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Foeman   Listen
noun
Foeman  n.  (pl. foemen)  An enemy in war. "And the stern joy which warriors feel In foemen worthy of their steel."






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Foeman" Quotes from Famous Books



... kindly foemen, rather than with friends unkind; Friend and foeman are distinguished not ...
— Hindu Literature • Epiphanius Wilson

... see the gallant Roxas grasp The towering banner of her sway; And Monagas, with fearful clasp, Plucks down the chief that stops the way; The reckless Urdaneta rides, Where rives the earth the iron hail; Nor long the Spanish foeman bides, The stroke of ...
— Graham's Magazine Vol XXXIII No. 2 August 1848 • Various

... he took to charging furiously at everything that came in his way, and was enjoying himself with this little game when Chand Moorut once more appeared on the scene! The rogue stopped short instantly. It was evident that he recognised a foeman, worthy of his steel, approaching. Chand Moorut advanced with alacrity. The rogue eyed him with a sinister expression. There was no hesitation on either side. Both warriors were self-confident; nevertheless, they did not rush to the battle. ...
— The Eagle Cliff • R.M. Ballantyne

... in her sight Who was my mistress should recorded be And of the nations. And, when thus the fight Faltered and men once bold with faces white Turned this and that way in excuse to flee, I only stood, and by the foeman's might Was overborne ...
— Reviews • Oscar Wilde

... when he was warm enough, told the story of his grief. Then said Kana, "Almost spent are my years; I am only waiting for death, and behold I have at last found a foeman ...
— Hawaiian Folk Tales - A Collection of Native Legends • Various

... saw not where the Pagan stood, and stared, As if with looks he would his foeman kill, But full of other thoughts he forward fared, And sent his looks before him up the hill, His gesture such his troubled soul declared, At last as marble rock he standeth still, Stone cold without; ...
— Jerusalem Delivered • Torquato Tasso

... G. Ingerman was a foeman worthy of even a novelist's skill in repartee. Thus far, he, Grant, had been merely uncivil, using a bludgeon for wit, whereas the visitor was making play with a ...
— The Postmaster's Daughter • Louis Tracy

... upon the castle wall, Oriana: She watch'd my crest among them all, Oriana: She saw me fight, she heard me call, When forth there stept a foeman tall, Oriana, Atween me ...
— The Early Poems of Alfred Lord Tennyson • Tennyson

... and bishops may capture any foeman which stands anywhere within their respective ranges; and the knights can capture the adverse men which stand upon the squares to which they can leap. The piece which takes occupies the square of the piece which is taken, the latter being removed from the ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 6, Slice 1 - "Chtelet" to "Chicago" • Various

... of that faith which in Spain we revere, Thou scourge of each foeman who dares to draw near; Whom the Son of that God who the elements tames, Called child of the thunder, ...
— The Bible in Spain • George Borrow

... begun work on them was stopped. This dismayed the natives. One morning there came to Mr. Fassit a letter imploring him to return: "Come back, o come agin and bore us some more wels. We wil protec you like a son. We dont make war on Ile." And I, being thus respected, went and came from the Foeman's Land, and joined in the dreadful rebel-ry and returned unharmed, leading a charmed if not particularly charming life all winter and the spring, to the great amazement and bewilderment of many, as will ...
— Memoirs • Charles Godfrey Leland

... royalty and nobility—with that contemptuously humorous tolerance of a necessary and somewhat amusing evil which we find in American comic papers. We had a battle royal for about one hour, and I must confess he was a foeman worthy of any man's steel, so long as I was reasonable in my arguments; but when I finally observed that it wouldn't be ten years before Barnum and Bailey's Greatest Show on Earth had the whole lot engaged for the New York circus ...
— Ghosts I have Met and Some Others • John Kendrick Bangs

... heron, the Heathen renewed the charge, and a second time was fain to retreat without coming to a close struggle. A third time he approached in the same manner, when the Christian knight, desirous to terminate this illusory warfare, in which he might at length have been worn out by the activity of his foeman, suddenly seized the mace which hung at his saddle-bow, and, with a strong hand and unerring aim, hurled it against the head of the Emir, for such and not less his enemy appeared. The Saracen was just aware ...
— The Ontario Readers: Fourth Book • Various

... Hagen the stark man, "It may well irk thy knights that he rideth hither as a foeman. Better had he refrained. My masters had never done the ...
— The Fall of the Niebelungs • Unknown

