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proper noun
Ki  n.  The Sumerian goddess personifying earth; the counterpart of Akkadian Aruru.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Ki" Quotes from Famous Books



... any treaty to be founded thereon, and to become responsible to Her Majesty for the faithful performance by their respective bands of such obligations as shall be assumed by them, the said Indians have thereupon named the following persons for that purpose, that is to say: Ka-ki-sha-way, or Loud Voice (Qu'Appelle River); Pis-qua, or The Plain (Leech Lake); Kea-wez-auce, or The Little Boy (Leech Lake); Ka-ke-na-wup, or One that sits like an Eagle (Upper Qu'Appelle Lakes); Kus-kee-tew-mus-coo-mus-qua, ...
— The Treaties of Canada with The Indians of Manitoba - and the North-West Territories • Alexander Morris

... in KI) colours the China silk a deep brown, Tussah a pale brown; the celluloses from collodion are coloured at first brown, then blue. The Pauly product, on the other hand, does ...
— Researches on Cellulose - 1895-1900 • C. F. Cross

... try. Their banging in here on me so quickly looks a little irregular. In business, you know, Snell, if you tie a tin can to a dog and he runs and ki-yi's, that's perfectly natural and you can sit back and wait for nature to take its course. If the dog doesn't run, but sits down and gnaws the string in two—then look ...
— The Landloper - The Romance Of A Man On Foot • Holman Day

... me kaunce a shkum ke zhick me nance a sance ke zis me quaich a squach ki ya me quon a tah koo koosh me tdush a yaudt mah che me owh a zheh mah kuk me zhusk che mon mah mick nah nindt che pywh mah noo na kowh ka che mahn tdah na yaub ka kate ma quah ne win ka gooh me chim ning kah ...
— Sketch of Grammar of the Chippeway Languages - To Which is Added a Vocabulary of some of the Most Common Words • John Summerfield

... Chen-Ki-Souen, "Lencre de China," by Maurice Jametel, appeared in Paris in 1882, but as the title indicates, it is the old "Indian" or Chinese ink that ...
— Forty Centuries of Ink • David N. Carvalho

... which is called in the Russian map of Peking Feuchen, but in the official Chinese Atlas Kung-Keih-cheng. (See Map at ch. xi. of Bk. II. in the first Volume.) ["Before arriving at the bridge the small walled city of Kung-ki cheng is passed. This was founded in the first half of the 17th century. The people generally call it Fei-ch'eng" (Bretschneider, Peking, p. 50.)—H.C.] It is described both by Magaillans and Lecomte, with some curious ...
— The Travels of Marco Polo, Volume 2 • Marco Polo and Rustichello of Pisa

... and John mounted his bicycle and rode away. On the Friday afternoon following when Lydia got home from school, she found the house apparently deserted. But there issued from the neighborhood of the kitchen a yipping and ki-yi-ing that would have moved a heart of stone. Lydia ran into the kitchen. The puppy wails came from behind the door of the ...
— Lydia of the Pines • Honore Willsie Morrow

... poisonous principle; but if the initial process of roasting the nuts was omitted—as in some districts—the meal was submitted to the purification of water for as long as two months, when it would be tasteless. It was then ground on the nether stone by the Moo-ki (almost a perfect sphere), used with a rotary action, until reduced to flour-like fineness, when it was made into flat or sausage-shaped cakes, wrapped in green leaves and baked. The intractability of the Cycad is such that if cattle eat the leaves they die or become permanently ...
— Tropic Days • E. J. Banfield

... mervelle qu'il trova Dont maintes fois s'espoenta Ne doit nus hom conter ne dire Cil ki le dist en a grant ire Car c'est li signes del Graal (other texts secres) S'en puet avoir et paine et mal (Li fet grant pechie et grant mal) Cil qui s'entremet del conter Fors ensi com it ...
— From Ritual to Romance • Jessie L. Weston

... places knee-deep. We arranged all the preliminaries at recess, and Tom Jones was to go around about nine o'clock and let us know if the coast was clear; but he wasn't to give our regular call—all the place knows that. It goes something in this way, "Ki-yuah-yuah, yoo-o," with a prolonged howl at the end. We always drop it when anything secret's on hand. It was agreed upon that Tom Jones should go to each house, if all was right, and have a coughing and sneezing spell that wouldn't arouse suspicion; then we were to creep out, when the folks ...
— Harper's Young People, March 2, 1880 - An Illustrated Weekly • Various

... gave a shrill "Ho, ye ho, ho!" that passed for a war-whoop, and in a minute they were all off, the farm horses rather startled at the carryings-on; the small boys wild with excitement; and the We are Sevens tearing madly down the road "ki-yi-ing" at the top of ...
— Blue Bonnet's Ranch Party • C. E. Jacobs

... in the Pacific Islands as C. Ti, and in New Zealand the species are C. australis and C. indivisa. It is called in New Zealand the Cabbage-tree (q.v.), and the heart used to be eaten by the settlers. The word is Polynesian. In Hawaiian, the form is Ki; in Maori, Ti. Compare Kanaka (q.v.) and Tangata. By confusion, Tea, in Tea-tree (q.v.), is frequently spelt Ti, and Tea-tree is ...
— A Dictionary of Austral English • Edward Morris

... But Ki-wa-nee, the trusty, the trader at Flying Post, the only Indian in the Company's service holding rank as a commissioned officer, grunted in contempt at the question, while Achard, of New Brunswick House, motioned warningly toward the groups ...
— The Silent Places • Stewart Edward White

... nearer its western limit, and built Kisakobi, where the pueblo stood in the seventeenth century. There is evidence that a Spanish mission was erected at this point, and the place is sometimes called Nueshaki, a corruption of "Missa-ki," Mass-house. From this place the original nucleus of Walpians moved to the present site about the close of the seventeenth century. Later the original population was joined by other phratries, some of which, as the Asa, ...
— Archeological Expedition to Arizona in 1895 • Jesse Walter Fewkes

... regiment be marched through the district, and as soon as they cross the line and enter the limits of the holy place they rend the air with cries of 'Kashi ji ki jai—jai—jai! (Holy Kashi! Hail to thee! Hail! Hail! Hail)'. The weary pilgrim scarcely able to stand, with age and weakness, blinded by the dust and heat, and almost dead with fatigue, crawls out of the oven-like railway carriage and as ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... numeration of the tablet in this old Babylonian edition. Its chief value, apart from its furnishing a proof for the existence of the Epic as early as 2000 B. C., lies (a) in the writing Gish instead of Gish-gi(n)-mash in the Assyrian version, for the name of the hero, (b) in the writing En-ki-du—abbreviated from dug—"Enki is good" for En-ki-d in the Assyrian version, [9] and (c) in the remarkable address of the maiden Sabitum, dwelling at the seaside, to whom Gilgamesh comes in the course of his wanderings. From the Assyrian version we know that the ...
— An Old Babylonian Version of the Gilgamesh Epic • Anonymous

... coal, iron, quicksilver, marble, granite, chalk, plaster of Paris (gypsum), thieves, murderers, desperadoes, ladies, children, lawyers, Christians, Indians, Chinamen, Spaniards, gamblers, sharpens; coyotes (pronounced ki-yo- ties), poets, preachers, and jackass rabbits. I overheard a gentleman say, the other day, that it was "the d—-dest country under the sun," and that comprehensive conception I fully subscribe to. It never rains here, and the dew never falls. No flowers grow here, and no green thing ...
— Mark Twain, A Biography, 1835-1910, Complete - The Personal And Literary Life Of Samuel Langhorne Clemens • Albert Bigelow Paine

