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Hand   Listen
noun
Hand  n.  
1.
That part of the fore limb below the forearm or wrist in man and monkeys, and the corresponding part in many other animals; manus; paw. See Manus.
2.
That which resembles, or to some extent performs the office of, a human hand; as:
(a)
A limb of certain animals, as the foot of a hawk, or any one of the four extremities of a monkey.
(b)
An index or pointer on a dial; as, the hour or minute hand of a clock.
3.
A measure equal to a hand's breadth, four inches; a palm. Chiefly used in measuring the height of horses.
4.
Side; part; direction, either right or left. "On this hand and that hand, were hangings." "The Protestants were then on the winning hand."
5.
Power of performance; means of execution; ability; skill; dexterity. "He had a great mind to try his hand at a Spectator."
6.
Actual performance; deed; act; workmanship; agency; hence, manner of performance. "To change the hand in carrying on the war." "Gideon said unto God, If thou wilt save Israel by my hand."
7.
An agent; a servant, or laborer; a workman, trained or competent for special service or duty; a performer more or less skillful; as, a deck hand; a farm hand; an old hand at speaking. "A dictionary containing a natural history requires too many hands, as well as too much time, ever to be hoped for." "I was always reckoned a lively hand at a simile."
8.
Handwriting; style of penmanship; as, a good, bad, or running hand. Hence, a signature. "I say she never did invent this letter; This is a man's invention and his hand." "Some writs require a judge's hand."
9.
Personal possession; ownership; hence, control; direction; management; usually in the plural. "Receiving in hand one year's tribute." "Albinus... found means to keep in his hands the government of Britain."
10.
Agency in transmission from one person to another; as, to buy at first hand, that is, from the producer, or when new; at second hand, that is, when no longer in the producer's hand, or when not new.
11.
Rate; price. (Obs.) "Business is bought at a dear hand, where there is small dispatch."
12.
That which is, or may be, held in a hand at once; as:
(a)
(Card Playing) The quota of cards received from the dealer.
(b)
(Tobacco Manuf.) A bundle of tobacco leaves tied together.
13.
(Firearms) The small part of a gunstock near the lock, which is grasped by the hand in taking aim. Note: Hand is used figuratively for a large variety of acts or things, in the doing, or making, or use of which the hand is in some way employed or concerned; also, as a symbol to denote various qualities or conditions, as:
(a)
Activity; operation; work; in distinction from the head, which implies thought, and the heart, which implies affection. "His hand will be against every man."
(b)
Power; might; supremacy; often in the Scriptures. "With a mighty hand... will I rule over you."
(c)
Fraternal feeling; as, to give, or take, the hand; to give the right hand.
(d)
Contract; commonly of marriage; as, to ask the hand; to pledge the hand. Note: Hand is often used adjectively or in compounds (with or without the hyphen), signifying performed by the hand; as, hand blow or hand-blow, hand gripe or hand-gripe: used by, or designed for, the hand; as, hand ball or handball, hand bow, hand fetter, hand grenade or hand-grenade, handgun or hand gun, handloom or hand loom, handmill or hand organ or handorgan, handsaw or hand saw, hand-weapon: measured or regulated by the hand; as, handbreadth or hand's breadth, hand gallop or hand-gallop. Most of the words in the following paragraph are written either as two words or in combination.
Hand bag, a satchel; a small bag for carrying books, papers, parcels, etc.
Hand basket, a small or portable basket.
Hand bell, a small bell rung by the hand; a table bell.
Hand bill, a small pruning hook. See 4th Bill.
Hand car. See under Car.
Hand director (Mus.), an instrument to aid in forming a good position of the hands and arms when playing on the piano; a hand guide.
Hand drop. See Wrist drop.
Hand gallop. See under Gallop.
Hand gear (Mach.), apparatus by means of which a machine, or parts of a machine, usually operated by other power, may be operated by hand.
Hand glass.
(a)
A glass or small glazed frame, for the protection of plants.
(b)
A small mirror with a handle.
Hand guide. Same as Hand director (above).
Hand language, the art of conversing by the hands, esp. as practiced by the deaf and dumb; dactylology.
Hand lathe. See under Lathe.
Hand money, money paid in hand to bind a contract; earnest money.
Hand organ (Mus.), a barrel organ, operated by a crank turned by hand.
Hand plant. (Bot.) Same as Hand tree (below). Hand rail, a rail, as in staircases, to hold by.
Hand sail, a sail managed by the hand.
Hand screen, a small screen to be held in the hand.
Hand screw, a small jack for raising heavy timbers or weights; (Carp.) a screw clamp.
Hand staff ((pl. hand staves)), a javelin.
Hand stamp, a small stamp for dating, addressing, or canceling papers, envelopes, etc.
Hand tree (Bot.), a lofty tree found in Mexico (Cheirostemon platanoides), having red flowers whose stamens unite in the form of a hand.
Hand vise, a small vise held in the hand in doing small work.
Hand work, or Handwork, work done with the hands, as distinguished from work done by a machine; handiwork.
All hands, everybody; all parties.
At all hands, On all hands, on all sides; from every direction; generally.
At any hand, At no hand, in any (or no) way or direction; on any account; on no account. "And therefore at no hand consisting with the safety and interests of humility."
At first hand, At second hand. See def. 10 (above).
At hand.
(a)
Near in time or place; either present and within reach, or not far distant. "Your husband is at hand; I hear his trumpet."
(b)
Under the hand or bridle. (Obs.) "Horses hot at hand."
At the hand of, by the act of; as a gift from. "Shall we receive good at the hand of God and shall we not receive evil?"
Bridle hand. See under Bridle.
By hand, with the hands, in distinction from instrumentality of tools, engines, or animals; as, to weed a garden by hand; to lift, draw, or carry by hand.
Clean hands, freedom from guilt, esp. from the guilt of dishonesty in money matters, or of bribe taking. "He that hath clean hands shall be stronger and stronger."
From hand to hand, from one person to another.
Hand in hand.
(a)
In union; conjointly; unitedly.
(b)
Just; fair; equitable. "As fair and as good, a kind of hand in hand comparison."
Hand over hand, Hand over fist, by passing the hands alternately one before or above another; as, to climb hand over hand; also, rapidly; as, to come up with a chase hand over hand.
Hand over head, negligently; rashly; without seeing what one does. (Obs.)
Hand running, consecutively; as, he won ten times hand running.
Hands off! keep off! forbear! no interference or meddling!
Hand to hand, in close union; in close fight; as, a hand to hand contest.
Heavy hand, severity or oppression.
In hand.
(a)
Paid down. "A considerable reward in hand, and... a far greater reward hereafter."
(b)
In preparation; taking place. "Revels... in hand."
(c)
Under consideration, or in the course of transaction; as, he has the business in hand.
In one's hand or In one's hands.
(a)
In one's possession or keeping.
(b)
At one's risk, or peril; as, I took my life in my hand.
Laying on of hands, a form used in consecrating to office, in the rite of confirmation, and in blessing persons.
Light hand, gentleness; moderation.
Note of hand, a promissory note.
Off hand, Out of hand, forthwith; without delay, hesitation, or difficulty; promptly. "She causeth them to be hanged up out of hand."
Off one's hands, out of one's possession or care.
On hand, in present possession; as, he has a supply of goods on hand.
On one's hands, in one's possession care, or management.
Putting the hand under the thigh, an ancient Jewish ceremony used in swearing.
Right hand, the place of honor, power, and strength.
Slack hand, idleness; carelessness; inefficiency; sloth.
Strict hand, severe discipline; rigorous government.
To bear a hand (Naut.), to give help quickly; to hasten.
To bear in hand, to keep in expectation with false pretenses. (Obs.)
To be hand and glove with or To be hand in glove with. See under Glove.
To be on the mending hand, to be convalescent or improving.
To bring up by hand, to feed (an infant) without suckling it.
To change hand. See Change.
To change hands, to change sides, or change owners.
To clap the hands, to express joy or applause, as by striking the palms of the hands together.
To come to hand, to be received; to be taken into possession; as, the letter came to hand yesterday.
To get hand, to gain influence. (Obs.) "Appetites have... got such a hand over them."
To get one's hand in, to make a beginning in a certain work; to become accustomed to a particular business.
To have a hand in, to be concerned in; to have a part or concern in doing; to have an agency or be employed in.
To have in hand.
(a)
To have in one's power or control.
(b)
To be engaged upon or occupied with.
To have one's hands full, to have in hand all that one can do, or more than can be done conveniently; to be pressed with labor or engagements; to be surrounded with difficulties.
To have the (higher) upper hand, or To get the (higher) upper hand, to have, or get, the better of another person or thing.
To his hand, To my hand, etc., in readiness; already prepared. "The work is made to his hands."
To hold hand, to compete successfully or on even conditions. (Obs.)
To lay hands on, to seize; to assault.
To lend a hand, to give assistance.
To lift the hand against, or To put forth the hand against, to attack; to oppose; to kill.
To live from hand to mouth, to obtain food and other necessaries as want compels, without previous provision.
To make one's hand, to gain advantage or profit.
To put the hand unto, to steal.
To put the last hand to or To put the finishing hand to, to make the last corrections in; to complete; to perfect.
To set the hand to, to engage in; to undertake. "That the Lord thy God may bless thee in all that thou settest thine hand to."
To stand one in hand, to concern or affect one.
To strike hands, to make a contract, or to become surety for another's debt or good behavior.
To take in hand.
(a)
To attempt or undertake.
(b)
To seize and deal with; as, he took him in hand.
To wash the hands of, to disclaim or renounce interest in, or responsibility for, a person or action; as, to wash one's hands of a business.
Under the hand of, authenticated by the handwriting or signature of; as, the deed is executed under the hand and seal of the owner.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Hand" Quotes from Famous Books