... friend, O Halfdan! of mingled blood, Lives near indeed, though distant be his abode; But to thy foeman's dwelling the way is weary,— Though standing by thy pathway, 'tis far ...
— Fridthjof's Saga • Esaias Tegner

... had presented itself for discussing the matter with him—which was while the king was displaying his fine feathers to his ladies; and it might very well happen that the old induna, animated by the best intentions in the world toward me, might select a foeman whom he might deem well worthy of my steel, for the purpose of enabling me to display my skill before the king. It was a most annoying dilemma for a peaceably disposed young fellow like myself, with a natural aversion to unnecessary strife and bloodshed, to find himself in, and for ...
— Through Veld and Forest - An African Story • Harry Collingwood

... the Englishman to the side of the trail, and set his back to a tree. When he saw that fallen foeman's breath was coming more strongly, he followed ...
— The Honor of the Big Snows • James Oliver Curwood

... —"On the foeman's deck, where a man should be, With his sword in his hand, and his foe at his knee. Cockswain, or boatswain, or reefer may try, But the first man on board will ...
— The Haunted Hour - An Anthology • Various

... coward's zeal, who, on his knee Behind the bole of his protecting tree, So curves his musket that the bark it fits, And, firing, blows the weapon into bits; But with the noble aim of one whose heart Values his foeman for he loves his art The veteran debater moves afield, Untaught to libel as untaught to yield. Dear foeman mine, I've but this end in view— That to prevent which most you wish to do. What, then, are you most eager to be at? To hate me? Nay, I'll help you, sir, at that. This only passion does ...
— Black Beetles in Amber • Ambrose Bierce

... with a sigh adown he lay And slept, nor ever woke again, For in that hour was he slain By stealthy traitors as he slept. He of a few was much bewept, But of most men was well forgot While the town's ashes still were hot The foeman on that day did burn. As for the land, great Time did turn The bloody fields to deep green grass, And from the minds of men did pass The memory of that time of woe, And at this day all things are so As first I said; ...
— The Earthly Paradise - A Poem • William Morris

... Dacotahs works in a similar manner. Before a party starts on the war-trail, the chief, with various ceremonies, takes his club and stands before his tent. An old witch bowls hoops at him; each hoop represents an enemy, and for each he strikes a foeman is expected to fall. A bowl of sweetened water is also set out to entice the spirits of the enemy.(1) The war-magic of the Aryans in India does not differ much in character from that of the Dacotahs. "If any one wishes his army to ...
— Myth, Ritual, and Religion, Vol. 1 • Andrew Lang

... champion of a hundred shows, The prey of every draught that blows, Art thou; in fact thy charms present The earmarks of a mixed descent. And, though too proud to start a fight With every cur that looms in sight, None ever saw thee quail beneath A foeman worthy of thy teeth. Thou art, in brief, a model hound, Not so much beautiful as sound In heart and limb; not always strong When nose and eyes impel to wrong, Nor always doing just as bid, But sterling as the minted quid. And I have loved thee in my fashion, Shared ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Volume 152, Feb. 7, 1917 • Various

... carnage and lurid flames which envelop both enemies and ships in common ruin. A fierce fight is often an earnest of future friendship, however, and we are told that Halfdan and Viking, having failed to conquer Njorfe, a foeman of mettle, sheathed their swords after a most obstinate struggle, and accepted their enemy as a third link in ...
— Myths of the Norsemen - From the Eddas and Sagas • H. A. Guerber

... in the fighting when the two would stand panting for breath, facing each other, mustering their wits and their forces for a new onslaught. It was during a pause such as this that Taug chanced to let his eyes rove beyond his foeman. Instantly the entire aspect of the ape altered. Rage left his countenance to be supplanted by ...
— Jungle Tales of Tarzan • Edgar Rice Burroughs

... ne'er Her warrior's dying wish shall hear. The passing zephyr bears no sigh; No wounded warrior meets the eye; Death is his sleep by Erie's wave; Of Raisin's snow we heap his grave. How many hopes lie buried here— The mother's joy, the father's pride, The country's boast, the foeman's fear, In 'wildered havoc, side by side! Lend me, thou silent queen of night, Lend me a while thy waning light, That I may see each well-loved form That sank ...
— Choice Specimens of American Literature, And Literary Reader - Being Selections from the Chief American Writers • Benj. N. Martin

