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Jack   Listen
noun
Jack  n.  
1.
A familiar nickname of, or substitute for, John. "You are John Rugby, and you are Jack Rugby."
2.
An impertinent or silly fellow; a simpleton; a boor; a clown; also, a servant; a rustic. "Jack fool." "Since every Jack became a gentleman, There 's many a gentle person made a Jack."
3.
A popular colloquial name for a sailor; called also Jack tar, and Jack afloat.
4.
A mechanical contrivance, an auxiliary machine, or a subordinate part of a machine, rendering convenient service, and often supplying the place of a boy or attendant who was commonly called Jack; as:
(a)
A device to pull off boots.
(b)
A sawhorse or sawbuck.
(c)
A machine or contrivance for turning a spit; a smoke jack, or kitchen jack.
(d)
(Mining) A wooden wedge for separating rocks rent by blasting.
(e)
(Knitting Machine) A lever for depressing the sinkers which push the loops down on the needles.
(f)
(Warping Machine) A grating to separate and guide the threads; a heck box.
(g)
(Spinning) A machine for twisting the sliver as it leaves the carding machine.
(h)
A compact, portable machine for planing metal.
(i)
A machine for slicking or pebbling leather.
(j)
A system of gearing driven by a horse power, for multiplying speed.
(k)
A hood or other device placed over a chimney or vent pipe, to prevent a back draught.
(l)
In the harpsichord, an intermediate piece communicating the action of the key to the quill; called also hopper.
(m)
In hunting, the pan or frame holding the fuel of the torch used to attract game at night; also, the light itself.
5.
A portable machine variously constructed, for exerting great pressure, or lifting or moving a heavy body such as an automobile through a small distance. It consists of a lever, screw, rack and pinion, hydraulic press, or any simple combination of mechanical powers, working in a compact pedestal or support and operated by a lever, crank, capstan bar, etc. The name is often given to a jackscrew, which is a kind of jack.
6.
The small bowl used as a mark in the game of bowls. "Like an uninstructed bowler who thinks to attain the jack by delivering his bowl straight forward upon it."
7.
The male of certain animals, as of the ass.
8.
(Zool.)
(a)
A young pike; a pickerel.
(b)
The jurel.
(c)
A large, California rock fish (Sebastodes paucispinus); called also boccaccio, and mérou.
(d)
The wall-eyed pike.
9.
A drinking measure holding half a pint; also, one holding a quarter of a pint. (Prov. Eng.)
10.
(Naut.)
(a)
A flag, containing only the union, without the fly, usually hoisted on a jack staff at the bowsprit cap; called also union jack. The American jack is a small blue flag, with a star for each State.
(b)
A bar of iron athwart ships at a topgallant masthead, to support a royal mast, and give spread to the royal shrouds; called also jack crosstree.
11.
The knave of a suit of playing cards.
12.
(pl.) A game played with small (metallic, with tetrahedrally oriented spikes) objects (the jacks(1950+), formerly jackstones) that are tossed, caught, picked up, and arranged on a horizontal surface in various patterns; in the modern American game, the movements are accompanied by tossing or bouncing a rubber ball on the horizontal surface supporting the jacks. same as jackstones.
13.
Money. (slang)
14.
Apple jack.
15.
Brandy. Note: Jack is used adjectively in various senses. It sometimes designates something cut short or diminished in size; as, a jack timber; a jack rafter; a jack arch, etc.
Jack arch, an arch of the thickness of one brick.
Jack back (Brewing & Malt Vinegar Manuf.), a cistern which receives the wort. See under 1st Back.
Jack block (Naut.), a block fixed in the topgallant or royal rigging, used for raising and lowering light masts and spars.
Jack boots, boots reaching above the knee; worn in the 17 century by soldiers; afterwards by fishermen, etc.
Jack crosstree. (Naut.) See 10, b, above.
Jack curlew (Zool.), the whimbrel.
Jack frame. (Cotton Spinning) See 4 (g), above.
Jack Frost, frost or cold weather personified as a mischievous person.
Jack hare, a male hare.
Jack lamp, a lamp for still hunting and camp use. See def. 4 (m.), above.
Jack plane, a joiner's plane used for coarse work.
Jack post, one of the posts which support the crank shaft of a deep-well-boring apparatus.
Jack pot (Poker Playing), the name given to the stakes, contributions to which are made by each player successively, till such a hand is turned as shall take the "pot," which is the sum total of all the bets. See also jackpot.
Jack rabbit (Zool.), any one of several species of large American hares, having very large ears and long legs. The California species (Lepus Californicus), and that of Texas and New Mexico (Lepus callotis), have the tail black above, and the ears black at the tip. They do not become white in winter. The more northern prairie hare (Lepus campestris) has the upper side of the tail white, and in winter its fur becomes nearly white.
Jack rafter (Arch.), in England, one of the shorter rafters used in constructing a hip or valley roof; in the United States, any secondary roof timber, as the common rafters resting on purlins in a trussed roof; also, one of the pieces simulating extended rafters, used under the eaves in some styles of building.
Jack salmon (Zool.), the wall-eyed pike, or glasseye.
Jack sauce, an impudent fellow. (Colloq. & Obs.)
Jack shaft (Mach.), the first intermediate shaft, in a factory or mill, which receives power, through belts or gearing, from a prime mover, and transmits it, by the same means, to other intermediate shafts or to a line shaft.
Jack sinker (Knitting Mach.), a thin iron plate operated by the jack to depress the loop of thread between two needles.
Jack snipe. (Zool.) See in the Vocabulary.
Jack staff (Naut.), a staff fixed on the bowsprit cap, upon which the jack is hoisted.
Jack timber (Arch.), any timber, as a rafter, rib, or studding, which, being intercepted, is shorter than the others.
Jack towel, a towel hung on a roller for common use.
Jack truss (Arch.), in a hip roof, a minor truss used where the roof has not its full section.
Jack tree. (Bot.) See 1st Jack, n.
Jack yard (Naut.), a short spar to extend a topsail beyond the gaff.
Blue jack, blue vitriol; sulphate of copper.
Hydraulic jack, a jack used for lifting, pulling, or forcing, consisting of a compact portable hydrostatic press, with its pump and a reservoir containing a supply of liquid, as oil.
Jack-at-a-pinch.
(a)
One called upon to take the place of another in an emergency.
(b)
An itinerant parson who conducts an occasional service for a fee.
Jack-at-all-trades, one who can turn his hand to any kind of work.
Jack-by-the-hedge (Bot.), a plant of the genus Erysimum (Erysimum alliaria, or Alliaria officinalis), which grows under hedges. It bears a white flower and has a taste not unlike garlic. Called also, in England, sauce-alone.
Jack-in-office, an insolent fellow in authority.
Jack-in-the-bush (Bot.), a tropical shrub with red fruit (Cordia Cylindrostachya).
Jack-in-the-green, a chimney sweep inclosed in a framework of boughs, carried in Mayday processions.
Jack-of-the-buttery (Bot.), the stonecrop (Sedum acre).
Jack-of-the-clock, a figure, usually of a man, on old clocks, which struck the time on the bell.
Jack-on-both-sides, one who is or tries to be neutral.
Jack-out-of-office, one who has been in office and is turned out.
Jack the Giant Killer, the hero of a well-known nursery story.
Yellow Jack (Naut.), the yellow fever; also, the quarantine flag. See Yellow flag, under Flag.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Jack" Quotes from Famous Books



... effects can be shown to be ultimately due, not to mind, but to matter acting on matter, according to methods approved by materialism, hysteria remains a word-cause and no more, like the meat-cooking quality of the roasting-jack. ...
— The Faith of the Millions (2nd series) • George Tyrrell

... could not enclose with linked hands; great masses of scarlet and purple, and—mostly—of a waxy white, with something deathlike in their translucent beauty. There, also, he would wade into the swamps around a certain little creek, lured by a hope of the jack-in-the-pulpit, to find only the odorous and disappointing skunk-cabbage. And there the woods were full of the aroma of sassafras, and of birch tapped by the earliest woodpecker, whose drumming throbbed through the young man's ...
— The Story of a New York House • Henry Cuyler Bunner

