Castles and Cave Dwellings of Europe • Sabine Baring-Gould

... dark complexion, speaks both French and English, shows the mark of the whip very much. A liberal reward will be paid for his apprehension, either by confining in any gaol, so that I can secure him, or his delivery to me at Plaquemine, La. ...
— American Scenes, and Christian Slavery - A Recent Tour of Four Thousand Miles in the United States • Ebenezer Davies

... the plane landed at La Guardia, and they'd taken a 'copter to the East Side Terminal and a taxi to the big blue-aluminum-and-glass Ravell Building, Malone had reached a new decision. It would be nothing short of wonderful, he felt, if he could ...
— Supermind • Gordon Randall Garrett

... a qui remettre le pouvoir qu'on va retirer de ses mains? Aux classes moyennes?—Elles ne font que de naitre en Irlande. L'avenir leur appartient; mats ne compromettront-elles pas cet avenir, si la charge de mener la societe est confiee des aujourd'hui a leurs mains inhabiles ...
— England's Case Against Home Rule • Albert Venn Dicey

... passe moi-meme chez une peuplade Indienne, qui se prenait a pleurer a la vue d'un voyageur, parce qu'il lui rappelait des amis partis pour la contree des Ames, et depuis ...
— The Pilgrims of New England - A Tale Of The Early American Settlers • Mrs. J. B. Webb

... between La Bassee and Armentieres it was practically an impossibility to dig in. The muddy water was of inconceivable thickness along the greater length of the whole front. It oused and eddied, it seemed to swirl ...
— Private Peat • Harold R. Peat

... her room and found her weeping quietly in bed. They tried to comfort her, and she said half-whimsically that she had been overcome by the feeling that she was homeless and without kith and kin la her own country. "I'm a poor solitary with only memories." "But you have troops of friends—you have us all—we all love you." "Yes, I ken, and I am grateful," she replied, "but"—wistfully—"it's just that I've none of my ain folk ...
— Mary Slessor of Calabar: Pioneer Missionary • W. P. Livingstone

... 11th.—We left Avignon on Tuesday, 7th, and took the rail to Valence, where we arrived between four and five, and put up at the Hotel de la Poste, an ancient house, with dirty floors and dirt generally, but otherwise comfortable enough. . . . . Valence is a stately old town, full of tall houses and irregular streets. We found a cathedral there, not very large, but with a high and venerable interior, a nave ...
— Passages From the French and Italian Notebooks, Complete • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... altogether another matter and belonged to another science, but whether one traced descent from the shark or the wolf was immaterial even in morals. This matter had been discussed for ages without scientific result. La Fontaine and other fabulists maintained that the wolf, even in morals, stood higher than man; and in view of the late civil war, Adams had doubts of his own on the facts ...
— The Education of Henry Adams • Henry Adams

... Hawkins, who had grown too cautious to work well with Drake, relieved the expedition of divided counsels; but Drake had not realised that in the years of his inaction the Spaniards had profited by the lessons he had taught them. Though he sacked and burnt La Hacha, Santa Marta, and Nombre de Dios, the spoils were small; the enemy, prepared for his coming, had secured the passes through Darien to Panama, and it was found that there was no possibility of forcing them. Then came the final disaster; Drake himself was seized with dysentery, ...
— England Under the Tudors • Arthur D. Innes

... system, the strap—"a la Mexico!"—not that he used it often nor very hard; but he terrorized Lily with it and the other girls were afraid of it, too, though they never got more than the threat, seeing that they were apprentices, who might have run away if ...
— The Bill-Toppers • Andre Castaigne

... come in handiest. I've seen the Hightalians who do the fruit trade up the big rivers that run north from the Plate—La Plata, you call it. They sail up for months to go and buy oranges to bring down for Europe and the States. They use brigs with spars so long you'd think they'd topple their boats over. Do you ...
— Old Gold - The Cruise of the "Jason" Brig • George Manville Fenn

... known throughout the later part of the Middle Ages and down to the eighteenth century as the Hebrew Josephus, and contrasted with the [Hebrew: Yosifon la-Romim], or "Latin Josephus." When the genuine works of our worthy became known to the Jews, Yosippon was regarded as the true representative of the Jewish point of view against the paganizing traitor. ...
— Josephus • Norman Bentwich

... la Senora Dona Elvira Maria de Guadalupe de Menella," replied the damsel, with a liquid sonorousness so annihilating, that Janet made a mocking courtesy; and her mother said it was like asking the head of the house of Hapsburg ...
— Magnum Bonum • Charlotte M. Yonge

... that. When we get to Paris, we'll see. But certainly it's true for women. If I went to the places in the rue de la Paix dressed as I am now, it'd take several years to convince them that I knew what I wanted and wouldn't be satisfied with anything but the latest and best. So I'm having these miserable dressmakers fit those dresses on me until they're absolutely perfect. It's wearing me out, but I'll be ...
— Susan Lenox: Her Fall and Rise • David Graham Phillips

... thank me for,—the books I had given them in my voyage up. Still, with all this aid, the Rob Roy was inextricably entangled with other heavier craft, and, in shoving her off I tumbled overboard, and had to put up with a thorough wetting; so, after a warm bath ashore, more a la mode, I returned to my little cabin for a ...
— The Voyage Alone in the Yawl "Rob Roy" • John MacGregor

... "La belle sauvage!" laughed the lady; and, in the dusk, I fancied I saw her reach over to pat Ursula's hand in her careless, pretty way. "Nay, ...
— John Halifax, Gentleman • Dinah Maria Mulock Craik

