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Hie   Listen
noun
Hie  n.  Haste; diligence. (Obs.)






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Hie" Quotes from Famous Books



... "I will hie me straight to the secret smithies of dwarfs," answered Loki; "and those cunning little kinsmen of mine shall make golden tresses for fair Sif, which will grow upon her head like other hair, and cause her to be an ...
— The Story of Siegfried • James Baldwin

... flourished in a gold camp or gambling joint, and that wildcat did not hie to Canada when the real estate boom broke loose, the wildcat species not in evidence was too rare to be classified. Property in small cities sold at New York and Chicago values. Suburban lots were staked out round small towns ...
— The Canadian Commonwealth • Agnes C. Laut

... your design MUST be best. It must combine the excellences of your invention with the excellences of his. Meanwhile a coolness should be made to arise between her and him: and as there would be no artistic reason for his presence here after the verdict is pronounced, he would perforce hie back ...
— A Laodicean • Thomas Hardy

... I'll away,—no longer be the sport of sentiment forlorn, But scale the heights of Primrose Hill, pretending it's the Matterhorn; Or hie me through the dusk to sit beside the shimmering Serpentine, And, with a little make-believe, imagine I am ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 99, August 30, 1890. • Various

... boundary of the two dialects, and history records the reason of it. We learn from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, A.D. 658, that "Cenwealh in this year fought against the Welsh at Pen, and put them to flight as far as the Parret." "Her Kenwealh gefeaht aet Peonnum with Wealas, and hie geflymde oth Pedridan." Upon this passage Lappenberg in his "England under the Anglo-Saxon kings" remarks: "The reign of Cenwealh is important on account of the aggrandisement of Wessex. He defeated in several battles the Britons of Dyvnaint and Cernau [Devon and Cornwall] who had endeavoured ...
— A Glossary of Provincial Words & Phrases in use in Somersetshire • Wadham Pigott Williams

... yet strong enough for travelling. The snow lies thickly on the ground, and the winter's wind whistles keenly through the forest and across the plain. Stay a while with your good friends here, and I'll come back for thee, and then we will hie away to lead the free life we have enjoyed so long." Old Michael spoke in a ...
— The Trapper's Son • W.H.G. Kingston

... chance, to stumble upon that incomparable specimen of modern sculpture which stands on high at King's-Cross, lifted up, in order, we presume, to enable the good citizens duly to feast their eyes upon its manifold perfections, as they daily hie them to and fro between their western or suburban retreats and the purlieus of King Street or Cheapside. What estimate would the stranger form of the taste or skill of those who placed on its pedestal the statue we have first supposed ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, No. 327 - Vol. 53, January, 1843 • Various

... make benches for the many valiant men, for the midsummer festival, (5) at which Siegfried should gain the name of knight. Then full many a noble knight and many a high-born squire did hie them to the minster. Right were the elders in that they served the young, as had been done to them afore. Pastimes they had and hope of much good cheer. To the honor of God a mass was sung; then there rose from the people full great a press, as ...
— The Nibelungenlied • Unknown

... thy chin, but a fire in thine eye, With lustiest Manhood's in passion to vie, A stripling in form, with a tongue that can make The oldest folks listen, maids sweethearts forsake, Hie over the fields at the first blush of May, And give thy boy's heart unto ...
— Shakespeare and Precious Stones • George Frederick Kunz

... going to slip out to Johnstown to spend Sunday with her mother. How I wish I could slip out to Rochester to sit a few hours in my mother's delightful east chamber, but I must hie me back to New ...
— The Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony (Volume 1 of 2) • Ida Husted Harper

... misdeeds and the craft and perfidy thou didst imagine against me and bethink thee how near thou art to being stoned to death. For know that thy soul is about the world to quit and cease in it and depart from it; so shalt thou to destruction hie and ill is the abiding-place thou shalt aby!"[FN153] Rejoined the wolf, "O Father of the Fortlet, hasten to return to amity and persist not in this rancorous enmity. Know that whoso from ruin saveth a soul, is as if he had ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 3 • Richard F. Burton

... nuptial torches bore, As brightly burning as the mid-day's sun: But after them doth Hymen hie as fast, Clothed in sable ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 34, June 22, 1850 • Various

... my spirit seeks escape From all the carking cares that vex it, I will not plunge thee into crape By any ordinary exit: So when—in slang—I "take my hook," Detesting all that's mean and skimpy, a Reserved and numbered seat I'll book, And hie to Venice ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Volume 102, January 16, 1892 • Various

... triumphe over me, and let my faults by thy hands be corrected, and make not mine unjuste enemie the minister of thy justice. But yet, my God, if in thy wisdome this be the aptest chastisement for my inexcusable follie; if this low bondage be fittest for my over-hie desires; if the pride of my not-inough humble hearte be thus to be broken, O Lord, I yeeld unto thy will, and joyfully embrace what sorrow thou wilt have ...
— Outlines of English and American Literature • William J. Long

... man shall flee and woman fail, And folly mock and hope deceive, Let cowards beat the breast and wail, I'll homeward hie; I will not grieve: I'll draw the blind, I'll there set free My heart's ...
— The Judgment House • Gilbert Parker

... chanced so, Bold Robin in forest did spy A jolly butcher, with a bonny fine mare, With his flesh to the market did hie. ...
— Heroes Every Child Should Know • Hamilton Wright Mabie

... Heauens hate, Consume me Fire with thy deuouring flames, Or Water drowne, who else would melt in teares. But liue, liue happy still, in safety liue, Who safety onely to my life can giue. Exit. Cor. O he is gon, go hie thee after him, My vow forbids, yet still my care is with thee, My cryes shall wake the siluer Moone by night, And with my teares I will salute the Morne. No day shall passe with out my dayly plaints, 460 No ...
— The Tragedy Of Caesar's Revenge • Anonymous

... to the praise of God, and testifeing of grait joy and consolation, the 124th Psalm, "Now Israel may say," etc., till heavin and erthe resoundit. This noyes, when the Duc [of Lennox] being in the town, hard, and ludgit in the Hie-gat, luiked out and saw, he rave his berde for anger, and hasted him ...
— Andrew Melville - Famous Scots Series • William Morison

... soft and skies are fair, I steal an hour from study and care, And hie me away to the woodland scene, Where wanders the stream with waters of green, As if the bright fringe of herbs on its brink Had given their stain to the wave they drink; And they, whose meadows it murmurs through, Have named the stream ...
— Poems • William Cullen Bryant

... Silver and gold, four hundred mules load high; Fifty wagons his wrights will need supply, Till with that wealth he pays his soldiery. War hath he waged in Spain too long a time, To Aix, in France, homeward he will him hie. Follow him there before Saint Michael's tide, You shall receive and hold the Christian rite; Stand honour bound, and do him fealty. Send hostages, should he demand surety, Ten or a score, our loyal oath to bind; Send him our sons, ...
— The Song of Roland • Anonymous

