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Haven   Listen
noun
Haven  n.  
1.
A bay, recess, or inlet of the sea, or the mouth of a river, which affords anchorage and shelter for shipping; a harbor; a port. "What shipping and what lading 's in our haven." "Their haven under the hill."
2.
A place of safety; a shelter; an asylum. "The haven, or the rock of love."






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Haven" Quotes from Famous Books



... including Theoretical and Practical Ethics. By JOSEPH HAVEN, D. D., late Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy in Amherst College; author of "Mental Philosophy." Royal ...
— The Life of Trust: Being a Narrative of the Lord's Dealings With George Mueller • George Mueller

... the waves and smite upon the sails and sweep the becalmed ship on toward its harbor. Oh, beautiful story, telling us how Christ touches the heart with his regenerating hand to release the soul's deeper convictions, to sweep man forward to the heavenly haven! ...
— The Investment of Influence - A Study of Social Sympathy and Service • Newell Dwight Hillis

... relatives and no acquaintances at all," Frau Hadebusch wailed, and her voice sounded like the scraping of carrots on a grater; "and no employment and no prospects and no boots or clothes but what he's got on. In all my life I haven't ...
— The Goose Man • Jacob Wassermann

... in order, to sum up, to teach them the means of protecting themselves against the oppression of the grand aristocracy. Although we are celebrated for our scribbling I believe that Miss Martineau would not repudiate me. You know that on the continent literature has become the haven of all Cats who protest against the immoral monopoly of marriage, who resist the tyranny of institutions, and who desire to encourage natural laws. I have omitted to tell you that, although Brisquet's body was slashed ...
— Lords of the Housetops - Thirteen Cat Tales • Various

... of self that grievous weight entailed, Have blossomed into laurels of renown. As, after days of bitter storm and blast, The chilling wind becomes a breeze of balm, Billows subside, and sea-tossed vessels cast Their anchors in the restful harbor calm, So this brave life has gained its haven blest, Bathed in the sunset glories of the west. WM. ...
— The History of Woman Suffrage, Volume IV • Various

... you'll do anything for HIM," Pandora said, smiling very sweetly at Mr. Lansing. "We haven't got much; we've been ...
— Pandora • Henry James

... bragging, Mr. nephew of an illustrious personage,' I said, going up to Asanov; 'you haven't any ...
— The Diary of a Superfluous Man and Other Stories • Ivan Turgenev

... First man, who has had Green Chartreuse with his coffee and seems snappish, annoyed at this, and says, "it's dam nonsense going on like that." "Oh," says the second, "then you leave it to me—is that it?" "Haven't I been saying so all along!" growls the other. Second Undecided Man silent for a time, evidently forcing himself to come to a decision of some sort. At last he looks up with relief. "Well," he says, very slowly, "what do you think about it?" Whereupon they begin all over again. ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 102, June 11, 1892 • Various

... know, or any mining stock; and so I am obliged to depend on the little presents that gentlemen happen to make me. Now that I've known you a year, how much better off am I for it, I should like to ask? My head looks like a fright because I haven't had anything to rig it out with, all that time; and as to clothes,—why, the only dress I've got in the world is in rags that make me ashamed to be seen with my friends: and yet you imagine that I can go on in this way without having any other means of living! ...
— Library of the World's Best Literature, Ancient and Modern, Vol. 1 • Charles Dudley Warner

... "Ye haven't got us yet," muttered Joe, with a sardonic grin. "If they get near us, Dick, keep yer eyes open an' look out for yer neck, else they'll drop a noose over it, they will, afore ye know they're near, an' haul ye off ...
— The Dog Crusoe and His Master - A Story of Adventure in the Western Prairies • Robert Michael Ballantyne

... man, who knew no more than she what would become of them all, and was infinitely the more wretched on that account, broke into a torrent of oaths. "Haven't I enough to bear?" he asked her. "Haven't I myself to think about? Is mine such a pleasant prospect, that you come to pester me, giving me no peace? How do other women manage? Women that have never had husbands to slave for them as I have slaved ...
— Mrs. Day's Daughters • Mary E. Mann

... Pasquale. I haven't seen him for two or three years. He is a fascinating youth, a study in reversion. I will ask him to dinner here some day soon. It will be quieter ...
— The Morals of Marcus Ordeyne • William J. Locke

... I haven't heard Crepe de Chine. I don't care much for Fournier's music. He imitates the Russians. Such a pity! Are you really going back to-morrow? Good-bye, then! Now, Rades, be amiable! Give us Enigme." ...
— The Way of Ambition • Robert Hichens

... do wish to heaven you wouldn't take it like that. I haven't changed—I never shall. I don't care two straws about Miss Walmer. But really, it is such a splendid chance for me! You ought no more to expect me to give it up than any other good business ...
— The Limit • Ada Leverson

... at close grips with the enemy, and our machine and another converged on a Hun. V. was firing industriously. As we turned, he glared at me, and knowing nothing of the fire, shouted: "Why the hell haven't you fired yet?" I caught sight of a Boche bus below us, aimed at it, and emptied a drum in short bursts. It swept away, but not before two of the German observer's bullets had plugged our petrol tank from underneath. The pressure went, and ...
— Cavalry of the Clouds • Alan Bott

... was comforting. He sat down on the white deal table, knowing himself an intruder, but boldly facing the tall monster that guarded the deserted room and challenged him. "You haven't stopped," he answered in his beard. "Why not?" And as he said it, a new expression stole upon its hardened countenance, the challenge melted, the obdurate stare relaxed. The quaint, grandfatherly aspect of benevolence shone ...
— The Extra Day • Algernon Blackwood

... with a sudden shakiness in her tone, added, "Though I don't know why we haven't! We've thought of the possibility that the rest of you might feel it would be better if Phil and I weren't around ...
— Watch the Sky • James H. Schmitz