... Ayrault entered by the regular door, the former going to the Government representatives' box, the latter to join his fiancee, Sylvia Preston, who was there with her mother. Bearwarden had a roll of manuscript at hand, but so well did he know his speech that he scarcely glanced at it. After being introduced by the chairman of the meeting, and seeing that his audience was all attention, he began, holding himself erect, his clear, powerful voice making every ...
— A Journey in Other Worlds • J. J. Astor

... he stood opposite Madame Louison at supper, with his eyes, as usual, fixed upon her face, his heart involuntarily quailed when he thought that within a few hours he was to raise his hand against that beautiful head; yet he still felt within himself no courage to refuse, nor any fertility of ...
— Tales for Young and Old • Various

... aforesaid; one plough for every three families, as aforesaid, one harrow for every three families as aforesaid; two scythes, and one whetstone and two hayforks and two reaping-hooks for every family as aforesaid; and also two axes, and also one cross cut saw, and also one hand saw, one pit saw, the necessary files, one grindstone and one auger for each band; and also for each Chief, for the use of his band, one chest of ordinary carpenter's tools; also for each band, enough of wheat, barley, potatoes and oats to plant the ...
— The Treaties of Canada with The Indians of Manitoba - and the North-West Territories • Alexander Morris

... resigned their authority rather than have anything to do with what they designated a cold-blooded butchery. But tools were not wanting, as indeed they never have been, for murder and its kindred outrages. What the heart of man can conceive, the hand of man will find a way to execute. The awful work was carried out with dread dispatch. Oh, what a record to read; what a picture to gaze upon; how awful the fact! An official edict offering expatriation or death ...
— The Story of "Mormonism" • James E. Talmage

... now in her hand. In her soul sat burning impatience, in her heart contempt for the callow youth before her. Yet to that youth her attitude seemed to speak naught but deference for himself and doubt ...
— The Mississippi Bubble • Emerson Hough

... and the other conspirators to his presence. Lentulus being Praetor, the Consul led him by the hand to the Temple of Concord, where the Senate was already met; the rest of the accused followed closely guarded. Volturcius, finding escape impossible, agreed, upon his own personal safety being insured, ...
— A Smaller History of Rome • William Smith and Eugene Lawrence

... morning, when he came into the sitting-room, to say his morning prayers before the little altar—alas! there lay his rose, all the pink petals scattered by the side of the stem. He was just stretching out his hand to touch the bell, when he saw the photograph of his beloved, half rolled up, lying by the side of the champagne glass. Louisa ...
— In Midsummer Days and Other Tales • August Strindberg

... she must give in or England would declare war on her. As he walked into Delcasse's presence, he began fumbling with the top button of his coat. "Don't touch that button," said Delcasse quickly. "Drop your hand. You have something in your pocket which must not be taken out. It is a threat, and if I see it, France will fight. Sit down. Let us talk this matter over coolly. Matters will adjust themselves all right in the end." And they did. Delcasse was finally able to quiet the French people, ...
— The World War and What was Behind It - The Story of the Map of Europe • Louis P. Benezet

... the temporal life. It is a brief and simple word, but it has a very wide scope. For when you mention and pray for daily bread, you pray for everything that is necessary in order to have and enjoy daily bread and, on the other hand, against everything which interferes with it. Therefore you must open wide and extend your thoughts not only to the oven or the flour-bin but to the distant field and the entire land, which bears and brings to us daily bread and every ...
— The Large Catechism by Dr. Martin Luther

... wonderfully anomalous flowers of Begonia frigida, formerly described, though they appear fit for fructification, are sterile.[409] Species of Primulae, in which the calyx is brightly coloured, are said[410] to be often sterile, though I have known them to be fertile. On the other hand, Verlot gives several cases of proliferous flowers which can be propagated by seed. This was the case with a poppy, which had become monopetalous by the union of its petals.[411] Another extraordinary poppy, with the stamens replaced by numerous small ...
— The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication, Volume II (of 2) • Charles Darwin

... painful contraction of the muscles may arise from various causes, and require different modes of treatment. But if no medical assistance be at hand, the application of volatile liniments to the part affected, a clyster with a little laudanum in it, or the warm bath, ...
— The Cook and Housekeeper's Complete and Universal Dictionary; Including a System of Modern Cookery, in all Its Various Branches, • Mary Eaton

... implying Syria), and then some account of the fortunes of the Church in China. Kao Tsung (650-683 the devout patron also of the Buddhist traveller and Dr. Hiuen Tsang) continued to favour it. In the end of the century, Buddhism gets the upper hand, but under HIUAN TSUNG (713-755) the Church recovers its prestige, and KIHO, a new missionary, arrives. Under TE TSUNG (780-783) the monument was erected, and this part ends with the eulogy of ISSE, a statesman and benefactor ...
— The Travels of Marco Polo, Volume 2 • Marco Polo and Rustichello of Pisa

... hand in his pocket, drew out a heavy purse, and, opening it, counted out twenty guineas. O'Neil took these up, and handed to him twenty ...
— In the Irish Brigade - A Tale of War in Flanders and Spain • G. A. Henty

... letters; one from the General, and the other, enclosed, from the princess herself. Danbury tore open the letter before glancing at the official communication. He read it through and then stood with it in his hand looking dreamily out across the blue waters. He whistled to himself. Then handing it ...
— The Web of the Golden Spider • Frederick Orin Bartlett

... of hand labor. One machine did the work of ten or more persons. What were these people who were thrown out, to do? Adjust themselves to the new conditions, you say. True, but many could not. They starved, grew sick, ate their hearts out ...
— Little Journeys to the Homes of the Great, Volume 11 (of 14) - Little Journeys to the Homes of Great Businessmen • Elbert Hubbard