... "Kickery-ki! kluk! kluk! kluk!"—that was an old hen who came creeping along, and she was from Kjoge. I am a Kjoger hen,"* said she, and then she related how many inhabitants there were there, and about the battle that ...
— A Christmas Greeting • Hans Christian Andersen

... the purpose of propitiating them. It appears to me more correct to attribute the origin of ancestor-worship to a contrary cause. It was the love of ancestors, not the dread of them" [Here he quotes the Chinese philosophers Shiu-ki and Confucius in corroboration] that impelled men to worship. "We celebrate the anniversary of our ancestors, pay visits to their graves, offer flowers, food and drink, burn incense and bow before their tombs, entirely from a feeling of ...
— The Evolution of the Dragon • G. Elliot Smith

... my attendant arranged the mats for repose, and, bidding me lie down, covered me with a large robe of tappa, at the same time looking approvingly upon me, and exclaiming 'Ki-Ki, nuee nuee, ah! moee moee motarkee' (eat plenty, ah! sleep very good). The philosophy of this sentiment I did not pretend to question; for deprived of sleep for several preceding nights, and the pain of my limb having much abated, I ...
— Typee - A Romance of the South Sea • Herman Melville

... of those Kiang-kou-jin,—those famous Chinese story-tellers, who nightly narrate to listening crowds, in consideration of a few tsien, the legends of the past. Something concerning her you may also find in the book entitled "Kin-Kou-Ki-Koan," which signifies in our tongue: "The Marvellous Happenings of Ancient and of Recent Times." And perhaps of all things therein written, the most marvellous is this memory ...
— Some Chinese Ghosts • Lafcadio Hearn

... protuberant about them, form the toe-tips. But, regarded as a whole, in their physique the Seminole warriors, especially the men of the Tiger and Otter gentes, are admirable. Even among the children this physical superiority is seen. To illustrate, one morning Ko-i-ha-tco's son, Tin-fai-yai-ki, a tall, slender boy, not quite twelve years old, shouldered a heavy "Kentucky" rifle, left our camp, and followed in his father's long footsteps for a day's hunt. After tramping all day, at sunset he reappeared in the camp, ...
— The Seminole Indians of Florida • Clay MacCauley

... as the cats leaped. Hampered by the garments Dot had put upon them, both Bungle and Popocatepetl went head-over-heels when they first landed on the floor, and with a frightened "ki, yi!" Tootsie distanced them to the ...
— The Corner House Girls at School • Grace Brooks Hill

... way of porcupines, mongoose, hares, birds, cats, and whatever else should interest any healthy-minded dog. If there happened to be any lions in the path of these rangings, the dogs retired rapidly, discreetly, and with every symptom of horrified disgust. If a dog came sailing out of a thicket, ki-yi-ing agitatedly, and took up his position, tail between his legs, behind his master, we knew there was probably a lion about. Thus ...
— African Camp Fires • Stewart Edward White

... "Ki!" laughed Ben, "white darkey. Mind ole dad, Mars' John, as took off in der swamp? Um asked dat Linkinite ef him saw dad up Norf. Guess him's free now. ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 9, No. 54, April, 1862 • Various

... water, made up to a litre; dissolving 257 grms. of sodium hydroxide (by alcohol) in water, likewise made up to a litre. After allowing the latter to stand, 800 c.c. of the clear solution are added to the litre of KI. ...
— Nitro-Explosives: A Practical Treatise • P. Gerald Sanford

... kela iloko o ke kiowai, a i luu ilalo o ka wai, alaila, holo aku oe a lawe mai i ka pa-u, a me ke kapa ona i haumia i kona mai, i auau kela a hoi mai ma kapa, aole ke kapa, alaila manao mai ua kii aku au, i hoi mai ai kela i ka hale nei, alaila ki ...
— The Hawaiian Romance Of Laieikawai • Anonymous

... Ki-yi-yi-yi! There is the railroad station just in front, only about three hundred yards away. He sees white men around the buildings, who will ...
— Boys and Girls Bookshelf (Vol 2 of 17) - Folk-Lore, Fables, And Fairy Tales • Various

... is a descendant of Aish-ki-bug-e-koszh, the most famous of all the Chippewa chiefs. He is stalwart in appearance and endowed with marked talents, and well deserves the title of "chief." At the appointed time for the dinner, Captain Glazier, ...
— Sword and Pen - Ventures and Adventures of Willard Glazier • John Algernon Owens

... woman had said, "she'll mek his heart ache many a time. She'll comb his haid wid a three-legged stool an' bresh it wid de broom. Uh, huh—putty, is she? You ma'y huh 'cause she putty. Ki-yi! She fix you! ...
— The Strength of Gideon and Other Stories • Paul Laurence Dunbar

... It would be quite in the modern style, this way of assuring the safety of the trains during the run through the Celestial Empire. Anyhow, there is one of these highwaymen, who has retained his independence and liberty of action, a certain Ki-Tsang." ...
— The Adventures of a Special Correspondent • Jules Verne

... defense or attack. There is a bridge over Salt Creek (ig') which has steep banks and will be a considerable obstacle if the bridge has been destroyed. From this creek to Kern the advance would be under effective fire from Hancock Hill (ki'), so that these heights must be seized before the main ...
— Manual of Military Training - Second, Revised Edition • James A. Moss

... towards me. I kept the hedge, which was my right; the two first brushed roughly past me, the third came full upon me and was tumbled into the road. There was a laugh from the two first and a loud curse from the last as he sprawled in the mire. I merely said "Nos Da'ki," and passed on, and in about a quarter of an hour reached home, where I found my wife awaiting me alone, Henrietta having gone to bed being slightly indisposed. My wife received me with a cheerful smile. I looked at her and the good ...
— Wild Wales - Its People, Language and Scenery • George Borrow

... written ki): Plant of lily family having bright green leaves three feet long and six ...
— Legends of Wailuku • Charlotte Hapai

... drought, a plague arose, which is said to have carried off about 5,000,000 of people. A few months afterwards an earthquake followed, at and near Kingsai; and subsequent to the falling in of the mountains of Ki-ming-chan, a lake was formed of more than a hundred leagues in circumference, where, again, thousands found their grave. In Houkouang and Honan, a drought prevailed for five months; and innumerable swarms of locusts destroyed the vegetation; while famine and pestilence, ...
— The Black Death, and The Dancing Mania • Justus Friedrich Karl Hecker

... Sonki-paug or so[n]ki-paug, 'cool pond.' (Sonkipog, 'cold water,' Eliot.) Egunk-sonkipaug, or 'the cool pond (spring) of Egunk' hill in Sterling, Conn., is named in Chandler's Survey of the Mohegan country, as one of the ...
— The Composition of Indian Geographical Names - Illustrated from the Algonkin Languages • J. Hammond Trumbull

... "Ki-yi!" chirruped his new acquaintance gleefully, "I knew when I got out of the blankets this morning I was to have good luck of some sort, had a 'hunch.' You can bet on me, Bub; you've struck the right rail, and I'm your ...
— The Treasure Trail - A Romance of the Land of Gold and Sunshine • Marah Ellis Ryan