... dismount before the door of your tent and sit down to a dinner of many courses, which to a stomach jounced for ten hours over a saddle seems a very fair dinner indeed. Your breakfast is what a Frenchman would call a dejeuner a la fourchette; and as you put down your napkin, your tent is folded almost as quickly and as silently, and you mount your horse, standing ready for another thirty miles. Yet, if you have just come from Egypt and three months on a dahabeah, you will not hesitate to call this luxurious mode ...
— Lippincott's Magazine, October 1885 • Various

... 1842, the Comtesse Laginska, with her charm of gentle melancholy, inspired a violent passion in the Comte de La Palferine, one of the most daring and presumptuous lions of the day. La Palferine was well aware that the conquest of a woman so guarded by reserve as the Comtesse Laginska was difficult, but he thought he could inveigle ...
— Paz - (La Fausse Maitresse) • Honore de Balzac

... tribes are what Major Davies calls the Lolo Group in his third division of the great Tibeto-Burman Family; but I merely suggest it, as it strikes me that the other branches of that group, including the Li-su, the La-hu, and the Wo-ni, seem to be descendants of a larger group, of which the Nou Su predominate in numbers, language, and customs. ...
— Across China on Foot • Edwin Dingle

... rancor which the king showed against Cosmo when the trial of La Mole and Coconnas took place a few weeks later. Finding him one of the agents of that conspiracy, he thought the Italians had tricked him; for it was proved that his mother's astrologer was not exclusively concerned with stars, the powder of projection, ...
— Catherine de' Medici • Honore de Balzac

... Gigue, taking hold of Cicely's arm and drawing her close up to his knee—"Comment chante le rossignol? Do, re, mi, fa, sol, la, si, ...
— God's Good Man • Marie Corelli

... Germany massing for their attack on the world's peace in the spring of 1914. Long before the pretext of war was provided by the murder of the Austrian Crown-Prince in Serajevo, I saw the troops, the artillery, the mountains of ammunition, assembled at Aix-la-Chapelle and Trier, ready for the invasion of neutral Belgium and Luxembourg, and the foul stroke ...
— What Peace Means • Henry van Dyke

... Launcelot brought sir Tristan and La Beate Isoud unto Joyous-gard, the which was his owne castle that hee had wonne with ...
— Northumberland Yesterday and To-day • Jean F. Terry

... wood, which is inlaid with rosewood, ivory, and tortoiseshell, the rasp measuring about 8 in. in length. An eighteenth-century French rasp of boxwood is carved in low relief; on one side a pair of doves is represented, under the picture being the legend, "Unis jusqu'a la mort." On the other side there is a man blowing a horn with the legend, "La fidelite est perdue," around which is a rope-like frame supporting two cornucopiae. Another curious variety of snuff rasp is ...
— Chats on Household Curios • Fred W. Burgess

... appointment to a command of a French army did not rest with Barras. He was only one of the five Directors who now decided the chief details of administration. His colleagues were Letourneur, Rewbell, La Reveilliere-Lepeaux, and the great Carnot; and, as a matter of fact, it was the last-named who chiefly decided the appointment ...
— The Life of Napoleon I (Volumes, 1 and 2) • John Holland Rose

... paler still, but he walked as straight as ever, and his shoulders were thrown back and his head was high! His French uniform was in tatters, and plastered with the obnoxious rings. A guard walked on each side of him. But no matter—he swung gaily along, singing "La Marseillaise." ...
— Three Times and Out • Nellie L. McClung

... humorist. He was the author of many epigrams and curt aphorisms which have become stock phrases in conversation, quoted in all classes of society wherever the English language is spoken. His phrasing is unpretentious, even homely, wearing none of the polished brilliancy of La Rochefoucauld or Bernard Shaw; but Mark Twain's sayings "stick" because they are rooted in shrewdness ...
— Mark Twain • Archibald Henderson

... closed around it. We descended with difficulty the steep bank and crossed the river to the camp-fire on the north shore. Three red-deer hunters were around it; they had some freshly killed elk meat, and potatoes from Fort-a-la-Corne, eighteen miles below the forks; and with so many delicacies our supper a-la-fourchette, despite a snow-storm, was ...
— The Great Lone Land - A Narrative of Travel and Adventure in the North-West of America • W. F. Butler

... Nearest to him stood those of Slav nationality, because these, he thought, would be the most convenient and effective weapons he could use in the uprooting of Russian despotism. In spite of their republic and their socialism a la Proudhon, he thought nothing of the French, and as for the Germans, he never mentioned them to me. Democracy, republicanism, and anything else of the kind he regarded as unworthy of ...
— My Life, Volume I • Richard Wagner

... when at home, usually wore on her head a front-piece of dark martin la Chao Chn, surrounded with tassels of strung pearls. She had on a robe of peach-red flowered satin, a short pelisse of slate-blue stiff silk, lined with squirrel, and a jupe of deep red foreign crepe, lined with ermine. Resplendent with pearl-powder and ...
— Hung Lou Meng, Book I • Cao Xueqin

... and he burst into such a violent paroxysm of grief that the attention of his comrades was attracted, and they demanded the cause of his tears, whereupon he told them his story, and pointed out the same arms impressed on his cachet. This tale came to the ears of the Chevalier de la Fare, who then commanded at Nice, and after a hasty investigation he treated his subordinate with excessive courtesy, evidently believing him to be the man whom he represented himself ...
— Celebrated Claimants from Perkin Warbeck to Arthur Orton • Anonymous