... and inhospitable. He did not offer to shake hands, nor pretend to see the hand she extended to him. Instead, he opened the door and invited her gruffly to enter. Closing the door behind them, he went to the stove and began to stir ...
— The Wind Before the Dawn • Dell H. Munger

... said, "I gotta hand it to you. Them guys might have got wise if you had worked in the Tyng-Tyng Company or the Bunsen stuff. There was big money into it, but it might not ...
— Police!!! • Robert W. Chambers

... laconically, but she slipped a confiding small hand in the doctor's larger one. He squeezed ...
— Rosemary • Josephine Lawrence

... Omai, when pressed on this subject, confessed that in the rage and fury of revenge, they would sometimes tear the flesh of their enemies that were slain with their teeth; but positively denied that they ever eat it. This was certainly approaching as near the fact as could be; but, on the other hand, the denial is a strong proof that the practice has actually ceased; since in New Zealand, where it still exists, the inhabitants neyer made the smallest scruple of ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume 17 • Robert Kerr

... he is no more than a socialist. The more socialist our State becomes the more essential becomes at the same time the adoption of eugenic practices as a working part of the State. "Socialism and eugenics must go hand ...
— Little Essays of Love and Virtue • Havelock Ellis

... we'll have to spare Pauline,' said Mr Harding. 'She has been a good girl, and she deserves a holiday.' He patted Pauline's hand kindly. ...
— A Princess in Calico • Edith Ferguson Black

... On the other hand, Brambridge, which stands in Twyford parish, but held part of the hundred of Boyatt in Otterbourne, was in the hands of the Roman Catholic family of Welles, who seem to have had numerous retainers at Highbridge, Allbrook, and Boyatt. Swithun Welles ...
— John Keble's Parishes • Charlotte M Yonge

... first place, it was wooden; built side to the street, so that you went up a little paved walk, in a shade of trees, to get to the door; and then the yard, on the right hand side as you came in, was laid out in narrow walks between borders of blossoming plants. There were vines against the brick end of the next building,—creepers and morning-glories, and white and scarlet runners; and a little martin-box was set upon a ...
— Real Folks • Mrs. A. D. T. Whitney

... on their side, and to constrain them to lend a hand to the working of the ship if she were to be diverted to the south would have been to provoke them to rebel. There was but one resource: to arouse their covetousness, to strike the chord ...
— An Antarctic Mystery • Jules Verne

... life in the boy but his determination to tell all his wrong. He forced back the gathering shadows of death, as he forced his clenched right hand to remain clenched, and ...
— A Tale of Two Cities - A Story of the French Revolution • Charles Dickens

... that a Man is ashamed to reflect upon them seriously; but the Fear, the Love, the Sorrow, the Indignation that are awakened in the Mind by Hymns and Anthems, make the Heart better, and proceed from such Causes as are altogether reasonable and praise-worthy. Pleasure and Duty go hand in hand, and the greater our Satisfaction is, ...
— The Spectator, Volumes 1, 2 and 3 - With Translations and Index for the Series • Joseph Addison and Richard Steele

... John," answered Raymond, speaking very calmly and steadily, "for thou knowest the charge laid upon me by my spiritual Father. 'Fear not, be not dismayed. A thousand shall fall beside thee, and ten thousand at thy right hand; but it shall not come nigh thee.' Such was the burden of his charge; and shall I shrink or falter when the hour I have waited and watched for all these years has come like a thief in the night? Good ...
— In the Days of Chivalry • Evelyn Everett-Green

... protective coloration of lookout posts, and of other necessary factors along the fighting front. Camouflage also found great usefulness in the protective coloration of battleships and merchant vessels. Scientific study went hand in hand with the art, the object being to confuse the enemy and to offer targets as small as possible ...
— History of the World War - An Authentic Narrative of the World's Greatest War • Francis A. March and Richard J. Beamish

... advantages. Chiefly they are tools for the mind. The foot's step is short, but the engine lengthens the stride and hastens it. The smith's blow is weak, but the trip-hammer multiplies the might of man's hand. Thus books are mental machines, enabling the mind of man to reap in many harvest fields and multiply the mental treasures. It takes years for Humboldt to search out the wonders of the Andes Mountains and other years ...
— A Man's Value to Society - Studies in Self Culture and Character • Newell Dwight Hillis

... the schoolmistress's letter from his wife's hand. He read the following in his big, ...
— Sparrows - The Story of an Unprotected Girl • Horace W. C. Newte

... colleague; but they were anxious that their nomination should be ratified by the consent of the army. On this solemn occasion, the guards, with the other troops whose stations were in the neighborhood of Milan, appeared under arms; and Constantius ascended his lofty tribunal, holding by the hand his cousin Julian, who entered the same day into the twenty-fifth year of his age. In a studied speech, conceived and delivered with dignity, the emperor represented the various dangers which threatened the prosperity of the republic, the ...
— The History of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire - Volume 2 • Edward Gibbon

... statesman, and a soldier stood Hand in each other's hand, by ruin faced, Consulting to find succor if they could, Till soon the lesser ones themselves abased, Their sword and parchment on an altar laid In deep humility the while the ...
— The Eye of Zeitoon • Talbot Mundy

... the day which nearly concern women; to choose the leaders who during the coming year are to guide the fortunes of our cause; and finally, to deliberate how the whole national body may on the one hand best give aid and succor to the States working for their own enfranchisement and on the other press for federal action in behalf of the women of the nation ...
— The History of Woman Suffrage, Volume V • Ida Husted Harper

... other hand, restricts us within a definite sphere. The term 'empty' restricts us within the sphere of things which are capable of fulness, that is, if the term be taken in its literal sense, things which ...
— Deductive Logic • St. George Stock

... what we ponder'd Or made pretty pretence to talk, As, her hand within mine, we wander'd Tow'rd the pool by the lime-tree walk, While the dew fell in showers from the passion flowers And the blush-rose bent ...
— The Book of Humorous Verse • Various

... manly, that after he had achieved a reputation and was relieved from immediate pecuniary pressure, he would have felt an ambition to do some worthy work and take time to bring out the best that was in him. As it is, he had only tried his 'prentice hand. Still, the figure of the old showman, though not very solidly painted, is admirably done. He is a sort of sublimated and unoffensive Barnum; perfectly consistent, permeated with his professional view of life, yet quite incapable of anything underhand or mean; ...
— Library Of The World's Best Literature, Ancient And Modern, Vol 6 • Various

... difficulty in distinguishing this affection from palpitation of the heart. The jerky motion affects the whole body, and is not confined to the region of the heart. If one hand is placed on the body at about the middle of the last rib, while the other hand is placed over the heart behind the left elbow, it will be easily demonstrated that there is no connection between the thumping or jerking of the diaphragm and the beating of the heart. In fact, when the animal is ...
— Special Report on Diseases of the Horse • United States Department of Agriculture

... with his hand on the stop-cock of the drain-tube, rapidly ran off the developer into the bucket and flooded the paper ...
— The Vanishing Man • R. Austin Freeman

... man thrust the quill into the slight fingers of the boy; but Raymond suddenly wrenched his hand away, and flung the frail weapon to the other end of the cell. He saw the vile purpose in a moment. Peter knew something of the nature of the woman he passionately desired to win for his wife, and he well knew that no lies of his invention respecting the falsity of her young lover ...
— In the Days of Chivalry • Evelyn Everett-Green

... girdle. It consisted of two round stones, covered with leather, each weighing about a pound, which were fastened to the two ends of a string about eight feet long. This is used as a sling, one stone being kept in the hand, and the other whirled round the head till it is supposed to have acquired sufficient force, and then discharged at the object. They are so expert in the management of this double-headed shot, that they will hit a mark, not bigger than a shilling, with both the stones, at the distance of fifteen ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. 12 • Robert Kerr