... know the exact place from which the three strangers had come; it was somewhere far South, known as Ki-yek-tuk. The three had been a long time in the village and had inspired all the people with a great dread by telling them of a giant race who wore fierce beards like the walrus; who killed with a great noise at long distances, and who would break any jail except one of ivory. ...
— Lost In The Air • Roy J. Snell

... Chipmunk came back and sat down, and his eyes followed Doctor Rabbit's eyes. Cheepy saw an animal such as he had never seen before. This animal looked somewhat like a dog, but Cheepy knew right away he was no dog. He was not quite so large as Ki-yi Coyote, and was of a reddish-brown color, with a large, bushy tail. The animal was walking along under the trees not far away, and did not even look in the direction of Doctor ...
— Doctor Rabbit and Brushtail the Fox • Thomas Clark Hinkle

... daily use of the canteen, explains the totally dissimilar names which were applied to the two types. The older, or spheroidal olla, was known as the k'iap ton ne, from k'ia pu, to place or carry water in, and tom me; while the newer olla is called k'ia wih na k'ia te ele, from k'ia wih na ki'a na ki'a, for bringing of water: te, earthen-ware, and e' le or e'l lai e, to stand or standing. The latter term, te e le, is generic, being applied to nearly all terra cotta vessels which are taller than they are broad. Te, earthen ware, is derived from t'eh', the ...
— A Study of Pueblo Pottery as Illustrative of Zuni Culture Growth. • Frank Hamilton Cushing

... day with them. They didn't mind him much; but all of a sudden a cat came out from the woodshed,—a strange cat, who didn't know Jock from a—from an elephant. Up went her back, and out went her tail, and she growled and spit like a good one. Of course Jock couldn't stand that, so he gave a 'ki-hi!' and after her. They made time round that yard, now I tell you! The hens scuttled off, clucking as if all the foxes in the county had broke loose; and for a minute or two it seemed as if there was two or three dogs and half-a-dozen cats. Well, sir!—I mean, ma'am! at last the cat ...
— Hildegarde's Holiday - a story for girls • Laura E. Richards

... was John Ramsay, sone to the Laird of Corstoun in Fyfe, who being ane handsome young boy was made choyse of to attend Ki: Ja: 3d att the Grammar School. Their was pains taken for another Gentleman's sone, who had been bred in the high-school of Edr. and both read and wrote better, yet the young King thinking John had more the mean of ane Gentleman preferred him, tho choyses of such princes ...
— Publications of the Scottish History Society, Vol. 36 • Sir John Lauder

... of them associated with the leaders of gangs on terms of equality and confidence. It was very common for a chief or the governor of a district in times of great difficulty and personal danger to require from one of the leaders of such gangs a night-guard or palang ki chauki: and no less so to entertain large bodies of them in the attack and defence of forts and camps whenever unusual courage and skill were required. The son of the Raja of Charda exchanged turbans with a Badhak leader, ...
— The Tribes and Castes of the Central Provinces of India - Volume II • R. V. Russell

... Jinny," said Cookie valiantly. "Yo' think I scared of any ghos' what lower hissel to be a live white mong'ol dog? Yere, yo' ki-yi, yo' bettah mek friends with ol' Cookie, 'cause he got charge o' de grub. Yere's a li'le fat ma'ow bone what mebbe come off'n yo' own grandchile, but yo' ain' goin' to mind dat now yo' is trans formulated dis yere way." And evidently the ...
— Spanish Doubloons • Camilla Kenyon

... remains. The Page 133 details of the armor resemble in some respects that of the Assyrians of a much later date. From what can be read of the inscription, it seems that the conquered enemies belonged to the country of Is-ban-ki. There is also mention of a city of Ur, allied with Sirpula. The pillar was sculptured on both faces. On the reverse is a royal or divine figure, of large size, holding in one hand the heraldic design of Sirpula (an eagle with the head of a lion), while the other brandishes a war-club ...
— The American Journal of Archaeology, 1893-1 • Various

... ago Nikon, a friar of Solovetsk, an island monastery in the White Sea, having quarrelled alike with equal and superior, was set adrift in an open boat; he reached the mainland at Ki, a small cape in Onega Bay, wandered southward to Olonets, where he got together a band of followers, proceeded to Moscow, obtained the notice of the throne, got preferment, was soon made Patriarch. He ruled with an iron hand, made many enemies, and when at last he obtained from Mount Santo, ...
— Russia - As Seen and Described by Famous Writers • Various

... me. For many years the clock of my seasons had been stilled. The coming of the birds, the budding of the leaves, the serial blossoming of spring had not touched me, and as I walked up the street that exquisite morning, a reminiscent ecstasy filled my heart. The laughter of the robins, the shrill ki-ki-ki of the golden-wing woodpeckers, and the wistful whistle of the lark, brought back my youth, my happiest youth, and when my mother met me at the door it seemed that all my cares and all my years of city life had fallen ...
— A Daughter of the Middle Border • Hamlin Garland

... transparent curtains of yellow silk, to admit the glow of perpetual summer. Lanterns, as many as you please, of all forms and sizes; they would remind us of China, and, depending from the roof of the palace, bring before us that of the Emperor Ki, which was twice as large as St. Peter's (if we may credit the grand annals), and lighted alone by tapers, for his Imperial Majesty, being tired of the sun, would absolutely have a new firmament of his own creation, and an artificial day. Was it not a rare fantastic idea? For my part, ...
— Dreams, Waking Thoughts, and Incidents • William Beckford

... Indian war-dance as given by the Cheyennes. That aroused every one and filled the sets instantly. The fiddlers caught the inspiration and struck into "Sift the Meal and save the Bran." In every grand right and left, we ki-yied as we had witnessed Lo in the dance on festive occasions. At the end of every change, we gave a war-whoop, some of the girls joining in, that would have put to shame ...
— Cattle Brands - A Collection of Western Camp-fire Stories • Andy Adams

... House, Achard of New; Ki-wa-nee, the Indian of Flying Post—these and others told briefly of many things, each in his own language. To all Galen Albret listened in silence. Finally Louis Placide from the post at Kettle Portage got to his feet. He too reported of the trade,—so many ...
— Conjuror's House - A Romance of the Free Forest • Stewart Edward White

... emancipation, one locates on the west bank of the Kiamichi river and later becomes known as Parson Stewart, the organizer and circuit rider of a sufficient number of churches, at the time of his decease in 1896, to form the Presbytery of Ki ...
— The Choctaw Freedmen - and The Story of Oak Hill Industrial Academy • Robert Elliott Flickinger

... gave a shrill, high-keyed, sustained cry, "Ki, ki, ki!" and he started from his reverie, the dapples of sun and shade falling upon his lithe figure as he hurried on down ...
— Main-Travelled Roads • Hamlin Garland

... we could make Could tell by what false statements swayed Ah John was led to undertake A task so foreign to his trade! He only smiled and said, 'Hoo Ki! I stop topside, I ...
— Rio Grande's Last Race and Other Verses • Andrew Barton 'Banjo' Paterson