... heard the soldiers comin' our boys turned the horses loose in the woods. The Yankees said they had to have 'em an' would burn the house down if we didn't get 'em. So our boys whistled up the horses an' the soldiers carried 'em all off. They carried off ol' Jennie mule too but let little Jack mule go. When the soldiers was gone the stable boss said,'if ol' Jennie mule once gits loose nobody on earth can catch her unless she wants. She'll be back!' Sure enough, in a couple of days she come home by herself an' we worked the farm jus' with ...
— Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States • Various

... Jack, Prince, Zigzag and even Whirlwind showed the effects of their long confinement, but all appeared to share the enthusiasm of their owners and worked royally to get forward. When they had traveled the distance named, the ...
— Deerfoot in The Mountains • Edward S. Ellis

... the problem," David said; "she's poisoning herself with it. I know what I'm talking about. I've seen it happen. My cousin Jack married a girl with a sister a great deal like Beulah, looks, temperament, and everything else, though she wasn't half so nice. She got going the militant pace and couldn't stop herself. I never met her at a dinner party that she ...
— Turn About Eleanor • Ethel M. Kelley

... took advantage of her husband's absence to push open the door of her daughter's study, and M. Andrea, who was sitting before the piano with Mademoiselle Eugenie, started up like a jack-in-the-box. Albert bowed with a smile to Mademoiselle Danglars, who did not appear in the least disturbed, and returned his bow with her usual coolness. Cavalcanti was evidently embarrassed; he bowed to Morcerf, who replied with the most impertinent look possible. Then Albert launched out ...
— The Count of Monte Cristo • Alexandre Dumas, Pere

... faint rippling whisper against the sides. Directly after the moon appeared from behind the thick mass of clouds and shed a path of silver over the sea, till it flooded the part where the cutter lay; and as Mark Vandean knelt there, he saw Tom Fillot standing before him with the Union Jack in ...
— The Black Bar • George Manville Fenn

... at home! Is my face very buggy? Don't rub it any more, please. That's Jack Mason over there! I play with him. I want him to see me. Hullo! Jack," he shouted, leaning out of the cab, "I've been run over, right over, face all buggy. Look at it! Hands too," spreading them out. "He's a nice boy," Freddy ...
— Berenice • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... gate, to which she clung panting for a moment, and then passed in. The little man had his coat off, and, stooping in his strawberry-bed, he did look very small indeed. Edith approached quite near before he noticed her. He suddenly straightened himself up almost as a jumping-jack might, and gave her a sharp, surprised look. He had heard the gossip in several distorted forms, but what hurt him most was that she did not come or send to him. But when he saw her standing before him with her head bent down ...
— What Can She Do? • Edward Payson Roe

... realism, "Captain Singleton," was reprinted a few years back in "The Camelot Classics," but it is safe to say that out of every thousand readers of "Robinson Crusoe" only one or two will have even heard of the "Memoirs of a Cavalier," "Colonel Jack," "Moll Flanders," or "Captain Singleton." It is indeed distressing to think that while many scores of thousands of copies of Lord Lytton's flashy romance, "Paul Clifford," have been devoured by the public, "Captain ...
— The Life, Adventures & Piracies of the Famous Captain Singleton • Daniel Defoe

... medium-sized quince, and has several large stones. The inside of the fruit is white, and is sweet and firm, and fragrant, but not very digestible. The wood resembles ebony, is very lustrous, and is esteemed for its solidity and hardness. The nanca [nangka, nangca; translated by Stanley, jack-fruit] (Artocarpus integrifolia—Willd.), was taken to the Philippines from India, where it was called yaca. The tree is large and wide-spreading, and has long narrow leaves. It bears fruit not only on the branches, but on the trunk and roots. The fruit ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898: Volume XVI, 1609 • H.E. Blair

... row, that poor little Mab is frightened out of her wits, and I don't know whether they would not eat her up if she did not creep up close to me. I'm tired of going at them with the poker, and would poison every man Jack of them if it were not for the fear of her ...
— The Trial - or, More Links of the Daisy Chain • Charlotte M. Yonge

... light to enable him to see that the floor of the cave was thickly strewn with fragments of shells and gray-white coral, the stone itself being so soft that he could easily penetrate it with his jack-knife. ...
— Golden Days for Boys and Girls - Volume XIII, No. 51: November 12, 1892 • Various

... matches from the mantelpiece, and gave some to each of the boys; but suddenly he cried, "Wait a moment: I will be back before you can say Jack Robinson," and ran out ...
— The Apple Dumpling and Other Stories for Young Boys and Girls • Unknown

... receive them. He was a tall, spare man, dressed in nankeen jacket and trousers, with a large-brimmed straw-hat upon his head. "Welcome, gentlemen, welcome. Kingston, how are you?" said he, as they stopped. "Now dismount, gentlemen; the boys will take the mules. Boy Jack, where are you? Where's Baby and where's Bulky? Come here you lazy rascals and take the mules. Now then, gentlemen, I'll show you the way. I ordered breakfast on the table, as I saw you coming down ...
— Newton Forster - The Merchant Service • Captain Frederick Marryat

... Bay), strikes north-west. On the 30th he has been walking four days in a northerly direction, when he arrives at the inn where the maid Jenny refreshes him at the pump, and he meets the author with whom he passes the night. On the 31st he purchases the horse and cart of Jack Slingsby, whom he had previously seen but once, at Tamworth, many years ago when he was little more than a child. On June 1st he makes the first practical experience of a vagrant's life, and passes the night in the open air in a Shropshire dell; on June 5th he is visited by ...
— Isopel Berners - The History of certain doings in a Staffordshire Dingle, July, 1825 • George Borrow

... handling round bundles of arrows in addition to the quivers which they wore. Heads were thrust out of windows more than usual, a woman ran out and called some children indoors, a knight rode down the street, and then more pikemen appeared along the walls, and all the jack-daws were in the air. In the street no troubadour sang. Mr. Sladden took one look along the towers to see that the flags were flying, and all the golden dragons were streaming in the wind. Then he had to go to Business. He took ...
— The Book of Wonder • Edward J. M. D. Plunkett, Lord Dunsany

... it makes you look like a common cheap-jack," said she. "It's not a gentleman's hat at all. I'm sure they would not tolerate it ...
— Tom, Dick and Harry • Talbot Baines Reed

... saddles, and, followed by his party, went clattering out of the sally-port and splashing over to the levee. Stable-call sounded as usual at four o'clock, and, for the first time in the record of that disciplined organization since the devastating hand of Yellow Jack was laid upon it the previous year, no officer appeared to supervise the grooming and feeding. Two of them were at the post, however. Mr. Doyle, in arrest on charge of absence without leave, was escorted ...
— Waring's Peril • Charles King

... politician (stop 'em) stop procession (tough boy) Little Ben Harry HARRISON Tippecanoe tariff too knapsack war-field (the funnel) windpipe throat quinzy QUINCY ADAMS quince fine fruit (the fine boy) sailor boy sailor jack tar JACKSON stone wall indomitable (tough make) oaken furniture bureau VAN BUREN rent link stroll seashore take give GRANT award school premium examination cramming (fagging) laborer hay field HAYES hazy clear (vivid) brightly lighted camp-fire war-field ...
— The Handy Cyclopedia of Things Worth Knowing - A Manual of Ready Reference • Joseph Triemens

... will you? I swear that I will make out the time to look with you on old Logier's quarters, ... and at Gerolt's, where they once would not allow you to put your slender legs upon a chair. Let politics be hanged and come to see me. I promise that the Union Jack shall wave over our house, and conversation and the best old hock shall pour damnation upon the rebels. Do not forget old friends, neither their wives, as mine wishes nearly as ardently as myself to see you, or at least to ...
— Stories of Authors, British and American • Edwin Watts Chubb

... Julietta. JACK and NED DE RESZKE Romeo and The Friar. Why the waltz alone, which ought to be on every organ besides Miss EAMES'S, but which, strange to say, isn't thoroughly popular, should be enough to make an Opera; but it's like the proportion of one swallow in the composition of a summer, and, however ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 100, April 25, 1891 • Various

... Garden of Eden of the world—evolves just as many cases per capita of melancholia as bleak, barren Maine. Wild, rocky, forbidding Scotland has produced more genius to the acre than beautiful England: and I have found that sailor Jack, facing the North Atlantic winter storms, year after year, is a deal jollier companion than the Florida cracker whose ...
— Little Journeys to the Homes of the Great, Vol. 2 of 14 - Little Journeys To the Homes of Famous Women • Elbert Hubbard