... leaving me altogether. The Rat fed me on cabbage soup and glasses of tea and caviare and biscuits. During those three days he never left me, and indeed tended me like a woman. He would sit by my bed and with his rough hand stroke my hair, while he poured into my ears ghastly stories of the many crimes that he had committed. I noticed that he was cleaner and more civilised. His beard was clipped and he smelt of cabbage and straw—a rather healthy smell. One morning he suddenly ...
— The Secret City • Hugh Walpole

... firmness and solemnity of manner, placed her hand upon his shoulder, and, looking him earnestly in the ...
— Fardorougha, The Miser - The Works of William Carleton, Volume One • William Carleton

... Cosconius Calidianus, who, without any discernment, amused the people with a rapidity of language (if such it might be called) which he attended with a perpetual hurry of action, and a most violent exertion of his voice.—Of much the same cast was Q. Arrius, who may be considered as a second-hand M. Crassus. He is a striking proof of what consequence it is in such a city as ours to devote one's-self to the occasions of the many, and to be as active as possible in promoting their safety, or their honour. For by these means, though of the lowest parentage, having raised himself to ...
— Cicero's Brutus or History of Famous Orators; also His Orator, or Accomplished Speaker. • Marcus Tullius Cicero

... distorted lips a torrent of profanity burst as Murphy laid a heavy hand on his shoulder and faced him eastward. I drew the blue paper from my wallet, whispered to Murphy, and handed it to him. He shoved it inside the breast of his hunting-shirt, cocked his rifle, and tapped Beacraft on ...
— The Maid-At-Arms • Robert W. Chambers

... close of the Middle Ages, when politics became secular, the art of government has advanced by giant strides. Invention has followed invention, and experiment experiment, till to-day skilled specialists in the Old World and the New are at hand to watch and to record the latest devices for dealing with a hundred difficult special problems—whether it be the administration of justice or patronage, the organization of political parties, the fixing of Cabinet responsibility, the possibilities and limits of federalism, ...
— Progress and History • Various

... saw a white shapely hand extended to him. He took it in great confusion (it was soft and passive) and heard at the same time a condescending murmur in which he caught only the words "Satisfactory" and "Persevere." But the most amazing thing of all was to feel suddenly a distinct pressure of the white ...
— Under Western Eyes • Joseph Conrad

... desired effect; for when they ceased to make the noise, they heard the heavy step of a man ascending the creaking stairs. It had not occurred to them that he might possibly come with a thick stick in his hand, to thrash them for making a row. The idea, however, flashed across Jack's mind by the time the man ...
— From Powder Monkey to Admiral - A Story of Naval Adventure • W.H.G. Kingston

... my lord! no stranger ever comes here, not even the sun!' and the king's wife laughed gaily as she went up to the giant and stroked the huge hand which hung down by ...
— The Lilac Fairy Book • Andrew Lang

... into a den of thieves and harlots, he executed the purest of all his statues—a "Pieta" in marble.[292] Christ is lying dead upon his mother's knees. With her right arm she supports his shoulders; her left hand is gently raised as though to say, "Behold and see!" All that art can do to make death beautiful and grief sublime, is achieved in this masterpiece, which was never surpassed by Michael Angelo in later years. ...
— Renaissance in Italy Vol. 3 - The Fine Arts • John Addington Symonds

... almost have represented him as a near relative whom she supposed unwell. At the end he looked round, and then, obeying some impulse that had gathered in her while they sat mute, she put out to him the tender hand she might have offered to a sick child. They had been talking about frankness, but she showed a frankness in this instance that made him perceptibly colour. To that in turn, however, he responded ...
— The Awkward Age • Henry James

... and Rootes; haveing beene with us some time, return'd to his house againe. his garment was of white cotton made like to a friars cote. in the Evening the King came to us againe with his 2 sones, being in one garbe, save that the Kinge had in his Hand a longe white rodd of about 7 foote longe, and a Hoope of Golde about his Head for his crowne. this Hoope was about 2 Inches and a half broade. the Kinge had 3 daughters of womens Estate, very comely Indians, who went in fine cotton Roped about ...
— Privateering and Piracy in the Colonial Period - Illustrative Documents • Various

... with these phenomena, he went at last to the door. "Well, this is a fine exhibition," he said, standing with his hand on the knob and regarding them. "Won election bets? Some good old auntie just died? Found something new to pawn? No? Well, I can't stand this. You resemble those fish they discover at ...
— The Third Violet • Stephen Crane

... of their silvery wings. One streak of golden ruddiness severed the gray of twilight, but it resembled more a fiery bar, closing the gates of heaven, than a radiant opening to the spirit-land. While she stood pale and trembling, with her hand on the latch of the door, afraid to stay where she was, afraid to return and confront the mystery of death, the gate opened, and Arthur Hazleton came up the steps. He had been there a short time before, and went away for something ...
— Helen and Arthur - or, Miss Thusa's Spinning Wheel • Caroline Lee Hentz

... than the active power of generation. But if anyone were to be formed by God out of human flesh, it is evident that the active power would not be derived from Adam. Consequently he would not contract original sin: even as a hand would have no part in a human sin, if it were moved, not by the man's will, but by some ...
— Summa Theologica, Part I-II (Pars Prima Secundae) - From the Complete American Edition • Saint Thomas Aquinas

... by mixing two thirds of mustard flour and one third of wheaten flour with warm water or vinegar, in sufficient quantity to render the powder of the consistence of paste. It is then spread on linen from the size of a half-crown to that of the palm of the hand, according to the effect intended, and placed on the skin. How long it is to be kept on will depend upon the individual sensibility of the skin of the child; but, in general, from fifteen to twenty minutes will be found amply sufficient. ...
— The Maternal Management of Children, in Health and Disease. • Thomas Bull, M.D.

... prominences in the bed rock are found more worn on the stoss than on the lee side, where indeed they may have a low cone of rock protected by them from abrasion. Cavities, on the other hand, have their edges worn on the lee side and left sharp upon ...
— The Elements of Geology • William Harmon Norton

... elusive, something not quite frank, about the replies of this young man. Her glance raked him again and swept up the details of his person. One of them that impressed itself upon her mind was the absence of a finger on his right hand. Another was that he was a walking arsenal. This startled her, though she was not yet afraid. She relapsed into silence, to which he seemed willing to consent. Once and again her glance swept him. He looked a ...
— Bucky O'Connor • William MacLeod Raine

... little shanty in the evening to wish her Happy Christmas, although it was over. They piled up comforts and blankets in the cart, and she lay on them quite snugly, her scarred child's-face looking out from a great woollen hood Mrs. Howth gave her. Old Yare held Barney, with his hat in his hand, looking as if he deserved hanging, but very proud of the kindness they all showed his girl. Holmes gave him some money for a Christmas gift, and he took it, eagerly enough. For some unexpressed reason, they stood a long time in the snow bidding ...
— Margret Howth, A Story of To-day • Rebecca Harding Davis

... agent, 'Rate too low: please cancel.' And there is where his diplomacy comes in. The agent, who must now get back the policy from the assured, must not be offended, or his more desirable business will be placed in some rival and more liberal company. If, on the other hand, the rate of premium seems adequate, but the amount at risk is too great, the underwriter reinsures or cedes a part of his line to another company, paying it a proportionate part of the premium, and holds only what he thinks safe. And here is where his judgment is needed. The ...
— White Ashes • Sidney R. Kennedy and Alden C. Noble

... presented itself during the life examination—the supply sergeant got busy and started to hand out what excess supplies he had and, in the matter of uniforms, of which there was always an undercess, measurements were taken with all the exactness and precision befitting a Fifth Avenue tailoring establishment. Why measurements were ever taken has ever remained ...
— The Delta of the Triple Elevens - The History of Battery D, 311th Field Artillery US Army, - American Expeditionary Forces • William Elmer Bachman