... one of their devils brewing bad medicine again up at Shi-wah-ki village. Red Snake always was a little bit crazy—talking about the thieving white man that stole his country and looking for a chance to get the rest of ...
— The Perils of Pauline • Charles Goddard

... vols. i. 46, vii. 326. A Joe Miller is told in Western India of an old General Officer boasting his knowledge of Hindostani. "How do you say, Tell a plain story, General?" asked one of the hearers, and the answer was, "Maydan ki bat bolo!" "speak a word about the plain" ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 3 • Richard F. Burton

... of famine and disappointment, that made the air shudder. From within the houses the dogs answered with mad clamor. A door would open to show first a long seal gun, then a fisherman, then a fool dog that darted between the fisherman's legs and capered away, ki-yi-ing a challenge to the universe. A silence, tense as a bowstring; a sudden yelp—Hui-hui, as the fisherman whistled to the dog that was being whisked away over the snow with a grip on his throat that prevented any answer; then the fisherman would wait and call in vain, and ...
— Northern Trails, Book I. • William J. Long

... ki castement vivront Se loiaute font a ceus qui iront; Et seles font par mal conseil folaje, A lasques gens et mauvais le feront, Car tout li bon iront ...
— Euphorion - Being Studies of the Antique and the Mediaeval in the - Renaissance - Vol. II • Vernon Lee

... Dirghagama-sutra, of each of the six Buddhas, the predecessors of Shakya Muni, if he carefully compare the list given above with the lists of the patriarchs of the Sarvastivada school given by San Yin (So-yu died A.D. 518) in his Chuh San Tsung Ki ...
— The Religion of the Samurai • Kaiten Nukariya

... occasion; these relics called in Mongol Chinghiz Bogdo (Sacred remains of Chinghiz) number ten; they are in the order adopted by the Mongols: the saddle of Chinghiz, hidden in the Wan territory; the bow, kept at a place named Hu-ki-ta-lao Hei, near Yeke Etjen-Koro; the remains of his war-horse, called Antegan-tsegun (more), preserved at Kebere in the Djungar territory; a fire-arm kept in the palace of the King of Djungar; a wooden and leather vase called Pao-lao-antri, kept at the place Shien-ni-chente; a wax ...
— The Travels of Marco Polo Volume 1 • Marco Polo and Rustichello of Pisa

... simply was, that her time had not come. Physical strength must rule for a time, and she was the weaker. She was very properly refused a feudal grant, because, say "Les Coustumes de Normandie," she is not trained to war or policy: C'est l'homme ki se bast et ki conseille. Other authorities put it still more plainly: "A woman cannot serve the emperor or feudal lord in war, on account of the decorum of her sex; nor assist him with advice, because of ...
— Atlantic Monthly Vol. 3, No. 16, February, 1859 • Various

... A ruler, Rim-Sin, of the dynasty of Larsa, associates Ea with Bel, declaring that these "great gods" entrusted Uruk into his hands with the injunction to rebuild the city that had fallen in ruins. The ideograms, with which his name is written, En-ki, designate him as god of that 'which is below,'—the earth in the first place; but with a more precise differentiation of the functions of the great gods, Ea becomes the god of the waters of the deep. When this stage of belief is reached, Ea is frequently associated with Bel, who, it will ...
— The Religion of Babylonia and Assyria • Morris Jastrow

... instantly overwhelmed by the fiery torrent, which, bearing on its foremost wave the enraged goddess, continued to pursue Kahawali and his companion. They ran till they came to an eminence called Puukea. Here Kahawali threw off his cloak of netted ki leaves and proceeded toward his house, which stood near the shore. He met his favorite pig and saluted it by touching noses, then ran to the house of his mother, who lived at Kukii, saluted her by touching noses, and ...
— Hawaiian Folk Tales - A Collection of Native Legends • Various

... puir cratur," said he; "seekin' for whit he'll never find, like the man with the lantern playin' ki-hoi wi' honesty." ...
— Doom Castle • Neil Munro

... barony of Bradwardine was a male fief, the first charter having been given at that early period when women were not deemed capable to hold a feudal grant; because, according to Les coustusmes de Normandie, c'est l'homme ki se bast et ki conseille; or, as is yet more ungallantly expressed by other authorities, all of whose barbarous names he delighted to quote at full length, because a woman could not serve the superior, or feudal lord, in war, on account of the decorum of her sex, nor assist him with advice, ...
— Waverley, Or 'Tis Sixty Years Hence, Complete • Sir Walter Scott

... says, is called Chong Ki or Royal Game. Forbes says the game is called by the Chinese "Choke ...
— Chess History and Reminiscences • H. E. Bird

... dis time. Prince he jist reared and kicked and foamed at de mouth, and did all de debil's own horse could do to fling Mass'r Richard, and Mass'r Richard, he de whitest white man any body eber seen. Ki! but de whip come down steady, ...
— The Hallam Succession • Amelia Edith Barr

... much bite in 'em as a ki-oodle," the man said; "how old is this old scow? 'Bout a hundred, ...
— Roy Blakeley's Camp on Wheels • Percy Keese Fitzhugh

... woodland was now echoing with the happy cries of the chase, the ki-yi of excited lap-dogs, the breathless voices of the young girls, the heavy crashing racket of stampeding young men rushing headlong through bramble and thicket with a noise like a ...
— The Gay Rebellion • Robert W. Chambers

... afraid of the sails and of rats, but he is afraid of rifle-fire, and at the first discharge goes yelping and ki-yi-ing below. The dislike Mr. Pike has developed for the poor little puppy is ludicrous. He even told me that if it were his dog he'd throw it overboard for a target. Just the same, he is an affectionate, heart-warming little rascal, and has already ...
— The Mutiny of the Elsinore • Jack London

... same, we had a pretty good run," said Drina, taking the cat into her arms and seating herself on the cushions; "didn't we, Kit-Ki?" And, turning to Selwyn, "Kit-Ki makes a pretty good fox—only she isn't enough afraid of us to run away very fast. Won't you sit down? Our mother is not ...
— The Younger Set • Robert W. Chambers

... Jippy and Jimmy crept out again, They said, "the river is full of rain!" They said, "the water is far from dry," Ki-hi! ...
— Five Mice in a Mouse-trap - by the Man in the Moon. • Laura E. Richards

... of the soil are good. The sweetish fruit of the jal, known as pilu, is liked by the people, and in famines they will even eat the berries of the leafless caper. Other characteristic plants of the Panjab plains are under Leguminosae, the khip (Crotalaria burhia), two Farsetias (farid ki buti), and the jawasa or camel thorn (Alhagi camelorum), practically leafless, but with very long and stout spines; under Capparidaceae several Cleomes, species of Corchorus (Tiliaceae), under Zygophyllaceae three Mediterranean genera, Tribulus, Zygophyllum, ...
— The Panjab, North-West Frontier Province, and Kashmir • Sir James McCrone Douie

... said Ki Ki. "Nonsense; Kapchack does not much like me now; he gave me a hint the other day not to soar too high. I suppose he did not like to think of my overlooking ...
— Wood Magic - A Fable • Richard Jefferies

... brave soldier in Ki[o]to, who through the malice of enemies at court, had fallen into disgrace. He had loved a beautiful lady whom he married. When her husband died she fled eastward to the Ashigara mountains, and there in the lonely forests in which no human being except poor woodcutters ever came, ...
— Japanese Fairy World - Stories from the Wonder-Lore of Japan • William Elliot Griffis