... an uneasy feeling existed, arising partly from the often-repeated demands of the Indians for a treaty with themselves, and partly from the fact that certain settlers in the neighborhood of Portage la Prairie and other parts of the Province, had been warned by the Indians not to cut wood or otherwise take possession of the lands upon which they were squatting. The Indians, it appeared, consented to their remaining on their holdings until sufficient time had been allowed ...
— The Treaties of Canada with The Indians of Manitoba - and the North-West Territories • Alexander Morris

... as we knew to make soup, and as The Other Man had that day lost an old Spanish tam-o'-shanter, we naturally concluded that he had used the old hat for the making of the soup, and at once christened it as "consomme a la maotsi"—and we can recommend it. After we had grown somewhat tired of the eternal curry and rice, we asked him quietly if he could not make us something else, fearing a rebuff. He stood hesitatingly before us, gazing into nothingness. His face was pallid, his ...
— Across China on Foot • Edwin Dingle

... became known, the Duc de la Force and Fagon (Councillor of State) went to the Regent—'twas on the 19th of August, 1718—and spoke to him with such effect, that he ordered them to assemble with Law that very day at my house in ...
— Marguerite de Navarre - Memoirs of Marguerite de Valois Queen of Navarre • Marguerite de Navarre

... she wants, as far as I know," said Aunt Jane, rather shortly. "Nobody ever told her not to. It's nothing very fine in the way of victuals I can get her, working as I work for two, and most beat out every night. La! Peace, you haven't eaten your meat, have you? Well, I'll warm it over to-morrow, and it'll be ...
— Gypsy's Cousin Joy • Elizabeth Stuart Phelps

... announced a waiter from the cafe La Campana, and the guests began to file out toward the table, the women, especially ...
— The Social Cancer - A Complete English Version of Noli Me Tangere • Jose Rizal

... threatened with the house of correction in case they ventured to return. Vide Hess's Flight through Germany, 1793.—Wimpfen also carried on a suit against its magistrate. In 1784, imperial decrees were issued against the aristocracy of Ulm. In 1786, the people of Aix-la-Chapelle rose against their magistrate. Nuremberg repeatedly demanded the production of the public accounts from the aristocratic town-council. The people of Hildesheim also revolted against their council. Vide ...
— Germany from the Earliest Period Vol. 4 • Wolfgang Menzel, Trans. Mrs. George Horrocks

... directed to Mme. Bertrand (really for Napoleon) at Plymouth, stating that the writer had placed sums of money with well-known firms of Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and Charlestown on his behalf, and that he (Napoleon) had only to make known his wishes "avec le the de la Chine ou les mousselines de l'Inde": for the rest, the writer hoped much from English merchantmen. This letter, after wide wanderings, fell into our hands and caused our Government closely to inspect all letters and merchandise that ...
— The Life of Napoleon I (Volumes, 1 and 2) • John Holland Rose

... and they accordingly allowed their wishes to become known in certain influential quarters. How the affair was managed they never knew, and indeed never inquired, but in due time they received an invitation to join a party coursing for hares in the wastes of La Pontoise, and this they understood as an intimation that their desire to visit Courance was about ...
— Lippincott's Magazine, Vol. 20, August 1877 • Various

... present state of politics. I have little doubt that it fell upon him as a Nemesis, in the first place for writing bad English, and secondly for daring to 'damn with faint praise' the loyal, generous, joyous, chivalrous, religious soldier, Frederick, Baron de la Motte-Fouque, and prince of romance. When the latter presents himself for admission my castle needs short siege. The drawbridge falls before the summons; and when I see him cross my threshold with his lovely and noble ...
— The Continental Monthly, Vol. 6, No 3, September 1864 - Devoted To Literature And National Policy • Various

... de la terre et des cieux, N'est point tel que l'erreur le figure a vos yeux: L'Eternel est son nom, le monde est son ouvrage; Il entend les soupirs de l'humble qu'on outrage, Juge tous les mortels avec d'egales lois, Et du haut de son trone ...
— Chosen Peoples • Israel Zangwill

... detective force. He told them that the minister of police believed that a man calling himself Vautrin, who lived with them in the Maison Vauquer, was an escaped convict from Toulon galleys, Jacques Collin, but known by the nickname of Trompe-la-Mort, and one of the most dangerous criminals in all France. In order to obtain certainty as to the identity of Vautrin with Collin he offered a bribe of three thousand francs if mademoiselle would administer a potion in his coffee or wine, which ...
— The World's Greatest Books, Vol. I • Various

... returned from Orleans to Paris in 1511, kept quiet for a month, in order to awaken public interest. Then he announced a course of lectures on Ausonius, to begin on 30 July. His device was entirely successful. Two thousand people gathered, and he was obliged to lead them over from his own college, de la Marche, to a larger building, known as the Portico of Cambray. He had composed an elaborate oration of twenty-four pages. 'It took me two hours and a half to deliver,' he says, 'and would have taken four, if I hadn't been a quick reader; ...
— The Age of Erasmus - Lectures Delivered in the Universities of Oxford and London • P. S. Allen

... painting by Paul de la Roche of the Earl of Strafford led forth to execution, engravings of which we have seen in the print shops in America. It is a strong and striking picture, and has great dramatic effect. But there was a painting in one corner by a Flemish artist, whose name I do not now remember, ...
— Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 1 (of 2) • Harriet Elizabeth (Beecher) Stowe