... again, expecting every moment to see him rise and obey the mesmerist's wishes, when there came from the platform a short, gasping cry as of a man utterly worn out and prostrated by a prolonged struggle. Messinger was leaning against the table, his hand to his forehead, and the perspiration pouring down his face. "I won't go on," he cried, addressing the audience. "There is a stronger will than mine acting against me. You must excuse me for to-night." The man was evidently ill, and utterly ...
— The Captain of the Pole-Star and Other Tales • Arthur Conan Doyle

... this quick wit and the gathering's response to the appeal he would have been in the same boat with us, or rather, on the same boat—the old hand ferry! Subsequently, he became a speaker of foreign and national repute, but at that time he might have traveled from Scarboro' to Land's End without attracting a ...
— The Strollers • Frederic S. Isham

... stepped out faster. For both the Diamonds were just grandly obedient. And Diamond soon found that, as he was obedient to his father, so the horse was obedient to him. For he had not ridden far before he found courage to reach forward and catch hold of the bridle, and when his father, whose hand was upon it, felt the boy pull it towards him, he looked up and smiled, and, well pleased, let go his hold, and left Diamond to guide Diamond; and the boy soon found that he could do so perfectly. It was a grand thing to be able to guide a great beast like that. And another discovery ...
— At the Back of the North Wind • George MacDonald

... lad," said Cary, stretching out his own hand to him across the water through the darkness, and giving him a hearty shake. "I know it; and listen, men! So help me God! but I'll be the first to back the Captain in being as good as his word, as I trust he never ...
— Westward Ho! • Charles Kingsley

... expiring Hellenistic formula which had been swept beyond its borders, ready at hand at the very moment the new religion was gathering itself together for that prodigious journey which, traversing the entire Far East, was to lead it to the shores of the Pacific. Once outside of India, it came into contact with Sassanian Persia and Bactria. With ...
— Chinese Painters - A Critical Study • Raphael Petrucci

... wholly mental infantiloid state or one purely physical may occur. Certain rather large Tom Thumbs belong to the group. In everyday life we see doll creatures, overgrown children, on every hand. Mental measurements of any large group of population reveal a remarkable percentage of it as below the mental age of 12. Juvenile traits and juvenile mind, separate or combined, should always suggest the possibility of the infantiloid constitution ...
— The Glands Regulating Personality • Louis Berman, M.D.

... brought the dog on furiously; in fifty yards he was up with his quarry. Prosper went on running; the dog chose his time, and sprang for his throat. Prosper, who had been waiting for this, ducked at the same minute; his dagger was in his hand. He struck upwards at the dog as he rose, and ripped his belly open. "That was your last jump, my friend," quoth he, "but I hope there are no more of you. It is a game ...
— The Forest Lovers • Maurice Hewlett

... new scheme was the increased risk of being brought in contact with the friends of the warrior of the red hand—of being accosted by them, and of course expected to make reply. How could I avoid meeting them—one or more of them? If interrogated, how shun making answer? I knew a few words of the Comanche tongue, but not enough to hold a conversation in it. Either my false accent or my voice would betray ...
— The War Trail - The Hunt of the Wild Horse • Mayne Reid

... early in the mornin', an' if the' wasn't much fixin' to be done we got back long before dark. About seven-thirty was our perchin' time before Bill took a hand, but after that we got so convivual that sometimes we'd sit up till purt' nigh half-past nine, playin' cut-throat an' swappin' tales. Sleep allus was a kind of a nuisance to Bill. Purt' nigh every night when ...
— Happy Hawkins • Robert Alexander Wason

... heavy hand struck with a resounding thwack across his lips. He reeled back against the wall, sputtering the ...
— The Untamed • Max Brand

... of a minute. Ester had very lately taken up the habit of securing one Bible verse as part of her armor to go with her through the day. On this particular morning the verse was: "Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with thy might." Now if her hands had found work waiting for her down this first flight of stairs instead of down two, as she had planned, what was that to her? Ester turned and went swiftly to the sick room, dispatched ...
— Ester Ried • Pansy (aka. Isabella M. Alden)

... large eyes, thou hast taken counsel with thy ministers. Do all, O king, that those counsels seem to indicate, for reliance on the gods, when supported by human exertion, always, O king, leadeth to success. If these two do not go hand-in-hand, success becometh unattainable. Therefore, with all thy advisers, make such arrangements in thy city as are proper, and pay homage, O monarch, as thou pleasest, to the gods.' While husband and wife were conversing with each other thus, ...
— The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 2 • Kisari Mohan Ganguli

... proceeded to relate what had passed in the cabin. Whatever it may have been, it seemed to afford the hearers satisfaction, for they smiled and nodded approval from time to time, as the story was being told; and when at length it was ended they all came aft and, while one hand hauled down the ensign and stowed it away, another stationed himself at the wheel, and the remainder tailed on to the braces, swung the headyards, boarded the foretack, and trimmed the jib and staysail sheets, getting way upon the ship and bringing ...
— The Strange Adventures of Eric Blackburn • Harry Collingwood

... receding from the road Have left on either hand an open space For fields and gardens, and for man's abode, Stands Waterloo; a little lowly place, Obscure till now, when it hath risen to fame, And given ...
— The Automobilist Abroad • M. F. (Milburg Francisco) Mansfield

... Captain useful to him in the carrying out of certain business arrangements on more than one occasion, and the relations between the respectable stockbroker and the disreputable adventurer assumed a very friendly character. Diana wondered to see so spotless a citizen as Philip Sheldon hand-and-glove with her father. Mrs. Sheldon and Charlotte were delighted with the Captain and his protege; these two penniless Bohemians were so much more agreeable to the feminine mind than the City men who were wont to sit in the dining-room ...
— Birds of Prey • M. E. Braddon

... only half ruin us." A lady of a political family (Liberal) next whom I sat at dinner the other night (and these women know their politics as no class of women among us do) said: "Tell me something about your great President. We hadn't heard much about him nor felt his hand till your tariff bill passed. He seems to have real power in the Government. You know we do not always know who has power in your Government." Lord Grey, the one-time Governor-General of Canada, stopped looking at the royal wedding presents the other ...
— The Life and Letters of Walter H. Page, Volume I • Burton J. Hendrick

... man gave his young friend his hand, which the latter prest cordially, and then said: "You cannot doubt my affection and friendship; and what you confide to me will in my hands be as secret as in ...
— The Old Man of the Mountain, The Lovecharm and Pietro of Abano - Tales from the German of Tieck • Ludwig Tieck

... narrowing shade of his own tent. Vanheimert was within five paces of him before he looked up so very quickly, with such a rapid adjustment of the terrible eye-glass, that Vanheimert stood stock-still, and the butt of his hidden weapon turned colder than ever in his melting hand. ...
— Stingaree • E. W. (Ernest William) Hornung

... would go hurrying home, the tears running down her face in shame for her unbound hair and her singing and dancing. Her cheeks were flushed and her eyes were shining as she rose now, and she looked appealingly pretty, one hand, palm outward, half hiding her trembling mouth. By her soft eyes, too, we knew that she ...
— Friendship Village • Zona Gale

... Review' (1870), the comparison is made between the Americans who "do Europe in six weeks" and the most nearly analogous class of British travellers, with the following interesting conclusions: "The American is generally the noisier and more actively disagreeable, but, on the other hand, he often partially redeems his absurdity by a certain naivete and half-conscious humour. He is often laughing in his sleeve at his own preposterous brags, and does not take himself quite so seriously as his British rival. He is vulgar, and even ostentatiously and atrociously vulgar; ...
— Mark Twain • Archibald Henderson