... intolerably fat and lazy, in which condition she was an object of great attraction to the Chinese; they longed for her, wanted to buy her, begged for her, and watched for her, knowing she must die soon, and then be thrown overboard. Jack, however, had no inclination to gratify the Chinamen, and when poor Jean breathed her last, two masses of ballast iron were placed, one on each cheek, and lashed to her neck and shoulders in such a manner, that by their projection ...
— Anecdotes of the Habits and Instinct of Animals • R. Lee

... companion; and a single glance told him all he wished to know. Jack Denis—for he was scarcely known by any other name—was an open-hearted, honest, straight-forward young fellow of twenty, with light-brown hair, frank eyes, and a cordial bearing which at once put every body at their ease. Still there ...
— The Youth of Jefferson - A Chronicle of College Scrapes at Williamsburg, in Virginia, A.D. 1764 • Anonymous

... Besides the ensigns, she had flying at the fore a large white flag, inscribed with the words: 'Sailors' Rights and Free Trade,' with the idea, perhaps, that this favourite American motto would damp the energy of the 'Shannon's' men. The 'Shannon' had a Union Jack at the fore, an old rusty blue ensign at the mizzen peak, and two other flags rolled up, ready to be spread if either of these should be shot away. She stood much in need of paint, and her outward appearance hardly inspired much belief in the order ...
— The True Story Book • Andrew Lang

... thing to her, and might have a softening and affectionate kind of effect, don't you see? As to Beadle, that I needn't say was wholly out of the question. If there is anything that is not to be tolerated on any terms, anything that is a type of Jack-in-office insolence and absurdity, anything that represents in coats, waistcoats, and big sticks our English holding on by nonsense after every one has found it out, it is a beadle. You ...
— Little Dorrit • Charles Dickens

... a true saying, that there never was a Jack without a Jill; but I could not have believed that my friend Jane Emory would have been willing to be the Jill to such ...
— Home Lights and Shadows • T. S. Arthur

... frightened, and, after a second hasty glance at the awful phantom, he fled back to his room, tripping up in his long winding-sheet as he sped down the corridor, and finally dropping the rusty dagger into the Minister's jack- boots, where it was found in the morning by the butler. Once in the privacy of his own apartment, he flung himself down on a small pallet- bed, and hid his face under the clothes. After a time, however, the brave old Canterville spirit ...
— Selected Prose of Oscar Wilde - with a Preface by Robert Ross • Oscar Wilde

... Spirit of the Nation who had so persistently endeavoured to establish herself as one of the family at Mount Music. "All I'm afraid of is that Papa may begin to beat the Protestant drum and wave the Union Jack! Such nonsense! The main thing is that Larry ...
— Mount Music • E. Oe. Somerville and Martin Ross

... King's life, immediately set out in a carriage for Versailles: "But remark," said he, "the spirit of 'courtisanerie' of a Prince, who may be Elector of Bavaria and the Palatinate tomorrow. This was not enough. When he arrived within ten leagues of Paris, he put on an enormous pair of jack-boots, mounted a post-horse, and arrived in the court of the palace cracking his whip. If this had been real impatience, and not charlatanism, he would have taken horse twenty leagues from Paris."—"I ...
— The Memoirs of Louis XV. and XVI., Volume 2 • Madame du Hausset, and of an Unknown English Girl and the Princess Lamballe

... was chiefly sporting, even the clergyman who performed the service being the famous "Jack" Russell, eighty-seven years of age, known in ...
— The Life of the Rt. Hon. Sir Charles W. Dilke V1 • Stephen Gwynn

... 'Ook! Ook!' a bull rose like a giant jack-in-the-box right alongside of me, giving us a regular shower bath, and he got both tusks on ...
— The North Pole - Its Discovery in 1909 under the auspices of the Peary Arctic Club • Robert E. Peary

... anything done, an' no men to work for me? With Colton Gray gone an' the rest of the P. C. & W. thieves playin' into that scoundrel Swinnerton's hands, where do we get off? We send for a hundred men, an' it saves Swinnerton the trouble an' expense of a wire. By now every man jack of them is makin' fences an' buildin' houses for him, or I'm the worst-fooled man in the country." And he swung off into a string of curses which would not have been unworthy ...
— Under Handicap - A Novel • Jackson Gregory

... one of these said gentlemen was set on horseback, his face towards the tail, which he held in his hand in the manner of a bridle, while with a collar significative of his offence, dangling about his neck, he made a public entree into the city of London, conducted by Jack Ketch, who afterwards did himself the honour of scourging and branding the impostor, previous to banishment, which completed his sentence. In the reign of James I, a terrible sweep was made among ...
— Thaumaturgia • An Oxonian

... your straying lambs. Like the Master Himself, your big heart always yearns over the wanderers from the fold. I wonder," he added, "if we couldn't get one or two newsboys to help in this search. Many of them are very keen, sharp little fellows, and they'd be as likely as anybody to know Jack, and to know his whereabouts if he is still in the city. Let me see—his name is Jack Finney, and he is about fifteen or sixteen now, ...
— The Bishop's Shadow • I. T. Thurston

... for Pendleton and Hardy Counties. Stay all night with Brother Jack Ratchford and his son Hugh Ratchford, on top of the Shenandoah mountain, where we have an evening meeting for prayer ...
— Life and Labors of Elder John Kline, the Martyr Missionary - Collated from his Diary by Benjamin Funk • John Kline

... thing," said Mrs. Moody, softly. Then she seemed to jack herself up to a realization that softness would not do and that she could not allow such goings-on in her house. "You're sick, and if I'm a judge you're mighty sick," she said, sharply. "Who's goin' to ...
— Youth Challenges • Clarence B Kelland

... They are merely created upon the old principle, that your scoundrel must be polite and powerful—a very sound principle. The villain must be not only a villain, but a tyrant. The giant must be larger than Jack. But in the books of the Dombey period we have many shrewd glimpses of the queer realities of English aristocracy. Of these Cousin Feenix is one of the best. Cousin Feenix is a much better sketch of the essentially ...
— Appreciations and Criticisms of the Works of Charles Dickens • G. K. Chesterton

... day the headquarters of the army were removed to the palace of Delhi. As the Union Jack of England ran up the flagstaff on the palace so lately occupied by the man crowned by the rebels Emperor of India, the seat and headquarters of the revolt which had deluged the land with blood, and caused the rule of England to totter, a royal salute was fired by the British guns, and tremendous ...
— In Times of Peril • G. A. Henty

... you, to muffle yourself up and start off with me for a good brisk walk over Hampstead Heath? I knows a good 'ous there where we can have a red-hot chop for dinner, and a glass of good wine:" which led to our first experience of Jack Straw's Castle, memorable for many happy meetings in coming years. But the rides were most popular and frequent. "I think," he would write, "Richmond and Twickenham, thro' the park, out at Knightsbridge, and over ...
— The Life of Charles Dickens, Vol. I-III, Complete • John Forster

... which he instructed them; his courtesy to the youngest private; the tact and thoughtfulness he showed in all his relations with them, had won their affection. His very peculiarities endeared him to them. Old Jack or Stonewall were his nicknames in the lines of his own command, and stories went round the camp fire of how he had been seen walking in the woods round Centreville absorbed in prayer, or lifting his left hand with that peculiar gesture which the men believed was an ...
— Stonewall Jackson And The American Civil War • G. F. R. Henderson

... was Jack and the Bean-stalk. A squash vine was put up in the barn. This was the bean-stalk. When it was cut down, the boy who played giant would come tumbling out of ...
— Stories of Great Americans for Little Americans • Edward Eggleston

... mamma said I might have some jelly and some sago for him—and there is nobody to take it. Foster is out of the way, and Jack is busy, and ...
— The Old Helmet, Volume I • Susan Warner

... village when the Germans came around that flank and started firing their Maxim gun. The Colonel and his orderly rushed into the street, and each discharged ten rounds quick, and then went back and finished their drinks. It's horrible when they put "Jack Johnsons" into your bivouac at night from about twelve miles off. You can hear them coming for about 30 seconds, and judge whether they are coming for you or a ...
— The New York Times Current History: the European War, February, 1915 • Various

