Free Translator Free Translator
Translators Dictionaries Courses Other
Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




Gat   Listen
verb
Gat  v.  Imp. of Get. (Obs.)






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"Gat" Quotes from Famous Books



... Flanders. But afore he did this indiscreet thing, he was avised [he made up his mind] to tell all unto a certain ancient and discreet maid that was servant in this his master's family, by name Elizabeth Lake, which had aforetime showed him kindness. So he gat up betimes of the morrow, and having called unto her, he saith—'Elizabeth, I would I had followed thy gentle persuadings and friendly rebukes; which if I had done, I had never come to this shame and misery which I am now fallen ...
— Robin Tremain - A Story of the Marian Persecution • Emily Sarah Holt

... gat," he asserted, "and it's fast. But I'll bet you a new hat I can empty my old smoke-wagon quicker than you ...
— Partners of Chance • Henry Herbert Knibbs

... part of the gulf may be here understood which is on the outside of the Straits of Ormuz, or the bay between Cape Ras-al-gat, or the coast of Muscat, and the Persian shore: Yet, from the after part of the voyage this could hardly be the case, and we ought perhaps to read in this part of the text the Arabian Sea, or that part of the Indian ocean which ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume VI - Early English Voyages Of Discovery To America • Robert Kerr

... coast; from whence he expected to be able to observe the first symptoms of moving, which the vessels might make. By some accident, however, he did not make his appearance before the captain was obliged to make sail, that he might get the ships through the intricate passage of the Cockle Gat before it was dark. Fortunately, through the kindness of Lieutenant Hewit, of the Protector, I was enabled to convey a note to our missing companion, desiring him to proceed immediately by the coach to the Pentland ...
— Narrative of a Journey to the Shores of the Polar Sea, in the Years 1819-20-21-22, Volume 1 • John Franklin

... until I had nae mair pouther an' grit-shot; an' ilka day I went I had the like luck; but my min' was ill at ease, an' I grew sad, an' dared na gae to prayers, or the kirk; for then hell seemed to yawn under me. At last they said I was mad, an' I went awee tae th' 'sylum yonder i' th' town, an' then I gat some sleep; an' ane nicht I saw in a dream a woman a' in white, an' she laid her cool, moist han' on my hot forehead, an' tauld me she would save me yet. 'It was th' auld enemy that ye forgathered wi' on th' ice, an' ye are his until ye can kill th' king o' th' geese; an' then ye ken whaever carries ...
— Adrift in the Ice-Fields • Charles W. Hall

... needn't keep your fist on that gat. I've no intention of committing suicide until ...
— A Daughter of the Dons - A Story of New Mexico Today • William MacLeod Raine

... crouse, The young anes ranting thro' the house— My heart has been sae fain to see them That I, for joy, hae barkit wi' them!"... By this, the sun was out o' sight, An' darker gloamin' brought the night: The bum-clock humm'd wi' lazy drone, The kye stood rowtin' i' the loan; When up they gat, an' shook their lugs, Rejoic'd they were na men but dogs; An' each took aff his several way, Resolv'd to meet ...
— English Dialects From the Eighth Century to the Present Day • Walter W. Skeat

... thereafter take counsel in thy mind and heart, how thou mayest slay the wooers in thy halls, whether by guile or openly; for thou shouldest not carry childish thoughts, being no longer of years thereto. Or hast thou not heard what renown the goodly Orestes gat him among all men in that he slew the slayer of his father, guileful Aegisthus, who killed his famous sire? And thou, too, my friend, for I see that thou art very comely and tall, be valiant, that even men unborn may praise thee. But I will now go down to the ...
— DONE INTO ENGLISH PROSE • S. H. BUTCHER, M.A.

... xxiv. 22:—'And Saul went home: but David and his men gat them up into the hold.' 1 Kings xviii. 42:—'So Ahab went up to eat and to drink: and Elijah went up to the top of Carmel, and he cast himself down upon the earth, and put his face between his knees.' Esther iii. 15:—'And the king and Haman sat down to drink; but the city of ...
— The Causes of the Corruption of the Traditional Text of the Holy Gospels • John Burgon

... beginning with the Creation and fall of Lucifer, and ending with the generall Judgment of the world, to be declared and played in Whitsonne weeke, was devised and made by one Sir Henry Frances, sometyme moonck of this monastrey disolved, who obtayning and gat of Clemant, then Bushop of Rome, a 1000 dayes of pardon, and of the Bushop of Chester at that tyme 40 dayes of pardon, graunted from thensforth to every person resorting, in peaceable manner with good devotion, to heare and see the sayd playes, from time to time as oft as they shall ...
— A History of Pantomime • R. J. Broadbent

... affourde ouer fulnes, two // many examples vnto vs. Therfore, ye great and greatest // noble mens children, if ye will haue rightfullie enemies to // that praise, and enioie surelie that place, which Nobilitie. // your fathers haue, and elders had, and left vnto you, ye must kepe it, as they gat it, and that is, by the onelie waie, of vertue, wisedome, and worthinesse. For wisedom, and vertue, there be manie faire examples in this Court, for yong Ientlemen to folow. But they be, like faire markes in the feild, ...
— The Schoolmaster • Roger Ascham

... think sic a waratch, an' a murderer, wad hae taen a name wi' some gritter difference in the sound. But the story is just that true that there were twa o' the Queen's officers here nae mair than an hour ago, in pursuit o' the vagabond, for they gat some intelligence that he had fled this gate; yet they said he had been last seen wi' black claes on, an' they supposed he was clad in black. His ain servant is wi' them, for the purpose o' kennin the scoundrel, an' ...
— The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner • James Hogg

... the messenger," Eckewart replied. With a right good will he gat him on the road and told Rudeger the message he had heard, to whom none such pleasing news had ...
— The Nibelungenlied • Unknown

... gun. I know him. So is that guy at the wheel. Pony's pardner packs a gat; and that guy standin' over by the wall, smoking is drawin' down reg'lar pay for jest standin' there, every night. 'Sides, they ain't enough stuff in sight to take a chanct for. We ain't organized for ...
— The Ridin' Kid from Powder River • Henry Herbert Knibbs

... more creditable to civilization. In 1812, the Algerines captured an American vessel, and made slaves of the crew. After the peace with England, in 1815, Decatur, in the Guerriere, sailed into the Mediterranean, and captured off Cape de Gat, in twenty-five minutes, an Algerine frigate of forty-six guns and four hundred men. On board the Guerriere, four were wounded, and no one killed. Two days later, off Cape Palos, he took a brig of ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Volume 6, No. 38, December, 1860 • Various

... they gat them forth to the meadow where grass and flowers alike had been refreshed. The glade was their pleasure-ground; they wandered hither and thither hearkening each other's speech, and waking the song of the birds by ...
— The Development of the Feeling for Nature in the Middle Ages and - Modern Times • Alfred Biese