... gentleman. He shook hands with everybody, even with the curate and Mr. Macbean; but Father John would not speak to a protestant, and used to scowl at the children when he met them, and then Mildred would seize Bernadine's hand and drag her past him quickly, because she hated to be scowled at; but Beth always stopped and made a face at him. He used to carry a long whip, and crack it at the people, and on Sunday mornings, if they did not go ...
— The Beth Book - Being a Study of the Life of Elizabeth Caldwell Maclure, a Woman of Genius • Sarah Grand

... Sewall enter that arbor at the end near the house, a long way off beyond lawns and flower beds. I was standing at the time with a fragrant cup of tea in my hand beside the wistaria arch that forms the entrance of the arbor near the orchard. I happened to be alone for a moment. I finished my tea without haste, and then placing the cup and saucer on a cedar table near-by, I decided ...
— The Fifth Wheel - A Novel • Olive Higgins Prouty

... rose and moved out slowly. He noticed how relaxed, almost limp, Milt was keeping him. There was only a little more effort used than in the pre-fight warm-up. His left hand had extra speed but only enough power to command respect. The pattern was just about as he had expected. As the fight went along the left would add up the points. But his thoughts were centered on a single question. How is it going to be ...
— Vital Ingredient • Gerald Vance

... first day, when we came out of the schoolhouse, Jack Lee snatched my books out of my hand, and threw them into the mud. 7. "I started after him as fast as I could run. I meant to ...
— McGuffey's Third Eclectic Reader • William Holmes McGuffey

... of Pentecost the bless'd, When royal Arthur held the accustom'd feast, When Carduel's walls contained the vast resort That press'd from every land to grace his plenar court. There did the sovereign's copious hand dispense Large boons to all with free magnificence, To all but one; from Bretany he came, A goodly knight, Sir Lanval was his name. Long had the king, by partial temper sway'd, His loyal zeal with cold neglect repaid; Yet from a throne Sir Lanval drew his birth, ...
— The Lay of Marie • Matilda Betham

... the tooth of wolf," said Eben Dudley, stooping to examine into the nature of a ragged wound in the neck; "and here, too, has been cut of knife; but whether by the hand of a red skin, it ...
— The Wept of Wish-Ton-Wish • James Fenimore Cooper

... severance. He cannot perform the ceremonial family rites which are obligatory on the householder. Yet Shankara, the ancient founder of the Swami Order, disregarded the injunctions. At the death of his beloved mother, he cremated her body with heavenly fire which he caused to spurt from his upraised hand. ...
— Autobiography of a YOGI • Paramhansa Yogananda

... hand, may we not imagine that possibly this earthly life of ours is to the other life what sleep is to waking? May not all our life be a dream and death an awakening? But an awakening to what? And supposing that everything is ...
— Tragic Sense Of Life • Miguel de Unamuno

... which he respectfully declined,—declared his act to be "wholly without parallel." A beautiful miniature portrait of her Majesty, which she caused to be specially made for him, and a letter written by her own hand, were the ...
— Eclectic School Readings: Stories from Life • Orison Swett Marden

... a school for very little children," said Mrs. Carr. "You don't have to know much, to teach them, and you write a very good hand." ...
— Life and Gabriella - The Story of a Woman's Courage • Ellen Glasgow

... passion—love—to visit Temperance, and begged her, with so much eloquence, to marry him before his cow should calve, that she consented, and he was happy. He spent the Sunday evenings with her, coming after conference meeting, hymn-book in hand. She was angry and ashamed, if I happened to see them sitting in the same chair, and singing, in a quavering voice, "Greenland's Icy Mountains," and continued morose ...
— The Morgesons • Elizabeth Stoddard

... that the magistrates, native commissioners, police officers, missionaries, farmers, miners, and traders in South Africa who have had first-hand experience of dealing with raw Natives will agree with me that in sound reasoning ability, as applied to matters with which he is familiar, the Native is no whit below the white man. It would be easy for me to give hundreds of instances that have come ...
— The Black Man's Place in South Africa • Peter Nielsen

... forgot to kill them. The ring of beasts closed in—we could see their yellow eyes glowing in the gloom. Orme and Quick might have got through by the help of their rifles, but they could not leave the others. The dreadful climax seemed at hand. ...
— Queen Sheba's Ring • H. Rider Haggard

... was at hand—a day that promised to make or mar the fortunes of Hawkins family for all time. Washington Hawkins and Col. Sellers were both up early, for neither of them could sleep. Congress was expiring, and was passing ...
— The Gilded Age, Complete • Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner

... intellectual qualification, he will tell you firmness, decision, and undaunted courage; and it is really an enigma to him, although he will not acknowledge it, how the sceptre of a country like England, subject to the monarchical sway which he detests, can be held in the hand of a young female of ...
— Diary in America, Series One • Frederick Marryat (AKA Captain Marryat)

... day, much to Ethelberta's surprise, there was a letter for her in her mother's up-hill hand. She neglected all the rest of its contents for ...
— The Hand of Ethelberta • Thomas Hardy

... ear of the telephone is but a servile drudge 'twixt speculative bacon merchants. And Books!—those miraculous memories of high thoughts and golden moods; those magical shells tremulous with the secrets of the ocean of life; those love-letters that pass from hand to hand of a thousand lovers that never meet; those honeycombs of dreams; those orchards of knowledge; those still-beating hearts of the noble dead; those mysterious signals that beckon along the darksome pathways of the past; voices through which the myriad lispings of ...
— Prose Fancies • Richard Le Gallienne

... almost double to enter the room, and Danny ran a hand through his shock of red hair and stared open-mouthed at the giant when he straightened again and towered above the guard of Red soldiers who had brought him into the ...
— The Hammer of Thor • Charles Willard Diffin

... her embrace the two greatest generals that the Roman empire had produced, Julius Caesar and Mark Antony, at the periods when they were respectively arbiters of the world's fate, perished Cleopatra by her own hand. ...
— Sketches of the Fair Sex, in All Parts of the World • Anonymous

... brought out, that we are now just in the preliminary stage of this Carpathian variety selection business. Of the selections made some have been made by default, because there weren't enough of other samples to compete with. On the other hand, the several we have we all consider outstanding in some respect, or other, and are of value as a beginning provided we bear in mind that we haven't scratched the ...
— Northern Nut Growers Association Report of the Proceedings at the 44th Annual Meeting • Various

... Placed in this way in the most important see of France, he was constantly thrown in contact with the Merovingian royal family and had abundant opportunity to become acquainted with the course of events at first hand. His most important work, the History of the Franks, is especially valuable from the fifth book on, as here he is on ground with which he was personally familiar. In Book II, from which the selection is taken, Gregory depends upon others, and ...
— A Source Book for Ancient Church History • Joseph Cullen Ayer, Jr., Ph.D.

... Christian experience even here gives more surely an anticipatory confirmation, than the fact that Christ became like unto us, that each of us may become like unto Him. The divine and the human natures are similar, and the fact of the Incarnation, on the one hand, and of the man's glorification by possession of the divine nature on the other, equally rest upon that fundamental resemblance between the divine nature and the human nature which God has made in His own image. If that which in each of us is unlike God is ...
— Expositions Of Holy Scripture - Volume I: St. Luke, Chaps. I to XII • Alexander Maclaren

... which was "to teach girls the danger of coquetry," is told by Schoolcraft (Oneota, 381-84). There was a girl who refused all her suitors scornfully. In one case she went so far as to put together her thumb and three fingers, and, raising her hand gracefully toward the young man, deliberately open them in his face. This gesticulatory mode of rejection is an expression of the highest contempt, and it galled the young warrior so much that he was taken ill and took to his bed until ...
— Primitive Love and Love-Stories • Henry Theophilus Finck

... was, however, precipitated by circumstances. One afternoon, after he had been accepted, he had taken his quid out of his cheek, wiped his mouth with the back of his hand, and was in the act of giving and receiving a chaste salute, when Lady Hercules happened to come down into the kitchen—a most rare occurrence, and wholly unexpected from a lady of her refined and delicate ideas. She caught my father and mother in the very act; and (as my father expressed it) ...
— Poor Jack • Frederick Marryat