... that firmly. I was once troubled—so troubled, that, for two or three days, I was ill—and so convinced was I that something had happened to Jack, and yet that he was not dead, that when, nigh two years afterwards, Ben came home, and I learned that it was on the day of the wreck of his ship that I had so suffered, I was not in the least surprised. ...
— The Tiger of Mysore - A Story of the War with Tippoo Saib • G. A. Henty

... of your friends,—they are waiting to hear Those jokes that are thought so remarkably queer; And all the Jack Horners of metrical buns Are prying and fingering to ...
— The Poetical Works of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Complete • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

... lads, and be popular with all alike. He came along fresh, hearty, healthy, full of sunlight, brimming over with news, fresh from contact with the great people in Halifax,—yet one of the plain people, hailing them Tom and Jack, and as happy with them as if in the king's palace. 'Joe Howe came to our house last night,' bragged a little girl as she skipped along to school next morning; 'he kissed mamma and kissed me too.' The familiarity ...
— The Tribune of Nova Scotia - A Chronicle of Joseph Howe • W. L. (William Lawson) Grant

... and the wine would make my teeth drop out of my head if I took a glass of it; there are no strawberries, no oranges, no melons, the cherries are as hard as their stones, the beans only good for horses, or Jack and the beanstalk, and this is the size of the ...
— Hortus Inclusus - Messages from the Wood to the Garden, Sent in Happy Days - to the Sister Ladies of the Thwaite, Coniston • John Ruskin

... anyone's else hands have I the scantest remembrance. What really most happened no doubt, was that my brother and I should both come away with a mind prepared for a perfect assimilation of Alphonse Daudet's chronicle of "Jack," years and years later on; to make the acquaintance in that work of the "petits pays chauds" among whom Jack learnt the first lessons of life was to see the Institution Vergnes at once revive, swarming as it did with small homesick Cubans and Mexicans; the complete failure ...
— A Small Boy and Others • Henry James

... in an adjacent wood. The aeroplane was flying at a great height and evidently laboured under the impression that the kits were men. Twice it flew over the field in the usual manner, and then the storm of shrapnel, 'Jack Johnsons' and other tokens from the Kaiser rained upon the confined space. A round four hundred shells were dropped into that field in the short period of ten minutes, and the range was so accurate ...
— Aeroplanes and Dirigibles of War • Frederick A. Talbot

... and the menu soared to unknown delicacies like "Potage a la Suisse, Choucroute garnie aux saucission de Berne, Puree de foie gras trufee, and Leckerley de Bale." Hanging above the buoyant assembly were the Cross of Helvetia and the Jack of Britannia. ...
— The Home of the Blizzard • Douglas Mawson

... breeches—gabardine or khaki. One belt. Two knives—one hunting-knife, one jack-knife. Three pair cloth putties. Three flannel shirts (I actually only used two). Six suits summer flannels, merino, long drawers. Three pair Abercrombie lightest shoes (one pair rubber soles). Three colored silk handkerchiefs. Two face towels—two bath towels. Three khaki cartridge ...
— In Africa - Hunting Adventures in the Big Game Country • John T. McCutcheon

... "Jack is not bound by critics' crabbed laws, But gives to all his unreserved applause: He laughs aloud when jokes his fancy please— Such are the honest manners of the seas. And never—never may he ape those fools Who, lost to reason, laugh or ...
— The Sailor's Word-Book • William Henry Smyth

... coercion or sheer necessity to enlist, the poor whites, the outcasts of the South, a class the most degraded in public estimate,—a class which has the respect of neither the white man nor the negro. These people inhabit to a great extent the scrub-oak or black-jack forests, the second growth which has sprung up on exhausted plantations. Destitute of schools, churches, and newspapers, unable to read or write, without culture, generally steeped in whiskey, their sole ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 10, Number 60, October 1862 • Various

... Haven was certainly not "busy," and if "rising," it had not risen enough for much of it to be visible. There were a few wooden buildings of a very rough description; there was a warehouse or two; and an erection sporting a flagstaff and a ragged Union Jack, whose front edge looked as if the rats had been trying which tasted best, the red, white, or blue; and upon a rough board nailed over the door was painted in white letters, about as badly as possible, "Jennings' Hotel;" but the painter had given so much space to "Jennings'," that ...
— The Dingo Boys - The Squatters of Wallaby Range • G. Manville Fenn

... influence of an indefinable kind on the rugged fellow, a woman whom he saw a good deal of; and to whom he had grown accustomed to look for a good deal of help. This was Miss Totty Nancarrow. Totty was no slight help with little Nelly, and even with Jack. For the former she ceased to be 'Miss Nanco,' and became 'Totty' simply; to Jack she was a most estimable acquaintance, who never grudged flattering wonder at his school achievements, even though they involved no more than a mastery ...
— Thyrza • George Gissing

... in the icy northland. They become weak and die when brought to warm climates. Others that are accustomed to tropical weather fail to make further growth when exposed to extreme cold. The appearance of Jack Frost means death to most of the trees that come from near the equator. Even on the opposite slopes of the same mountain the types of trees are often very different. Trees that do well on the north side require plenty of moisture and cool weather. Those ...
— The School Book of Forestry • Charles Lathrop Pack

... at Woolwich, and in 1780 had gone to Russia in search of employment. Three years later he was sent by Prince Potemkin to superintend a great industrial establishment at Kritchev on a tributary of the Dnieper. There he was to be 'Jack-of-all-trades—building ships, like Harlequin, of odds and ends—a rope-maker, a sail-maker, a distiller, brewer, malster, tanner, glass-man, glass-grinder, potter, hemp-spinner, smith, and coppersmith.'[251] He was, that is, to transplant ...
— The English Utilitarians, Volume I. • Leslie Stephen

... choose to fight," was the cool reply. "And as I observe that you wear neither sword nor pistols, and as jack boots and a fine tight-buttoned riding coat are not the easiest clothes to wrestle in, it appears just possible that ...
— Audrey • Mary Johnston

... loyal ears of even old Jonas, found no lack of new material now. In the Dalesman's Daughter in Silverdale and in the Border Ram at Grammoch-town, each succeeding market day brought some fresh tale. Men told how the gray dog had outdone Gypsy Jack, the sheep-sneak; how he had cut out a Kenmuir shearling from the very centre of Londesley's pack; and a ...
— Bob, Son of Battle • Alfred Ollivant

... glaring at us each in turn. "So, thet durned nigger ain't dead, arter all, hey? Snakes an' alligators! Why, it's a reg'ler con-spiracy all round—rank mutiny, by thunder! I guess I'll hev ye all hung at the yard-arm, ev'ry man Jack of ye, fur it, ez sure ez my name's ...
— The Island Treasure • John Conroy Hutcheson

... Barebones sits opposite ye. Look yer, old boy (throwing himself in chair), I kin allow how it comes easy for ye to run this bank, for it's about as exciting, these times, as faro was to ye in '49, when I first knew ye as Jack Oakhurst; but how the Devil you can sit opposite that stiff embodiment of all the Ten Commandments, day by day, damn it! that's wot GETS me! Why, the first day I came here on business, the old man froze me so that I couldn't thaw a ...
— Two Men of Sandy Bar - A Drama • Bret Harte

... together, the sunbeams making Jack-o-lanterns at their feet. Light branches swayed in the wind, and through the dancing leaves the sunlight sifted, making Lena's hair a brighter brown, and Polly's ...
— Princess Polly's Playmates • Amy Brooks

... venture to come themselves, but sent messages with assurances of their desire to be on friendly terms. A good deal of ceremonial was observed. The marines and bluejackets were drawn up in line before the hall, which was decorated with green boughs; a Union jack waved from a ...
— Among Malay Pirates - And Other Tales Of Adventure And Peril • G. A. Henty

... and lifted myself up. Then he did not know me, having, perhaps, never seen Adam in his simplicity, but he twisted his nose around to catch my scent; and the moment he had done so he sprang like a jumping-jack and rushed into his den ...
— The Writings of John Burroughs • John Burroughs

... know what we would have done in Bloomdale if Dot and Dimpsie had not had a father who would rather go off fishing, or lounge in the sun telling stories, than support his family. Everybody disapproved of Jack Roper, but everybody liked his patient little wife and his two dear little girls, and we ...
— Holiday Stories for Young People • Various