... nor the son who now fills his place, had taken any notice of this newly found document, which we are now informed was drawn up by Lord Byron in August 1817, while Mr. Hobhouse was staying with him at La Mira, near Venice, given to Mr. Matthew Gregory Lewis, for circulation among friends in England, found in Mr. Lewis's papers after his death, and now in the possession of Mr. Murray.' Here ...
— Lady Byron Vindicated • Harriet Beecher Stowe

... our camp one day, inward bound. They were the Duke of Penaranda and Sr. de la Huerta, and reported no lions during their few days in the district. Prince Lichtenstein was also somewhere on the plateau, but we didn't run across him. In addition to these three parties and ours, the only other expedition in the Guas Ngishu Plateau was Colonel ...
— In Africa - Hunting Adventures in the Big Game Country • John T. McCutcheon

... minstrel's talk or verse, than he did with the practical, rising citizen of Luscombe. To the young lover of Lily Mordaunt there was a discord, a jar, in the knowledge that the human heart admits of such well-reasoned, well-justified transfers of allegiance; a Jessie to-day, or an Emily to-morrow; "La reine est ...
— Kenelm Chillingly, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... "La la," laughed Mercedes Higgins. "I forgot I was in America. In other lands all Americans are called Yankees. It is true that you are ...
— The Valley of the Moon • Jack London

... in the morning to Notre-Dame de la Victoire, he appeared to me again, but for a shorter time, and pressed me always to speak to his brother, and left me, saying still, 'Jusques, jusques,' without choosing to reply ...
— The Haunters & The Haunted - Ghost Stories And Tales Of The Supernatural • Various

... awful, sir," he exclaimed: "horrible: a fearful thing has happened. We have just found Mme. la ...
— Fantomas • Pierre Souvestre

... With succour suitable from lower still,) A foe who, these concurring to the charm, Excites those storms that shall o'erturn the state, Rend up her ancient honours by the root, And lay the boast of ages, the rever'd Of nations, the dear-bought with sumless wealth And blood illustrious, (spite of her La Hogues, Her Cresseys, and her Blenheims,) in the dust. How must this strike a horror thro' the breast, Thro' every generous breast where honour reigns, Thro' every breast where honour claims a share! Yes, and thro' every breast of honour void! This thought ...
— The Poetical Works of Edward Young, Volume 2 • Edward Young

... grown, (gout or dropsy!) since the collar was put on! for, he said, it was a downright impossibility for such a huge Os Frontis to pass through so narrow a collar! Just at this instant the servant girl came near, and understanding the cause of our consternation, "La, Master," said she, "you do not go about the work in the right way. You should do like as this," when turning the collar completely upside down, she slipped it off in a moment, to our great humiliation and wonderment; ...
— Reminiscences of Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Robert Southey • Joseph Cottle

... "L'Istria"; Bianchi's "Zara Cristiana" and "Antichita Romane e mediaevale di Zara"; Mgr. Bulic's "Guide to Spalato and Salona"; Caprin's "Il Trecento a Trieste," "Alpi Gulie," and "L'Istria noblissima"; Carrara's "La Dalmazia descritta"; Chiudina's "Le Castella di Spalato"; Fabianich's "La Dalmazia ne primi cinque secoli del Cristianesimo"; Fosco's "La Cathedrale di Sebenico"; Franceschi's "L'Istria"; Gelcich's "Memorie storiche delle Bocche di Cattaro" and "Dello Sviluppo civile di Ragusa"; Lago's ...
— The Shores of the Adriatic - The Austrian Side, The Kuestenlande, Istria, and Dalmatia • F. Hamilton Jackson

... the thing, Madame la Marquise, if not to the sound; nothing could be more beautiful than the latter as you have pronounced it, except the reality, amidst these mountains and these retired ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 61, No. 378, April, 1847 • Various

... broke into such a fit of laughter, that, if she had not suddenly steadied herself with her feet against the czimbalom stand, she would have fallen over. As it was, her hair being, according to the fashion of the day, coiled up "a la Giraffe" round a high comb, and the comb falling from her head, her two tresses of raven hair fell waving over her ...
— Debts of Honor • Maurus Jokai

... doing the station work from Dunkirk, as it is 16 kilometres from Adinkerke; but the place itself is nice, and I just have to trust to lifts. I fill my pockets with cigarettes and go to the "sortie de la ville," and just wait for something to pass—and some queer, bumpy rides I get. Still, the soldiers who drive me are delightful, and the cigarettes are ...
— My War Experiences in Two Continents • Sarah Macnaughtan

... as the atmosphere there had become too disagreeable for him through controversy after controversy in which lie became involved. He joined a group of painters and writers of all nationalities in it little village in France. There he wrote "La France," setting forth the relations between France and Sweden in olden times. This was published in Paris and the French government, tendered him the decoration of the legion of honor which, however, he refused very politely, ...
— Plays: The Father; Countess Julie; The Outlaw; The Stronger • August Strindberg

... spot where Nigger Martha had sat and died that Grace met her enemy the night after the funeral. Lizzie La Blanche, the Marine's girl, was there; Elsie Specs, Little Mame, and Jack the Dog, toughest of all the girls, who for that reason had earned the name of "Mayor of the Bowery." She brooked no rivals. They were all within reach when the two enemies ...
— Children of the Tenements • Jacob A. Riis

... Europe joined in extolling, what all Europe had a little before, disbelieved. A continent stretching little under 10,000 miles, from south to north, with a maximum breath of 2000 miles, between sea and sea, rivers, such as the La Plata and the Amazon—mountains like that of the Andes, whose highest peak rises 20,280 feet above the sea—Volcanoes, which cast their fires over plains of interminable extent—tropical fruits of every kind—mines of gold and silver the richest the ...
— Incentives to the Study of the Ancient Period of American History • Henry R. Schoolcraft