... the left a landscape of Jealousy, Presents itself unto thine eye. A Kingfisher, a Swan, an Hern, Two fighting-cocks you may discern, Two roaring Bulls each other hie, To assault concerning venery. Symbols are these; I say no more, Conceive the rest by ...
— The Anatomy of Melancholy • Democritus Junior

... remember with a whey face and a satchel not so very many years ago, I think young Hazlewood grows a fine fellow. I am more afraid of a new attempt at legal oppression than at open violence, and from that this young man's presence would deter both Glossin and his understrappers.—Hie away, then, my boy—peer out—peer out—you'll find them somewhere about Derncleugh, or ...
— Guy Mannering • Sir Walter Scott

... slave, the ugly monster, Death, Shaking and quivering, pale and wan for fear, Stands aiming at me with his murdering dart, Who flies away at every glance I give, And, when I look away, comes stealing on. Villain, away, and hie thee to the field! I and mine army come to load thy back With souls of thousand mangled carcasses. Look, where he goes; but see, he comes again, Because I stay: Techelles, let us march And weary Death with bearing souls to hell. Part II, ...
— The Principles of English Versification • Paull Franklin Baum

... here to-day the cloud of thunder lours To-morrow it will hie on far behests; The flesh will grieve on other bones than ours Soon, and the soul will mourn ...
— Last Poems • A. E. Housman

... the architecture of which one of the handsomest girls and her swain made a striking silhouette. Then she remembered that the next name on the programme was Warner's; he was to read for half an hour from his own work; after which all would hie themselves to the music room ...
— The Gorgeous Isle - A Romance; Scene: Nevis, B.W.I. 1842 • Gertrude Atherton

... done easily, I were to describe how they, by transgressing their own principles, make it apparent what kind of a spirit is moving them, while they, by virtue of the foundation of such principles, are scoffers and Ishmaels of all well-ordered church-life. Hic Rhodus, hie saltant (Here is Rhodes, here they dance)." "Also here" (as in Europe), Falckner proceeds, "the Protestant Church is divided in three nations; for there is here an English Protestant Church, a Swedish Protestant Lutheran Church, and people of the German nation belonging ...
— American Lutheranism - Volume 1: Early History of American Lutheranism and The Tennessee Synod • Friedrich Bente

... I did me hie, Of all the land it beareth the prize. "Hot peascods!" one began to cry, "Strawberry ripe!" and "Cherries in the rise!" {82c} One bade me come near and buy some spice, Pepper and saffron they gan me bede, But for lack of Money I might ...
— Playful Poems • Henry Morley

... clip, progress, locomotion; journey &c. 266; voyage &c. 267; transit &c. 270. restlessness &c. (changeableness) 149; mobility; movableness, motive power; laws of motion; mobilization. V. be in motion &c. adj.; move, go, hie, gang, budge, stir, pass, flit; hover about, hover round, hover about; shift, slide, glide; roll, roll on; flow, stream, run, drift, sweep along; wander &c. (deviate) 279; walk &c. 266; change one's ...
— Roget's Thesaurus • Peter Mark Roget

... thairintill; and this done, the said craftismen's servands, with the said condempnit cordonar, past doun to the Netherbow, to have past furth thairat; bot becaus the samyne on thair coming thairto wes closet, thai past vp agane the Hie streit of the said bourghe to the Castellhill, and in this menetymne the saidis provest and baillies, and thair assistaris being in the writing buith of the said Alexr. Guthrie, past and enterit in the said tolbuyt, and in the said servandes ...
— The Abbot • Sir Walter Scott

... fired, the vessel must fly To the town from the green wood shady. Come, friends, now we to the table will hie, A gentleman ...
— O. T. - A Danish Romance • Hans Christian Andersen

... the deportment of the Count himself. Only one thing more did he desire, a flower for his buttonhole—and Lisette remained in her situation until the morrow! What more natural, finally, than that he should hie him to the florist's? ...
— A Chair on The Boulevard • Leonard Merrick

... be a falling star; If only once, and by one glorious deed, I could but knit the name of Catiline With glory and with deathless high renown,—Then should I blithely, in the hour of conquest, Leave all, and hie me to an alien shore, Press the keen dagger gayly to my heart, And die; for then I ...
— Henrik Ibsen • Edmund Gosse

... Kiyokimi, in 802, and the latter accompanied Fujiwara Kuzunomaro, two years later. Saicho was specially sent to China by his sovereign to study Buddhism, in order that, on his return, he might become lord-abbot of a monastery which his Majesty had caused to be built on Hie-no-yama—subsequently known as Hiei-zan—a hill on the northeast of the new palace in Kyoto. A Japanese superstition regarded the northeast as the "Demon's Gate," where a barrier must be erected against the ingress of evil influences. Saicho also ...
— A History of the Japanese People - From the Earliest Times to the End of the Meiji Era • Frank Brinkley and Dairoku Kikuchi

... pity to the worn men in gray, who were being blindly dashed against this embodiment of modern power. And now this "silence that is golden" indeed is over all, and my limbs are unhurt, and I suppose if I were a Catholic, in my fervent gratitude I would hie me with a rich offering to the shrine of "our Lady ...
— Famous Adventures And Prison Escapes of the Civil War • Various

... the river," Betty called to them, stopping once more to listen to the rhythmic sound of splashing water. "Come on, girls. It can't be more than a few hundred feet away, even though we can't see it for the bushes. Lead on, Mollie Billette, I wouldst hie me hence." ...
— The Outdoor Girls at Wild Rose Lodge - or, The Hermit of Moonlight Falls • Laura Lee Hope

... my young readers to mount my hippogriff and hie with me to the almost inaccessible heights of the Rocky Mountains. There, for years, a band of wild and untamable savages, known as the Pigeon Feet, had resisted the blankets and Bibles of civilization. For years the trails leading ...
— The Luck of Roaring Camp and Other Tales • Bret Harte

... Curse on the laws of war!— If worth like thine must thus be sacrificed, To policy so cruel and unjust, I will forswear my country and her service: I'll hie me to the Briton, and with fire, And sword, and every instrument of death Or devastation, join in the work of war! What, shall worth weigh for nought? I ...
— Andre • William Dunlap

... cud get a grip o'—as to hoo he had gotten the said siller, an' sic like—the siller 'at naebody ever saw; for upo' that siller, as I tell ye, naebody ever cuist an e'e. Some said he had been a pirate upo' the hie seas, an' had ta'en the siller in lumps o' gowd frae puir ships 'at hadna men eneuch to hand the grip o' 't; some said he had been a privateer; an' ither some said there was sma' differ atween the twa. An' some wad hae't he was ane o' them 'at tuik an' sauld the puir black fowk,'at ...
— Warlock o' Glenwarlock • George MacDonald