... Behaving themselves, in ye most Brutish and Indecent manner and taking us prisoners by ye arms, one Squaw on each Side of a prisoner, they led us up to their Village and placed themselves In a Large Circle Round us, after they had Gat all prepared for their Dance, they made us sit down In a Small Circle, about 18 Inches assunder and began their frolick, Dancing Round us and Striking of us in ye face with English Scalps, yt caused ye Blood to Issue from our mouths and Noses, In a Very ...
— Glimpses of the Past - History of the River St. John, A.D. 1604-1784 • W. O. Raymond

... Pendragon made war on the duke of Cornwall, and how by the mean of Merlin he lay by the duchess and gat Arthur. ...
— Le Morte D'Arthur, Volume I (of II) - King Arthur and of his Noble Knights of the Round Table • Thomas Malory

... branching horns, he felled, and then the common sort, and so 190 Their army drave he with his darts through leafy woods to go: Nor held his hand till on the earth were seven great bodies strown, And each of all his ships might have one head of deer her own. Thence to the haven gat he gone with all his folk to share, And that good wine which erst the casks Acestes made to bear, And gave them as they went away on that Trinacrian beach, He shared about; then fell to soothe their ...
— The AEneids of Virgil - Done into English Verse • Virgil

... him on all sides. He fixed his eyes on me, glowing with holy indignation, while a two-edged sword proceeded out of his mouth. My sins arose before me. Conscience condemned me. I could not look up. The pains of hell gat hold upon me. In a voice unlike all I ever heard before, he said, 'Slayer of my Son, despiser of my grace, what hast thou done? Thou hast set at nought all my counsels.' I longed to flee; but above me stood the Judge, below, the abyss. I could give no reply. Again he said, ...
— Woman And Her Saviour In Persia • A Returned Missionary

... bonny bonny bride? Where gat ye that winsome marrow? I gat her where I daurna weel be seen, Pu'ing the birks on ...
— English Songs and Ballads • Various

... puny and fearful, and these men clepen Radicals. And they go ever in fear, and they scream on high for dread in the streets and the houses, and they fain would flee away from all that their fathers gat them with the sword. And this sort men call Scuttleres, but the mean folk and certain of the baser sort hear them gladly, and they say ever that Englishmen ...
— Letters to Dead Authors • Andrew Lang

... and in what manner ought yee to bee so desirous of worldly honour so dangerous! Therefore mee thinketh this present booke is right necessary often to be read, for in it shall yee finde the most gracious, knightly, and vertuous war of the most noble knights of the world, whereby they gat praysing continually. Also mee seemeth, by the oft reading thereof, yee shall greatly desire to accustome your selfe in following of those gracious knightly deedes, that is to say, to dread God, and to love righteousnesse, ...
— Tales of the Enchanted Islands of the Atlantic • Thomas Wentworth Higginson

... (whom may He save and assain!) so do thou fare in safety, while I and thy Wazir will order thy reign in thine absence till such time as thou shalt return." Accordingly the Prince went forth and gat him ready and rode on till he reached Cairo where he asked for Mubarak's house. The folk answered him saying, "O my lord, this be a man than whom none is wealthier or greater in boon deeds and bounties, ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 3 • Richard F. Burton

... bracelets on his wrists," further explained the head pilot briskly, "and be sure to frisk him for a gat or even a knife. You see, we're going to have our hands full with the boss and can't fool around with this chap ...
— Eagles of the Sky - With Jack Ralston Along the Air Lanes • Ambrose Newcomb

... captains can gie an unco deal o' fash in thae times, where they take an ill-will.—The dragoons will be crying for ale, and they wunna want it, and maunna want it—they are unruly chields, but they pay ane some gate or other. I gat the humle-cow, that's the best in the byre, frae black Frank Inglis and Sergeant Bothwell, for ten pund Scots, and they drank out ...
— Old Mortality, Complete, Illustrated • Sir Walter Scott

... didst thou leave Cairo?" "But now." "How can that be?" "Know," said she, "that, when I fell out with thee and Satan prompted me to do thee a damage, I complained of thee to the magistrates, who sought for thee and the Kazis enquired of thee, but found thee not. When two days were past, repentance gat hold upon me and I knew that the fault was with me; but penitence availed me not, and I abode for some days weeping for thy loss, till what was in my hand failed and I was obliged to beg my bread. So I fell to ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 10 • Richard F. Burton

... there is no Might save in Allah, the Glorious, the Great! Verily we are God's and unto him we shall return; without recourse we be dead folk this time." When the head eunuch heard her speak thus, fear gat hold upon him, by reason of that which he knew of the Princess's violence and that her father was ruled by her, and he said to himself, "Belike the King hath commanded the nurse to carry his daughter forth upon some occasion of hers, whereof ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 7 • Richard F. Burton

... this place appears to have been on that part of the oceanic coast of Arabia called the kingdom of Maskat, towards Cape Ras-al-gat and the entrance to the Persian gulf. The name seems compounded of these words Div or Diu, an island, Bander a port, and Rumi the term in the east for the Turks as successors of the Romans. It is said ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume VII • Robert Kerr

... Abiezerites in three divisions: one of which made for the gates, while the other two fell upon the scattered labourers in the vineyards. Abimelech then fought against the city and took it, but the chief citizens had taken refuge in "the hold of the house of El-berith." "Abimelech gat him up to Mount Zalmon, he and all the people that were with him; and Abimelech took an axe in his hand, and cut down a bough from the trees, and took it up, and laid it on his shoulder: and he said unto the people that were with him, What ye have seen me do, make haste, and do as I have done. ...
— History Of Egypt, Chaldaea, Syria, Babylonia, and Assyria, Volume 6 (of 12) • G. Maspero

... clouds, from which flashes of lightning, with crackling peals of thunder, burst forth. Still he swam on, until again the moon shone forth. Having cut off his heavy boots, he swam more easily. And now Lowestoft Light came in sight, and he saw the checkered buoy of Saint Nicholas Gat, opposite his own door, but still four miles away from land. He had been five hours in the water. Here was something to hold on by; but he reflected that his limbs might become numbed from exposure to the night air, and that it would be more prudent ...
— A Yacht Voyage Round England • W.H.G. Kingston

... seventy, But I gat agate once more; "I'll live for my country, not on her" Were my words ...
— Songs of the Ridings • F. W. Moorman

... our twin souls they sought the sky, And were welcome guests in the heavens high; And we gat our choice through all the spheres What lives to lead ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction - Volume 19, No. 533, Saturday, February 11, 1832. • Various

... Pymwnt a phymcant Trychwn a thrychant Tri si chatvarchawc Eidyn euruchawc Tri llu llurugawc Tri eur deyrn dorchawc Tri marchawc dywal Tri chat gyhaual Tri chysneit kysnar Chwerw vysgynt esgar Tri en drin en drwm Llew lledynt blwm Eur e gat gyngrwn Tri theyrn maon A dyvu o vrython Kynri a Chenon Kynrein o aeron Gogyuerchi yn hon Deivyr diuerogyon A dyvu o vrython Wr well no Chynon Sarph ...
— Y Gododin - A Poem on the Battle of Cattraeth • Aneurin