... "Vive la patrie!" cried the wounded man, whose grey-blue tunic was stained crimson with his own blood. "I thank you from the bottom of my heart, lieutenant. Again you heap the coals ...
— With Haig on the Somme • D. H. Parry

... said Mrs Nickleby, with great pride. And so it was. And little Miss La Creevy had brought it home for inspection ...
— The Life And Adventures Of Nicholas Nickleby • Charles Dickens

... the city of Orleans would take the trouble to inquire of M. Troisetoiles, landlord of the Hotel Aux Cles de la Ville, in the Place du Marche, he would obtain a confirmation of the truth of this history, together with many other facts and circumstances, collateral and ramificatory, concerning the bride and ...
— Chambers's Edinburgh Journal, No. 456 - Volume 18, New Series, September 25, 1852 • Various

... man came forward, and requested her hand. She coloured, looked excessively silly, and walked off with him to join the dancers. When, between the dances, she came our way, he plagued her, 'a la Sir Clement.(128) ...
— The Diary and Letters of Madame D'Arblay Volume 1 • Madame D'Arblay

... ardor and wrote to Congress that he was sensible, discreet, and able to speak English freely. It was with an eye to the influence in France of the name of the young noble that Congress advanced him so rapidly. La Fayette was sincere and generous in spirit. He had, however, little military capacity. Later when he might have directed the course of the French Revolution he was found wanting in force of character. The great Mirabeau tried to work with him for the good of France, but was repelled by ...
— Washington and his Comrades in Arms - A Chronicle of the War of Independence • George Wrong

... "Monsieur de la Baudraye announced that your expected confinement after so many years made it necessary that it should take place in Paris, and that he had insisted on your going to be attended by the first physicians," replied ...
— Parisians in the Country - The Illustrious Gaudissart, and The Muse of the Department • Honore de Balzac

... Honor al primero, Que el patriota acero Oso fulminar. La Patria afligida Oyo' sus acentos, Y vio' sus tormentos, En ...
— Two Knapsacks - A Novel of Canadian Summer Life • John Campbell

... twenty-four carats was fixed at seven hundred and forty livres nine sous and one denier one-eleventh the mark of eight Paris ounces. {See Dictionnaire des Monnoies, tom. ii. article Seigneurage, p. 439, par 81. Abbot de Bazinghen, Conseiller-Commissaire en la Cour des Monnoies Paris.} The gold coin of France, making an allowance for the remedy of the mint, contains twenty-one carats and three-fourths of fine gold, and two carats one-fourth of alloy. The mark ...
— An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations • Adam Smith

... of his birth was February 4, 1688, a year noteworthy as introducing to the public the first edition of the Caracteres of La Bruyere, with whom Marivaux has often been compared. His father was of an old Norman family, which had had representatives in the parlement of that province.[2] Since then the family had "descended from the robe to finance," following the expression of d'Alembert.[3] Ennobled by the ...
— A Selection from the Comedies of Marivaux • Pierre Carlet de Chamblain de Marivaux

... the captain blurted impulsively, "but hasta la vista, auf Wiedersehen, until the day ... you will permit me, for the last time to ...
— Happy Ending • Fredric Brown

... money. He was not to say that she had called. In the Boulevard Montparnasse she took a cab. To the menagerie, she said to the driver. How strange it all looked: the Invalides, Notre Dame, the Tuileries Gardens, the Place de la Concorde! The innumerable lights were so near and yet so far: it was a kink of the brain, but she seemed withdrawn from them, not they from her. A woman passed with a baby in her arms. The light from a kiosk fell on it as she passed. What a pretty, ...
— The Judgment House • Gilbert Parker

... trill-trill-trill-trill-trill, as blithely as if free in its native woods, or pampered by fair hands in a gilded cage. The bird was the only true artist there, it sang as the poet sings,—to obey its nature and vent its heart. Trill-trill-trillela-la-la-trill-trill, went the song,—louder, gayer than usual; for there was a gleam of April sunshine struggling over the rooftops. The song at length roused up Gabriel; he turned his chair round, laid his head on one side, listened, and looked curiously ...
— Lucretia, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... to know, but now to promise: doe but now promise Kate, you will endeauour for your French part of such a Boy; and for my English moytie, take the Word of a King, and a Batcheler. How answer you. La plus belle Katherine du monde mon trescher & ...
— The First Folio [35 Plays] • William Shakespeare

... midway between the two extremes, neither tall nor short, a vivid complexion, rather fair than dark, somewhat stooped in the shoulders, and not very lightfooted: this, I say, is the author of 'Galatea,' 'Don Quixote de la Mancha,' 'The Journey to Parnassus,' which he wrote in imitation of Cesare Caporali Perusino, and other works which are current among the public, and perhaps without the author's name. He is commonly called MIGUEL DE CERVANTES SAAVEDRA. He was for many years a soldier, and ...
— The Exemplary Novels of Cervantes • Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra

... difficulty he held his eagerness in check, but other men were waiting for his place, and he went out and crossed the street to the hotel where there was light to read by. As he entered it a girl bustling about a long table in the big stove-warmed room turned with la ...
— Winston of the Prairie • Harold Bindloss