... inconsistent. The jealous guard Longarad kept over his books, the quarrel over Columba's Psalter, and the great esteem in which scribes were held,[1] suggest a scarcity of books. The practice of enshrining them in cumdachs, or book-covers, points to a like conclusion. On the other hand, Bede tells us the Irish could lend foreign students books, so plentiful were they. His statement is corroborated by the number of scribes whose deaths have been recorded by the annalists, the Four Masters, for example, note sixty-one eminent scribes before the year 900, ...
— Old English Libraries, The Making, Collection, and Use of Books • Ernest A. Savage

... and offered her hand. The doctor, this new doctor, took it, let it drop and said, "Good evening, Miss Esther," then turned to Jane with a politely worded message ...
— Up the Hill and Over • Isabel Ecclestone Mackay

... psychic began to stir again. "Look out!" I called, warningly. "Let every hand be accounted for. Some new demonstration is preparing. These periods of suffering are strangely like the pangs of childbirth. I wonder if, after all, Archdeacon Colley was not in the right when he asserted that he had seen the miraculous issue ...
— The Shadow World • Hamlin Garland

... entered the house; and the hum of the wheel and the singing Suddenly ceased; for Priscilla, aroused by his step on the threshold, Rose as he entered, and gave him her hand, in signal of welcome, Saying, "I knew it was you, when I heard your step in the passage; For I was thinking of you, as I sat there singing and spinning." Awkward and dumb with delight, that a thought of ...
— The Literary World Seventh Reader • Various

... now had more pupils than he could take, and his pecuniary circumstances would not be improved by the change, save that a settled income would be assured to him. This was of course a tempting prospect; on the other hand, the task of organizing de novo a new department in a large university, and the curtailed freedom which the position would necessitate, made him hesitate. But the assurance of an income free from precariousness finally decided him in favour of acceptance; ...
— Edward MacDowell • Lawrence Gilman

... battle over the principles of art. Hazard defended and justified every portion of the painting with a vigor and resource quite beyond Esther's means, and such as earned her lively gratitude. When he had reduced Wharton to silence, which was not a difficult task, for Wharton was a poor hand at dispute or argument, and felt rather than talked, Mr. Hazard turned to Esther who gave him a look of gratitude such as she had rarely conferred ...
— Esther • Henry Adams

... termination,—that being the correct moment to give the tool "the feed, or advance for the taking of the next cut. The saving, in respect to time, was 10 to 1 in comparison with the same amount of work done by hand labour; while the "truth" or correctness of the work done by this handy little application of the turning-lathe was absolutely perfect I have been the more particular in my allusion to this contrivance, as it is applicable to any lathe, and can perform work which no lathe without it can ...
— James Nasmyth's Autobiography • James Nasmyth

... you be dismayed And in confusion fall, Because I spied on you arrayed In cap and overall, And saw you for a moment stand Clenching a duster in your hand? ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 156, April 9, 1919 • Various

... bill had brought this matter to the attention of the legislature, and had an opportunity to express their views. He believed that the hearing would be productive of benefit to both parties, in that on the one hand it would tend to make the voters more careful as to whom they selected for the important duties of the school board, and on the other would—he, as a lover of democratic institutions, hoped—serve to ...
— Unleavened Bread • Robert Grant

... last trace of a lingering hope that would have dismayed the little woman—not hope, exactly, but something almost like it which he would only translate to himself as an earnest desire that he might be at hand when the dread indisposition did attack her. Just now there could be no doubt that she was ...
— Merton of the Movies • Harry Leon Wilson

... and powerful, employed all their art and influence to exasperate their passions, and widen the breach between the two nations. The court of Versailles did not fail to seize this opportunity of insinuation: while, on one hand, their ministers and emissaries in Holland exaggerated the indignities and injuries which the states had sustained from the insolence and rapacity of the English; they, on the other hand, flattered ...
— The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.II. - From William and Mary to George II. • Tobias Smollett

... a small game, And Ah Sin took a hand; It was euchre—the same He did not understand; But he smiled as he sat at the table With the smile ...
— The Wit and Humor of America, Volume X (of X) • Various

... ask her sharply what business she had in his study; but, remembering that he had not seen her for three weeks, he held out his hand and said, rather frigidly: ...
— The Gadfly • E. L. Voynich

... his Recollections, published three years ago, there is a final paragraph which runs as follows: "A painful interrogatory, I must confess, emerges. Has not your school held the civilized world, both old and new alike, in the hollow of their hand for two long generations past? Is it quite clear that their influence has been so much more potent than the gospel of the various churches? Circumspice. Is not diplomacy, unkindly called by Voltaire the field ...
— Preaching and Paganism • Albert Parker Fitch

... awe came over me. I felt my insignificance. I saw the hand of God. My relation to my surroundings was very clear. My soul bowed to the God-ness in all things natural. The God-ness in me was calling to be released. It was useless to struggle against it, and deafen my ears to the cry. It must ...
— Child and Country - A Book of the Younger Generation • Will Levington Comfort

... reached the stream, apparently undiscovered, when suddenly he was startled by another rifle report, close at hand, and he lay flat, ...
— Tom Slade Motorcycle Dispatch Bearer • Percy Keese Fitzhugh

... Cross over me," she said after a moment's hesitation, and when her aunt had made the holy sign, Vera kissed her hand and ...
— The Precipice • Ivan Goncharov

... turning to me, loosening the string around a package of papers, and spreading them out like a game of solitaire, "draw yo' chair closer. Fitz, hand me ...
— Colonel Carter of Cartersville • F. Hopkinson Smith

... remarkable. In war, the most turbulent of exercises, AEschylus, Dante, Camoens, and a long list of other poets, distinguished themselves; and, though it may be granted that Horace was a bad rider, and Virgil no tennis-player, yet, on the other hand, Dante was, we know, a falconer as well as swordsman; Tasso, expert both as swordsman and dancer; Alfieri, a great rider; Klopstock, a skaiter; Cowper, famous, in his youth, at cricket and foot-ball; and Lord Byron, pre-eminent ...
— Life of Lord Byron, Vol. I. (of VI.) - With his Letters and Journals. • Thomas Moore

... beg, I promise you I'll keep 'em both out of mischief as long as I can. Be certain sure that it won't be my having the pups that'll make me get into a skrimmage a bit the sooner; for I never was the man to ask whether my dogs were at hand before I could say the word, 'set-on!' It's a sort of nature in a man that don't stop to look after his weapons, but naturally expects to find 'em any how, when his blood's up, and there's a ...
— Charlemont • W. Gilmore Simms

... of exaltation in her eyes, which told of some deep, new experience that had aroused profound reverence and wonder, and a drooping of her sweet lips that bespoke a spirit bowed beneath a sense of humility, and she carried a letter in her hand. ...
— Katherine's Sheaves • Mrs. Georgie Sheldon

... khaki riding-habit, as usual; her head was couched in the crook of her arm, and in the other hand she held her Stetson hat by its strap. ...
— The Fur Bringers - A Story of the Canadian Northwest • Hulbert Footner

... the cape I spoke of;" and she unfolded a paper, and drew from it a piece of muslin which had evidently received a very pretty shape, fine embroidery, and tasteful bows of riband from some Parisian hand. "This is the one I spoke of.—Is it not much prettier ...
— Elinor Wyllys - Vol. I • Susan Fenimore Cooper