... Walker (afterwards Canon of Westminster), and Mr. Bowles, played together at Littlemore instrumental trios written by the Cardinal himself, and which Father Bowles once told us were "most pleasing." What has become of them?[38] On our showing the Father in 1869 an original song to his words "The Haven,"[39] he pointed to the second chord, exclaiming, "Ah, a diminished seventh!" We had no notion at that time what perpetrated iniquity that might be, but two years later he wrote: "Every beginner deals in diminished sevenths. At least, I did as a boy. I first learnt the chord from the ...
— Cardinal Newman as a Musician • Edward Bellasis

... "I haven't felt lonely," she said, "because I have been writing a foolish story, and my characters have been my companions. I am sure it is no good, and yet my head is a little turned at having expressed ...
— Ainslee's, Vol. 15, No. 5, June 1905 • Various

... was your jolly old mater's lecture last night that made the nominee quit. You must charge in and take his place. Sort of poetic justice, don't you know, and what not!" He turned to Mr. Blake. "When is the conflict supposed to start? Two-thirty? You haven't any important engagement ...
— Indiscretions of Archie • P. G. Wodehouse

... meaning to, by my light mention of the dead. I've been too near death's door myself lately to joke about it." He paused, but she remained silent. "I'm going away now," he said softly. "Won't you say that you excuse me, and that you haven't any hard ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Vol. 26, October, 1880 • Various

... and have made my way; and as to Nelly, why I never thought of her, nor of any other lass in that way; her least of all; why, she is like my sister. What ever put such a ridiculous idea in your head? Why, at eighteen boys haven't left school and are looking forward to going to college; those boy and girl marriages among our class are the cause of half our troubles. Thirty is quite time enough to marry. How Nelly would laugh if she knew what ...
— Facing Death - The Hero of the Vaughan Pit. A Tale of the Coal Mines • G. A. Henty

... fight." And again, "'This is the grave digger' (would Tom Hickman exclaim in the moments of intoxication from gin and success, showing his tremendous right hand); 'this will send many of them to their long homes; I haven't done with them yet.'" But he went under to Neale, of Bristol, on the ...
— The Works of Charles and Mary Lamb, Volume 2 • Charles Lamb

... "You haven't heard the news broadcasts the past couple of days? How the devil could you have missed them?" Hennessey was scowling ...
— Combat • Dallas McCord Reynolds

... to bathe at the very end of the season when I haven't been in the surf all summer," replied the ...
— The Awakening and Selected Short Stories • Kate Chopin

... been living for till now? What? Tell me, haven't I wasted my youth? All the best years of my life to know nothing but keeping accounts, pouring out tea, counting the halfpence, entertaining visitors, and thinking there was nothing better in the world! Nurse, do understand, I have the cravings ...
— The Chorus Girl and Other Stories • Anton Chekhov

... into the haven now, In distant cities cheerily dies away The busy tumult; in the arbor Gleams ...
— The German Classics of The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Vol. IV • Editor-in-Chief: Kuno Francke

... more delusive diplomacy, and it was natural that the lieutenant-general abroad and the statesman at home should be sad and indignant, seeing England drifting to utter shipwreck while pursuing that phantom of a pacific haven. Had Walsingham and himself tampered with the enemy, as some counsellors he could name had done, Leicester asserted that the gallows would be thought too good for them; and yet he hoped he might be hanged if the whole Spanish faction ...
— The Rise of the Dutch Republic, 1555-1566 • John Lothrop Motley

... watch.) I'll go in and see him about the certificate. Now you haven't begun to put your things together, and you've only got a bit over half an hour. In less than that time I shall be back. I shall want to look through ...
— The Great Adventure • Arnold Bennett

... taxing those who bring it to them. No English vessel was allowed to enter their inner harbour: this privilege was reserved for Spaniards and Portuguese. On one occasion, a small British schooner of war was proceeding into this haven, her commander never imagining that the restriction put on the merchant vessels of his country could possibly extend to Her Britannic Majesty's pennant: he was mistaken, however, and the first battery he came near, threatened to fire ...
— Trade and Travel in the Far East - or Recollections of twenty-one years passed in Java, - Singapore, Australia and China. • G. F. Davidson

... to the box. But the child stopped him. A quick thought had come to her. "You have been in Athens, haven't you? I want to ask you ...
— Mr. Achilles • Jennette Lee

... depended a mass of crystallization, four or five inches deep, in the form of prisms, with their lower ends open, which, when the ice was laid on its smooth side, resembled the roofs and steeples of a Gothic city, or the vessels of a crowded haven under a press of canvas. The very mud in the road, where the ice had melted, was crystallized with deep rectilinear fissures, and the crystalline masses in the sides of the ruts resembled exactly asbestos in the disposition ...
— Excursions • Henry D. Thoreau

... and still have said nothing about it. He has a very sensitive delicacy and might have thought it my business and not his. I haven't told him about the twelve thousand pounds yet. I don't bother him about business matters. In fact, I'm going to manage his business as ...
— The Loudwater Mystery • Edgar Jepson

... from them. Ninety-nine out of one hundred were dormant, and about that many lived. The wood was thoroughly dormant and plump. I cut it right out of the orchard in May or June and got them to live. Of course if you cut scions from the ends of branches, you haven't a ...
— Northern Nut Growers Association, Report of the Proceedings at the Fourth Annual Meeting - Washington D.C. November 18 and 19, 1913 • Various

... Phoenicia known to the Assyrians,[467] but unmentioned by any Greek author. The situation was a promontory, which runs out towards the north-west, in Lat. 34 27' nearly, for the distance of a mile, and is about half a mile wide. The site is "well adapted for a haven, as a chain of seven small islands, running out to the north-west, affords shelter in the direction from which the most violent winds blow."[468] The remotest of these islands is ten miles distant from the shore.[469] We are told that the colonists who founded Tripolis ...
— History of Phoenicia • George Rawlinson

... explaining the nature of the bill, and supporting it by all the arguments he could bring forward in its favour, the right honourable baronet expressed a hope that the church of Scotland would find a haven of peace and security, and in that spirit of hope and peace he moved its second reading. Mr. Wallace said that the bill would create more doubts than had heretofore existed, and would make the people renounce the church; on which grounds he moved that it be read that ...
— The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.III. - From George III. to Victoria • E. Farr and E. H. Nolan