... upholstered, and then piled high with pillows, or, the wood having been nicely finished, the upholstery may cover the seat only. Be sure and have the seat made low, otherwise the Cozy Corner will be uncomfortable, its name will be belied, and no one will hie to what might have been the ...
— Social Life - or, The Manners and Customs of Polite Society • Maud C. Cooke

... rich array. Thomas dwelled in that solace 205 More than I you say, parde; Till on a day, so have I grace, My lovely lady said to me[53]; "Do busk thee, Thomas; thee buse[54] again; For thou may here no longer be; 210 Hie thee fast with might and main; I shall thee bring till Eildon tree." Thomas said then with heavy cheer[55], "Lovely lady, now let me be; For certes, lady, I have been here 215 Nought but the space of dayes three!" ...
— The Sources and Analogues of 'A Midsummer-night's Dream' • Compiled by Frank Sidgwick

... fair and cool and pleasant" So you hie yourself away To the wild-wood sweet and shady For a joyous, happy day; Then the rain comes down in torrents Till it drowns the very snakes, And you have a high example ...
— Oklahoma Sunshine • Freeman E. (Freeman Edwin) Miller

... delightful combination of a liberal railway management, a fast and yet cheap train. He had beguiled himself with a delicious certainty. Early the next morning—or at any rate as early as civilization permitted—he would hie him to Bayswater, and present himself at the neat iron gate of Philip Sheldon's gothic villa. She would be there, in the garden most likely, his divine Charlotte, so bright and radiant a creature that the dull October morning ...
— Birds of Prey • M. E. Braddon

... case I shall hie me home at once to do something I should otherwise have to do tomorrow. So Alice Penhallow is to be married tonight. Three weddings for you in one summer, Anne—Phil's, Alice's, and Jane's. I'll never forgive Jane for not inviting me to ...
— Anne Of The Island • Lucy Maud Montgomery

... left thy home— Thou diest this very hour!' 'Oh! it is true, I left my home; But yet, before I die, Oh! look not on me with face so changed, Nor with so fierce an eye! Oh! let me, but for a minute's space, Into my chamber hie; One prayer I would say for thee and me— One prayer—before I die!' She left the bower; and as he stept To and fro in ireful mood, A stranger from the chamber came, And close behind him stood. Long locks of molten yellow gold Hung over his cheek so brown, ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, No. 341, March, 1844, Vol. 55 • Various

... of this idea, old Marheyo himself would hie him away to the sea-shore by the break of day, for the purpose of collecting various species of rare sea-weed; some of which among these people are considered a great luxury. After a whole day spent in this employment, he would return about nightfall with several ...
— Typee - A Romance of the South Sea • Herman Melville

... aerial arena, an archangel soaring among the Eolian melodies of shrapnel. I envy, I applaud, but I cannot emulate. The upper circles are reserved for youth and over musty tomes I have squandered mine. I am thirty-two by the clock and I should hie me to the grave-digger that he may take my measure. And yet if I could—if I could!—I would like to be one of the liaison chaps and fall if I must in a shroud ...
— The Paliser case • Edgar Saltus

... A warning letter is sent to my Lord Monteagle, and whereto it may grow—Hie you to White Webbs when morning breaketh, with all the speed you may, and tell Mr Catesby of this. I fear—I very much fear ...
— It Might Have Been - The Story of the Gunpowder Plot • Emily Sarah Holt

... smart sprinkling of squirrels and birds looking to the special wants of the doctors and nurses. Every morning he would furnish the squirrel or bird required of him; which, having done by way of compromise between his better judgment and his duty as a son, then away to the lick would he hie himself on his own responsibility for something better worth a hunter's notice. The good fellow had evidently taken Sprigg's case into his own hands, under an abiding conviction that nothing less than an heroic course of wild meat could bring it to a happy issue. Thus, while ...
— The Red Moccasins - A Story • Morrison Heady

... wythout wommen menne were pheeres To salvage kynde, and wulde botte lyve to slea, Botte wommenne efte the spryghte of peace so cheres, Tochelod yn Angel joie heie Angeles bee; Go, take thee swythyn to thie bedde a wyfe; Bee bante or blessed hie yn ...
— English Poets of the Eighteenth Century • Selected and Edited with an Introduction by Ernest Bernbaum

... fromen oder schaden, gewin oder vorlust, ere oder unere, lob oder unlob oder diser keins, sunder was in der warheit das edelste und das aller beste ist, das solt auch das allerliebste sin, und umb nichts anders dan allein umb das, das es das edelst und das beste ist. Hie nach mocht ein mensche sin leben gerichten von ussen und von innen. Von ussen: wan under den creaturen ist eins besser dan das ander, dar nach dan das ewig gut in einem mer oder minner schinet und wurket ...
— Memories • Max Muller

... with a savage whimper. This he invariably did on first leaving the house with me, sometimes nipping me so severely, after we had gone a short distance, that I have hesitated whether to go back for a pistol to shoot him, or forward for a pennyworth of biscuit to buy him off. When told to "hie away," the extravagance of his joy knew no bounds. He would have been as invaluable to a tailor as was to the Parisian dcrotteur the poodle instructed by him to sully with his paws the shoes of the passengers; for, in the exuberance of his gladness, he but too often rent insufferably the vestments ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 4, No. 25, November, 1859 • Various

... to God are left us from the latter period of Firenzuola, when for years he lay ill of fever, in which, though he expressly declares himself a believing Christian, he shows that his religious consciousness is essentially theistic. Hie sufferings seem to him neither as the punishment of sin, nor as preparation for a higher world; they are an affair between him and God only, who has put the strong love of life between man and his despair. 'I curse, but only curse Nature, since Thy greatness forbids me ...
— The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy • Jacob Burckhardt

... hunting if that I may!" Then the Percy out of Bamborough came, with him a mighty mean-y; With fifteen hundred archers, bold of blood and bone, they were chosen out of shires three. This began on a Monday, at morn, in Cheviot, the hillis so hie, The child may rue that is unborn, it was the more pitie. The drivers thorough the wood-es went for to raise the deer; Bowmen bickered upon the bent with their broad arrows clear, Then the wild thorough ...
— A Bundle of Ballads • Various

... her flashing diamonds and costly laces, and Uncle Joseph, listening to her with parted lips and hushed breath, would whisper softly, "Yes, that's Sarah, beautiful Sarah; but tell me—does she ever think of me, or of that time in Hie orchard when I wove the apple blossoms in her hair, where the diamonds are now? She loved me then; she told me so. Does she know how sick, and sorry, and foolish I am?—how the aching in my poor, simple brain is all for ...
— Aikenside • Mary J. Holmes

... approved of; yea, in such sort that if nature had not been so favourable unto them as to have sprinkled their forehead with a little tincture of bashfulness and modesty, you should see them in a so frantic mood run mad after lechery, and hie apace up and down with haste and lust, in quest of and to fix some chamber-standard in their Paphian ground, that never did the Proetides, Mimallonides, nor Lyaean Thyades deport themselves in the time of their bacchanalian ...
— Gargantua and Pantagruel, Complete. • Francois Rabelais