... you a maiden lady, why, the will of heaven be done! If you marry another, never mind who the man, there's my stock to the fruit of the union, never mind what the sex. But, if you will have one so unworthy of you as me, my hand and heart are at your feet, ma'am, as I have lost no time in coming to tell you.' So Captain Bulsted concluded. Our eyes were directed on my aunt. The squire bade her to speak out, for she had his sanction to act according to her judgement ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... said, stopping me and putting out his hand. "I'm not only sorry, but I give you my word I have not a doubt—no, not a suspicion of your good faith throughout this business—and if at any time you see your way to open up negotiations, you're welcome. Do you understand? You're welcome to come in here or to my ...
— Frenzied Finance - Vol. 1: The Crime of Amalgamated • Thomas W. Lawson

... nut trees is very difficult, and the development and testing of new varieties, a slow and expensive process. We need the Government's helping hand, and are very glad that there has been set aside by Congress an appropriation to help develop this industry. We have with us, the Nut Culturist from the Department of Agriculture, who is devoting his ...
— Northern Nut Growers Association Report of the Proceedings at the Sixth Annual Meeting. Rochester, New York, September 1 and 2, 1915 • Various

... over 10,000 herds, each of more than a thousand animals. The army commanders had been awarded large regions which they themselves had conquered. They collected the taxes in these regions, and passed on to the state only the yield of the wine tax. On the other hand, in order to feed the armies, in which there were now many Chinese soldiers, the frontier regions were settled, the soldiers working as peasants in times of peace, and peasants being required to contribute to the support ...
— A history of China., [3d ed. rev. and enl.] • Wolfram Eberhard

... evidence of my own proper senses at this moment, that there are charms and graces in such greetings, such as no other greeting can possess. I know that in every beautiful work of the Almighty hand, which is illustrated in your lectures, and in every real or ideal portraiture of fortitude and goodness that you find in your books, there is something that must bring you home again to them for its brightest and ...
— Speeches: Literary and Social • Charles Dickens

... anxiousness showed itself in her eyes, and Betty sat down by her and took her hand. She had come because what she knew was that Rosalie must be prepared for any step taken, and the time had arrived when she must not be allowed to remain in ignorance even of things it would be unpleasant ...
— The Shuttle • Frances Hodgson Burnett

... be made to it; and, if so, the amount and form of grant that would be suitable—so that your Majesty may be furnished with full information on the whole matter. Since, as has been stated, the departure of these vessels is so near at hand, a copy of the constitutions of the Confraternity is not sent, but a summary of them, which is enclosed. Your Majesty will see by this abstract that the works to which this Confraternity is dedicated are those ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898: Volume XIV., 1606-1609 • Various

... poor Toni. With every nerve strained to the utmost, with her mind emptied of anything which did not bear upon the subject in hand, she had striven to help Owen, to take down from dictation the words, the sentences, in which his thoughts ...
— The Making of a Soul • Kathlyn Rhodes

... The Turkish economy consists of a mixture, on the one hand, of modern industry and commerce, and, on the other hand, of time-honored village agriculture and crafts. Since World War II, it has become increasingly integrated into the West European economic arena, for example, as a member of OECD. The economy has improved significantly since ...
— The 1996 CIA Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency.

... in it was the frequent presence of the boys' uncle, Aaron Rushton, who was a crusty bachelor with little liking for boys. He was constantly preaching the need of a firm hand in bringing up his nephews and scolding his brother for his ...
— The Rushton Boys at Treasure Cove - Or, The Missing Chest of Gold • Spencer Davenport

... had condemned me to keep the form of a beast till a beautiful young lady should agree to marry me, and ordered me, on pain of death, not to show that I had any sense. You, alone, dearest Beauty, have kindly judged of me by the goodness of my heart; and in return I offer you my hand and my crown, though I know the reward is much less than what I owe you." Beauty, in the most pleasing surprise, helped the prince to rise, and they walked along to the palace, when her wonder was very ...
— Fairy Tales Every Child Should Know • Various

... that it was impossible to deal with these papers exhaustively. They would provide material for a historical series extending to several hundred volumes. Moreover, on the other hand, there are many gaps, as a great deal of the business of State was transacted by interviews of which ...
— The Letters of Queen Victoria, Volume 1 (of 3), 1837-1843) • Queen Victoria

... themselves; indefatigable on the road, and surpassing every other people in conducting and taking care of horses. In features they resemble strongly the Chinese of Nankin. The Tongusees, on the other hand, bear a striking resemblance to the Tartars who conquered China. The Yakuts and Tongusees however wear very much the same costume. The hair of the women, which hangs in two or three braids behind, is stuck over with small copper or silver plates, more or less rich in proportion ...
— The American Quarterly Review, No. 17, March 1831 • Various

... to the property of the Italian soil placed on the one hand those Roman domain-lands which had been handed over in usufruct to the former allied communities and now on their dissolution reverted to the Roman government, and on the other hand the confiscated territories of the communities incurring punishment, ...
— The History of Rome (Volumes 1-5) • Theodor Mommsen

... Lord Monmouth,' said Sidonia, exchanging a recognition as he took Lucretia in his arms, and bore her into the dwelling that was at hand. Those who were standing at the door assisted him. The woman of the house and Lord Monmouth ...
— Coningsby • Benjamin Disraeli

... You know what a state my nerves are in. I thought he was in a fit or something,—he just looked like death, and he didn't seem to hear me when I called. He had a large envelope addressed to papa in his hand and there was another under his arm that didn't look as if it had ever been opened, but I couldn't see the address. I ran for mamma, but before we got back he was gone and the letters with him. Whatever it was, it has had an awful effect upon him, though ...
— A Beautiful Possibility • Edith Ferguson Black

... noticed now, when the actresses who play the women of the "hupper circles" with the greatest delicacy and keenness of touch are frequently the products of the lower or middle class. On the other hand, the dame de societe who trips lightly from the drawing-room to the stage, amid the blare of trumpets and the excitement of her friends, usually fails to make a mark. To be sure, several of them have made marks—very ...
— The Palmy Days of Nance Oldfield • Edward Robins

... hand on her shoulder and looked into her eyes. Molly had nice eyes when you looked at them closely: they were honest and candid, though of too pale a blue to show at first sight the expression they really contained. Just ...
— Grandmother Dear - A Book for Boys and Girls • Mrs. Molesworth

... removal in his present state would be injudicious. He assured himself of this over and over again, so that no false hope might linger in his heart. And yet hope did linger there whether false or true. Why might he not aspire to the hand of Madeline Staveley,—he who had been assured that he need regard no woman as too high ...
— Orley Farm • Anthony Trollope

... at the coronation of Queen Mary, from the account of Planché, in the Royal Records. “At the close of the second course of the Coronation Banquet, the Champion, Sir Edward Dymoke, entered Westminster Hall, riding on a roan destrier (war horse) trapped in cloth of gold, with a mace in one hand and a gauntlet in the other. He was escorted to the upper end of the hall by the Lord High Constable, and the Earl Marshall, and the Herald of the Queen with a trumpet; and after he had made obeisance to the Queen’s highness, he turned him a little aside, and with ...
— Records of Woodhall Spa and Neighbourhood - Historical, Anecdotal, Physiographical, and Archaeological, with Other Matter • J. Conway Walter

... his trips took him into the mouth of a little gorge, and, as he bent down to seize the end of a big stick, he heard just ahead a rustling that caused him with instinctive caution to straighten up and spring back, his hand, at the same time, flying to the butt of the pistol in his belt. A figure, tall and menacing, emerged from the darkness, and he retreated two ...
— The Masters of the Peaks - A Story of the Great North Woods • Joseph A. Altsheler

... be flying to Pelton with the news that he was at a meeting of the committee, and all the thugs of the other side would be turned loose on his heels. As he walked briskly through the streets toward the place appointed, his hand lay on the hilt of a revolver in the outside pocket of his overcoat. He was a man who would neither seek trouble nor let it overwhelm him. If his life were attempted, he meant to ...
— Ridgway of Montana - (Story of To-Day, in Which the Hero Is Also the Villain) • William MacLeod Raine



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