... fact is that only people of ample leisure make good correspondents. But now to sum up: Yesterday I saw Stanton, had a glimpse of Swallow, saw Mr. Lincoln, and had an adventure so out of the common that it was like one of the stories of adventure in which Jack used to delight. Now I cannot—should not tell it—but some day—yes. Send this P.S., bit of good news, on its way. Read ...
— Westways • S. Weir Mitchell

... heard this question, big with two hundred thousand francs, Adeline forgot the odious insults heaped on her by this cheap-jack fine gentleman, before the tempting picture of success described by Machiavelli-Crevel, who only wanted to find out her secrets and laugh ...
— Cousin Betty • Honore de Balzac

... from bush to bush, continually "mewing," and seeming to be in great distress. "There's the nest, Jack," cried Bob, pointing to a mass of twigs on the top of a tall bush. "You stand underneath and hold your hat to catch the eggs if they fall, and I'll bend down ...
— Harper's Young People, October 5, 1880 - An Illustrated Weekly • Various

... on earth," answered Ben, reflecting over her words with a hand buried amid the jack-knives, bits of twine, and lumps of lead, in his deepest of deep pockets. "That ere sentiment used to sound beautiful on a Fourth of July, when I was a shaver, but it's took after my example, and out-grown itself ...
— Mabel's Mistake • Ann S. Stephens

... Caroline, what is it about Jack?" burst out Olivetta with an excited flutter after Miss Gardner had gone into the bedroom. "I hadn't heard anything of it before! Has—has anything ...
— No. 13 Washington Square • Leroy Scott

... better how to juggle than to write: Alas! a Poet's good for nothing now, Unless he have the knack of conjuring too; For 'tis beyond all natural Sense to guess How their strange Miracles are brought to pass. Your Presto Jack be gone, and come again, With all the Hocus Art of Legerdemain; Your dancing Tester, Nut-meg, and your Cups, Out-does your Heroes and your amorous Fops. And if this chance to please you, by that rule, He that writes Wit is ...
— The Works of Aphra Behn - Volume IV. • Aphra Behn

... Adrian," he said. "Mr Fordyce and I croak too much. Still, you will find a grain or two of sense among the chaff, as Jack Point says." ...
— The Right Stuff - Some Episodes in the Career of a North Briton • Ian Hay

... the upside down, to show Its inclination for below; In vain, for a superior force, Applied at bottom, stops its course; Doomed ever in suspense to dwell, 'Tis now no kettle, but a bell. A wooden jack, which had almost Lost by disuse the art to roast, A sudden alteration feels, Increased by new intestine wheels; And, what exalts the wonder more, The number made the motion slower; The flier, though 't had leaden feet, Turned round so quick you scarce ...
— TITLE • AUTHOR

... acquaint My Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty that I sailed again from Jack-in-the-Basket with His Majesty's Ship Pandora under my command on the 7th day of November, and anchored in Santa Cruz by Teneriffe on the 22nd: that nothing particular occured in my passage to this place, except that of my falling in with His Majesty's sloop Shark on the 17th November in ...
— Voyage of H.M.S. Pandora - Despatched to Arrest the Mutineers of the 'Bounty' in the - South Seas, 1790-1791 • Edward Edwards

... promptly. "You had better take apple-jack too, young man. Georgie K. has gin that beats the record, and peach brandy, but when it comes to his apple-jack—it's worth the ...
— 'Doc.' Gordon • Mary E. Wilkins-Freeman

... when I was a little boy, that was quite a pet with the whole family. We called him Jack, and he knew his name as well as I did. The biography of the old veteran would be very interesting, I am sure, if any body were to write it. I do not mean to be his biographer, however, though my partiality for him will be a sufficient apology for ...
— Stories about Animals: with Pictures to Match • Francis C. Woodworth

... of his past. This is at the time of the Civil War, when the locality is in constant agitation, fearing that a battle will be fought in the immediate vicinity. During this time there appears upon the scene a Confederate surgeon who, for reasons of his own, claims Jack as his son. The youth has had trouble with this man and despises him. He cannot make himself believe that the surgeon is his parent and he refuses to leave his foster mother, who thinks the world of him. Many complications arise, but in the end the truth concerning the youth's identity ...
— Young Captain Jack - The Son of a Soldier • Horatio Alger and Arthur M. Winfield

... bleed. My limbs jerk numbly like those of a jumping-jack. An earthy taste is on my lips. I have long lost all sense of progress. One cliff is like another in its jagged nakedness; one abysm dark and empty as another. Perhaps I wander in a circle. Perhaps this brown hand is leading me wildly astray, this hand whose grasp ...
— The Indian Lily and Other Stories • Hermann Sudermann

... of images is in connection with that mental process known as Imagination. As we study the writings of Jack London, Poe, Defoe, Bunyan, we move in a realm almost wholly imaginary. And as we take a cross-section of our minds when thus engaged, we find them filled with images. Furthermore, they are of great variety—images of colors, sounds, tastes, smells, ...
— How to Use Your Mind • Harry D. Kitson

... three floors did not bring Jenny Lind back. Mary Rose pressed her face close to Aunt Kate and tried not to cry and to believe the conscience-stricken Miss Carter when she said that Jenny Lind was all right, they'd find her before Mary Rose could say Jack Robinson. ...
— Mary Rose of Mifflin • Frances R. Sterrett

... strangle Sikes as surely as if I had his bull's throat between my fingers now. If he comes back, and leaves the boy behind him; if he gets off free, and dead or alive, fails to restore him to me; murder him yourself if you would have him escape Jack Ketch. And do it the moment he sets foot in this room, or mind me, it will be ...
— Oliver Twist • Charles Dickens

... and trousers on. Thus burdened he turned to ask his fare, but the cabman gave a yell of terror, whipped up his horse, and disappeared at a hand-gallop; and a woman who happened to be going by, ran down the street, howling that Jack the Ripper had come to town. The man bolted in at the door, and toiled up the dark stairs tramping heavily, the legs and feet, which he dragged after him, making an unearthly clatter. He came in and put his burden ...
— Three Elephant Power • Andrew Barton 'Banjo' Paterson

... Prix," she said quietly; "take him to the factory. Get Rette de Lancy's hand above him for care, and Jack for all things else. Take these my men, and give them all the post affords, but chiefly ...
— The Maid of the Whispering Hills • Vingie E. Roe

... him alive. I shall pass over the particulars of all previous information which I have received, and endeavour to give you, in a few words, the result of a deliberate inquiry from the Batta chiefs of Tappanooly. I caused the most intelligent to be assembled; and in the presence of Mr. Prince and Dr. Jack, obtained the following information, of the truth of which none of us have the least doubt. It is the universal and standing law of the Battas, that death by eating shall be inflicted in the following cases:—Adultery; ...
— John Rutherford, the White Chief • George Lillie Craik

... signal. At the end of ten minutes fifty thousand lights glittered, descending from the Palazzo di Venezia to the Piazza del Popolo, and mounting from the Piazzo del Popolo to the Palazzo di Venezia. It seemed like the fete of jack-o'-lanterns. It is impossible to form any idea of it without having seen it. Suppose that all the stars had descended from the sky and mingled in a wild dance on the face of the earth; the whole accompanied by cries that were never ...
— The Count of Monte Cristo • Alexandre Dumas, Pere

... the recesses of his dressing-gown, and produced a great jack-knife, with a crooked iron blade and a ...
— What Might Have Been Expected • Frank R. Stockton

... country of Nolichucky Jack's is worth the trouble we have had in coming. Something in the stillness of the night makes me think of those dreadful Revolutionary days. What a time it was and what a lot of great heroes ...
— History Plays for the Grammar Grades • Mary Ella Lyng

... pulled on the forty-eight great "jack-screws," lifting and blocking up the building section by section, who excavated exactly to the surveyor's stakes, who mixed concrete and mortar, who framed and handled the huge "hard pine" timbers, who earnestly undertook whatever was told them—for this was new and strange work—if these ...
— American Missionary, Volume 43, No. 10, October, 1889 • Various

... rough riding-boots under our chairs, to avoid marking the contrast with our host's resplendent jack-boots of patent-leather, and buttoning up our coat collars, we endeavoured to make ourselves as inconspicuous as possible in this brilliant assembly. But in spite of our tramp-like garb, we were always highly ...
— The Land of the Black Mountain - The Adventures of Two Englishmen in Montenegro • Reginald Wyon