... I know how to speak," said the Crow, "haven't I, for a hundred years and more, been watching men and listening to their words? Why shouldn't I be able ...
— The Boy Who Knew What The Birds Said • Padraic Colum

... if he were not antagonistic to him, would regard him as a sort of duty. It wasn't his immorality particularly. Nobody is either moral or immoral in these days, but penniless persons must be decent. It's all a matter of taste and manners. I haven't any morals myself, my dear, but I have beautiful manners. A woman can have the kind of manners which keep her from breaking the Commandments. As to the Commandments, they are awfully easy things not to break. Who wants to break them, good Lord! Thou shall do no ...
— Emily Fox-Seton - Being The Making of a Marchioness and The Methods of Lady Walderhurst • Frances Hodgson Burnett

... know it's a piece of distinction to be waited upon by a Benshee. It's a proof that one has pure blood in one's veins. But, egad, now we're talking of ghosts, there never was a house or a night better fitted than the present for a ghost adventure. Faith, Sir John, haven't you such a thing as a haunted chamber to ...
— Tales of a Traveller • Washington Irving

... They were an age looking at your photograph album. I suppose they haven't got such things where they come from. Madame Lorinet couldn't tear herself away from it. 'Nothing but men,' she said, 'have you noticed that, Jules?'—'Well, Madame,' I said, 'that's just how it is here; except ...
— Serge Panine • Georges Ohnet

... acted on orders given, and haven't said a word about it to anybody but you, Ralph. The reason I tell you is, because I think you are interested in some of the persons who are buying meals from me in this strange way. It's all right for me to speak out before ...
— Ralph on the Engine - The Young Fireman of the Limited Mail • Allen Chapman

... Mrs. F. H. Godfrey, Vincent Richards, Watson Washburn, N. W. Niles, R. N. Williams, W. F. Johnson and myself. Matches were staged at Orange, Short Hills, Morristown and Elizabeth, New Jersey, Green Meadow Club, Jackson Heights Club, Ardsley-on-the-Hudson, New Rochelle, Yonkers, New York, New Haven, and Hartford, Connecticut. They proved a tremendous success financially, and France netted a ...
— The Art of Lawn Tennis • William T. Tilden, 2D

... there runs out through the fields. Our land runs back to the other public road and beyond that is the farm I told you of where the saw mill is running. I've got some pretty good cowpeas you'll pass by. I haven't got them off the ...
— The Story of the Soil • Cyril G. Hopkins

... didn't fill to capacity at Freetown, and I'm afraid not. Why, what is the matter? Haven't you any ...
— Around the World in Ten Days • Chelsea Curtis Fraser

... two or three nights, as they drew near the Western shore, the round orb rose behind them, casting its soft light over sea and sky; and these happy men seemed like heavenly voyagers, floating gently on to a haven ...
— Great Fortunes, and How They Were Made • James D. McCabe, Jr.

... account of such a fantasy as Judd's Margaret. The only New-Englander who has attempted the novel on a scale proportioned to the work of the New-Englanders in philosophy, in poetry, in romance, is Mr. De Forest, who is of New Haven, and not of Boston. I do not forget the fictions of Doctor Holmes, or the vivid inventions of Doctor Hale, but I do not call them novels; and I do not forget the exquisitely realistic art of Miss Jewett or Miss Wilkins, ...
— Henry James, Jr. • William Dean Howells

... for I may not be able to help it. Besides, I haven't met him yet, and it isn't necessary to cross a bridge till you get to it. Now let ...
— Luke Walton • Horatio Alger

... Anne, if I haven't brought you home little Hetty a second time out of trouble. Found her on the road I did, with her ankle sprained. We'll take her in for the present, and I'll go to the Hall ...
— Hetty Gray - Nobody's Bairn • Rosa Mulholland

... is flattering but untrue. The case was its own best advocate. But you haven't answered the question. Why not ...
— Revenge! • by Robert Barr

... not allow her to proceed. "I have no fault to find with him," he went on—"absolutely none. Why, dear me! haven't I been in business myself? and don't I know what it is? First, we borrow a thousand francs or so from the cash account, then ten thousand, then a hundred thousand. Oh! without any bad intention, to be sure, ...
— Other People's Money • Emile Gaboriau

... I haven't earned this," said Oakes, puffing away. He let the ash of his cigar fall delicately to the floor—another action which seemed significant to his employer. As a rule, his assistants, unless particularly pleased ...
— Death At The Excelsior • P. G. Wodehouse

... haven't. I am quite well, but all the same I shall have them till you give me back ...
— The Memoires of Casanova, Complete • Jacques Casanova de Seingalt

... do it to-day. Victualling and physicking are very good things, but must be done in season. I have been up all night at the accounts,—haven't I, O'Malley?" here he winked at me most significantly; "and then I have the forage and stoppage fund to look through ['we dine at six, sharp,' said he, sotto voce], which will leave me without one minute unoccupied for ...
— Charles O'Malley, The Irish Dragoon, Volume 1 (of 2) • Charles Lever

... she, "you asked me not to speak to you, and I haven't spoken, but now you yourself have begun. I don't trust him, Natasha. Why ...
— War and Peace • Leo Tolstoy

... of impatience forced him to narrow his answer to the requirements of the moment. "What are my plans, you asked? I haven't any. I'm a man at a loose end and at a beginning—like all the world, as you ...
— The Kingdom Round the Corner - A Novel • Coningsby Dawson

... a Gold cake over the recipe from 'Cake Secrets,' as eggs are plentiful; but we haven't any Swansdown flour. I think we will wait until we ...
— Mary at the Farm and Book of Recipes Compiled during Her Visit - among the "Pennsylvania Germans" • Edith M. Thomas