... with a broad grin, the corners of his mouth being lost in the heavy fold of his jowls. "I see it doesn't," went on Henry. "Very well. Joe's name is Joe Clune. Yonder sits Scottie Macdougal. There is Larry la Roche. And I ...
— Way of the Lawless • Max Brand

... in his Hist. gen. des Voyages, Tome XVI. (a la Haye) p. 79-81, has given some account of Vlaming's voyage in French; but the observations on the coast between Shark's Bay and Willem's River are there ...
— A Voyage to Terra Australis • Matthew Flinders

... informe a la fin du mois passe que deux particuliers avoient fait depuis peu un armement dans les Portes de Zelande, et qu'ils en essoient partis avec deux Vaisseaux armez en guerre pour aller dans les Isles d'Amerique faire la guerre a ses Sujets sous la Commission de Monsieur l'Electeur de Brandenbourg, ...
— Privateering and Piracy in the Colonial Period - Illustrative Documents • Various

... manner of Thackeray. An "abuse"—the distribution in supposed unjust proportion of the funds of an endowed hospital for aged men—is its main avowed subject. But Trollope indulged in no tirades and no fantastic-grotesque caricature—in fact he actually drew a humorous sketch of a novel a la Dickens on the matter. His real object was evidently to sketch faithfully, but again not without humour, the cathedral society of "Barchester" as it actually spoke, dressed, thought, and lived: and he did it. The first book had a little ...
— The English Novel • George Saintsbury

... capital. With keen perception they draw the deeper meaning from out the stones of Prague; thus in the fifties of the last century writes Viollet-le-Duc, "Prague est une capitale dans laquelle on sent la puissance d'un grand peuple," and Massieu de Clerval is yet more emphatic: "si un pays peut se vanter d'une nationalite indestructible c'est a coup sur la Boheme.—Une nation qui a passe par de pareilles epreuves ne perira, elle ...
— From a Terrace in Prague • Lieut.-Col. B. Granville Baker

... end of 1491, he came to Varallo alone, and had hardly got there before he felt himself rapt into an ecstasy, in the which he was drawn towards the Sacro Monte; when he got up to the plain on the top of the mountain which was then called "La Parete," perceiving at once its marvellous resemblance to Jerusalem, even to the existence of another mountain hard by which was like Calvary, he threw himself on the ground and thanked God in a transport of delight. It is said that for some time previously the shepherds ...
— Ex Voto • Samuel Butler

... a very poor but very busy man, and always praising his own work. When he talked with other people he ended every third or fourth word with "la," which was the last syllable of his name and ...
— Philippine Folk-Tales • Clara Kern Bayliss, Berton L. Maxfield, W. H. Millington,

... worshipped idols. The clergy, headed by the Dominican and Franciscan monks, introduced Lady Days into the calendar and invented the rosary to facilitate the recital of the Aves; secular orders of knighthood placed themselves under the Virgin's protection (La Chevalerie de Sainte Marie), but the rarest minds, sublimating the beloved, raised her into Heaven and worshipped her as divine. The established religion was compelled to enter into partnership with the great emotion of the time, metaphysical ...
— The Evolution of Love • Emil Lucka

... of song! Her name your hearts divine; To her the banquet's vows belong Whose breasts have poured its wine; Our trusty friend, our true ally Through varied change and chance So, fill your flashing goblets high,— I give you, VIVE LA FRANCE! ...
— The Poetical Works of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Complete • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

... his telescope to the heavens, when Secchi and Huggins studied the chemistry of the stars by means of the spectroscope, and when Warren De la Rue set up a photoheliograph at Kew, we see that a progress in the same direction as before, in the evolution of our conception of the universe, was being made. Without definite expression at any particular date, it came to be an accepted fact that not only do earthly dynamics apply to the heavenly ...
— History of Astronomy • George Forbes

... 'to Tepararee', C'est un chemin long, c'est vrai; C'est un chemin long 'to Tepararee', Et la belle fille qu'je connais. Bonjour, Peekadeely! Au revoir, Lestaire Squaire! C'est un chemin long 'to Tepararee', Mais mon ...
— Rhymes of a Red Cross Man • Robert W. Service

... he did not hold the extreme opinions upon this subject which have been attributed to him. He thought that popular institutions could be established, and the elective franchise safely made universal, only in an intelligent and virtuous community. In France he advised La Fayette and Barnave to be contented with a constitutional monarchy. When the South American States rebelled, and Clay and many other statesmen were enraptured with the prospect of a Continent of Republics, Jefferson ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. II., November, 1858., No. XIII. • Various

... that season its bite was especially venomous. Music was the sole remedy employed, and none other was needed. Among other authorities may be mentioned: Dr. Pierre Jean Burette (1665-1747), "Dialogue sur la musique"; Dr. Giorgio Baglivi, "De Anatomia, Morsu et Effectibus Tarantulae Dissertatio" (1695); and Dr. Theodore Craanen, a Dutch physician, "Tractatus physico-medicus De Tarantula" (Naples, 1722). Worthy of note also is an elaborate ...
— Primitive Psycho-Therapy and Quackery • Robert Means Lawrence

... extravagant praise, this heart-shaking and lovely drama; this vieille et triste legende de la foret, with its indescribable glamour, its affecting sincerity, its restraint, its exquisite and unflagging simplicity. The hesitant and melancholy personages who invest its scenes—Melisande, timid, naive, child-like, wistful, ...
— Debussy's Pelleas et Melisande - A Guide to the Opera with Musical Examples from the Score • Lawrence Gilman