... I was blindfolded!" was her grateful thought. "But how ridiculous, boys! A razor! If they'd wanted to kill me, at least one of them had a gat. Ask Hiram." ...
— The She Boss - A Western Story • Arthur Preston Hankins

... ye gat him in your thrall, An' brak him out o' house an' hall, While scabs and blotches did him gall Wi' bitter claw, An' lowsed his ill-tongued ...
— The Mysteries of All Nations • James Grant

... Ronicky heartily. "D'you know what would have happened out in my neck of the woods, if there had been a game like the one tonight? I wouldn't have waited to be polite, but just pulled a gat and ...
— Ronicky Doone • Max Brand

... been thus instructed, he went out immediately and gat him to his evil den, and took his magical books, and, because they were the beginnings of all evil, and the storehouses of devilish mysteries, burnt them with fire. And he betook himself to the cave of that same holy man, to whom Nachor also had resorted, ...
— Barlaam and Ioasaph • St. John of Damascus

... said about ane Campbell, that suld hae been concerned in the rubbery, mair or less, and that he suld hae had a warrant frae the Duke of Argyle, as a testimonial o' his character. And this put MacCallum More's beard in a bleize, as gude reason there was; and he gat up wi' an unco bang, and garr'd them a' look about them, and wad ram it even doun their throats, there was never ane o' the Campbells but was as wight, wise, warlike, and worthy trust, as auld Sir John the Graeme. Now, ...
— Rob Roy, Complete, Illustrated • Sir Walter Scott

... Eucharis excel In all the fair of beauty! yet he wanted Virtue to make his own desires implanted In his dear Eucharis; for women never Love beauty in their sex, but envy ever. His judgment yet, that durst not suit address, Nor, past due means, presume of due success, 140 Reason gat Fortune in the end to speed To his best prayers[95]: but strange it seemed, indeed, That Fortune should a chaste affection bless: Preferment seldom graceth bashfulness. Nor grac'd it Hymen yet; but many a dart, And many an amorous ...
— The Works of Christopher Marlowe, Vol. 3 (of 3) • Christopher Marlowe

... she is up to her elbows in suds, and surrounded with steam, she thinks a drap of the old gemman (having no pretensions to a young one) would comfort and strengthen her inside, and consequently swallows the inspiring dram. The travelling Gat-gut Scraper, and the Hurdy-Grinder, think there is music in the sound of max, and can toss off their kevartern to any tune in good time. The Painter considers it desirable to produce effect by mingling his dead white with a little sky blue. The Donkey driver and the Fish-fag ...
— Real Life In London, Volumes I. and II. • Pierce Egan

... having finished speaking, sat Down on a bench was in the humble place, And with His blest hands for a moment's space, He touched the distaff, rocked the little one. Rose, signed to Peter, and they gat them gone. ...
— Poems with Power to Strengthen the Soul • Various

... servants and maidens, and had servants born in my house; also I had great possessions of great and small cattle above all that were in Jerusalem before me: I gathered me also silver and gold, and the peculiar treasure of kings and of the provinces: I gat me men singers and women singers, and the delights of the sons of men, as musical instruments, and that of all sorts. So I was great, and increased more than all that were before me in Jerusalem: also my wisdom remained with me." And what was the end? "Then I looked on all the works ...
— True Words for Brave Men • Charles Kingsley

... Antiphates was born The brave Oicleus; from Oicleus sprang Amphiaraues, demagogue renown'd, Whom with all tenderness, and as a friend Alike the Thund'rer and Apollo prized; Yet reach'd he not the bounds of hoary age. But by his mercenary consort's arts[66] Persuaded, met his destiny at Thebes. 300 He 'gat Alcmaeon and Amphilocus. Mantius was also father of two sons, Clytus and Polyphides. Clytus pass'd From earth to heav'n, and dwells among the Gods, Stol'n by Aurora for his beauty's sake. But (brave Amphiaraues once ...
— The Odyssey of Homer • Homer

... my lord, that gat the victory; And therefore grieve not at your overthrow, Since I shall render all into your hands, And add more strength to your dominions Than ever yet confirm'd th' Egyptian crown. The god of war resigns his room to me, Meaning to ...
— Tamburlaine the Great, Part I. • Christopher Marlowe

... parrot, now a few careless words, now a sugar plum. At present the season is waning, and a great dread has taken possession of him, lest she should slip away from him altogether, for Dame Rumour has given the widow of the American millionaire in marriage to more than one. The demon of unrest hath gat hold on him and every night ere going to one or other of the many distractions open to him, he paces the square opposite her windows to see who is admitted. More than once Col. Haughton and the man he most fears, Trevalyon, ...
— A Heart-Song of To-day • Annie Gregg Savigny

... "In the afternoone we gat vp vnto them, giuing them the broad side with our great ordnance, and a volee of small shot, and presently laid the ship aboord, whereof the King of Spaine was owner, which was Admirall of the South-sea, called the S. Anna, and thought ...
— History of the Philippine Islands Vols 1 and 2 • Antonio de Morga

... "For they gat not the land in possession by their own sword; neither was it their own arm that helped them; but Thy right hand, and Thine arm, and the light of Thy countenance, because Thou hadst a favor unto them." ...
— War Poetry of the South • Various

... of iron-gray; he had a few wrinkles; his face was so deeply sunburnt, that, excepting a half-smothered glow on the tip of his nose, a dusky yellow was the only apparent hue. As the people gazed, it was observed that the elderly men, and the men of substance, gat themselves silently to their steeds, and hied homeward with an unusual degree of haste; till at length the inn was deserted, except by a few wretched objects to whom it was a constant resort. These, instead of retreating, drew closer ...
— Fanshawe • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... they gat in To pray till nine; Then called, "Come maids, true maids, away! Kiss and begone, Ha' done, ha' done, Until another day With love, and love ...
— Henry Brocken - His Travels and Adventures in the Rich, Strange, Scarce-Imaginable Regions of Romance • Walter J. de la Mare

... old Gothic slang abounded in it. Here is boffete, a box on the ear, which is derived from bofeton; vantane, window (later on vanterne), which comes from vantana; gat, cat, which comes from gato; acite, oil, which comes from aceyte. Do you want Italian? Here is spade, sword, which comes from spada; carvel, boat, which comes from caravella. Do you want English? Here is bichot, ...
— Les Miserables - Complete in Five Volumes • Victor Hugo

... God with. In the 2d chapter of Ecclesiastes, music is mentioned by Solomon among the vanities and follies in which he found no profit, in terms which show how generally a cultivated taste was diffused among his subjects. "I gat me men-singers and women-singers, and the delights of the sons of men, as musical instruments, and that of all sorts." Many other passages of similar import might be quoted from the sacred writings, and ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, No. 327 - Vol. 53, January, 1843 • Various