... now day, Hrimgerd! and Atli has thee detained to thy loss of life. A ludicrous haven-mark 'twill, indeed, be, where thou a ...
— The Elder Eddas of Saemund Sigfusson; and the Younger Eddas of Snorre Sturleson • Saemund Sigfusson and Snorre Sturleson

... Lord Ragnall, laughing pleasantly. "I have an idea that Mr. Quatermain is full of surprises. However, with his leave, we'll see. If you have a day to spare, Mr. Quatermain, we are going to shoot through the home coverts to-morrow, which haven't been touched till now, and I ...
— The Ivory Child • H. Rider Haggard

... in sight of haven, he, Poor fellow, could he help it? recommenced, And ran thro' all the coltish chronicle, Wild Will, Black Bess, Tantivy, Tallyho, 160 Reform, White Rose, Bellerophon, the Jilt, Arbaces, and Phenomenon, and the rest, Tilt, not to ...
— Selections from Wordsworth and Tennyson • William Wordsworth and Alfred Lord Tennyson

... Sara slowly, "is impulsive. He is never afraid of changing his mind. Many people are called firm merely because they haven't the moral courage to ...
— Robert Orange - Being a Continuation of the History of Robert Orange • John Oliver Hobbes

... He is not only in it, but of it; there's no comparison between us there. Society is in rings like a target, and we never were in the bull's-eye, however thick you may lay on the ink! I was asked for my cricket. I haven't forgotten it yet. But this fellow's one of themselves, with the right of entre into the houses which we could only 'enter' in a professional sense. That's obvious unless all these little exploits are the work of different hands, which they as obviously are not. And it's why I'd ...
— Raffles - Further Adventures of the Amateur Cracksman • E. W. Hornung

... is therefore necessary to inquire how the condition of woman can be improved, in so far as she remains dependent upon herself. To this portion of our adversaries, the Social Question seems solved for those women who have entered the haven ...
— Woman under socialism • August Bebel

... see that you haven't been reasonable, my dear child," said he. "You must have talked too much, and have bestirred and excited yourself." Then, having carefully probed the wound, he added, while dressing it: "The bone is injured, ...
— The Three Cities Trilogy, Complete - Lourdes, Rome and Paris • Emile Zola

... like to take this last opportunity," I said, "of telling you that up till now I haven't enjoyed this early morning bathe one little bit. I suppose there will be a notable moment when the ecstasy actually begins, but at present I can't see it coming at all. The only thing I look forward to with any pleasure is the telling Dahlia and Myra at breakfast what I think of their ...
— The Holiday Round • A. A. Milne

... considerably. At its conclusion he quietly put on his hat, dropped into the crowd, and went his way; but the tone of criticism amongst his hearers was very favourable, and I quite agree with the critics that it's a pity we haven't "more parsons like that." It is not, however, simply by religious zeal such a want as that to which I allude is to be supplied, but by the substitution of some sensible recreation for the low attractions of the beershop and gin-palace. ...
— Mystic London: - or, Phases of occult life in the metropolis • Charles Maurice Davies

... haven't a couple of paddles," answered Sam. "No, what we need now is courage and endurance. We must wait for a wind, and keep our courage up. We are suffering already with hunger and thirst, and will suffer ...
— Captain Sam - The Boy Scouts of 1814 • George Cary Eggleston

... McDOUGALL, Burr consents, at great hazard, to be the bearer of a verbal confidential communication to General Washington; amusing incident at Townsend's iron-works, in Orange county, on this expedition; in July, 1779, the British under Tryon land at East Haven; Burr, although confined to a sick-bed, arises, sallies forth, takes command of the students in the college green, and checks for a time the advance of the enemy; Colonel Platt's account of Burr's ...
— Memoirs of Aaron Burr, Complete • Matthew L. Davis

... Dr. Anderson many orders for cuts for their various juvenile publications, he still found time to engrave for publishers of other cities. We find his illustrations in the toy-books printed in Boston and Philadelphia; and for Sidney Babcock, a New Haven publisher of juvenile literature, he supplied many of the numerous woodcuts required. The best of Anderson's work as an engraver coincided with the years of Babcock's very extensive business of issuing children's ...
— Forgotten Books of the American Nursery - A History of the Development of the American Story-Book • Rosalie V. Halsey

... he meant to flog them all to death; they began immediately to cry out "What have I done Massa? What have I done Massa?" He replied; "D—n you, I will let you know what you have done, you don't breed, I haven't had a young one from one of you for several months." They told him they could not breed while they had to work in the rice ditches. (The rice grounds are low and marshy, and have to be drained, and ...
— The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Omnibus • American Anti-Slavery Society

... have is not to act in our own lives, but to be true—real and true. For one's own life as well as one's work to be all grease-paint—no, no, no. I have hid all that has been between us, because of things that have nothing to do with fear or courage, and for your sake; but I haven't acted, or pretended. I have not flaunted my private ...
— The Judgment House • Gilbert Parker

... (we haven't met as Yet I must record) Figure in Debrett as Out-and-out a Lord: Ancestors, a thousand, Dignities, a score— Hear my bashful vows, and Think this ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 102, Feb. 20, 1892 • Various

... I spoke," I assured her. "And, by the way, if you haven't heard the latest gossip it may interest you to hear that the young rascal has formed an attachment, and is very proud of her fiancee. She is an awfully pretty girl and quite athletic as well—in fact, his arm is not nearly so small as Johnny's ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 159, December 1, 1920 • Various

... "Haven't you noticed Pete's freckles?" asked Uncle Joe. "He has more and bigger ones than any other human in Texas, and the boys called him 'Pinto Pete' the first minute they clapped eyes on him. He don't mind—it's ...
— Blue Bonnet's Ranch Party • C. E. Jacobs

... unenviable style. He did not covet the favors and caresses of the world. He looked upon all,—the rich, the poor, the prince, the beggar,—alike, as his brethren. He believed that all stood upon one platform, all were bound to the same haven, and that all should be equally interested in each other's welfare. With this belief, and with rules of a similar character, guided by which he pursued his course of life, it was not to be wondered at that he could boast of many friends, and not ...
— Town and Country, or, Life at Home and Abroad • John S. Adams