... Ki, the Indian who helped with the farm work, smiled at Betty but said nothing more than the single "Howdy," which was his stock form of salutation. Mrs. Watterby's waffles were quite as good as they smelled, and she apparently had mixed an inexhaustible quantity of batter. ...
— Betty Gordon at Boarding School - The Treasure of Indian Chasm • Alice Emerson

... the keel, wi' Dick Slavers an' Matt, An' the Mansion House stairs we were just alongside, When we a' three see'd somethin', but didn't ken what, That was splashin' and labberin', aboot i' the tide. 'It's a fluiker,' ki Dick; 'No,' ki Matt, 'its owre big, It luik'd mair like a skyet when aw furst seed it rise;' Kiv aw—for aw'd getten a gliff o' the wig— 'Ods marcy! wey, marrows, becrike, it's ...
— A Book About Lawyers • John Cordy Jeaffreson

... time has come. The hour is at hand. The people rule. Tyranny is down. Enter in and take possession of the spoilers' gains. Algonquin Avenue is heaped with riches wrung from the sweat of the poor. Clean out the abodes of blood guiltiness.' And you ought to have heard the ki-yi's that followed. That encouraged him, and he went on: 'Algonquin Avenue is a robbers' cave, It's very handsome, but it needs one thing more.' 'What's that?' some fellows yelled. 'An aristocrat hung to every lamppost.' This was very popular too, you can bet your boots. On that I ...
— The Bread-winners - A Social Study • John Hay

... do so. The functions of politeness and etiquette exist in order to make things go smoothly in all social contact. Orientals have very thorough training in this department. They have systems of good manners which have been practiced for thousands of years. The Chinese Li-ki ("Ritual of Propriety") dates from the beginning of the Christian era. It is an elaborate text-book of correct conduct in all affairs of life. It is of universal application, except for details of the mode of life in China, and it shows ...
— Folkways - A Study of the Sociological Importance of Usages, Manners, Customs, Mores, and Morals • William Graham Sumner

... which I would direct the attention of the reader most particularly, which is, that Wa prefixed to the essential word of a country, means men or people; M prefixed, means man or individual; U, in the same way, means place or locality; and Ki prefixed indicates the language. Example:—Wagogo, is the people of Gogo; Mgogo, is a Gogo man; Ugogo, is the country of Gogo; and ...
— The Discovery of the Source of the Nile • John Hanning Speke

... of distress My dwelling was on the mountain height, My talking companions were the birds, The decaying leaves of the Ki ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 18 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... leaders: majority party: Democratic Liberal Party (DLP), KIM Yong-sam, president opposition: Democratic Party (DP), YI Ki-taek, executive chairman; United People's Party (UPP), KIM Tong-kil, chairman; several smaller parties note: the DLP resulted from a merger of the Democratic Justice Party (DJP), Reunification Democratic ...
— The 1995 CIA World Factbook • United States Central Intelligence Agency

... rolling down the slope, over and over. He was in a panic of terror. The unknown had caught him at last. It had gripped savagely hold of him and was about to wreak upon him some terrific hurt. Growth was now routed by fear, and he ki-yi'd like any frightened puppy. ...
— White Fang • Jack London

... song of Finnur hin frii, we have the following verse:— Hegar Finnur hetta sr. When this peril Finn saw, Mannspell var at meini, That witchcraft did him harm, Skapti hann seg varglki: Then he ...
— The Book of Were-Wolves • Sabine Baring-Gould

... which I suspect to be a clerical error for "Katal-ki" Allah strike thee dead. See vol. iv. 264, 265. [One of the meanings of "Mukabalah," the third form of "kabila," is "requital," "retaliation." The words in the text could therefore be translated: "may God ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 6 • Richard F. Burton

... end, 8 feet long, used with the throwing stick for general purposes. 7. Hard wood spear with single barb spliced on, 8 feet long, used from Port Lincoln to King George's Sound for chase or war, it is launched with the throwing stick. 8. Ki-ko—reed spear, hard wood point, 6 to 7 feet long, used with the throwing-stick to kill birds or other game. 9. Hard wood spear, grass-tree end, barbed with flint, used with the throwing-stick for war. 10. The head of No. 9 on a arger scale. 11. The head of No. 1 on a larger ...
— Journals Of Expeditions Of Discovery Into Central • Edward John Eyre

... the Minister of State and the Shoguns, and with satire, invective, and the enthusiasm of a patriot, urged the unlawfulness of the usurpation of the imperial power by these mayors of the palace. In his Sei-Ki, or political history of Japan, he traced the history of the imperial family, and mourned with characteristic pathos the decadence of the imperial power. The labors of these historians and scholars bore in time abundant fruit. Some of their disciples became men of will and action: ...
— The Constitutional Development of Japan 1863-1881 • Toyokichi Iyenaga

... Beke, the Cassaby of Monteiro and Gamitto (p. 494), and the Kassaby or Cassay of Valdez. Its head water is afterwards called by the explorer Lomame and Loke, possibly for Lu-oke, because it drains the highlands of Mossamba and the district of Ji-oke, also called Ki-oke, Kiboke, and by the Portuguese "Quiboque." The stream is described as being one hundred yards broad, running through a deep green glen like the Clyde. The people attested its length by asserting, in true African style, "If ...
— Two Trips to Gorilla Land and the Cataracts of the Congo Volume 2 • Richard F. Burton

... here are excessively polite and ceremonious, especially to those advanced in years. They salute one another by laying the hand on the breast, making a bow, and inquiring, Kona lafia? ki ka ky kee—Fo fo da rana: How do you do? I hope you are well. How have you passed the heat of the day? The last question corresponds in their climate to the circumstantiality, with what our country folks inquire about a ...
— Lander's Travels - The Travels of Richard Lander into the Interior of Africa • Robert Huish

... Ki Pak, Yung Pak's father, was one of the king's officials. On this account his home was near the great palace of the king, in the city of Seoul, ...
— Our Little Korean Cousin • H. Lee M. Pike

... thought of that as she was winding her watch. It seemed incredible that it was no longer than that since the saccharine little sob in John McCormack's voice as he had sung "Just a little love, a li-ttle ki-iss," had ...
— The Real Adventure • Henry Kitchell Webster

... boys to decide who of them should be Bow-bearer to their chief for the ensuing year followed, and as the great drum, Kas-a-lal-ki, rolled forth its hollow, booming notes, twenty slender youths stepped forward, of whom the handsomest was Has-se the Sunbeam, and the tallest was dark-faced Chitta the Snake. All were stripped to the skin, and wore only girdles ...
— The Flamingo Feather • Kirk Munroe

... the feminine nouns immensely preponderate (p. 206). The pronouns of the second (me, pha) and third person (u, ka) have separate forms for the sexes in the singular, but in the plural only one is used (phi, ki), and this is the plural ...
— The Khasis • P. R. T. Gurdon

... "Ki, aint him cotchin' it good?" was John's mental comment, as he daily watched the proceedings, and while Hannah pronounced him "the hen-peck-ed-est man she had ever seen," the amused villagers knew that will had ...
— Cousin Maude • Mary J. Holmes