... Land he allowed me, life-joy at homestead, Manor to live on. Little he needed From Gepids or Danes or in Sweden to look for 35 Trooper less true, with treasure to buy him; 'Mong foot-soldiers ever in front I would hie me, Alone in the vanguard, and evermore gladly Warfare shall wage, while this weapon endureth That late and early often ...
— Beowulf - An Anglo-Saxon Epic Poem • The Heyne-Socin

... "'Hie thee hence, Rodrigo Diaz, An thou love thy liberty; Lest, with this thy king, we take thee Into dire captivity.'" Ancient Spanish ...
— Legends of the Middle Ages - Narrated with Special Reference to Literature and Art • H.A. Guerber

... With waters clear and sweet my thirsting tongue they ply. My clothes of sendal are, my veil of the sun's light, The very handiwork of God the Lord Most High. Whenas my sisters dear forsake me, grieved that they Must leave their native place and far away must hie, The nobles' hands, for that my place I must forsake, Do solace me with beds, whereon at ease I lie. Lo! in the garden-ways, the place of ease and cheer, Still, like the moon at full, my ...
— Tales from the Arabic Volumes 1-3 • John Payne

... officer, fifty-three years of age, despite his orders, went unarmed over the top, in the whirl-wind of the charge, amidst the shriek of shell and tear of shrapnel, and picked up the American boy left for dead in No Man's Land, carrying him on hie back over the shell-torn ...
— The War Romance of the Salvation Army • Evangeline Booth and Grace Livingston Hill

... the Taylor pup This way and that did hie Upon his mad, erratic course, Intent on ...
— Songs and Other Verse • Eugene Field

... It. We had a sword naked, when on the sound row'd we, Hard in hand, as we twain against the whale-fishes 540 Had mind to be warding us. No whit from me In the waves of the sea-flood afar might he float The hastier in holm, nor would I from him hie me. Then we two together, we were in the sea For a five nights, till us twain the flood drave asunder, The weltering of waves. Then the coldest of weathers In the dusking of night and the wind from the northward Battle-grim turn'd against us, rough grown were the billows. Of the mere-fishes ...
— The Tale of Beowulf - Sometime King of the Folk of the Weder Geats • Anonymous

... them as fast as I could pull the trigger, but it only checked them momentarily. A few snaps, and of their wounded brethren there was nothing left but a pile of glistening bones. Then, hie away, and they were once again in red-hot pursuit. At last our pace slackened, and still I could see no signs of the lake. A great grey shape, followed by others, then rushed by us and tried to reach the horses' flanks with ...
— Animal Ghosts - Or, Animal Hauntings and the Hereafter • Elliott O'Donnell

... eloquence in general. But though he took no particular pains to understand their rhetoric, he did feel the music which came through the man who was speaking and the men who were listening. The power of the speaker was raised to the hundredth degree by the echo thrown back from hie hearers. At first Christophe only took stock of the speakers, and he was interested enough to make the acquaintance of some ...
— Jean-Christophe Journey's End • Romain Rolland

... ofeel-field Dight am I to hie me: Give, O God, thy singer With glaive to end the striving. Here shall I the head cleave Of Helga's love's devourer, At last my bright sword bringeth Sundering ...
— The Story Of Gunnlaug The Worm-Tongue And Raven The Skald - 1875 • Anonymous

... enemies; that you can not live at court with a jaundiced countenance. Heigh-ho! Alackaday! You should hie yourself back to the woods and barren wastes ...
— Under the Rose • Frederic Stewart Isham

... would'st not play false. And yet would'st wrongly win: thou'dst have, great Glamis, That which cries, Thus thou must do, if thou have it; And that which rather thou dost fear to do, Than wishest should be undone. Hie thee hither, That I may pour my spirits in thine ear; And chastise with the valor of my tongue All that impedes thee from the golden round, Which fate and metaphysical[114] aid doth seem To have thee ...
— Characteristics of Women - Moral, Poetical, and Historical • Anna Jameson

... him! hie you back again, And guide him, lest in bypaths he mistake. Much, fetch a richer garment for my father; Good Friar Tuck, I prythee rouse thy wits: Warman, visit mine uncle and Sir Doncaster, See if they can come forth to grace our show. God's pity, Marian, let your Jenny wait. ...
— A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. VIII (4th edition) • Various

... really accused; the Cyclopians, Lamiae, and Lestrygons, who officiated at their altars. He speaks of the custom, as well known: and it had undoubtedly been practised in those parts, where in aftertimes hie was born. For he was a native [642]of Zancle, and lived in the very country, of which we have been speaking, in the land of the Lestrygons, and Cyclopians. The promontory of Scylla was within his sight. ...
— A New System; or, an Analysis of Antient Mythology. Volume II. (of VI.) • Jacob Bryant

... spirit loves the storm, That, borne on Terror's desolating wings, Shakes the high forest, or remorseless flings The shivered surge; when rising griefs deform Thy peaceful breast, hie to yon steep, and think,— When thou dost mark the melancholy tide Beneath thee, and the storm careering wide,— Tossed on the surge of life how many sink! And if thy cheek with one kind tear be wet, ...
— The Poetical Works of William Lisle Bowles, Vol. 1 • William Lisle Bowles

... king regarded not my words, being absorbed in play. O Charioteer, I seek thy protection. Do my behest. My mind misgiveth me. The king may come to grief. Yoking Nala's favourite horses endued with the fleetness of the mind, do thou take these twins (my son and daughter) on the car and hie thou to Kundina. Leaving the children there with my kindred as also the car and the horses, either stay thou there, or go to any other place as it listeth thee." Varshneya, the charioteer of Nala, then ...
— Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa Bk. 3 Pt. 1 • Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa

... swimming, his soft young strength would collapse. A howl of terror would apprise the world at large that he was about to drown. Whereat some passing boatman would pick him up and hold him for ransom, or else some one from The Place must jump into skiff or canoe and hie with all speed to the rescue. The same thing would be repeated day ...
— Bruce • Albert Payson Terhune

... a neighbouring boy to hie to the booth for the latest figures, and his emissary taught lightning ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... Was preaching once with zeal and with fire; And a butcher of the town Had lost a flitch of bacon; And well the friar knew That the Gypsies it had taken; So suddenly he shouted: "Gypsy, ho! Hie home, and from the pot! Take the flitch of bacon out, The flitch good and fat, And in its place throw A clout, a dingy clout of thy brat, Of thy brat, A clout, a ...
— Romano Lavo-Lil - Title: Romany Dictionary - Title: Gypsy Dictionary • George Borrow