... improving, William," she remarked presently, "you haven't got into any mischief to-day. You have been a mighty good little boy now ...
— Miss Minerva and William Green Hill • Frances Boyd Calhoun

... he said; "but they would have to pay much more for their houses; and if they haven't the money to pay with, what's ...
— Melchior's Dream and Other Tales • Juliana Horatia Ewing

... County) was given its significant name about 1543. When Heceta and Bodega in 1775 were searching the coast for harbors, they anchored under the lee of the next northerly headland. After the pious manner of the time, having left San Blas on Trinity Sunday, they named their haven Trinidad. Their arrival was six days before ...
— A Backward Glance at Eighty • Charles A. Murdock

... stand here in the rain," he said. "You know I haven't a palace to offer, but you are welcome to share my poor place for one night anyway. ...
— The World's Great Men of Music - Story-Lives of Master Musicians • Harriette Brower

... hold the pail, Margery, and I'll pick into my hat. Jiminy! They haven't been picked over to-day at all. We'll get our ...
— A Little Question in Ladies' Rights • Parker Fillmore

... "He has a fine face, this old man. A noble face. Whoever he is ... wherever he came from, he died bravely and he knew the way, though he never reached this haven of the ...
— To Each His Star • Bryce Walton

... without a home, A man of dim and tearful sight, Up from the hallowed haven clomb In lowly ...
— Ionica • William Cory (AKA William Johnson)

... friend of Pascal, and the intrepid antagonist of the Vatican and the Grand Monarque; one of the noblest, freest, most untiring and honest intellects, our world has ever seen. "Why don't you rest sometimes?" said his friend Nicole to him. "Rest! why should I rest here? haven't I an eternity to rest in?" The following sentence from his "Port-Royal Logic," so well introduced and translated by Mr. Baynes, contains the gist of all we have been trying to say. It should be engraven on the tablets of every young student's heart—for the heart has to ...
— Spare Hours • John Brown

... comprises the most favorable health-chances in the world. (If only the suffocating crowding of some of its tenement houses could be broken up.) I find I never sufficiently realized how beautiful are the upper two-thirds of Manhattan island. I am stopping at Mott Haven, and have been familiar now for ten days with the region above One-hundredth street, and along the Harlem river and Washington heights. Am dwelling a few days with my friends Mr. and Mrs. J. H. J., and a merry houseful of young ladies. Am putting the last ...
— Complete Prose Works - Specimen Days and Collect, November Boughs and Goodbye My Fancy • Walt Whitman

... untold; All thy streets and walls are fashioned, All are bright with purest gold! III. Gates of pearl, for ever open, Welcome there the loved, the lost; Ransomed by their Saviour's merits; This the price their freedom cost: City of eternal refuge, Haven of the tempest-tost. IV. Fierce the blow, and firm the pressure, Which hath polished thus each stone: Well the Mastermind hath fitted To his chosen place each one. When the Architect takes reck'ning, He will ...
— Edwy the Fair or the First Chronicle of Aescendune • A. D. Crake

... pleasant climate. The Principality has successfully sought to diversify into services and small, high-value-added, nonpolluting industries. The state has no income tax and low business taxes and thrives as a tax haven both for individuals who have established residence and for foreign companies that have set up businesses and offices. About 55% of Monaco's annual revenue comes from value-added taxes on hotels, banks, and the industrial sector; about ...
— The 1997 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency.

... something breathed close to my ear," said Miss Faithful, turning white; "and what's more," she continued, as they crossed the passage and entered the work-room, "I believe you heard it too, and that you've seen things in this house you haven't told me of." ...
— Not Pretty, But Precious • John Hay, et al.

... so!" exclaimed Coretti triumphantly; "it's a magic word, that fourth of the forty-ninth! Haven't I the right to see my general with some little comfort,—I, who was in that squadron? I saw him close at hand then; it seems right that I should see him close at hand now. And I say general! He was my battalion commander for a good half-hour; for ...
— Cuore (Heart) - An Italian Schoolboy's Journal • Edmondo De Amicis

... "I haven't seen him," said Charlotte with a certain air of discretion; "but I had a line from him in answer to one I wrote on my arrival: and he does seem to have been ...
— King John of Jingalo - The Story of a Monarch in Difficulties • Laurence Housman

... girl's turn to sense the situation. "How ridiculous!" she laughed. "Of course you wouldn't know. Allen Sanford and I used to play together when we were children in Pittsburgh. I haven't seen him since we moved away after mamma died; but that really looked like him. I wonder if by any ...
— The Lever - A Novel • William Dana Orcutt

... an Association of Collegiate and Professional Students in the United States and Europe. [Greek:'Ekasto onmachoi pantos]; January, 1860. Printed for the Association. New Haven, Conn. ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume V, Number 29, March, 1860 - A Magazine Of Literature, Art, And Politics • Various

... Rosia had excellently well begun. I am sorry to add, though, that it does not carry on quite so bravely as you might expect from such a start. My own suspicion is that Lady Rosia is one of many novels that owe their existence to a summer holiday. I haven't the slightest knowledge of the facts, and still less wish to incur a libel action, but, by my way of imagining it, Miss FREDA MARY GROVES found herself one day in the Winchelsea country, fell very naturally in love with its jolly old houses, ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 147, July 22, 1914 • Various

... bit of difference, Auntie. The stories we like best we have heard over and over again. Besides, the other girls haven't heard it. Come, ...
— Miss Elliot's Girls • Mrs Mary Spring Corning

... to speak. Don't worry, at any rate: I assure you I'll back you up." Then after a moment and while he smoked he reverted to Mrs. Beale and the child's first enquiry. "I'm afraid we can't do much for her just now. I haven't seen her since that day—upon my word I haven't seen her." The next instant, with a laugh the least bit foolish, the young man slightly coloured: he must have felt this profession of innocence to ...
— What Maisie Knew • Henry James