... full childish and unwise. Had his father been on the throne, no such thing had ever happed: he wist how to deal with traitors. But now, with so slack an hand did the King rule, that not only Sir Roger gat free of the Tower by bribing one of his keepers and drugging the rest, but twenty good days at the least were lost while he stale down to the coast and so won away. There was indeed a hue and cry, but it wrought nothing, and even that was not for a week. There ...
— In Convent Walls - The Story of the Despensers • Emily Sarah Holt

... to serue for drudges and slaues, were reserued, and carried into Scotland as prisoners, where they remained manie yeares after; in so much that there were few houses in that realme, but had one or mo English slaues and captiues, whom they gat at this vnhappie voiage. Miserable was the state of the English at that time, one being consumed of another so vnnaturallie, manie of them destroied by the Scots so cruellie, and the residue kept vnder ...
— Chronicles of England, Scotland and Ireland (2 of 6): England (1 of 12) - William the Conqueror • Raphael Holinshed

... might as well tell you," carelessly. "He got hurt; the fool compelled me to hit him with a gat; so he's out of it, and you might as well come through clean—that guy isn't going to ...
— The Case and The Girl • Randall Parrish

... windy, winter night, The stars shot down wi' sklentin' light, Wi' you, mysel, I gat a fright Ayont the lough; Ye, like a rash-bush, stood ...
— The Humourous Poetry of the English Language • James Parton

... prowess-confident, he defied us all. Yea, in the fight around Achilles, I Slew foes far more than thou; 'twas I who saved The dead king with this armour. Not a whit I dread thy spear now, but my grievous hurt With pain still vexeth me, the wound I gat In fighting for these arms and their slain lord. In me as in Achilles is ...
— The Fall of Troy • Smyrnaeus Quintus

... the whole regiment of this realme, bare impatientlie that any truble should be maid to that kingdome of darknes, whairof within this realme he was the head. And, thairfoir, he so travailled[48] with the said Maister Patrik, that he gat him to Sanctandrosse, whair, eftir the conference of diverse dayis, he had his freedome and libertie. The said Bischop and his blooddy bucheouris, called Doctouris, seamed to approve his doctryne, and to grant ...
— The Works of John Knox, Vol. 1 (of 6) • John Knox

... hadde, whan that he wente Uppon the see, til Jhesu Crist him pente. He hadde a cros of latoun ful of stones, And in a glas he hadde pigges bones. But with these reliques, whanne that he fond A poure persoun dwelling uppon lond, Upon a day he gat him more moneye Than that the persoun gat in monthes tweye. And thus with feyned flaterie and japes, He made the persoun ...
— Three Thousand Years of Mental Healing • George Barton Cutten

... grew worse and worse because she would be so, none about her being able to go to bed. My lord-admiral was sent for, (who by reason of my sister's death, that was his wife, had absented himself some fortnight from court;) what by fair means what by force, he gat her to bed. There was no hope of her recovery, because she ...
— Memoirs of the Court of Queen Elizabeth • Lucy Aikin

... in a gent like that," went on Sandersen, his pale blue eyes becoming dreamy. "Get your gat out, will ...
— The Rangeland Avenger • Max Brand

... Devil gat next to Westminster, And he turned to "the room" of the Commons; But he heard as he purposed to enter in there, That "the Lords" had received a summons; And he thought, as "a quondam Aristocrat," He might peep at the Peers, though ...
— The Works of Lord Byron, Vol. 7. - Poetry • George Gordon Byron

... his lord's command, he continued to kneel, till lusty James of Avondale came and caught him by the elbow. "Up, Sir Knight, and give grace and good thank to your lord. Not your head but mine hath a right to be muzzy with the coup I gat this day on the green meadow of ...
— The Black Douglas • S. R. Crockett

... four missing pilots returned, and were picked up by submarine E 11, close to Norderney Gat. They were there attacked by a hostile airship; the submarine, as soon as it had taken the pilots on board, was forced to dive, and the machines were abandoned. The missing pilot, Flight Commander F. E. T. Hewlett, had engine failure, and came down on the sea near ...
— The War in the Air; Vol. 1 - The Part played in the Great War by the Royal Air Force • Walter Raleigh

... grinned. "Sure—quiet," he chuckled. "And then you wake up and bust Minter for your first crack. You began late, son, but you may go far. Pretty tricky with the gat, eh?" ...
— Black Jack • Max Brand

... the laugh against himself this time. In the midst of it he leaned over to Ralph, and, as though to cover his discomfiture, whispered, "He's gat a lad's ...
— The Shadow of a Crime - A Cumbrian Romance • Hall Caine

... the fool, poor fellow, he hath yielded up the rights of a wise man. Any way, all he gat by it was that the Cardinal bade two of the yeomen lay hands on him and bear him off. Then there came on him that reckless mood, which, I trow, banished him long ago from the Forest, and brought him to the motley. He fought with them with all his force, and broke away once—as if that ...
— The Armourer's Prentices • Charlotte M. Yonge

... said, I shall never be moved; thou, Lord, of Thy goodness hast made my hill so strong"—forgetting that he must be kept safe every moment of his life, as well as made safe once for all. "Thou didst turn Thy face from me, and I was troubled. Then cried I unto Thee, O Lord, and gat me to my Lord right humbly. And THEN," he adds, "God turned my heaviness into joy, and girded me with gladness," (Psalm xxx.) And again, he says, "BEFORE I was troubled I went wrong, but NOW I have kept Thy word," (Psalm cxix.) And this is the way in which Christ the Lord treated St. Peter ...
— Twenty-Five Village Sermons • Charles Kingsley

... his harp he stood at Apollo's left side, playing his prelude, and thereon followed his winsome voice. He sang the renowns of the deathless Gods, and the dark Earth, how all things were at the first, and how each God gat his portion. ...
— The Homeric Hymns - A New Prose Translation; and Essays, Literary and Mythological • Andrew Lang

... not, far off was he. Through forty realms he did his tribes rally; His great dromonds, he made them all ready, Barges and skiffs and ships and galleries; Neath Alexandre, a haven next the sea, In readiness he gat his whole navy. That was in May, first summer of the year, All of his hosts he launched upon ...
— The Song of Roland • Anonymous

... not only foiled the enemy in his attempt to advance into the central districts of Cape Colony, but had appreciably diminished the pressure in other portions of the theatre of war. Gatacre was firmly established at Sterkstroom, with an advanced post at Cypher Gat, the main body of those fronting him remaining passively at Stormberg. A Boer commando had made a demonstration towards Molteno on 3rd January, and another party, about the same date, had driven out of Dordrecht a patrol of British mounted troops, which had occupied that ...
— History of the War in South Africa 1899-1902 v. 1 (of 4) - Compiled by Direction of His Majesty's Government • Frederick Maurice

... him anywhere. From that I concluded that he had either stopped or had taken to tiptoeing, too. I had my 'gat' ready and started in. I felt along the bales and boxes a ways. Just as I heard you fellows come into the door something tripped me and down ...
— Boy Scouts in the North Sea - The Mystery of a Sub • G. Harvey Ralphson