... from left to right, and, the speed rapidly increasing, it flew far to the rear. At high speed a sharp whistling noise could be heard. In the second method, which was shown by 'bungil wunkun,' and elicited admiring ejaculations of 'ko-ki' from the black fellows, the boomerang was thrown in a plane considerably inclined to the left. It there flew forward for say the same distance as before, gradually curving upward, when it seemed to 'soar' up—this is the best term—just ...
— The Galaxy, Volume 23, No. 2, February, 1877 • Various

... in the sky and flyin' high; We're goin' to live instead of die, It's time to laugh instead of cry; Oh, my! Ki-yi! Ain't ...
— Sky Island - Being the further exciting adventures of Trot and Cap'n - Bill after their visit to the sea fairies • L. Frank Baum

... reelected President of the Supreme People's Assembly Presidium and given the responsibility of representing the state and receiving diplomatic credentials head of government: Premier PAK Pong-chu (since 3 September 2003); Vice Premiers KWAK Pom-ki (since 5 September 1998), CHON Sung-hun (since 3 September 2003), NO Tu-chol (since 3 September 2003) cabinet: Cabinet (Naegak), members, except for the Minister of People's Armed Forces, are appointed ...
— The 2003 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency

... Her name was Verbena M., and she personated Faith. She had colored slippers, and was drinking tea from her mother's cup. Another child, named Broderick McGowan, represented Columbus, and joyfully shouted "Ki-yi!" every half-minute. One child was attired as a prominent admiral; another as a prominent general; and one stood in a boat and was Washington. As Mrs. Brewton examined them and dealt with the mothers, the names struck me afresh—not so much the boys; Ulysses Grant and James ...
— The Jimmyjohn Boss and Other Stories • Owen Wister

... ancestor-worship. All Shinto traditions were by these writings blended into one mythological history,—explained upon the basis of one legend. The whole mythology is contained in two books, of which English translations have been made. The oldest is entitled Ko-ji-ki, or "Records of Ancient Matters"; and it is supposed to have been compiled in the year 712 A.D. The other and much larger work is called Nihongi, "Chronicles of Nihon [Japan]," and dates from about 720 A.D. Both works profess to be histories; but a large ...
— Japan: An Attempt at Interpretation • Lafcadio Hearn

... stoop, hide, crouch, when about to rain : Kiddi kit mya warra. To go a long distance : Maran dugon bordeneuk. To cut up an animal of any kind for roasting : Dedayah killa, kuirderkan, ki ti kit. To cover up, to keep warm : Borga koorejalah kunah. For roasting : Ki ti kit. To cut up : Kurerkna. Give me some water : Yahago cabe. I'm very thirsty : Gangah. To carry the pickaninee : Colanganee wandung. Here carry the pickaninee (strong expression) : Colang maranga ...
— Discoveries in Australia, Volume 2 • John Lort Stokes

... news of Sidoti's imprisonment and death arrived at Canton—the latter being attributed to his continual fasts and austerities. But Griffis relates (Mikado's Empire, pp. 262, 263) so much as may now be known about Sidoti's fate, derived from a book—Sei Yo Ki Bun ("Annals of Western Nations")—written by the Japanese scholar who examined the priest, which gives the facts of the case, and the judicial proceedings therein. Sidoti "was kept a prisoner, living for several ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898 (Vol 28 of 55) • Various

... protected from the cold, he took up the fifteen miles of homeward race, the seven dogs ki-yi-ing at his heels. ...
— Panther Eye • Roy J. Snell

... his imminent peril came over Zeb when he felled the rising Shawnee to the earth. It was his intention, in the first place, to serve every one in the same manner; but as they came to their feet far more rapidly than he anticipated, he gave over the idea, and, with a "Ki! yi!" plunged headlong into the woods. At this very juncture, the attention of the Indians was taken up with Leland, as the more important captive of the two, and for a moment the negro escaped notice; but the instant the four ...
— The Ranger - or The Fugitives of the Border • Edward S. Ellis

... parted. Jack sails for Newfoundland, is shipwrecked and carefully, somewhat too carefully, tended by 'La-ki-wa, or the Star that shines,' a lovely Indian maiden who belongs to the tribe of the Micmacs. She is a fascinating creature who wears 'a necklace composed of thirteen nuggets of pure gold,' a blanket of English manufacture ...
— Reviews • Oscar Wilde

... nul de desuz ceil Tant ben s['e]ist esp['e]e no la corone el chef! Uncore cunquerrei-jo citez ot mun espeez." Cele ne fud pas sage, folement respondeit: "Emperere," dist-ele, trop vus poez preiser. "Uncore en sa-jo un ki plus se fait l['e]ger, Quant il porte corune entre ses chevalers; Kaunt il met sur sa teste, ...
— A Handbook of the English Language • Robert Gordon Latham

... book, Kobodaishi-ichi-dai-ki, it is related that when he was in China, the name of a certain room in the palace of the Emperor having become effaced by time, the Emperor sent for him and bade him write the name anew. Thereupon Kobodaishi ...
— Glimpses of an Unfamiliar Japan - First Series • Lafcadio Hearn

... asked them where there were some more people. They told him that there were some people down the river, and some up in the mountains. But they said: "Do not go there, for it is bad, because Ai-sin'-o-ko-ki (Wind Sucker) lives there. He will kill you." It pleased K[)u]t-o'-yis to know that there was such a person, and he went to the mountains. When he got to the place where Wind Sucker lived, he looked into his mouth, and could see many dead people there,—some skeletons and some just dead. ...
— Blackfoot Lodge Tales • George Bird Grinnell

... consider the case of my trunk. Then it took him some time to wake up his horse, which did a bewildered Lady Macbeth up the street. I was walking beside, and suddenly a roly-poly puppy slipped away from a boy and ran straight under the clumsy hoofs.... You never heard such ki-yi's. You'd think he was being vivisected. There was a shrieking streak of white and he disappeared under a culvert. The old mare stopped, wide-awake and horror-stricken, and the boy—a pitiful little person with his head held tautly back, almost a hunchback—and ...
— Jane Journeys On • Ruth Comfort Mitchell

... went out to battle, Major would go with them, and bark and growl all the time. Once, in a battle way down in Louisiana, Major began to bark and growl as usual, and to stand up on his hind-legs. Then he ran around, saying, "Ki-yi, ki-yi." By and by he saw a cowardly soldier, who was running away; and he seized that soldier by the leg, and would not let him go for a long time. He wanted him to go ...
— The Nursery, No. 107, November, 1875, Vol. XVIII. - A Monthly Magazine for Youngest Readers • Various

... every time a dart hit him, so I imagined they hurt, and though I, too, felt much annoyed, I had to put a stop to this cruel sport, when one of the aggrieved policemen cried out to me: "Taubada (master), why you stop him get hurt? This fellow he ki-ki (eat) you if ...
— Wanderings Among South Sea Savages And in Borneo and the Philippines • H. Wilfrid Walker

... arises from the multiplied meaning of conjunctions and adverbs. (102) For instance, vau serves promiscuously for a particle of union or of separation, meaning, and, but, because, however, then: ki, has seven or eight meanings, namely, wherefore, although, if, when, inasmuch as, because, a burning, &c., and so ...
— A Theologico-Political Treatise [Part II] • Benedict de Spinoza