... "You haven't even got me—now—have you," Madame von Marwitz went on, looking down at her door-knob and running her hand slowly round it while she spoke. "Not even the criminal. But that is a gain, you feel, no doubt, rather than ...
— Tante • Anne Douglas Sedgwick

... a horse and bade him go: though the roads were held by armed outlaws, who were reported to be specially hostile to monks. He was afraid; but he summoned his courage and went. If the Abbey seemed a haven before, when he came back to it from the experiences of his ordination at Augsburg, this time it was a refuge and strength against the fear that lurketh in forests and ...
— The Age of Erasmus - Lectures Delivered in the Universities of Oxford and London • P. S. Allen

... won it in my own way, haven't I! [Hitting the palm of his hand with his fist.] I've done what I determined to do, Robbie; what I knew I should do, sooner or later! I've got there—got there!—by simple, honest ...
— The Big Drum - A Comedy in Four Acts • Arthur Pinero

... dwelling-houses, formed the main highway of the city; and the pageant, accompanied throughout by innumerable lanterns and wax tapers, took its course up one of these streets, crossing the water by a bridge up-stream, and down the other, to the haven, every possible standing-place, out of doors [106] and within, being crowded with sight-seers, of whom Marius was one of the most eager, deeply interested in finding the spectacle much as Apuleius had described it in his ...
— Marius the Epicurean, Volume One • Walter Horatio Pater

... "I haven't changed my opinion in the slightest degree," she retorted. "I am still quite convinced that Robert did not ...
— The Moon Rock • Arthur J. Rees

... child from Norway! You've set up your husband as an idol, and you're always on your knees before him. It's awfully sweet of you, but it's quite absurd, all the same. Angelic wives always get the worst of it, and so you'll see! Haven't ...
— Thelma • Marie Corelli

... love you as I've never loved before! I've refused twelve women, nine have refused me, but I never loved one of them as I love you.... I'm weak, I'm wax, I've melted.... I'm on my knees like a fool, offering you my hand.... Shame, shame! I haven't been in love for five years, I'd taken a vow, and now all of a sudden I'm in love, like a fish out of water! I offer you my hand. Yes or no? You don't want me? Very well! [Gets up and ...
— Plays by Chekhov, Second Series • Anton Chekhov

... like this: 'William, Lord Cobden, Earl of Sorsetshire an' Derry. Dear Sir. Bein' brought up under Republican institutions, in the land of the free—' I left out 'the home of the brave' because there wasn't no use crowin' about that jus' then—'I haven't had no oppertunity of meetin' with a individual of lordly blood. Ever since I was a small girl takin' books from the circulatin' libery, an' obliged to read out loud with divided sillerbles, I've drank in every word of the tales of ...
— The Rudder Grangers Abroad and Other Stories • Frank R. Stockton

... the magistrate, coming forward after inquiring particulars from the shepherd in the background. 'Haven't you got the man ...
— Wessex Tales • Thomas Hardy

... to be Lord Trevorsham, and owner of the property; but one day, when Fulk found him galloping his pony in the field laid up for hay, and ordered him out, he retorted that "You ain't my proper brother, and you haven't any rights over me! It is my field; and I ...
— Lady Hester, or Ursula's Narrative • Charlotte M. Yonge

... STAR of starres, with thy streames clear, Star of the Sea, to shipman Light or Guide, O lusty Living, most pleasant t'appear, Whose brighte beames the cloudes may not hide: O Way of Life to them that go or ride, Haven from tempest, surest up t'arrive, O me have mercy ...
— Our Lady Saint Mary • J. G. H. Barry

... held up his hand. "I've been waiting for that, Eddie. Don't humiliate yourself by asking for a small amount. I haven't the remotest idea how much you already owe me, but it doesn't matter in view of the fact that you'll never pay it. You were about to request the loan of ten dollars, my boy. Why not ask for ...
— Her Weight in Gold • George Barr McCutcheon

... raising himself up when the other entered. 'So you pulled me out of that hole! Shake hands, Buzzy, old fellow! You've had a talk with my governor, haven't you? What do you ...
— The House of Cobwebs and Other Stories • George Gissing

... cob-pipe which muttered responsively, "Not so long as I've got anything to smoke. Gets up," he explained to Reverdy, "and jerks it out of my mouth, when we haven't got company." ...
— The Leatherwood God • William Dean Howells

... thing that haunts me when I'm traveling, and makes my life a misery. I dream that I haven't packed it, and wake up in a cold perspiration, and get out of bed and hunt for it. And, in the morning, I pack it before I have used it, and have to unpack again to get it, and it is always the last thing I turn out of the bag; and then I repack ...
— Journeys Through Bookland, Vol. 5 • Charles Sylvester

... desperation. "Oh, haven't you been in Paris long enough to know what a corbeille is? It's the collection of gifts a bridegroom makes for his bride. He puts his taste, his sentiment, his"—she waved her fingers in the air—"as well as his money, into it. A corbeille shows what a man is. He must have been ...
— Lazarre • Mary Hartwell Catherwood

... double the northern point of Nova Zembla, Barentz had remained alone in the achievement until this period. On the 7th September, 1871, the Norwegian Captain, Elling Carlsen, well known by his numerous voyages in the North Sea and the Frozen Ocean, arrived at the ice haven of Barentz, and on the 9th he discovered the house which had sheltered the Dutchmen. It was in such a wonderful state of preservation that it seemed to have been built but a day, and everything was found in the same position as at the departure of the shipwrecked crew. Bears, foxes, and other creatures ...
— Celebrated Travels and Travellers - Part I. The Exploration of the World • Jules Verne

... said Budge, in a perfect delirium of delight, "I believe if my papa and mamma had stayed away any longer I believe I would die. I've been so lonesome for them that I haven't known what to do. I've cried whole pillowsful about it, right ...
— The World's Greatest Books, Volume V. • Arthur Mee and J.A. Hammerton, Eds.