... you want, I can supply you all with firearms," said Rhoda. "There are plenty at the ranch. And the boys most always lug around a 'gat,' as they call 'em, because ...
— Nan Sherwood at Rose Ranch • Annie Roe Carr

... gat bruises green and black, I loved him never the less a jot; Though he bound burdens on my back, If he said 'Kiss me and heed it not' Right little pain I felt, God wot, When that foul thief's mouth, found so sweet, Kissed me—Much good thereof I got! I keep the sin and ...
— Poems & Ballads (Second Series) - Swinburne's Poems Volume III • Algernon Charles Swinburne

... thaa and me is here; his father telled me he wor aat hoalf at noight on Amebury common, crying and praying by a big tree roit, and he gat converted there all alone; and when he came into th' haase, his face was ...
— Little Abe - Or, The Bishop of Berry Brow • F. Jewell

... So they gat them raiment of wool and clothing themselves therewith, went forth and wandered in the deserts and wastes; but, when some days had passed over them, they became weak for hunger and repented them of ...
— Tales from the Arabic Volumes 1-3 • John Payne

... fine tu me," Ole began again. "Aye lak yu bully! Ven yu come by St. Paul, take Yim Hill's railroad and come to Sven Akerson's camp, femt'n mile above Lars Hjellersen's gang. Aye ban boss of Sven's camp now. Aye gat yu ...
— At Good Old Siwash • George Fitch

... over men for ages Whose worship wist not of me And gat but sorrows for wages, And hardly for ...
— Poems and Ballads (Third Series) - Taken from The Collected Poetical Works of Algernon Charles - Swinburne—Vol. III • Algernon Charles Swinburne

... unkind salutes as I ne'er felt; And since that time there hath not pass'd an hour, Wherein she hath not either rail'd upon me, Or laid her anger's load upon my limbs. Even now (for no occasion in the world, But as it pleas'd her ladyship to take it) She gat me up a staff, and breaks my head. But I'll no longer serve so curs'd a dame; I'll run as far first as my legs will bear me. What shall I do? to hell I dare not go, Until my master's twelve months be expir'd, ...
— A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. VIII (4th edition) • Various

... the battle with all at length, When my weakness had passed, and I gat full strength; And alone with three thousands the fight I fought, Till death to the foes whom I ...
— Heroic Romances of Ireland Volumes 1 and 2 Combined • A. H. Leahy

... declared Uncle Bill. "First he cussed me out proper. Then he went for his gat and he beat me to the draw. They ain't no disgrace to that. You'll learn pretty soon that anybody might get beaten sooner or later—if he fights enough men. And my gun hung in the leather. Before I got it on him he'd shot me clean through ...
— Bull Hunter • Max Brand

... said unto the elders, Tarry you here for us, until we come again unto you: and, behold, Aaron and Hur are with you: and if any man have matters to do, let him come unto them. And Moses went into the midst of the cloud, and gat him up into the mount: and Moses was in the mount forty days and ...
— The Emancipation of Massachusetts • Brooks Adams

... we saw a most extraordinary effect of mirage. To the east (100 deg. b.m.) the peculiar flat-topped Gat (or Gut) Mountain, which looked like a gigantic lamp-shade, could be seen apparently suspended in the air. The illusion was perfect, and most startling to any one with teetotal habits. Of course the optical illusion was caused by the different temperatures in the layers of air ...
— Across Coveted Lands - or a Journey from Flushing (Holland) to Calcutta Overland • Arnold Henry Savage Landor

... burnt the town, and slain more than fifty men: and they be in purpose to Kedwelly, and a siege is ordained at the castle I keep, and that is great peril for me, and all that be with me; for they have made a vow that they will [al gat] at all events have us dead therein. Wherefore I pray you not to beguile us, but send to us warning shortly whether we may have any help or no; and, if help is not coming, that we have an answer, that we may steal away by night to Brecknock, because ...
— Henry of Monmouth, Volume 1 - Memoirs of Henry the Fifth • J. Endell Tyler

... father's idol-grove and came out from among his own people and carved his own way in the world. Ever as I read his story, I mind me of a man I knew in Lancashire who went to the house of his fathers to claim what was his own, and when he gat it not, he threw down the idols he had been trained to worship, and shook off the dust of that idol-grove where Mammon and Rank and the world's opinion were set up as gods, and went out into the world ...
— Standish of Standish - A story of the Pilgrims • Jane G. Austin

... year and more, into the time that St. Helen, that was mother to Constantine the Emperor of Rome. And she was daughter of King Coel, born in Colchester, that was King of England, that was clept then Britain the more; the which the Emperor Constance wedded to his wife, for her beauty, and gat upon her Constantine, that was after Emperor of ...
— The Travels of Sir John Mandeville • Author Unknown

... but for nearly the whole time within sight of the numerous lighthouses which mark the various entrances of the Scheldt and the Maas. The masters on duty were kept very busy in consulting the charts and the sailing directions; but at one o'clock the squadron was off the Brielle Gat, which is the deepest ...
— Dikes and Ditches - Young America in Holland and Belguim • Oliver Optic

... that he did stour, And jumbled at it till he swat; When he had jumblit ane lang hour, The sorrow crap of butter he gat. ...
— The Balladists - Famous Scots Series • John Geddie

... thou art of sweet composure Praise him that gat thee, she that gave thee suck; Fam'd be thy tutor, and thy parts of nature Thrice-fam'd beyond, beyond all erudition; But he that disciplin'd thine arms to fight— Let Mars divide eternity in twain ...
— The History of Troilus and Cressida • William Shakespeare [Craig edition]

... into which she poured willow flower water with a lump of snow and a spoonful of sugar candy. The Caliph thanked her and said in himself,"By Allah, I will recompense her to morrow for the kind deed she hath done." The others again addressed themselves to conversing and carousing; and, when the wine gat the better of them, the eldest lady who ruled the house rose and making obeisance to them took the cateress by the hand, and said, "Rise, O my sister and let us do what is our devoir." Both answered "Even so!" Then the portress stood up and proceeded to remove the table service and the remnants of ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 1 • Richard F. Burton

... and leaned against the rock with one leg crossed before the other in a manner sometimes supposed to reflect social ease and elegance. "But I'm game to take what's comin'. If you'll just stick me up and extract the .38 automatic I'm packin' on my hip,—and, believe me, she's a bad Gat. when she's in action,—why, I'll feel lots better. The little gun might get to shootin' by herself, and then somebody would get hurt sure. You see, I'm givin' you all the chance you want to take me without gettin' mussed up. I'm ...
— Overland Red - A Romance of the Moonstone Canon Trail • Henry Herbert Knibbs

... away and gat her from the hall, but Solita remained with her lord, making moan and easing his fetters with her hands as best she might. Hence it fell out that she who should have comforted must needs be comforted herself, and that the ...
— Ensign Knightley and Other Stories • A. E. W. Mason