... for all the operations of my mind and body seemed in abeyance. Mechanically I turned the ship westward again; and when the sun came up, there, hardly two miles from me, were the cliffs of Dover; and on the crenulated summit of the Castle I spied the Union Jack hang motionless. ...
— The Purple Cloud • M.P. Shiel

... passing into the custom-pen, I was gruffly addressed, "On ne passe pas!" I said, "On ne passe pas? Comment on ne passe pas?" The only thing wanting, it seemed, was a visiting-card; but the opportunity of being safely insolent was too tempting to the Jack-in-office for him to pass it over. I could not help feeling glad these braves had never reached Berlin; they would have made Europe uninhabitable. France was charming as an empire or as a monarchy, but as a brand-new republic it was ...
— The Romance of Isabel Lady Burton Volume II • Isabel Lady Burton & W. H. Wilkins

... its broken teeth and mouthed at me. We had reached the stage at which we had become intensely patriotic by the singing of songs. A beautiful actress, who had no thought of doing "her bit" herself, attired as Britannia, with a colossal Union Jack for background, came before the footlights and sang the ...
— The Glory of the Trenches • Coningsby Dawson

... wanted, but Peter had no French money. The Fusilier bought him the first two, however, and together they forced their way out into the great lounge. "Half an hour before lunch," said his new companion, and then, catching sight of someone: "Hullo, Jack, you back? Never saw you on the boat. Did you ..." His voice trailed off as he crossed ...
— Simon Called Peter • Robert Keable

... has been sent for Fox, who is touring with Mrs. Armstead on the continent; but I have not heard whether the Prince has sent for him, or given any orders to Fox's friends to that effect. The system of favouritism is much changed since Lord Bute's and the Princess-Dowager's time, for Jack Payne, Master Leigh, an Eton schoolboy, and Master Barry, brother to Lord Barrymore, and Mrs. Fitz, form the Cabinet at ...
— Memoirs of the Courts and Cabinets of George the Third - From the Original Family Documents, Volume 1 (of 2) • The Duke of Buckingham and Chandos

... pretty picture that night lighted by pumpkin Jack o' Lanterns in which electric bulbs had been hidden, and by grotesque paper lanterns representing bats, owls and all sorts of flying nocturnal creatures. The side walls had been covered with gorgeous autumn foliage, palms and potted rubber plants stood all ...
— A Dixie School Girl • Gabrielle E. Jackson

... [Footnote 92: "Whiskey Jack," the name by which the Canada Jay (Perisoreus Canadensis) is best known to the lumbermen and hunters of Maine and Canada, is the Montagnais Ouishcatcha[n] (Cree, Ouiskeshauneesh), which has passed ...
— The Composition of Indian Geographical Names - Illustrated from the Algonkin Languages • J. Hammond Trumbull

... occasions he enjoyed "the distinction of being the only guest besides the Duke of Sussex who ever indulged in the rare habit of smoking. But while the Royal Duke was wont to puff away at a long meerschaum in his bedroom till he actually blinded himself, and all who came near him, Fidele Jack [Lord Althorp's nickname] behaved in more considerate fashion, only smoking out of doors as he passed restlessly up and ...
— The Social History of Smoking • G. L. Apperson

... or mawkishness; but it is rather long, and the rest of the conversation is longer. The husband naturally, though, as no doubt he expects, vainly, tries to know who it is that thus threatens his wife's peace and his own, and for a time the eavesdropper (one wishes for some one behind him with a jack-boot on) is hardly less on thorns than M. de Cleves himself. At last a reference to the portrait-episode (see above) enlightens Nemours, and gives, if not an immediate, a future clue to ...
— A History of the French Novel, Vol. 1 - From the Beginning to 1800 • George Saintsbury

... man who had a child. This child was the youngest of seven which the Lord had given him, so it was destined from its birth to be lucky. It was christened John, because all dunces and upstarts are named John. The father loved little Jack like the very apple of his eye. It could not have been otherwise, since the boy was the youngest of seven children and the smallest, chubbiest, and fattest of them all. But the father doesn't count for every thing. He comes and goes, appears and vanishes, the house ...
— Roumanian Fairy Tales • Various

... George scornfully. "You 'done noble,' Jack. If those men don't find the place, you may rest easy that they will keep track ...
— The Go Ahead Boys and Simon's Mine • Ross Kay

... as doors should be, Before you went to bed last night; Yet Jack Frost has got in, you see, And ...
— The Home Book of Verse, Vol. 1 (of 4) • Various

... Dardanelles. There was no crowd to cheer us and wave white handkerchiefs; nothing but a silent, deserted dockyard—because of that policeman at the gate. It was only as we crept past a great cruiser, whose rails were crowded with Jack Tars, that cheers and banter ...
— Tell England - A Study in a Generation • Ernest Raymond

... my boy, it's a jolly old game, Though athletic fanatics might vote it too tame, But sense is not baffled by bogies. The Emerald Green and the "bowls" and the "jack," Are beautiful—but for that bend in the back— To those ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 100, May 16, 1891 • Various

... the stone of Joseph Merriam, who died in 1677 and those of Colonel Barrett who commanded the troops, and of Major Buttrick who led them at the bridge, and of his son the fifer who furnished the music to which they marched. Here also is the inscription to John Jack famous for its alliteration, and the tablets of the old ministers and founders of church and State. Some of these headstones bear coats of arms and rough portraits in stone, while others more symbolic, ...
— The Bay State Monthly, Volume 3, No. 4 • Various

... wagon box he drew out a jack and a tin of grease. Then, still with an easy, leisurely air he jacked up one wheel ...
— The Law-Breakers • Ridgwell Cullum

... william, which will be a mass of delicate bloom for five weeks or more. The trillium or wake robin is another desirable flower, and wild violets thrive where the cultivated kind will not grow. The Indian turnip or Jack-in-the-Pulpit is an interesting plant and a curiosity to many who never ramble in the woods to see it in its native abode. All of these bear transplanting and are satisfactory as garden plants, but choose ...
— Mother's Remedies - Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remedies from Mothers - of the United States and Canada • T. J. Ritter

... flowers spread so thickly that the trail soon lost itself; it seemed like a paper-chase where the hare had scattered coloured petals instead of torn white copy-books. Each searcher followed the sign of his or her own favourite flower; like a Jack-in-the-Box each one bobbed up and down, smelling, panting, darting hither and thither as in the mazes of some gnat—or animal-dance, till knees and hands were stained with sweet brown earth, and lips and noses gleamed with the ...
— The Extra Day • Algernon Blackwood

... the play suddenly entered, and Lucien beheld M. du Bruel, a short, attenuated young man in an overcoat, a composite human blend of the jack-in-office, the owner of house-property, and ...
— A Distinguished Provincial at Paris • Honore de Balzac

... in all the Terraqueous Globe (a Map of which, it seems, hung up in his Work-Shop) so like a Pair of Breeches unmade up, as the Island of Sicily:—Nor is there any thing, if you go to that, quoth an honest Shoe-maker, who had the Honour to be a Member of the Club, so much like a Jack-Boot, to my Fancy, as the Kingdom of Italy.—What the Duce has either Italy or Sicily to do in the Affair? cries the President, who, by this Time, began to tremble for his Hypothesis,—What have they to do?—Why, ...
— A Political Romance • Laurence Sterne

... bosom of that very stream from whose banks I had been twice forced to retire." They did not pull far up the stream, for a native fishing-net was stretched across, and Sturt forbore to break it. The Union Jack was, however, run up to the peak and saluted with three cheers, and then with a favouring wind they bade farewell to the Darling and the ...
— The Explorers of Australia and their Life-work • Ernest Favenc

... illness of Lady Holland's page, who has got a tumour in his thigh. This 'little creature,' as Lady Holland calls a great hulking fellow of about twenty, is called 'Edgar,' his real name being Tom or Jack, which he changed on being elevated to his present dignity, as the Popes do when they are elected to the tiara. More rout is made about him than other people are permitted to make about their children, and the inmates of Holland House ...
— The Greville Memoirs - A Journal of the Reigns of King George IV and King William IV, Vol. II • Charles C. F. Greville