... in the Noah's ark that haven't any names,' the parrot told him. 'All those are considered fair game. Hullo! blugraiwee!' it shouted, as a little grey beast with blue spots started from the shelter of a rock and made for the cover of a patch of giant seaweed. Then all sorts of little animals got up ...
— The Magic City • Edith Nesbit

... frame, He may bring forth his grievance without fear. Redress shall instantly be given to each. Come, monkey, now, first let us have your speech. You see these quadrupeds, your brothers; Comparing, then, yourself with others, Are you well satisfied?' 'And wherefore not?' Says Jock. 'Haven't I four trotters with the rest? Is not my visage comely as the best? But this my brother Bruin, is a blot On thy creation fair; And sooner than be painted I'd be shot, Were I, great sire, a bear.' The bear approaching, ...
— The Fables of La Fontaine - A New Edition, With Notes • Jean de La Fontaine

... said father. "They've been written to you, couldn't be delivered, and so were sent to the Dead Letter Office at Washington, which returned them to the writer, and unopened he has forwarded them once more to you. You've heard of dead letters, haven't you?" ...
— Laddie • Gene Stratton Porter

... vanity. However, I haven't told you all yet. De la Mole says the mother's a dragon, hard as iron, cold as steel, living for ambition. She was left poor, on her husband's death, as the Vale-Avon estates went with the title to a distant relative, and the girl's been brought up to ...
— The Car of Destiny • C. N. Williamson and A. M. Williamson

... further supported by the Supreme Court of the state. Such a decision was inspiring, but it was not the rule, and already the problems of another decade were being foreshadowed. Already also under the stress of conditions in the South many Negroes were seeking a haven in the North. By 1900 there were as many Negroes in Pennsylvania as in Missouri, whereas twenty years before there had been twice as many in the latter state. There were in Massachusetts more than in Delaware, whereas twenty ...
— A Social History of the American Negro • Benjamin Brawley

... that this was wholly unheard by her father and mother. And there was no withstanding the eager, happy, shy looks of the mother, whose whole face betrayed that after many storms she had come into a haven of peace, and that she was proud to owe it ...
— More Bywords • Charlotte M. Yonge

... 1852, the school was organized, and seventeen students admitted, two to the Senior and fifteen to the Junior class. James W. Patterson, who was a student in the theological school at New Haven, was elected tutor, and the new institution placed in his charge. In July, 1854, Mr. Patterson was elected Chandler Professor of Mathematics, and during the college years 1852-53, and 1853-54, in addition to the general management, gave nearly all the instruction in the Chandler School, at the ...
— The History of Dartmouth College • Baxter Perry Smith

... of Louis de Clameran was swollen with desire, and he felt that he should go mad if the horses crawled with such torturing slowness: he would like to spring from the old stage, and fly to his haven of delight. ...
— File No. 113 • Emile Gaboriau

... of Andorra's economy, accounts for roughly 80% of GDP. An estimated 13 million tourists visit annually, attracted by Andorra's duty-free status and by its summer and winter resorts. The banking sector, with its "tax haven" status, also contributes substantially to the economy. Agricultural production is limited by a scarcity of arable land, and most food has to be imported. The principal livestock activity is sheep raising. Manufacturing ...
— The 1995 CIA World Factbook • United States Central Intelligence Agency

... and then, as some slashing reviews occurred to him, yet becoming more peaceful and impartial of mind under the long monotonous cadence and quiet repetitions of the soothing sea. For now he was beyond the Haven head—the bulwark that makes the bay a pond in all common westerly weather—and waves that were worthy of the name flowed towards him, with a gentle breeze ...
— Springhaven - A Tale of the Great War • R. D. Blackmore

... up-sliding Cheeeep! which was the mother's signal to swoop. Paddling up under the point in my canoe, I found them all wheeling and diving over a shoal, where I knew the fish were smaller and more nimble, and where there were lily pads for a haven of refuge, whither no hawk could follow them. Twenty times I saw them swoop only to miss, while the mother circled above or beside them, whistling advice and encouragement. And when at last they struck their fish and bore away towards the mountain, there was ...
— Wood Folk at School • William J. Long

... 'the parson's bothered us into it at last, and we're to begin pulling down this spring. But we haven't got money enough yet. I was for waiting till we'd made up the sum, and, for my part, I think the congregation's fell off o' late; though Mr. Barton says that's because there's been no room for the people when they've come. You see, the congregation got ...
— Scenes of Clerical Life • George Eliot

... of transition are of necessity full of discomfort, doubt, and anxiety, vague, variable, and unsatisfying. The men in whose spirits the fermentation of the change is felt, who have abandoned their old moorings, and have not yet reached the haven for which they are steering, cannot but be indistinct and undecided in their faith. The universe of which they form a part becomes important to them in its infinite immensity. The principles of beauty, goodness, order and law, no longer connected in their minds with definite articles of ...
— Sketches and Studies in Italy and Greece • John Addington Symonds

... Mall together—"they tell me you're writin' some gas or other about shootin'. Well, if you want a tip from me, just you let into the smokin' room shots a bit; you know the sort I mean, fellows who are reg'lar devils at killin' birds when they haven't got a gun in their hands. Why, there's that little son of a corn-crake, FLICKERS—when once he gets talkin' in a smokin' room nothing can hold him. He'd talk the hind leg off a donkey. I know he jolly nearly laid me out the last time I met him with all his talk—No, ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, VOL. 103, November 26, 1892 • Various

... was laying up against the screen, three or four feet off, and not dry yet; and old Palmer he looked at it curious-like, and then he turned round on me and he says, 'Now then, you boys, have you been up to some of your games here?' 'No,' I says, 'I haven't, Mr. Palmer; there's none of us been about here till just this minute,' and while I was talking the other boy, Evans, he got looking in through the chink, and I heard him draw in his breath, and he came away sharp and up to us, and says he, 'I believe there's something in there. I saw something ...
— A Thin Ghost and Others • M. R. (Montague Rhodes) James