... haes gowd and gear, Fair Annet she has gat nane; And the little beauty Fair Annet haes, O it wull ...
— Ballads of Romance and Chivalry - Popular Ballads of the Olden Times - First Series • Frank Sidgwick

... Joe gat him meditatively back to Main Street and to the Tocsin building. This time he did not hesitate, but mounted the stairs and knocked upon the door ...
— The Conquest of Canaan • Booth Tarkington

... to her granny says, 'Will ye gae wi' me, granny? I'll eat the apple at the glass I gat frae uncle Johnny.' She fuff't her pipe wi' sic a lunt, In wrath she was sae vap'rin, She notic't na an aizle brunt Her braw new worset apron ...
— The Folk-lore of Plants • T. F. Thiselton-Dyer

... we read, "I gat me men singers and women singers, the delights of the sons of men, as musical instruments, and that of all sorts." These last seven words represent only two in the original Hebrew, Shiddah-veshiddoth. ...
— Hebraic Literature; Translations from the Talmud, Midrashim and - Kabbala • Various

... Old Grandpere gat in the corner, With his grandchild on his knee, Looking up at his wrinkled visage, For his winters ...
— Hesperus - and Other Poems and Lyrics • Charles Sangster

... the body of Holofernes cast upon the ground and his head taken away. When also he found not Judith, he leaped out to the people and told them; and great fear and trembling fell upon them, and they fled, being chased until past Damascus and the borders thereof by the children of Israel, who gat many spoils. Then Judith sang a song of thanksgiving in all Israel, and the people sang after her. She dedicated the spoil of Holofernes, which the people had given her, for a gift unto the Lord; and when she died in Bethulia, a widow of great honour, ...
— The Worlds Greatest Books, Volume XIII. - Religion and Philosophy • Various

... have a gat at that—that is, not until the bulls planted it in his kick on the way to the station house." The dignity of Mr. Hagan's consultation manner had dropped from him, and he had relapsed into the gang argot with which police days had given him an ...
— The Tyranny of Weakness • Charles Neville Buck

... terms they at present use in reference to the subject seem of recent origin, and invented by the interpreters. They name the Deity, "Ya ga ta-that-hee-hee,"—"The Man who reclines on the sky;" angels are called "the birds of the Deity,"—"ya gat he-be e Yadze;" the devil, "Ha ...
— Notes of a Twenty-Five Years' Service in the Hudson's Bay Territory - Volume II. (of 2) • John M'lean

... wanting to cleik the cunzie (that is, hook the siller), he cannily carried off Gilliewhackit ae night when he was riding dovering hame (wi' the maut rather abune the meal), and with the help of his gillies he gat him into the hills with the speed of light, and the first place he wakened in was the Cove of Vaimh ...
— The Proverbs of Scotland • Alexander Hislop

... farre at wordes that we wer almost by ye eares togither. Eula what say you woman? xan. He toke vp a staffe wandryng at me, as the deuill had bene on hym ready to laye me on the bones. Eula. were thou not redye to ron in at the bench hole. xanti. Nay mary I warrant the. I gat me a thre foted stole in hand, & he had but ones layd his littell finger on me, he shulde not haue founde me lame. I woulde haue holden his nose to the grindstone Eulalia. A newe found shelde, ye wanted but youre dystaffe to haue made you a speare. xantip. And he shoulde ...
— A Merry Dialogue Declaringe the Properties of Shrowde Shrews and Honest Wives • Desiderius Erasmus

... that had getten scratted off t' yowes' backs for ten mile around. Shoo were a patteren wife, and sooin fowks began to say to one another: 'I've bin reight thrang to-day; I've bin well-nigh as thrang as Throp's wife.' So 'thrang as Throp's wife' gat to be a regular nominy, an' other fowks took to followin' her example; it were fair smittlin'! They bowt theirsens spinnin'-wheels, an' gat agate o' spinnin', while there were all nations o' stockins turned out ...
— Tales of the Ridings • F. W. Moorman

... end of his speech ended his words ere they when they heard a noise heard the roar of thunderings of thunder rending the that would rend a mountains and shaking mount and shake the the earth, and fear gat earth, whereat the Queen hold upon the queen, the Mother was seized with mother of Zein ul Asnam, mighty fear and affright. Yea and sore trembling; But presently appeared but, after a little, the the King of the Jinn, King of the Jinn who said to her, "O my appeared and said ...
— The Life of Sir Richard Burton • Thomas Wright

... straightway he hurled out of the press, and rode back again at full speed, sword in hand. The Count Bougars de Valence heard say they were about hanging Aucassin, his enemy, so he came into that place, and Aucassin was ware of him, and gat his sword into his hand, and lashed at his helm with such a stroke that he drave it down on his head, and he being stunned, fell grovelling. And Aucassin laid hands on him, and caught him by the nasal of his helmet, and gave him ...
— Aucassin and Nicolete • Andrew Lang

... he clad in thin and wanton raiment, but she in nought else save what God had given her of long, crispy yellow hair. Then was Walter ashamed to look on her, seeing that there was a man with her, and gat him back to his bed; but yet a long while ere he slept again he had the image before his eyes of the fair woman ...
— The Wood Beyond the World • William Morris

... loot down nae milk; He kirned, nor butter gat; And a' gade wrang, and nought gade right; He danced with rage, and grat; Then up he ran to the head o' the knowe Wi' mony a wave and shout— She heard him as she heard him not, And ...
— The Book of Humorous Verse • Various

... he. "An' he was gaun to question him where the treasure was, but he had eneuch to do to get him laid without deaving him wi' questions, for a' the deils cam' about him, like bees biggin' out o' a byke. He never coured the fright he gat, but cried out, 'Help! help!' till his very enemy wad hae been wae to see him; and sae he cried till he died, which was no that lang after. Fouk ...
— Folk-Lore and Legends - Scotland • Anonymous

... right and public duty unreservedly to express, by word and deed, their views on politics, had better not seek employment in the public service. (p. 146) Burns having once drawn upon himself the suspicions of his superiors, all his words and actions were no doubt closely watched. It was found that he 'gat the Gazetteer,' a revolutionary print published in Edinburgh, which only the most extreme men patronized, and which after a few months' existence was suppressed by Government. As the year 1792 drew to a close, the political heaven, ...
— Robert Burns • Principal Shairp

... preuaile, no power, no strength, or might in lande. God disposeth Princes seates, their kyngdome there with stan- des. I knewe before the brickell state, how kyngdomes ruine caught, my iye the chaunge of fortune sawe, as Priamus did aduaunce his throne, by fauour Fortune gat, on other For- tune then did froune, whose kingdom did decaie. Well, now [Sidenote: Fortune hath no staie.] I knowe the brickle state, that fortune hath no staie, all rashe her giftes, Fortune blind doeth kepe no state, her stone doth roule, as floodes now flowe, floodes ...
— A booke called the Foundacion of Rhetorike • Richard Rainolde