... calumnies, aspiring without measure, railing without reason, and making their own imaginations the square of their conscience. I protest, before the great God, and, since I am here as vpon my testament, it is no place for me to lie in, that ye shall never find with any Hie-land, or Border theeves, greater ingratitude, and more lies and vile perjuries: ye may keep them for trying your patience, as Socrates did ...
— Literary Character of Men of Genius - Drawn from Their Own Feelings and Confessions • Isaac D'Israeli

... me perswaded forth with him to fare. Nought tooke I with me, but mine oaten quill: Small needments else need shepheard to prepare. So to the sea we came; the sea, that is A world of waters heaped up on hie, Rolling like mountaines in wide wildernesse, Horrible, ...
— Spenser - (English Men of Letters Series) • R. W. Church

... gods! are ye so silent, so reserved, that ye cannot speak? A seat and place choose for me at your board, or bid me hie ...
— The Elder Eddas of Saemund Sigfusson; and the Younger Eddas of Snorre Sturleson • Saemund Sigfusson and Snorre Sturleson

... Mrs. Rachel in the year of grace seventeen hundred and sixteen; but time passes—et singula praedantur anni—that is most certain. But once again ye are most heartily welcome to my poor house of Tully-Veolan! Hie to the house, Rose, and see that Alexander Saunderson looks out the old Chateau Margaux, which I sent from Bourdeaux to Dundee in the ...
— Waverley, Or 'Tis Sixty Years Hence, Complete • Sir Walter Scott

... had had a call from a little country parish to a large and wealthy one in a big city. He asked time for prayer and consideration. He did not feel sure of his light. A month passed. Some one met hie youngest son. "How is it, Josiah; is your father ...
— Good Stories from The Ladies Home Journal • Various

... horror fell upon her at what she had done. She wore a tragic mask. "Erchie, the Lord peety you, dear, and peety me! I have buildit on this foundation" - laying her hand heavily on his shoulder - "and buildit hie, and pit my hairt in the buildin' of it. If the hale hypothec were to fa', I think, laddie, I would dee! Excuse a daft wife that loves ye, and that kenned your mither. And for His name's sake keep yersel' frae inordinate desires; haud your heart ...
— Weir of Hermiston • Robert Louis Stevenson

... (du Bellay) 'gins Barras hie to raise His Heavenly muse, th' Almighty to adore. Live, happy spirits! th' honor of your name, And fill the world ...
— Anne Bradstreet and Her Time • Helen Campbell

... a fortune, and wishes to go home to the Hie Germanie. This is a tile on our head, and if a shower, which is now falling, lets up, I must go down to Apia, and see if I can find a substitute of any kind. This is, from any point of view, disgusting; above all, from that ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 25 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... he came and went: but scarce more than a sennight had passed ere I learned that he had come to dwell in Paris all out; and but little more time was spent when one even, Dame Isabel de Lapyoun came into our chamber as we were about to hie us abed, and saith she, speaking to none in especial, ...
— In Convent Walls - The Story of the Despensers • Emily Sarah Holt

... ore blew awl thyme new ate lief cell dew sell won praise high prays hie be inn ail road rowed by blue tier so all two time knew ate leaf one due sew tear buy lone hare night clime sight tolled site knights maid cede beech waste bred piece sum plum e'er cent son weight tier rein weigh heart wood paws through fur fare main pare beech ...
— The Art Of Writing & Speaking The English Language - Word-Study and Composition & Rhetoric • Sherwin Cody

... What, ho, officers, gentlemen! Hie to the presence to attend the Emperor.— Good Frederick, see the rooms be voided straight: His majesty is coming to the hall; Go back, and see the state ...
— Dr. Faustus • Christopher Marlowe

... ever saw a dog come out of the water and not shake himself? Carlo, hie, Carlo!" and George threw a stone along the ground, after which Carlo trotted; but his limbs seemed to work stiffly; the stone spun round a sharp corner in the ...
— It Is Never Too Late to Mend • Charles Reade

... half-dress'd steer; Caroused in seas of sable beer; While round, in brutal jest, were thrown The half-gnaw'd rib, and marrow bone: Or listen'd all, in grim delight. While Scalds yell'd out the joys of fight. Then forth, in frenzy, would they hie, While wildly-loose their red locks fly, And dancing round the blazing pile, They make such barbarous mirth the while, As best might to the mind recall The boisterous joys of ...
— Christmas: Its Origin and Associations - Together with Its Historical Events and Festive Celebrations During Nineteen Centuries • William Francis Dawson

... of these apples of night Distilling over me Makes sickening the white Ghost-flux of faces that hie Them endlessly, endlessly by Without meaning or reason why They ever ...
— Look! We Have Come Through! • D. H. Lawrence

... in polite society when an accredited writer's name is mentioned, go to college and listen to the lectures of literary Ph. D.'s. But if you want to learn to write, take your Bible, your Shakespeare and your Brann and hie you to your garret, there to read, reread, study, memorize, and imitate if you can. And God be praised if you can steal the best and to it add somewhat of ...
— Volume 1 of Brann The Iconoclast • William Cowper Brann

... not to me, get thee gone! Death and destruction dog thee at thy heels; Thy mother's name is ominous to children. If thou wilt outstrip death, go cross the seas, And live with Richmond, from the reach of hell: Go, hie thee, hie thee from this slaughter-house, Lest thou increase the number of the dead; And make me die the thrall of Margaret's curse, Nor mother, wife, nor ...
— The Life and Death of King Richard III • William Shakespeare [Collins edition]

... afflict any one at that place. And, O foremost of conquerors, on all sides of that mountain, there exist mines of gold, resplendent as the rays of the sun. And O king, the attendants of Kuvera, desirous of doing good to him, protect these mines of gold from intruders, with uplifted arms. Hie thee thither, and appease that adorable god who is known by the names of Sarva, Bedha, Rudra, Sitikantha, Surapa, Suvarcha, Kapardi, Karala, Haryyaksha, Varada, Tryaksha, Pushnodantabhid, Vamana, Siva, Yamya, Avyaktarupa, Sadvritta, Sankara, Kshemya, Harikesa, Sthanu, ...
— The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 4 • Kisari Mohan Ganguli

... I have learned also that her father holds Eve a prisoner, suffering her to speak with none, and—one lamb among those wolves—Oh! God! why didst Thou suffer my wisdom to fail me? Doubtless for some good purpose—where is my faith? Yet we must act. Hie, you there," he called to one of the men-at-arms, "go to Master de Cressi's house and bid him meet us by the market-cross mounted and armed, with all his sons and people. And, you, get out my horse. Mother Agnes, bring ...
— Red Eve • H. Rider Haggard

... play amid the trees In bosky groves, while from the vivid sky The sun's gold arrows fleck the fields at noon, Where weary cattle to their slumber hie. How sweet the music of the purling rill, Trickling adown the grassy hill! While dreamy fancies come to give repose When the first star of ...
— The Upward Path - A Reader For Colored Children • Various

... landed, some of the crew propose, like merry Englishmen as they are, to hie to a neighboring ale-house, and have a cosy pot or two together. Agreed. They start, and Israel with them. As they enter the ale-house door, our prisoner is suddenly reminded of still more imperative calls. Unsuspected of any design, ...
— Israel Potter • Herman Melville

... arke at the autere ende, j old coofre irebonde having a long lok of the olde facion, and j lasse new coofre having iij loks called the tresory cofre and certain almaries." "In the inner house j new hie almarie with ij dores to kepe in the evidence of the Churche and j great old arke and certain olde Almaries, and in the house afore the Chapter house j old irebounde cofre having hie feet and rings of iron in the endes thereof ...
— Vanishing England • P. H. Ditchfield

... Hie thee to the breezy common, where the melancholy goose Stalks, and the astonished donkey finds that he is really loose; There amid green fern and furze-bush shalt thou soon MY WHOLE behold, Rising 'bull-eyed and ...
— Verses and Translations • C. S. C.