... 24th.—Cloudy, with the wind from the eastward. At half-past six in the morning descried a sail in the north east. Got up steam and gave chase. At nine came up with a brig, which proved to be a Frenchman, La Mouche Noire, from Nantes to Martinique. Sent a boat on board of him. He had no newspapers, and said he knew the United States were at war—we had the United States colours flying—but with whom he did not know. Enlightened Frenchman! Or this may teach us a ...
— The Cruise of the Alabama and the Sumter • Raphael Semmes

... with only the more pleasure to the "blessed elixir," whose fascinations neither the poverty of your pocket, nor the penury of your brain, can withstand, and by the magic of whose spell you are great and gifted. "Vive la bagatelle!" saith the Frenchman. "Long live flattery!" say I, come from what quarter it will,—the only wealth of the poor man, the only reward of the unknown one; the arm that supports us in failure; the hand that crowns us in success; the comforter in our affliction; the gay companion in ...
— Charles O'Malley, The Irish Dragoon, Volume 2 (of 2) • Charles Lever

... leading out of it, there was but one practicable wagon-road—that by which we had entered. But at the southern extremity there was a precipitous canon, through which flowed a considerable stream. To the west was another canon, a dry one, called La Puerta—the doorway—which led into the second valley, called the Valley ...
— Captured by the Navajos • Charles A. Curtis

... she draws forth a small slip of paper from a pouch carried a la chatelaine; along with it a pencil. She is about to write, when a thought ...
— The Lone Ranche • Captain Mayne Reid

... more accounts (unofficial) of a victory near Shreveport, La. One of the enemy's gun-boats has been blown up and ...
— A Rebel War Clerk's Diary at the Confederate States Capital • John Beauchamp Jones

... about for a cab to the Turkish bath place, in fact he was signaling one that he saw jogging up the Avenue de la Grande Armee, when he became aware that a gentleman was approaching him with the intention of speaking. Turning quickly, he saw in the uncertain light a man of medium height with a dark beard tinged with gray, wearing a loose ...
— Through the Wall • Cleveland Moffett

... heart the King of France was of the same opinion; he had refused the permission to serve in America which he had been asked for by many gentlemen: some had set off without waiting for it; the most important, as well as the most illustrious of them all, the Marquis of La Fayette, was not twenty years old when he slipped away from Paris, leaving behind his young wife close to her confinement, to go and embark upon a vessel which he had bought, and which, laden with arms, awaited him in a Spanish ...
— A Popular History of France From The Earliest Times - Volume VI. of VI. • Francois Pierre Guillaume Guizot

... E. DE. "Le sens de l'espace chez les souris dansantes japonaises." Cinquantenaire de la Societe de Biologie (Volume jubilaire). p. 544-546. ...
— The Dancing Mouse - A Study in Animal Behavior • Robert M. Yerkes

... we came again through Aix. The Mule blanche without the town, is better than any auberge within, and Mons. L'Abbe Abrard Praetor, de la ordre de St. Malta, is not only a very agreeable, but a very convenient acquaintance for a stranger, and who is always ready to shew the English in particular, attention, and who had much attention shewn him by Lord A. PERCY and ...
— A Year's Journey through France and Part of Spain, Volume II (of 2) • Philip Thicknesse

... in La Mancha, of which I cannot remember the name, there lived not long ago one of those old-fashioned gentlemen who are never without a lance upon a rack, an old target, a lean horse, and a greyhound. His diet consisted more of beef than mutton; and with minced meat on most nights, lentils ...
— The Children's Hour, v 5. Stories From Seven Old Favorites • Eva March Tappan

... countenance showed that our situation had become critical. The little, stout, and hitherto phlegmatic fellow became suddenly animated by a new spirit. His black eyes lightened; he uttered several times the well-known English oath which Figaro declares to be "le fond de la langue," rubbed his bands violently together, and at length exclaimed, "Captain! I should like a glass of grog—Devil take me if I don't bring you safe into Portsmouth yet!" His wish was of course ...
— A New Voyage Round the World in the Years 1823, 24, 25, and 26. Vol. 1 • Otto von Kotzebue

... officer who investigated the ship, M. Montgery, also wrote a description, published in "Notice sur la Vie et ...
— Fulton's "Steam Battery": Blockship and Catamaran • Howard I. Chapelle

... appearance are situated on the posterior region of the cerebral hemispheres, while, in the human foetus, the sulci first become visible on the frontal lobes. (76. "Chez tous les singes, les plis posterieurs se developpent les premiers; les plis anterieurs se developpent plus tard, aussi la vertebre occipitale et la parietale sont-elles relativement tres-grandes chez le foetus. L'Homme presente une exception remarquable quant a l'epoque de l'apparition des plis frontaux, qui sont les ...
— The Descent of Man and Selection in Relation to Sex • Charles Darwin

... dinner, Mrs. Bannister chattering on, Rufus Blight meditative but offering a mono-syllable now and then as evidence that he listened, I smiling responsively, Penelope came in. How could I not forgive her when I saw her thus, gowned in the daintiest art of the Rue de la Paix, cloaked in soft white fur, capped with a scarf of filmy lace, and one small hand held out ...
— David Malcolm • Nelson Lloyd

... lean and hungry out of the terrible winter that followed the World's Fair. In that beautiful enterprise the prodigal city had put forth her utmost strength, and, having shown the world the supreme flower of her energy, had collapsed. There was gloom, not only in La Salle Street where people failed, but throughout the city, where the engine of play had exhausted the forces of all. The city's huge garment was too large for it; miles of empty stores, hotels, flat-buildings, showed ...
— The Web of Life • Robert Herrick