... Payne omits the last line. It refers to what Persian boys call, in half-Turkish phrase, "Alish Takish," each acting woman after he has acted man. The best wine is still made in monasteries and the co-called Sinai convent is world-famous for its "Rki" distilled from raisins. ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 5 • Richard F. Burton

... his temper. Roy, hurt and angry, tried to keep cool. Against an antagonist so skilled and relentless, it was his only chance. Their names were shouted. "Shahbash[26] Sinkin, Sahib," from the men of Roy's old squadron; and from Lance's men, "Desmin Sahib ki jai!"[27] ...
— Far to Seek - A Romance of England and India • Maud Diver

... fifty of the now well-known jin-ti-ki-shas, and the air was full of a buzz produced by the rapid reiteration of this uncouth word by fifty tongues. This conveyance, as you know, is a feature of Japan, growing in importance every day. It was only invented seven years ago, and already there are nearly 23,000 in ...
— Unbeaten Tracks in Japan • Isabella L. Bird

... my mandarin friend. His name was Ki-Chang; he was a mandarin of the fifth class, his distinctive mark being a crystal button on the top of his cap. He was forty-six years old, intelligent, amiable, and gentlemanly. He and I had much intercourse ...
— Under the Dragon Flag - My Experiences in the Chino-Japanese War • James Allan

... u ils 'estuient Cels de l'ost virent, ki pres furent." Roman de Rou, Second Part, ...
— Harold, Complete - The Last Of The Saxon Kings • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... seven ponies and the dog teams were hard at it all the forenoon. I ran six journeys with five dogs, driving them in the Siberian fashion for the first time. It was not difficult, but I kept forgetting the Russian words at critical moments: 'Ki'—'right'; 'Tchui'—'left'; 'Itah'—'right ahead'; [here is a blank in memory and in diary]—'get along'; 'Paw'—'stop.' Even my short experience makes me think that we may have to reorganise this driving ...
— Scott's Last Expedition Volume I • Captain R. F. Scott

... assumed the maudlin expression and insipid ricanement of the Hindu charged with "Sharm ki bat" ...
— Two Trips to Gorilla Land and the Cataracts of the Congo Volume 1 • Richard F. Burton

... office of the exclusive Kennel Club and entered the Chow Ki-Yi for the next Bench Show. At the Clearing House for K. M.'s she filed a loud call for a Cook who could cook. Then she cashed a check, ordered a pound of Salted Nuts (to be delivered by Special Wagon at once), enveloped a ball of Ice Cream gooed with Chocolate, ...
— Ade's Fables • George Ade

... Ma, ki jai!" This reiterated chant from scores of enthusiastic little throats greeted the saint's party as it entered the school gates. Showers of marigolds, tinkle of cymbals, lusty blowing of conch shells and beat of the MRIDANGA drum! The Blissful Mother wandered smilingly over the ...
— Autobiography of a YOGI • Paramhansa Yogananda

... so-called, who writes about the Island of Mackinac and the Straits and vicinity, tells us that the definition or the meaning of the word "Michilimackinac" in the Ottawa and Chippewa language, is "large turtle," derived from the word Mi-she- mi-ki-nock in the Chippewa language. That is, "Mi-she" as one of the adnominals or adjectives in the Ottawa and Chippewa languages, which would signify tremendous in size; and "Mikinock" is the name of mud turtle—meaning, ...
— History of the Ottawa and Chippewa Indians of Michigan • Andrew J. Blackbird

... Bald'ur; who was the favorite of all the gods. Only Lo'ki, the spirit of evil, hated him. Baldur's face was as bright as sunshine. His hair gleamed like burnished gold. Wherever he went night was turned ...
— Famous Men of the Middle Ages • John H. Haaren

... Soon in the wash tub, and when I got out of thar I had somebody's washin' in one hand and about five yards of that pig tail in tother, and Mr. Hop Soon, he wuz standin' thar yellin'—ung wa moo ye song ki le yung noy song oowe pelecee, pelecee, pelecee. I had quite a ...
— Uncles Josh's Punkin Centre Stories • Cal Stewart

... to be believed that a long time ago, when roofs lay over the walls of Kya-ki-me, when smoke hung over the housetops, and the ladder rounds were still unbroken in Kya-ki-me, then the Black Mexicans came from their abodes in Everlasting Summerland. One day, unexpectedly, out of Hemlock Canon they came, and descended to Kya-ki-me. But ...
— The Journal of Negro History, Volume 6, 1921 • Various

... by the Governor! This is a great injustice, and Yar Khan is hot with rage. And of the others: Mahbub Ali is still at Pubbi, writing God knows what. Tugluq Khan is in jail for the business of the Kohat Police Post. Faiz Beg came down from Ismail-ki-Dhera with a Bokhariot belt for thee, my brother, at the closing of the year, but none knew whither thou hadst gone: there was no news left behind. The Cousins have taken a new run near Pakpattan to breed mules for the Government carts, and there is a story in ...
— Soldiers Three • Rudyard Kipling

... our coastal and inland tablelands, particularly in sheltered positions. Under the heading of semi-tropical fruits, all kinds of citrus fruits, persimmons, loquats, date palm, wine palm, pecan nut, Brazilian cherry, Natal plum, ki-apple, and many other fruits are included, as well as several fruits that more properly belong to the temperate regions, such as Japanese plums, Chickasaw plum, peaches of Chinese origin, figs, mulberries of sorts, strawberries, cape gooseberries, &c. Of all ...
— Fruits of Queensland • Albert Benson

... after-generations. There had been instances in China in which favoritism such as this had caused national disturbance and disaster; and thus the matter became a subject of public animadversion, and it seemed not improbable that people would begin to allude even to the example of Yo-ki-hi.[5] ...
— Japanese Literature - Including Selections from Genji Monogatari and Classical - Poetry and Drama of Japan • Various

... Volksetymologie is found in Genesis xi. 9, from balbal, "to confound." A second name of the city, which perhaps originally denoted a separate village or quarter, was Su-anna, and in later inscriptions it is often represented ideographically by E-ki, the pronunciation and meaning of which are uncertain. One of its oldest names, however, was Din-tir, of which the poets were especially fond; Din-tir signifies in Sumerian "the life of the forest," though ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 3, Part 1, Slice 1 - "Austria, Lower" to "Bacon" • Various

... Tibet. His dynasty, called the Hia, kept the throne until 1766; ending with the downfall of a cruel weakling. Followed then the House of Shang until 1122; set up by a wise and merciful Tang the Completer, brought to ruin by a vicious tyrant Chousin. It was Ki-tse, a minister of this last, and a great sage himself, who, fleeing from the persecutions of his royal master, established monarchy, civilization, and social ...
— The Crest-Wave of Evolution • Kenneth Morris

... first of November we came in sight of the long, low-built village of Yin-des-tuk-ki. As we paddled up the winding channel of the Chilcat River we saw great excitement in the town. We had hoisted the American flag, as was our custom, and had put on our best apparel for the occasion. ...
— Alaska Days with John Muir • Samual Hall Young

... dat!" chuckled the other. "Him's past dat! Ki! how fat he ar!" seizing the opossum, and beginning to dress ...
— Cudjo's Cave • J. T. Trowbridge