... thy footsteps turn, to meet, An earthquake yawning at thy feet, While o'er thy head pale meteors glare, And boding tempests fill the air, In throbbing anguish doom'd to roam, Yet never find a peaceful home. Haste! to the shrine of Mercy hie, There lift the penitential eye, With breaking heart thy sins deplore, And wound Integrity no more! Repentance then thy soul shall save, And snatch ...
— Elegies and Other Small Poems • Matilda Betham

... barge was as a man's thought, After his pleasure to him brought, The queene herself accustomed aye In the same barge to play, It needed neither mast ne rother, I have not heard of such another, No master for the governance, Hie sayled by thought and pleasaunce, Without labor east and west, All was one, ...
— A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers • Henry David Thoreau

... Manuel. Hie to the castle, some of ye, and bring What aid you can. Saddle the barb, and speed For the leech to the ...
— Life of Lord Byron, Vol. IV - With His Letters and Journals • Thomas Moore

... innermost wall's encircling bound Shall take in a couple of acres of ground; And there in that Abbey, all the year round, A full choir of monks and a full choir of nuns, And Sir Ingoldsby Bray, Without delay, Shall hie him again To Ascalon plain, And gather the bones of the foully slain; And shall place said bones, with all possible care, In an elegant shrine in his abbey so fair; And plenty of lights shall be there ...
— The Haunted Hour - An Anthology • Various

... it tries ower soon to flee, Folks are sure to tumble, when they climb ower hie; They wha canna walk right are sure to come to wrang, Creep awa', my ...
— The Home Book of Verse, Vol. 1 (of 4) • Various

... are surprised, Jane," said he, in a tone not without affection in it. "You did not expect, I suppose, ever to see me again. It was a mere chance brought me to America. I shall stay here a moment, and then hie me back again. I could not pass through the city without a 'How d'ye' to the little girl for whom I have ...
— Jane Talbot • Charles Brockden Brown

... red was the dawn o' day, And tall was the gallows-tree: The Southland lord to his ain has fled And the mess-priest's hangit hie! ...
— Reviews • Oscar Wilde

... to make the acquaintance of the bird must either resort to some fancier's shop, or hie themselves to the cool heights of Mussoorie, or, better still, of Darjeeling, where the liothrix is exceptionally abundant. But even at Darjeeling the Pekin-robin will have to be looked for carefully, for it ...
— Birds of the Indian Hills • Douglas Dewar

... survey, those who have studied her secret way, the daylight's falsehoods— rank and fame, honor and all at which men aim— to them are no more matter than dust which sunbeams scatter, In the daylight's visions thronging only abides one longing; we yearn to hie to holy night, where, unending, ...
— Tristan and Isolda - Opera in Three Acts • Richard Wagner

... Roderick too— Let me be just—that friend so true; In danger both, and in our cause! Minstrel, the Douglas dare not pause. Why else that solemn warning given, 'If not on earth, we meet in heaven!' Why else, to Cambus-kenneth's fane, If eve return him not again, Am I to hie and make me known? Alas! he goes to Scotland's throne, Buys his friends' safety with his own; He goes to do—what I had done, Had Douglas' daughter ...
— The Lady of the Lake • Sir Walter Scott

... front, thou glutton for plunder, how can one, Servant here to thy mandates, heed thee among our Achaians, Either the mission hie on or stoutly do fight with the foemen? I, not hither I fared on account of the spear-armed Trojans, Pledged to the combat; they unto me have in nowise a harm done; Never have they, of a truth, come lifting my horses or oxen; Never ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... Hie away to the house on the brow, Gaffer-Gray; And knock at the jolly priest's door. 'The priest often preaches Against worldly riches; But ne'er gives a mite to ...
— The Adventures of Hugh Trevor • Thomas Holcroft

... to sit. Yea, thou shalt turn from exile back, Nor choicest blessings ever lack, Then fill with rapture ever new My bosom and thy consort's too. To Siva and the heavenly host My worship has been paid, To mighty saint, to godlike ghost, To every wandering shade. Forth to the forest thou wilt hie, Therein to dwell so long: Let all the quarters of the sky Protect my child from wrong." Her blessings thus the queen bestowed; Then round him fondly paced, And often, while her eyes o'erflowed, Her dearest son ...
— The Ramayana • VALMIKI

... beautie doth request, Euen at the first, Loue ransacketh the brest: And though maids seem coy, yet the heart is strooke At the first glancing of an amourous looke: For from the Louer to the loued eie Passeth the visuall beames, which gendred nie Vnto the heart, they thither hie amaine, And there her bloud do secretly inflame With strange desires, faint hopes, and longing feares, Vnheard of wishes, thoughts begetting teares, That ere she is aware she's farre in loue, Yet knowes no cause that should affection moue. I could be froward, ...
— Seven Minor Epics of the English Renaissance (1596-1624) • Dunstan Gale

... Mrs. Rachel in the year of grace seventeen hundred and sixteen; but time passes—ET SINGULA PRAEDANTUR ANNI—that is most certain. But once again, ye are most heartily welcome to my poor house of Tully-Veolan!—Hie to the house, Rose, and see that Alexander Saunderson leaks out the old Chateau Margaux, which I sent from Bourdeaux to ...
— Waverley • Sir Walter Scott

... did a delicious old lady telling about her grandson to the two Willises, who were company to tea, that made Hie audience shake with jollity. There was a perfectly darling trace of Miss Priscilla in the way she did it, that made the Colonel almost unable to keep his seat, and Miss Priscilla laughed out loud twice. The affection I bear Mamie Sue fattens ...
— Phyllis • Maria Thompson Daviess

... however, O Zarathustra, did I fly and hie longest; and though I hid myself from thee, I was nevertheless thy best shadow: wherever thou hast ...
— Thus Spake Zarathustra - A Book for All and None • Friedrich Nietzsche