... another squirrel pops across the trail dodging like a yearling trying to get back to the herd. Quick as a wink out comes Red's gun. It just does a flip out of the holster and bang! The dust jumped right under the squirrel's belly. Bang! goes the gat again and Mister Squirrel's tail is chopped plumb in two and then he ducks down his hole by the side of the trail and we hear him squealing and chattering cusswords ...
— Alcatraz • Max Brand

... colts. Then she cooed about poor bruised Percy and tried to coax him to come to the house. But Percy said he was going to drive that team, even if he had to be strapped to the mower-seat. And, oddly enough, he did "gat them beat," as Olga expressed it, but it tired him out and wilted his collar and the sweat was running down his face when he came in at noon. Olga is very proud of him. But she announced that she'd drive that ...
— The Prairie Wife • Arthur Stringer

... English prison. In these dark days, when the watch on the church steeple saw the smoke of burning villages on the sky-line, or a clump of spears and fluttering pennon drawing nigh across the plain, these good folk gat them up, with all their household gods, into the wood, whence, from some high spur, their timid scouts might overlook the coming and going of the marauders, and see the harvest ridden down, and church and cottage go up to heaven all night in flame. It was but an ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. XXII (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... said to Jones—or should have said But feared the Articles of War— "You must not think you have a head Because you know from A to Z This military lore, By years of study slowly gat (And somewhat out-of-date at that), When lo, I had the whole thing pat ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 150, March 15, 1916 • Various

... brother. Burleigh still Beset Drake's path with pitfalls: treacherous greed For Spain's blood-money daggered all the dark Around him, and John Doughty without cease Sought to make use of all; until, by chance, Drake gat the proof of treasonable intrigue With Spain, against him, up to the deadly hilt, And hurled him into the Tower. Many a night She sat by that old casement nigh the sea And heard its ebb and flow. ...
— Collected Poems - Volume One (of 2) • Alfred Noyes

... really been Rochester, which is a few minutes to the east of Greenwich. The wind changed in the middle of the day, and we passed through a large fleet of merchantmen hove-to under shelter of Cape de Gat, where they had collected, I suppose, from various ports in ...
— A Voyage in the 'Sunbeam' • Annie Allnut Brassey

... land of the tribe was neither fish nor fruit, And the deepest pit of popoi stood empty to the foot.[1] The clans upon the left and the clans upon the right Now oiled their carven maces and scoured their daggers bright; They gat them to the thicket, to the deepest of the shade, And lay with sleepless eyes in the deadly ambuscade. And oft in the starry even the song of morning rose, What time the oven smoked in the country of their foes; For oft to loving hearts, and waiting ears and sight, The lads that went to forage ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 14 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... elcock some nots, and thay put me in pruson all the night for me pains, and non new whear i was, and i did gat cold. ...
— The Spectator, Volumes 1, 2 and 3 - With Translations and Index for the Series • Joseph Addison and Richard Steele

... thing like this to yield my breath, Awake, yet dreaming, with no sounds of fear, No dreadful sights to tell me it is near; Yea, God, I thank Thee!" but with that last word It seemed to him that he his own name heard Whispered, as though the wind had borne it past; With that he gat unto his feet at last, But still awhile he stood, with sunken head, And in a low and trembling voice he said, "Lord, I am ready, whither shall I go? I pray Thee unto me some token show." And, as he said this, round about he turned, And in the east beheld ...
— The Earthly Paradise - A Poem • William Morris

... neighbor," he said, falling again into the Western drawl he sometimes used as a mark of his friendship for her. "But have it your own way. I'll not even tote a gat." ...
— The Highgrader • William MacLeod Raine

... in good faith, and by this chair, which, by the grace of God, I intend presently to sit in, I had three suits in one year made three great ladies in love with me: I had other three, undid three gentlemen in imitation: and other three gat three other gentlemen widows of three thousand pound ...
— Every Man Out Of His Humour • Ben Jonson

... fitting suggestion that each bullet should bear a tag with the devise, "You're shot!" An aged "roughneck" of a half-century of Mexican residence had put it succinctly: "Yer travel scheme's all right; but I'll be —— —— if I like the gat you carry." However, such as it was, I drew it now and held it ready for whatever it might be called upon ...
— Tramping Through Mexico, Guatemala and Honduras - Being the Random Notes of an Incurable Vagabond • Harry A. Franck

... gat my death frae twa sweet een, Twa lovely een o' bonnie blue; 'Twas not her golden ringlets bright, Her lips like roses wet wi' dew— Her graceful bosom lily white— It was her een sae bonnie ...
— Bluebell - A Novel • Mrs. George Croft Huddleston

... choosest; but do thou get ready for me gypsum lime and ashlar- stone and brick-clay and handicraftsmen, while I also bring architects and master masons and they shall erect for thee whatso thou requirest." So King Pharaoh gat ready all this and fared forth with his folk to a spacious plain without the city whither Haykar and his pages had carried the boys and the vultures; and with the Sovran went all the great men of his kingdom ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 6 • Richard F. Burton

... brother should not be without a sword, he swiftly gat upon his horse and rode on, and delivered the sword to Sir Kay, and thought no more of aught but the splendid knights and richly garbed lords ...
— King Arthur's Knights - The Tales Re-told for Boys & Girls • Henry Gilbert

... and Borja (pronounced Borha) on the Babo River were established. Manbos of the Sibgat River were converted and a settlement was founded at its juncture with the W-wa. This settlement is now called Pait. San Miguel on the Tgo River was founded with 25 families, most of whom were Manbos. This town is no longer in ...
— The Manbos of Mindano - Memoirs of the National Academy of Sciences, Volume XXIII, First Memoir • John M. Garvan

... this scenario, Yeager. The old man sent it out to me to see if we can pull off the riding end of it. Scene twenty-seven is the sticker. Here's the idea: You've been thrown from your horse and your foot's caught in the stirrup. You draw your gat to shoot the bronch and it's bumped out of your hand as you're dragged over the rough ground. See? You save your life by wriggling your foot out of your boot. Can it be done without taking too ...
— Steve Yeager • William MacLeod Raine

... carry him off. As we picked him up, he insisted, in a voice like that of a drunken man, on somebody bringing his carbine and hat. "Where's my rifle an' hat? Rifle an' hat!" The third man took them and gat—I heard this later. You have no idea what a weight a mortally-wounded man is, and the poor fellow was in reality rather lightly built. On we went, stumbling over stones, a ditch, and into little chasms in the earth. Once or twice he mumbled, "Not so fast, not so fast!" ...
— A Yeoman's Letters - Third Edition • P. T. Ross

... noisy chap in t'cabin. They called him Mr. D—-, and said he 'twas t'mayor of Belleville; but I thought they were a-fooning. He wouldn't sleep himself, nor let t'others sleep. He gat piper, an' put him top o' table, and kept him playing ...
— Life in the Clearings versus the Bush • Susanna Moodie