... The last sound heard ere reaching the realms of unconsciousness is the steady tramp of the sentinels pacing to and fro. Scarcely have I fallen asleep—so at least it seems to me —when I am awakened by my four guards singing out, one after another, "Kujawpuk! Ki-i-puk!!" This appears to be their answer to the challenge of the officer going his rounds, and they shout it out in tones clear and distinct, in succession. This programme is repeated several times during the night, and, notwithstanding the sleep-inducing fatigues of the last few days, my slumbers ...
— Around the World on a Bicycle Volume II. - From Teheran To Yokohama • Thomas Stevens

... come into the cage by-'m-by, and put his head into my mouth. Then I'm a gunter swaller him! Ki! ...
— Atlantic Monthly,Volume 14, No. 82, August, 1864 - A Magazine Of Literature, Art, And Politics • Various

... "Ki-eye! yow! yow!" Kathump, kathump, kathump, kathump; kathump, kathump, kathump, kathump! Fast, fast went Pedro's feet, running, ...
— Here and Now Story Book - Two- to seven-year-olds • Lucy Sprague Mitchell

... "Afsanah" by Al-Mas'udi, both words having the same sense tale story, parable, "facetiae." Moslem fanaticism renders it by the Arab "Khurafah" silly fables, and in Hindostan it a jest: "Bat-ki bat, khurafat-ki khurafat" (a word for a word, a ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 10 • Richard F. Burton

... koria wena ketenes, dovo sikerela yoi tevel ketni buti barveli rya. Pen sarja vonka tu dikesa o latch apre lakis cham, talla lakis kor, te vaniso, adovos sigaben yoi tevel a bori rani. Ma kessur tu ki lo se, 'pre o truppo te pre o bull, pen laki sarja o latch adoi se sigaben o boridirines. Hammer laki apre. Te dikessa tu yoi lela bitti wastia te bitti piria, pen laki trustal a rye ko se divius pa rinkeni piria, te sa o rinkeno wast anela kumi bacht te rinkno mui. Hammerin te kamerin te ...
— The Gypsies • Charles G. Leland

... the battle of Kusaka, there was a man who hid in a great tree, and by so doing escaped danger. So pointing to this tree, he said: "I am grateful to it, as to my mother." Therefore the people of the day called that place Omo no ki no Mura. ...
— The Great Events by Famous Historians, Vol. 1 • Various

... took the envelope was not more of an idiot than most chaprassis. He merely forgot where this most unofficial cover was to be delivered, and so asked the first Englishman he met, who happened to be a man riding down to Annandale in a great hurry. The Englishman hardly looked, said: "Hauksbee Sahib ki Mem," and went on. So did the chaprassi, because that letter was the last in stock and he wanted to get his work over. There was no book to sign; he thrust the letter into Mrs. Hauksbee's bearer's hands and went off to smoke ...
— The Works of Rudyard Kipling One Volume Edition • Rudyard Kipling

... "Oh, ki! you stupid Caesar, you 'spose I got eyes all round," replied Jupiter, leaping on his legs with the empty sack hanging round his nook, and stooping down his head ready to receive the ...
— Old Jack • W.H.G. Kingston

... natives); Dogs (destined for food);[3] Hogs; Fowls; Fish, crabs, cuttle-fish, shell-fish; Kukui nuts (Aleurites moluccana) for making relishes, and for illumination; Edible sea-weed (limu); Edible ferns (several species, among others the hapuu); Awa (Piper methysticum, Forst.); Ki roots (Cordyline ti, Schott.), a very saccharine vegetable; Feathers of the Oo (Drepanis pacifica), and of the Iiwi (Drepanis coccinea): these birds were taken with the glue of the ulu or bread-fruit (Artocarpus incisa); Fabrics of beaten bark (kapa) and fibre of the olona ...
— Northern California, Oregon, and the Sandwich Islands • Charles Nordhoff

... country is fabulously rich in gold, silver, copper, lead, coal, iron, quick silver, marble, granite, chalk, plaster of Paris, (gypsum,) thieves, murderers, desperadoes, ladies, children, lawyers, Christians, Indians, Chinamen, Spaniards, gamblers, sharpers, coyotes (pronounced Ki-yo-ties,) poets, preachers, and jackass rabbits. I overheard a gentleman say, the other day, that it was "the d—-dest country under the sun."—and that comprehensive conception I fully subscribe to. It never rains here, and the dew never falls. No ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... Sage, after a moment's thought, with his forehead wrinkled into deep furrows, "is to send the Ki-Wi to the Court of the Little Panjandrum for a fresh authority. It's no use your having this one back if it won't act properly, is it?" he inquired, turning to ...
— Dick, Marjorie and Fidge - A Search for the Wonderful Dodo • G. E. Farrow

... old woman had said, "she'll mek his heart ache many a time. She'll comb his haid wid a three-legged stool an' bresh it wid de broom. Uh, huh—putty, is she? You ma'y huh 'cause she putty. Ki-yi! She fix you! Putty women ...
— The Strength of Gideon and Other Stories • Paul Laurence Dunbar

... the husband. Precisely parallel seems to be the injunction laid upon Hohodemi, by Toyotamahime, daughter of the Sea-god. I know not what may be the rule in Japan; but it is probably not different from that which obtains in China. There, as we learn from the Li Ki, one of the Confucian classics, a wife in Toyotamahime's condition would, even among the poor, be placed in a separate apartment; and her husband, though it would be his duty to send twice a day to ask after her, would not see her, nor apparently ...
— The Science of Fairy Tales - An Inquiry into Fairy Mythology • Edwin Sidney Hartland

... refracted ray MKI, which I consider as going to the eye at I, it necessarily follows that the point L, by virtue of the same refraction, will be seen by the refracted ray LRI, so that LR will be parallel to MK if the distance from the eye KI is supposed very great. The point L appears then as being in the straight line IRS; but the same point appears also, by ordinary refraction, to be in the straight line IK, hence it is necessarily judged ...
— Treatise on Light • Christiaan Huygens

... del lac[41] Ces Roumans fu par escris. En lan del Incarnation nostre Segnor. mil deus cens et sixante et quatorse le semedi apres pour ce li ki lescrist. ...
— A Bibliographical, Antiquarian and Picturesque Tour in France and Germany, Volume Two • Thomas Frognall Dibdin

... beginning of the seventh century of our era, is to be found an extract from the ancient annals of Magadha, which proves the existence of the Nirgrantha or Jainas in their original home from a very early time. [Footnote: Beal, Si-yu-ki. Vol. II, p. 168.] This extract relates to the building of the great monastry at Nalanda, the high school of Buddhism in eastern India, which was founded shortly after Buddha's Nirva[n.]a, and mentions incidentally that a Nirgrantha who was a great astrologer ...
— On the Indian Sect of the Jainas • Johann George Buehler

... "Ki—yi-i-i!" yelled Dave Naab with all the power of his lungs. His head was back, his mouth wide open, his face red, his neck corded and swollen with the intensity of ...
— The Heritage of the Desert • Zane Grey

... upon his feet and looking back with dazed eyes at the door, then he muttered: "Pu' me out, wi' you? Pu' me out, damn you! Well, I ki' you. See 'f I don't;" and he half walked, half ...
— The Sport of the Gods • Paul Laurence Dunbar



Words linked to "Ki" :   Red China, vitality, Cathay, vim, People's Republic of China, Sumer, energy, china, mainland China



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