... slowly to shore by strong and willing arms. The women and children watch eagerly on the bank. At length the glittering haul is pulled up high and dry on the beach, the fish are divided among the men, the women fill their baskets, and away they hie to the nearest bazaar, or if it be not bazaar or market day, they hawk the fish through the nearest villages, like our ...
— Sport and Work on the Nepaul Frontier - Twelve Years Sporting Reminiscences of an Indigo Planter • James Inglis

... appoint their sovereign His sports, his pleasures, and his company?— Yet, ere thou go, see how I do divorce [Embraces young Spenser. Spenser from thee. Now get thee to thy lords, And tell them I will come to chastise them For murdering Gaveston: hie thee, get thee gone! Edward, with fire and sword, follows at thy heels. [Exit Herald. My lord[s], perceive you how these rebels swell?— Soldiers, good hearts! defend your sovereign's right, For, now, even now, we march to ...
— Edward II. - Marlowe's Plays • Christopher Marlowe

... people. Bah! such a speech was not like Louis Herbois! but out it came, Heaven knows how, and no sooner had I finished than up runs the young creature, and seizing my moustache she cries, "My brave fellow, hie away, and crop off all this; none but men have a right to it; God grant you were not born in France; no Frenchman could give such an answer to a man imploring protection for his wife. Look at my husband—did ...
— The International Magazine, Volume 2, No. 2, January, 1851 • Various

... toward unravelling the mystery, Dollops, my lad," he said. "A regular right-hand man you are, eh, Mr. Narkom? This evening we'll hie us to the Saltfleet Road and see what further the 'Pig and Whistle' can reveal to us. It'll be like the old times of the 'Twisted-Arm' days, boy, where every second held its own unknown and certain danger. Give us an appetite ...
— The Riddle of the Frozen Flame • Mary E. Hanshew

... light from the sun-tipped eastern hills, and it painted the waves that lapped the sleek sides of a yacht lying at anchor under the hill. A yacht that Paul had watched many a day and dreamed of many a night; for he often longed with a great longing to slip cable and hie away, even unto ...
— In the Footprints of the Padres • Charles Warren Stoddard

... hie, says Anthony, puss in the pantry Gnawing, gnawing a mutton, mutton-bone; See now she tumbles it, see now she mumbles it, See how she ...
— Cole's Funny Picture Book No. 1 • Edward William Cole

... from heaven, from heaven so hie, Of angeles ther came a great companie, With mirthe, and joy, and great solemnitye, The sange, terly, terlow; So mereli the sheppardes their ...
— In The Yule-Log Glow—Book 3 - Christmas Poems from 'round the World • Various

... and so, with the quiet characteristic of rifle-matches, the evening draws toward the dew. The smoke-whitened guns are carefully swabbed with tow and prepared for their rest as tenderly as infants. Dobbin is rescued from the (fence) stake to hie hill-ward with his master, cantering exultant or jogging grumly according to the result of the "event;" and the metropolis of Petticoat Gap—for such, in the vernacular and on the maps, is its unfortunate designation—relapses ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science Vol. XV., No. 85. January, 1875. • Various

... There are also a fishes teeth, which fish is called a Morsse. The takers thereof dwell in a place called Postesora, [Footnote: Query, Petschora?] which bring them vpon Hartes to Lampas to sell, and from Lampas carie them to a place called Colmogro, [Footnote: Cholmogori, near Archangel.] where the hie market is holden on Saint Nicholas day. To the West of Colmogra there is a place called Gratanowe, in our language Nouogorode, where much fine flaxe and Hempe groweth, and also much, waxe and honie. The Dutch marchants ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, • Richard Hakluyt

... come to our planet in this way, it seems, and hasten to incarnate themselves in as promising unborn though just begotten men and women as they find, that they may the sooner be free to hie them sunwards with ...
— The Martian • George Du Maurier

... more readily listening, Whiles your song to familiar Duty calls him, he hie apace, Lord of fair paramours, of youth's ...
— The Poems and Fragments of Catullus • Catullus

... my son, let us hie to the siege of Washington. Washington was besieged and Washington was saved; and the history of its salvation must not perish. Rome, you know, was saved by the cackling of a goose. And when I tell you that Washington, the capital city of this great nation was saved by the too free use of a ...
— Siege of Washington, D.C. • F. Colburn Adams

... saying, "Come, sweet breeze, come and fan me; you know how I love you! You make the groves and my solitary rambles delightful." He was running on in this way when he heard, or thought he heard, a sound as of a sob in the bushes. Supposing it some wild animal, he threw hie javelin at the spot. A cry from his beloved Procris told him that the weapon had too surely met its mark. He rushed to the place, and found her bleeding and with sinking strength endeavoring to draw forth from the wound ...
— TITLE • AUTHOR

... has the name of being the neatest and tidiest city in Spain, and neatness and tidiness are such dear homely virtues, I thought I could not do better than hie me thither to see if the tale were true. With a wrench I tore myself from the soft capital of Andalusia, delightful but demoralizing. I was growing lazier every day I spent there; I felt energy oozing out of every ...
— Romantic Spain - A Record of Personal Experiences (Vol. II) • John Augustus O'Shea

... court-yard, On the highway hear the sledges, To the court comes Ilmarinen, With his body-guard of heroes; In the midst the chosen suitor, Not too far in front of others, Not too far behind his fellows. Spake the hostess of Pohyola: "Hie ye hither, men and heroes, Haste, ye watchers, to the stables, There unhitch the suitor's stallion, Lower well the racer's breast-plate, There undo the straps and buckles, Loosen well the shafts and traces, And conduct the suitor hither, Give my son-in-law good welcome!" Ilmarinen turned his racer ...
— The Kalevala (complete) • John Martin Crawford, trans.

... few words by way of application, and there was no decent opportunity to demur. They were the intruders in the smoking-room—not he! Here with his pipe and his paper, he was within the accommodation assigned him. They must hie them back to the casino to be at ease, and this would they do when he should reach the end of his story—if indeed it ...
— The Lost Guidon - 1911 • Charles Egbert Craddock (AKA Mary Noailles Murfree)

... should they loue thee? that woulde I knowe As wel as me, I pray you showe I am the superiour of hie and lowe 170 No ...
— The Interlude of Wealth and Health • Anonymous

... soul there came this sense: "Her heart has answered unto thine; She comes, to-night. Go, hie thee hence! Meet her: no ...
— Rose and Roof-Tree - Poems • George Parsons Lathrop

... sein Gnad' also, Dass sie recht Priester worden: Sich selbst ihm mussten opfern da Und geh'n im Christen Orden, Der Welt ganz abgestorben sein, Die Heuchelei ablegen, Zum Himmel kommen frei und rein, Die Moencherei ausfegen Und Menschen Tand hie lassen. ...
— The Hymns of Martin Luther • Martin Luther