... streets in the vicinity of the water, you will notice many buildings with the sign "Sailors' Boarding House." One would suppose that poor Jack needed a snug resting place after his long and stormy voyages, but it is about the last thing he finds in New York. The houses for his accommodation are low, filthy, vile places, where every effort is made to swindle him out of his money; the proprietors ...
— The Secrets Of The Great City • Edward Winslow Martin

... paradise. I do believe if Adam and Eve wos here they'd think they'd got back again into Eden. It's more beautifuller than the blue ocean, by a long chalk, an' if you wants a feller that's handy at a'most anything after a fashion—a jack of all trades and master of none (except seamanship, which aint o' no use here)—Jo Bumpus ...
— Gascoyne, the Sandal-Wood Trader • R.M. Ballantyne

... so cheerful; and when you get there, you must take Ellen's advice, and depind solely on yourself.' 'Och! ma'am dear, don't mention it; sure it's that makes me so down in the mouth this very minit. Sure I saw that born blackguard, Jack Waddy, and he comes in here, quite innocent-like—'Shane, you've an eye to squire's new lodge,' says he. 'Maybe I have,' says I. 'I'm yer man,' says he. 'How so,' says I. 'Sure I'm as good as married to my lady's maid,' said ...
— Anecdotes for Boys • Harvey Newcomb

... left; unyoked them and came on with them to where the water was left, from which place I meant to start the two blacks, Peter and Sambo, into the lake with them; gave the blacks each a canteen full of water, also Jack, the native shepherd, with instructions to keep on to the lake on the tracks of the advance party, intending to ride over to the lake myself to water my horse, leaving Palmer, and Frank (a native) with the cart and all the ...
— McKinlay's Journal of Exploration in the Interior of Australia • John McKinlay

... spirit, however, and at last Burt stole out and sat by the dying fire. When the mind is ready for impressions, a very little thing will produce them vividly, and Amy's snatch of song about "Jack and Jill" had awakened Burt at last to a consciousness that he might be carrying his attention to Miss Hargrove too far, in view of his vows and inexorable purpose of constancy. He assured himself that his only object ...
— Nature's Serial Story • E. P. Roe

... hear horses' hoofs in the distance. "Here he is now," he said, only to realize presently that the sound was from the other direction. "It's Jack," he added. ...
— The Huntress • Hulbert Footner

... and again reached its borders and found bogs of bottomless depth, quagmires which would suck one out of sight in a few minutes, and at nightfall legions of evil spirits, as they thought them—for after dark these sloughs were alive with Jack-o'-lanterns, which men believed to be the ...
— The Rival Heirs being the Third and Last Chronicle of Aescendune • A. D. Crake

... more The number made the motion slower; The flier, though't had leaden feet, Turned round so quick, you scarce could see 't; But, slackened by some secret power, Now hardly moves an inch an hour. The jack and chimney, near allied, Had never left each other's side: The chimney to a steeple grown, The jack would not be left alone; But up against the steeple reared, Became a clock, and still adhered; And still its love to household cares, By a shrill ...
— Specimens with Memoirs of the Less-known British Poets, Complete • George Gilfillan

... The union jack was hoisted half mast at Fort George and Castle Cornet from the day succeeding the bailiff's death to that of his funeral, on which days also the bells of the parish church of St. Peter-Port were tolled, and the flags of the vessels ...
— The Life and Correspondence of Sir Isaac Brock • Ferdinand Brock Tupper

... years, round and about Viterbo, there was a well-known character, Giovanni Ugolini by name, a sort of itinerant "Jack-of-all-trades," who wandered about from place to place, picking up any odd job he could find, and begging when he could turn his hand to nothing else. He is described in the legal reports as a Tinker ...
— Rome in 1860 • Edward Dicey

... Lamb of Roxbury, having confessed the burning of two dwellings, was sentenced by the Governor "yt she should goe from the barr to the prison whence she came and thence to the place of execution and there be burnt.—ye Lord be mercifull to thy soule, sd ye Govr." The other was Jack, a negro belonging to Samuel Wolcott of Weathersfield, who upon conviction of having set fire to a residence by waving a fire brand about in search of victuals, was condemned to be hanged until dead and then burned to ashes in the fire ...
— American Negro Slavery - A Survey of the Supply, Employment and Control of Negro Labor as Determined by the Plantation Regime • Ulrich Bonnell Phillips

... declared Mrs. Cassidy, "that didn't beat me up at least once a week. Shows he thinks something of you. Say! but that last dose Jack gave me wasn't no homeopathic one. I can see stars yet. But he'll be the sweetest man in town for the rest of the week to make up for it. This eye is good for theater tickets and a silk shirt ...
— The Trimmed Lamp • O. Henry

... the yellow dragon, By the tri-color's bars of light; By the double-throated eagle That screams with the lust of fight, By the Union Jack of Britannia, By Columbia's stars and bars, They pray to the god of battle For the ...
— Pan and Aeolus: Poems • Charles Hamilton Musgrove

... lovingly about my shoulders, and burst into laughter. "Yer bet yer life, we're a goin' ter eat, an' drink too. I don't go back on none o' ther boys. Yer never heerd nuthin' like thet 'bout Tim Kennedy, I reckon. Eat, sure—yer know Jack Rale?" ...
— The Devil's Own - A Romance of the Black Hawk War • Randall Parrish

... "Whistling Jack," he answered; a new name to me, and a good one; it would take a nicer ear than mine to discriminate with certainty between a white-throat's voice ...
— The Foot-path Way • Bradford Torrey

... Anton explained. "Well, when the levee broke and the water commenced to come into the house, Dad and Uncle Jack went and got the two boats we always keep on the river. Dad picked me up and carried me down on to the porch. I heard him call to ...
— The Boy with the U. S. Weather Men • Francis William Rolt-Wheeler

... Capt. Jones, with shouts and gestures, strove to hold back the excited men until another broadside could be given the enemy. But the enthusiasm of the sailors was beyond all control. All at once, they saw a sailor from New Jersey, named Jack Lang, spring on a gun, cutlass in hand, ready to board. All were about to follow him, when Capt. Jones called him down. Only for a minute did Jack's sense of duty overcome his enthusiasm; and then, remembering that he had once been impressed on ...
— The Naval History of the United States - Volume 1 (of 2) • Willis J. Abbot

... whom was reading a newspaper, while the other was trying to take a siesta, were Frederick Button, and his faithful companion, the writer of these adventures, whom we will distinguish by the name of Jack, as it is both familiar and common, and has the ...
— The Gold Hunter's Adventures - Or, Life in Australia • William H. Thomes

... how great a flame Yon little spark shall kindle! The lurid morning shall reveal A fire no king can smother, When British flint and Boston steel Have clashed against each other! Old charters shrivel in its track, His worship's bench has crumbled, It climbs and clasps the Union Jack,— Its blazoned pomp is humbled. The flags go down on land and sea, Like corn before the reapers; So burned the fire that brewed the tea ...
— Tea Leaves • Various

... Jack Bosworth, the son of a prominent corporation attorney, and Harry Stevens, whose father was a well-known automobile manufacturer, were the other members of the group. These latter two were members of the Black Bear Patrol ...
— Boy Scouts in the North Sea - The Mystery of a Sub • G. Harvey Ralphson

... Striker. I'll call ye when the table's set. Now, you go an' set over there in the corner, away from the window, deary, where the lightnin' can't git at you, an'—You'll find a comb on the mantel-piece, Mr. Gwynne, an' Phineas will git you a boot-jack out o' the bedroom if that darkey is too weak to pull your boots off for you. Don't any of you go trampin' all over the room with your muddy boots. I've got work enough to do without scrubbin' floors after a pack of—My land! I do believe ...
— Viola Gwyn • George Barr McCutcheon

... with spreading verandas all overgrown by roses and woodbine, and commanding on all sides a wide view of the rolling alfalfa-fields, was a most bewitching place for a young couple to spend the first few months of their married life. So Jack and I were naturally much delighted when Aunt Agnes asked us to consider it our own for as long as we chose. The ranch, in spite of its distance from the nearest town, surrounded as it was by the prairies, and without ...
— Shapes that Haunt the Dusk • Various