... in old King James's time, when I was wont to esteem it a high favor to be admitted to a court mask! There used to be a swarm of these small apparitions, in holiday time; and we called them children of the Lord of Misrule. But how gat such ...
— The Scarlet Letter • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... ye your dinner, Lord Randal, my son? Where gat ye your dinner, my handsome young man?" "I din'd wi' my true-love; mother, make my bed soon, For I'm weary wi' hunting, and fain wald ...
— Library Of The World's Best Literature, Ancient And Modern, Vol 3 • Various

... riding home without me, I would give her a good half hour of it. I always do when she throws herself over like that.—I've gat my Epictetus?" he asked himself feeling in his ...
— The Marquis of Lossie • George MacDonald

... "Verily, her fashion glorifieth the Great Creator and extolled be the perfection of Him who made her and graced her with this beauty and goodliness!" And his back was cloven in sunder, [321] when he saw her; his thought was confounded and his understanding [322] dazed and the love of her gat hold upon his whole heart; so he turned back and returning home, went in to his mother, like one distraught. She bespoke him and he answered her neither yea nor nay; then she brought him the morning-meal, as he abode on this wise, and said to him, "O my son, what hath ...
— Alaeddin and the Enchanted Lamp • John Payne

... gat owre the bed, To see if the thing was true; But she's ta'en the bonny clerk in her arms, And covered him owre wi' blue, blue; And covered him ...
— Ancient Poems, Ballads and Songs of England • Robert Bell

... covered with a cloath of silke; then Sir Launcelot stooped downe, and cut a piece of that cloath away, and then it fared under him as the earth had quaked a little, whereof he was afeard, and then hee saw a faire sword lye by the dead knight, and that he gat in his hand, and hied him out of the chappell. As soon as he was in the chappell-yerd, all the knights spoke to him with a grimly voice, and said, 'Knight, Sir Launcelot, lay that sword from thee, or else thou shalt die.'— 'Whether I live or die,' said Sir Launcelot, 'with no ...
— Marmion • Sir Walter Scott

... from the which I gat out by stooping, let vs come on forward to the sweet liberties which I next beheld and that was a thicke wood of Chestnuts at the foote of the hill, which I supposed to be a soile for Pan or some ...
— Hypnerotomachia - The Strife of Loue in a Dreame • Francesco Colonna

... Ellidi, he gat, the best of good things, of his father's heritage, and another possession therewith—a gold ring; no dearer ...
— The Story Of Frithiof The Bold - 1875 • Anonymous

... an' these hats of ours are alike. Just as I come by that lumber-pile down yonder, a man hopped out an throwed a 'gat' under my nose. He was quicker than light, and near blowed my skelp into the next block before he saw who I was; then he ...
— The Spoilers • Rex Beach

... Senate ar taken oft to counsayle With Statis of this and many a other region. Whiche of theyr maners vnstable ar and frayle Nought of Lawe Ciuyl knowinge nor Canon. But wander in derknes clerenes they haue none. O noble Rome thou gat nat thy honours Nor general ...
— The Ship of Fools, Volume 1 • Sebastian Brandt

... ower again he wad be sayin' til himsel','A hun'er poun'! Ay, a hun'er poun'!' It maittered na what he wad be speikin' aboot, or wha til, in it wad come!—i' the middle o' onything, ye cudna tell whan or whaur,—'A hun'er poun'!' says he;'Ay, a hun'er poun'!' Fowk leuch at the first, but sune gat used til't, an' cam hardly to ken 'at he said it, for what has nae sense has little hearin'. An' I doobtna thae rimes wasna even a verse o' an auld ballant, but jist a cletter o' clinkin' styte (nonsense),'at he had learnt frae some blackamore bairn, ...
— Warlock o' Glenwarlock • George MacDonald

... found him (Sir Kay) fighting a desperate fight against nine foreign knights, and straightway took the battle solely into his own hands, and conquered the nine; and that night Sir Launcelot rose quietly, and dressed him in Sir Kay's armor and took Sir Kay's horse and gat him away into distant lands, and vanquished sixteen knights in one pitched battle and thirty-four in another; and all these and the former nine he made to swear that about Whitsuntide they would ride ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... knew at the moment was that something had given way in the knee-joint, and that when I attempted to put my foot to the ground after extricating it from the hole in which it had been caught "the pains of hell gat hold upon me." I suppose I must, up to that time, have been fairly free from physical torments of any kind. I had certainly no conception, before that moment, that it was possible for a human being to suffer such torture as I had then ...
— Memoirs of Sir Wemyss Reid 1842-1885 • Stuart J. Reid, ed.

... all meanes possible, by a shorter way to recouer his Port, and where he saw the yce neuer so little open, he gate in at one gappe and out at another, and so himselfe valiantly led the way thorow before to induce the Fleete to follow after, and with incredible paine and perill at length gat through the yce, and vpon the one and thirtieth of Iuly recouered his long wished Port after many attempts and sundry times being put backe, and came to anker in the Countesse of Warwicks sound, in the entrance whereof, when he thought all perill ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of The English Nation, Vol. XII., America, Part I. • Richard Hakluyt

... or ever the dawning shed On dreams a narrow flame, Three gaping dwarfs gat out of bed And gazed ...
— Songs of Childhood • Walter de la Mare

... I gat me from thence, Before the clerks of the Chancery; Where many I found earning of pence; But none at all once regarded me. I gave them my plaint upon my knee; They liked it well when they had it read; But, lacking money, I ...
— English Satires • Various

... his father's son,' returned Sir Patrick, 'who gat the bride with a kingdom for her tocher that these folks have well-nigh lost ...
— Two Penniless Princesses • Charlotte M. Yonge

... his force began to decline, so as he [Sidenote: Earle Goodwine fled the realme.] should not be able to match the kings power, he fled the realme, and so likewise did his sonnes. He himselfe with his sonnes Swanus, Tostie, and Girth, sailed into Flanders: and Harold with his brother Leofwine gat ships at Bristow, and passed into Ireland. Githa the wife of Goodwine, and Judith the wife of Tostie, the daughter of Baldwine earle of Flanders went ...
— Chronicles (1 of 6): The Historie of England (8 of 8) - The Eight Booke of the Historie of England • Raphael Holinshed

... a fairer face, Though fairer anes are few, An' I hae marked kinder smiles Than e'er I gat frae you. But smiles, like blinks o' simmer sheen, Leave not a trace behind; While early love has forged chains The freest heart ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volume III - The Songs of Scotland of the Past Half Century • Various

... ye a lang pystle, but, Gude forgie me, I gat mysel sae notouriously fou the day after kail-time that I can hardly stoiter but ...
— The Letters of Robert Burns • Robert Burns

... was one funeral for the slain King and for her whom his slaying had slain: and when that was done, the little king was borne to the font, and at his christening he gat ...
— Child Christopher • William Morris



Words linked to "Gat" :   pistol, rod, side arm, patois, cant, vernacular, lingo, handgun, shooting iron



Copyright © 2019 Free-Translator.com