... praise and hope which were up-lifted on the shores of Delft Haven, in the hour of farewell between those who went and those who stayed, though the faith which inspired them was stanch, and the voices which chanted them musical and sweet, could not restrain the tears that flowed at the severing of ties which had been welded ...
— The History of the United States from 1492 to 1910, Volume 1 • Julian Hawthorne

... you saying? What is it you are dreaming aloud? Am I not your wife? Haven't you come ...
— Abbe Mouret's Transgression - La Faute De L'abbe Mouret • Emile Zola

... has not been in," he muttered. "Now let's see. Anything else? How absurd! Haven't finished ...
— Witness to the Deed • George Manville Fenn

... does all of the outside work. I think I shall like him. Don't you remember how as a little girl I always adored the Lion-hearted king? I always think of him when I see Dr. Brooks. He isn't handsome, but he is broad-shouldered and big and blond. I haven't had but one chance to speak to him since he and his mother left Bower's. Perhaps I shan't have many chances to speak to him. But a cat may ...
— Mistress Anne • Temple Bailey

... that?" I exclaimed, in my anger. "How do they know what men and women will smell like? They haven't tried. There won't be any smell at all—not the least; and the smoke will all consume itself, so that even you, living just where you are, will not know when cremation is going on. We might consume all Gladstonopolis, as I hope we shall some day, and not a living soul would know ...
— The Fixed Period • Anthony Trollope

... you jealous for? What do it matter what people think, so long as I know I haven't ...
— Esther Waters • George Moore

... so," he confessed. "You see, up to the present we haven't the least idea as to what has become of all those documents and plans which Mr. Jocelyn Thew so very cleverly ...
— The Box with Broken Seals • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... I haven't a great deal of confidence in seedlings. As a general thing we find all the nut trees are inclined to go back to their original type. If we take our filberts, even the best varieties, the chances are that they will go back to the European type that they originally came from. ...
— Northern Nut Growers Association Report of the Proceedings at the 13th Annual Meeting - Rochester, N.Y. September, 7, 8 and 9, 1922 • Various

... couldn't move Chip, it would be such a bother, so I have given poor birdie away to Allie Smith;" tears flowing afresh. "I let Amy Wells have my kitten, but I haven't found a place for my poor little rose. See," said Bessie, going to the table and removing the wrapper from her parcel, "isn't it a beauty? You will keep it to remember me by, and take care of it always, won't you, ...
— The King's Daughter and Other Stories for Girls • Various

... knew poor old Holroyd,' he said; 'that's how I came to take his rooms. Sad thing, his going down like that, wasn't it? It must have been a great shock for you—I can see you haven't got over ...
— The Giant's Robe • F. Anstey

... of Rector was given to the chief officer of Yale College at the time of its foundation, and was continued until the year 1745, when, by "An Act for the more full and complete establishment of Yale College in New Haven," it was changed, among other alterations, to that of President.—Clap's Annals ...
— A Collection of College Words and Customs • Benjamin Homer Hall

... see, the trouble is that I can't ever seem to get real chummy with a girl but what her mother has to come and camp on my trail and scare me into fits. You haven't the least idea what a catch your son is, Joshua Barnes. Why, a mother-in-law looks to me like something in petticoats that comes creeping up with a catlike tread, carrying in one hand a net and in the other a bale-hook. I can't ...
— Officer 666 • Barton W. Currie

... "I haven't got quite enough cash with me to pay for these, but I have been intending to cash this check all the afternoon. Of course, you don't know me or even that my name is Lang, but if you will forward the check to the bank they will certify it, and to-morrow ...
— True Stories of Crime From the District Attorney's Office • Arthur Train

... will do you good.' But you'll make yourself ill, if you go on." He caught her wrist and gripped it. "Put your feet up, because I'm going to push the sofa to the fire. . . . Your shoulders are frozen. . . . Now I'm going to bring you the lobster. . . . And you haven't had ...
— The Education of Eric Lane • Stephen McKenna

... "Oh, I haven't much to carry, I might as well carry that, if I am to win the princess and half the kingdom," ...
— East O' the Sun and West O' the Moon • Gudrun Thorne-Thomsen

... "I'm afraid you're not a good provider. Here we are, hungry as wolves, and you haven't brought us a mite of anything to eat. You've moved everything but the provisions, and you've forgotten ...
— The Big Brother - A Story of Indian War • George Cary Eggleston

... not try to impose upon me," she interrupted, "because it is of no use. Didn't you make thousands of the dead man, and now haven't you got the house? Why, if you never had a penny of costs, instead of all you have pocketed, that house and the name it has brought to you, and the fame which has spread abroad in consequence, can't be reckoned as less than hundreds a year ...
— The Uninhabited House • Mrs. J. H. Riddell

... house," which he hired and furnished; and then "in the year one thousand seven hundred and nineteen, all unhinged again." The regiment had been ordered off to the Isle of Wight, thence to embark for Spain, on "the Vigo Expedition," and "we," who accompanied it, "were driven into Milford Haven, but afterwards landed at Bristol, and thence by land to Plymouth again, and to the Isle of Wight;" losing on this expedition "poor Joram, a pretty boy, who died of the smallpox." In the Isle of Wight, Mrs. ...
— Sterne • H.D. Traill

... "I haven't dared to ask Miss Jelliffe whether she would like to cast a fly also," I said. "I suppose she will have to stay and nurse ...
— Sweetapple Cove • George van Schaick

... die if I don't! I haven't said a word since I came back; I know it's useless; but I love you, Elsie, ...
— A Noble Woman • Ann S. Stephens

... replied the sailor; "but just let me tell you something, Paulvitch. You haven't got no more show to turn us men against the Englishman than nothing. We had all we wanted of you and that other beast. He's dead, an' if I don't miss my guess a whole lot you'll be dead too before long. You two treated us like dogs, and if you think ...
— The Beasts of Tarzan • Edgar Rice Burroughs



Words linked to "Haven" :   landing, port of call, harbour, port, anchorage, dock, landing place, tax haven, dockage, New Haven, anchorage ground, Boston Harbor, Caesarea, seaport, harbor



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