... for him, yet, there is still a vast difference betwixt the slovenly butchering of a man, and the fineness of a stroke that separates the head from the body, and leaves it standing in its place. A man may be capable, as Jack Ketch's wife said of his servant, of a plain piece of work, a bare hanging; but to make a malefactor die sweetly, was ...
— A Voyage to the Moon • George Tucker

... shot up from the dustiest depths of memory, I turned the old geography sidewise and examined the edges of the cover. Yes, there was the cache I had made by splitting the pasteboard with my jack-knife. I thrust in my fingernail; out came a slip of paper. I glanced at Burbank—he was still busy. I, somewhat stealthily, you may imagine, opened the paper and—well, my heart beat much more rapidly as I saw in a ...
— The Plum Tree • David Graham Phillips

... taught me that many tools generally mean a bad workman. Somehow, the moment the rich man blunders into any department of the world's labour, his wealth shows at a disadvantage. And gold pens and silver inkpots and jade paper-weights are as incongruous as ivory-handled sledge-hammers and rose-wood jack-planes, when you ...
— Aliens • William McFee

... whittled into shape with his own jack-knife, deserves more credit, if that is all, than the regular engine- turned article, shaped by the most approved pattern, and French- polished by society and travel. But as to saying that one is every way the equal of the other, that is another ...
— The Autocrat of the Breakfast Table • Oliver Wendell Holmes

... admitted, had been to blame, and pretty damnably. To be sure they were drunk, every man Jack of them, the Collector included. The Collector, indolent by nature but capable of long stretches of work at a pinch, had been at his desk since six o'clock in the morning. The news brought by the Fish-hawk had reached him at five; and after bathing, dressing, and drinking ...
— Lady Good-for-Nothing • A. T. Quiller-Couch

... with the others, was in a quiver of excitement. He stumbled along, shifting Sid Northcutt's rifle from one shoulder to the other, and listening open-mouthed to Jack Carter's directions. "You know, Bud," said that young gentleman, gravely, "it ain't every man that gets a chance to go on a snipe-hunt. And if ...
— Southern Lights and Shadows • Edited by William Dean Howells & Henry Mills Alden

... be very much amused. "Well," he said, still laughing, "Which shall it be, a razor or a jack-knife?" ...
— Three People • Pansy

... keen sense of fun made Gilbert ready to accept frequent invitations to stand. At Glasgow in 1925 Austen Chamberlain got 1242, votes, Chesterton 968 and Sidney Webb 285. "What swamped you," wrote Jack Phillimore, always critical of the gentler sex, "was the women, whose simple snobbery cannot get past the top hat and frock coat and Right Honourable . . . Boyle was never kidnapped: others ...
— Gilbert Keith Chesterton • Maisie Ward

... kind of Court he found it,—neglected, dirty, and out of repair. One of the first retainers whom he met was Jack Kelly, the family fool. Jack was not such a fool as those who, of yore, were valued appendages to noble English establishments. He resembled them in nothing but his occasional wit. He was a dirty, barefooted, unshorn, ragged ruffian, ...
— The Kellys and the O'Kellys • Anthony Trollope

... Sandy, in his moments of relaxation, is a fisherman. He and Percy began swapping stories of salmon and trout, and he finally got out his case of fishing flies, and gallantly presented Betsy and me with a "silver doctor" and a "Jack Scott" out of which to make hatpins. Then the conversation wandered to sport on the Scotch moors, and he told about one time when he was lost, and spent the night out in the heather. There is no doubt about it, Sandy's heart is in ...
— Dear Enemy • Jean Webster

... me. With that "fly-cop" and the two hoboes at my heels, and under the direction of the former, I led the way to the city jail. There we were searched and our names registered. I have forgotten, now, under which name I was registered. I gave the name of Jack Drake, but when they searched me, they found letters addressed to Jack London. This caused trouble and required explanation, all of which has passed from my mind, and to this day I do not know whether I was pinched ...
— The Road • Jack London

... Mastah Jack come home all sickly; he was broke for life, dey said; An' dey lef my po' young mastah some'r's on de roadside,—dead. W'en de women cried an' mou'ned 'em, I could feel it thoo an' thoo, For I had a loved un fightin' in de way o' dangah, too. Den dey tol' me dey had laid him ...
— The Complete Poems of Paul Laurence Dunbar • Paul Laurence Dunbar

... shall be accidental and laid upon [not] good principles of doing good. Mr. May shewed me the King's new buildings, in order to their having of some old sails for the closing of the windows this winter. I dined with Sir G. Carteret, with whom dined Mr. Jack Ashburnham and Dr. Creeton, who I observe to be a most good man and scholar. In discourse at dinner concerning the change of men's humours and fashions touching meats, Mr. Ashburnham told us, that he remembers since the only fruit in request, and eaten by the King and Queen at table as ...
— Diary of Samuel Pepys, Complete • Samuel Pepys

... reins and sorting them carefully, the driver spoke to his team: "You, Buck! Molly! Jack! Pete!" The mules heaved ahead. Again the silence of the world-old hills was shattered by the rattling rumble of the heavy-tired wagon and the ring and clatter ...
— The Winning of Barbara Worth • Harold B Wright

... person I want to introduce is Jack Lucas from Hattiesburg, Mississippi. Jack, would you stand up. Fifty years ago in the sands of Iwo Jima, Jack Lucas taught and learned the lessons of citizenship. On February the 20th, 1945, he and three of his buddies encountered the enemy and two grenades at their ...
— Complete State of the Union Addresses from 1790 to the Present • Various



Words linked to "Jack" :   jackstones, man jack, working man, bring up, jack-o-lantern, bracero, steeplejack, shit, Caranx hippos, strip-Jack-naked, carangid fish, cleaner, diddly, cheap-jack, longshoreman, gandy dancer, pilot, jack off, diddlyshit, Jack William Nicklaus, jackscrew, lumper, lift, Alectis ciliaris, dock-walloper, edible fruit, Jack Kerouac, muleteer, platelayer, laborer, boatswain, manual laborer, jack ladder, carangid, Jack Frost, helmsman, old salt, able seaman, Black Jack Pershing, peon, workman, stevedore, lumberjack, hunt down, telephone jack, Sir Jack Hobbs, blue runner, Caranx bartholomaei, track down, day laborer, yellow jack, crevalle jack, Seriola dorsalis, yardman, logger, rainbow runner, leatherjacket, Union Jack, roustabout, fireman, jack-by-the-hedge, digger, jack-in-the-box, day labourer, face card, jumping jack, thread-fish, workingman, ass, run, threadfish, section hand, Jack London, Jack Roosevelt Robinson, gypsy, Jack Kennedy, lawn bowling, able-bodied seaman, jack-a-lantern, bosun, jack pine, Jack the Ripper, phone jack, jack oak, bowls, small indefinite amount, gob, raise, hired man, lighterman, ship's officer, Jack Dempsey, steersman, diddlysquat, tracklayer, dock worker, officer, dockhand, loader, navvy, flag, runner, bumper jack, sea dog, Jack Lemmon, miner, hunt, galley slave, gipsy, jack bean, Elagatis bipinnulata, blue jack, electrical device, crewman, woodcutter, get up, bo'sun, amberfish, whaler, bo's'n, jackfruit, Caranx crysos, Jack Nicklaus, lumberman, bos'n, wrecker, feller, whisker jack, gravedigger, hod carrier, bargeman, dockworker, tool, kingfish, hodman, sailor, steerer, elevate, high-low-jack, jack up, agricultural labourer, jackfruit tree, jacklight, knave, seaman, banded rudderfish, game equipment, Seriola zonata, diddly-squat, deckhand, hewer, Artocarpus heterophyllus, jackass, labourer, picture card, jak, doodly-squat, family Carangidae, Seriola grandis, agricultural laborer, rail-splitter, mariner, jack-o-lantern fungus, hand, mule skinner, diddly-shit, small indefinite quantity, jack of all trades, Carangidae, yellowtail, jack plane, drudge, jack crevalle, hired hand, jack-o'-lantern, mineworker, jack salmon, tar, porter, jack-in-the-pulpit, stoker, Jack-tar, mule driver, stacker, splitter, itinerant, screw jack, squat, sawyer, docker, amberjack, working person, skinner, rudderfish, diddley, seafarer, leatherjack, bargee, ball, Jack Benny, sea lawyer, jack mackerel, dishwasher



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