... fell fairly out one evening and broke the little ligatures in two. No sooner had I quarrelled with Tarleton than Lady Hasselton received him in my place, and a week afterwards I was favoured with an anonymous letter, informing me of the violent passion which a certain dame de la cour had conceived for me, and requesting me to meet her at an appointed place. I looked twice over the letter, and discovered in one corner of it two g's peculiar to the caligraphy of Lady Hasselton, though the rest of the letter (bad ...
— Devereux, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... little town of La Gorgue we could see to our right a chateau in quite pretentious gardens—a chateau in which the German Crown Prince is said to have been staying when a British shell crashed through the roof and made him move on the double quick. This town like our own was intersected by a ...
— On the Fringe of the Great Fight • George G. Nasmith

... rectangle or circle is suspended and a magnet brought near it when the current passes, the loop will be attracted or repelled, as the law requires. The experiments usually performed with De la Rive's floating battery ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 643, April 28, 1888 • Various

... display, and the town-talk, when our regicide is on a visit of ceremony. At home nothing will equal the pomp and splendor of the Hotel de la Republique. There another scene of gaudy grandeur will be opened. When his Citizen Excellency keeps the festival, which every citizen is ordered to observe, for the glorious execution of Louis the Sixteenth, and renews his oath of detestation ...
— The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. VI. (of 12) • Edmund Burke

... the effort. Point Loma, twelve miles distant, gives a wonderful view, one of the finest in the world. I warrant you will be so famished on arriving that you will empty every lunch-basket before attending to the outlook. National City, Sweet Water Dam, Tia Juana (Aunt Jane), La Jolla—you will hear of all these. I have tried ...
— A Truthful Woman in Southern California • Kate Sanborn

... you, March, I know them inside out; and I know they are behaving like heroes. Every man of them ought to have a statue, and on the pedestal words like those of the noblest ruffian of the Revolution: 'Que mon nom soit fletri; que la ...
— The Man Who Knew Too Much • G.K. Chesterton

... of an equally remarkable man, Oberlin, the French pastor of Ban-de-la-Roche, a wild mountainous district between Alsace and Lorraine, where, single-handed, and in the midst of extraordinary difficulties and privations, he was privileged to work wonders amongst a most ignorant and poverty-stricken people. The knowledge of several pious and excellent ...
— Amos Huntingdon • T.P. Wilson

... moindres mouvements me semblaient avoir dans le monde une importance extrahumaine. Mon coeur comme de la poussiere se soulevait derriere vos pas. Vous me faisiez l'effet d'un clair-de-lune par une nuit d'ete, quand tout est parfums, ombres douces, blancheurs, infini; et les delices de la chair et de l'ame etaient contenues pour ...
— The Poems And Prose Of Ernest Dowson • Ernest Dowson et al

... In the letters and verses of Marguerite there is seen gleaming forth here and there a sentiment of truth and tenderness, a free and graceful play of fancy. We have three collections of her writings: 1. her Heptameron, ou les Sept Journees de la Reine de Navarre, a collection of sixty-eight tales more or less gallant, published for the first time in 1558, without any author's name; 2. her OEuvres poetiques, which appeared at Lyons in 1547 and 1548, in consequence of her ...
— A Popular History of France From The Earliest Times - Volume IV. of VI. • Francois Pierre Guillaume Guizot

... personal documents were especially valuable. Although they were not supplied for this book, Professor Flinders Petrie gave them in order that they might be of use to some biographer of his grandfather, and the author begs to thank him, and also Mr. E La Touche Armstrong, the chief librarian, in whose custody they are, and who has given frequent ...
— The Life of Captain Matthew Flinders • Ernest Scott

... of La Biche a half-dozen burlapped pieces were removed from a cache in a thicket of balsam and added to the outfit. And at Fort Chippewayan the scows with their contents were examined by two officers of the Mounted, and allowed ...
— The Gun-Brand • James B. Hendryx

... Per ritornar la donde venne fora, L' immortal forma al tuo carcer terreno Venne com' angel di pieta si pieno Che sana ...
— Michael Angelo Buonarroti • Charles Holroyd

... child's apprehensions, she soon satisfied him that she was in a perfect state of health; at which the little thing expressed great satisfaction, and said he was glad she was well again. Amelia told him she had not been in the least disordered. Upon which the innocent cried out, "La! how can people tell such fibs? a great tall man told my papa you was taken very ill at Mrs. Somebody's shop, and my poor papa presently ran down-stairs: I was afraid he would have broke his neck, to come ...
— Amelia (Complete) • Henry Fielding



Words linked to "La" :   Ivry la Bataille, Gulf States, Walter John de la Mare, United States, Pedro Calderon de la Barca, a la carte, Pays de la Loire, Georges de La Tour, United States of America, a la mode, la-di-da, Aix-la-Chapelle, Shangri-la, mal de la rosa, Louisiana, American state, Alexandria, USA, metal, Shreveport, dixie, La Paz, Clichy-la-Garenne, Jean de La Fontaine, La Fayette, La Fontaine, Baton Rouge, red, La Spezia, Gilles de la Tourette syndrome, de la Mare, fa la, Deep South, south, tra-la-la, Ouachita River, Calderon de la Barca, capital of Louisiana, La Tour, America, Gilles de la Tourette, Francois de La Rochefoucauld, Ouachita, confederacy, Walter de la Mare, Morgan City, Red River, La Plata, New Orleans, lah, tra-la



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