... Saladin. But even as Raschi spake an abrupt noise Of angry shouts, of battering staves that shook The oaken portal, stopped the enchanted voice, The uplifted wine spilled from the nerveless hand Of Rabbi Jochanan. "God pity us! Our enemies are upon us once again. Hie thee, Rebekah, to the inmost chamber, Far from their wanton eyes' polluting gaze, Their desecrating touch! Kiss me! Begone! Raschi, my guest, my son"—But no word more Uttered the reverend man. With one huge crash The strong doors ...
— The Poems of Emma Lazarus - Vol. II. (of II.), Jewish Poems: Translations • Emma Lazarus

... heareth now That his lady bright of brow Dwelleth in his own countrie, Never man was glad as he. To her castle doth he hie With the lady speedily, Passeth to the chamber high, Findeth Nicolete thereby. Of her true love found again Never maid was half so fain. Straight she leaped upon her feet: When his love he saw at last, Arms about her did he cast, Kissed her often, kissed her sweet ...
— Aucassin and Nicolete • Andrew Lang

... student, devoting several of the early morning hours of each day to practice on the piano-forte. Even during the heated term, when most artists neglect their instruments, and hie away to enjoy the refreshing breezes of the sea-shore or the mountains, he may much of the time be found at his rooms, undeterred by the hot atmosphere, diligently at work keeping up the nice degree of proficiency he has already attained, or ...
— Music and Some Highly Musical People • James M. Trotter

... When I gave thee away, I deem'd that I gave My child to one who would gain renown, By the deeds which had given his sires renown, To a boy who would snatch, ere his limbs were grown, The heaviest bow of the strongest man, And hie to the strife with a painted face, And a shout that should ring in the lonely glades, Like a spirit's among the hills; I did not deem I had given my dove To a youth with the heart of a doe; A gatherer-in of flowers, A snarer of simple birds, A weeder with women of maize[D], A man with the cheek ...
— Traditions of the North American Indians, Vol. 1 (of 3) • James Athearn Jones

... direction, to set to work at once. So Rob bade his brothers and cousin get their rude fishing rods, and hie away down to the rocks at the mouth of the harbor, and see what fish they could get for him ...
— The New McGuffey Fourth Reader • William H. McGuffey

... I'll hie me to the bower That thou wi' roses tied, And where wi' mony a blushing bud I strove myself to hide. I'll doat on ilka spot Where I ha'e been wi' thee; And ca' to mind some kindly word By ilka burn ...
— The World's Best Poetry, Volume 3 - Sorrow and Consolation • Various

... said I, "if you have given up, in these six hours, a tithe of your heart to this man—if, in fact, his screed be not arrant bosh—then will I hie me to London for good and all, and write political leaders all the days of ...
— The Delectable Duchy • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... could the lot of the fender-fisherman be happier? No colds, quinsies or asthmas follow his incursions into the realms of fancy where in cool streams and peaceful lakes a legion of chubs and trouts and sawmon await him; in fancy he can hie away to the far-off Yalrow and once more share the benefits of the companionship of Kit North, the Shepherd, and that noble Edinburgh band; in fancy he can trudge the banks of the Blackwater with the sage of Watergrasshill; ...
— The Love Affairs of a Bibliomaniac • Eugene Field

... studied in coquetish rules, Aim wily glances at unthinking fools; Or shew the lilly hand with graceful air, Or wound the fopling with a lock of hair: And when the hated discipline is o'er, And Misses tortur'd with Repent no more, They mount the pictur'd coach, and to the play The celebrated idols hie away. ...
— The Young Gentleman and Lady's Monitor, and English Teacher's Assistant • John Hamilton Moore

... about as fine as the rest but some of 'em done finer. John Carleton, the schoolteacher, shone with particular brilliancy as he delivered himself of such natural, everyday speeches as: "I have dispatched a messenger to town with the glad tidings," or "We will leave this barren spot and hie to the gay scenes of city life." And Frank Crosby, as "September Gale," the noble young fisherman, tossed the English language about as a real gale might toss what he would have called "a cockle shell," as he declared, "With a true heart and a stout arm, who cares for danger?... ...
— Fair Harbor • Joseph Crosby Lincoln

... so hardy, That would go with thee and bear thee company. Hie thee that you were gone to God's magnificence, Thy reckoning to give before his presence. What, weenest thou thy life is given thee, And ...
— Everyman and Other Old Religious Plays, with an Introduction • Anonymous

... yet are those King-folk lovely, and no guile of heart they know, And, in troth and love rejoicing, by Sigurd's side they go: O'er heath and holt they hie them, o'er hill and dale they ride, Till they come to the Burg of the Niblungs and the war-gate of their pride; And there is Grimhild the wise-wife, and she sits and ...
— The Story of Sigurd the Volsung and the Fall of the Niblungs • William Morris

... aunt was carried out into the courtyard. When the dancing was at an end, she, as was her wont, questioned the men and the elder woman as to all she desired to know; and, learning from them that the men were likewise tinkers, she bid Ann hie to the kitchen and command that the house-keeper should bring together all broken pots and pans. But now, near by the wagon, was a noise heard of furious barking, and the ...
— Uarda • Georg Ebers

... red ray is gone; Now the twilight shadows hie; Still the bell-notes, one by one, Send their soft voice to the sky, Praying, as with human lip,— "Angels, hasten, night is nigh, Take us ...
— Verses • Susan Coolidge

... toil and love I strayed With Sita through the forest shade, No trace of grief was seen in her, My kind and thoughtful comforter. How shall my faltering tongue relate To Queen Kausalya Sita's fate? How answer when in wild despair She questions, Where is Sita, where? Haste, brother, haste: to Bharat hie, On whose fond love I still rely. My life can be no longer borne, Since Sita ...
— The Ramayana • VALMIKI

... the Palais Royal to gamble with his remaining nine francs. The great man unknown to fame, though he had a divine mistress, must needs hie him to a low haunt of vice to wallow in perilous pleasure. Vignon betook himself to the Rocher de Cancale to drown memory and thought in a couple of bottles of Bordeaux; Lucien parted company with him on the threshold, declining to share that supper. When he ...
— A Distinguished Provincial at Paris • Honore de Balzac

... others than he. Come, you will consent to be my guest to-night. You are unwell; I shall be your amateur physician. My treatment and a night of rest will put you all right, and to-morrow, by break of day, we will hie back to ...
— Rivers of Ice • R.M. Ballantyne

... clearly, if you please—except in a case of extreme urgency. This is a distinct order, Adelaide, and I shall be severely displeased if you fail to observe it. And now," he resumed his lighter manner again as he rose from his chair, "I must hie me to the parish room where my good Miss Whalley ...
— The Bars of Iron • Ethel May Dell



Words linked to "Hie" :   rush along, move, race, flash, thrust ahead, cannonball along, shoot down, scud, push forward, shoot, step on it, rush, tear, bucket along, dart, speed, pelt along, barge, belt along, dash, charge



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