... bovine, their outlook crude and raw. They abandon vital matters to be tickled with a straw, But the straw that they were tickled with—the chaff that they were fed with— They convert into a weaver's beam to break their foeman's head with. ...
— Songs from Books • Rudyard Kipling

... upon the people who heard it we have spoken; throughout the country it produced a profound impression. The North felt that a new prophet had arisen; the South, a new foeman. The great advocate of nullification, however, was not Hayne, who would be scarcely remembered to-day but for the fact that it was to him Webster addressed his reply, but that formidable giant of a man, ...
— American Men of Action • Burton E. Stevenson

... Meet welcome to her guest she made, And every courteous rite was paid, That hospitality could claim, Though all unasked his birth and name. 585 Such then the reverence to a guest, That fellest foe might join the feast, And from his deadliest foeman's door Unquestioned turn, the banquet o'er. At length his rank the stranger names, 590 "The Knight of Snowdoun, James Fitz-James; Lord of a barren heritage, Which his brave sires, from age to age, By their good swords had held with toil; ...
— Lady of the Lake • Sir Walter Scott

... rattle of Dieskau's guns, and that wild war-whoop, more terrible than all. Again old Monro watches from his fortress-walls the steadily approaching foe, and looks in vain for help, save to his own brave heart. I see the light of conquest shining in his foeman's eye, darkened by no shadow of the fate that waits his coming on a bleak Northern hill; but, generous in the hour of victory, he shall not be less noble in defeat,—for to generous hearts all generous ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. XII. July, 1863, No. LXIX. - A Magazine Of Literature, Art, And Politics • Various

... admiring his shrewdness and courage. He—Lecoq—had prepared himself for a strenuous struggle with this man, and he hoped to conquer in the end. Nevertheless in his secret soul he felt for his adversary, admiring that sympathy which a "foeman worthy of one's steel" ...
— Monsieur Lecoq • Emile Gaboriau

... down in the west, and the first stats of the twilight began to glimmer, when Morven started front his seat, and a trembling appeared to seize his limbs. His lips foamed; an agony and a fear possessed him; he writhed as a man whom the spear of a foeman has pierced with a mortal wound, and suddenly fell upon his ...
— The Fallen Star; and, A Dissertation on the Origin of Evil • E. L. Bulwer; and, Lord Brougham

... cried, "Give me thy sword, Julianus!" And her son Unsheathed the blade (that had not left his side Save when it sought a foeman's blood to shed), Awed by her regal bearing, ...
— Poems of Cheer • Ella Wheeler Wilcox

... within the grave Is hid that prince, the wise, the brave; But in an islet's narrow bound, With the great Ocean roaring round, The captive of a foeman base He pines to ...
— Life and Letters of Lord Macaulay • George Otto Trevelyan

... under Sabhal's twin peaks, upon us drave the horsemen, troop upon troop, and the foeman pressed us sore— They said to us, "Two things lie before you; now must ye choose the points of the spears couched at ye; or if ye will not, chains!" We answered them, "Yea this thing may fall to you after the fight, ...
— Library Of The World's Best Literature, Ancient And Modern, Vol. 2 • Charles Dudley Warner

... Gather, O gather, Foeman and friend in love and peace! Waves sleep together When the blasts that called them to battle, cease. For fangless Power grown tame and mild 5 Is at play with Freedom's fearless child— The dove ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley Volume I • Percy Bysshe Shelley

... sped ship Gudruda, Left her lord in foeman's ring; Brighteyes back to back with Baresark Held his head 'gainst mighty odds. Down amidst the ballast tumbling, Ospakar's shield-carles were rolled. Holy peace at length they handselled, Eric must ...
— Eric Brighteyes • H. Rider Haggard

... the mighty Eteoclus is wheeling his foaming steeds, bearing a buckler blazoned with a man in armor treading the steps of a ladder to his foeman's tower. Megareus, the offspring of Creon, is the valiant warrior who will either pay the debt of his nurture to his land or will decorate his father's house with the spoils of the ...
— Prometheus Bound and Seven Against Thebes • Aeschylus

... the winding valleys a hillsman went his way; His eyes were black and flaming, his gun was clean and bright He cried unto the vultures: "Oh, follow me to-day, And you shall have my foeman to feed upon to-night!" ...
— The World's Greatest Books, Vol. I • Various

... so, old True Penny? The Kunnel has met a foeman worthy of his steel," said Foster in great glee, as he bent above the Colonel. "I know. How do I know?" quotha. "By the curve on the Kunnel's back. The size of the parabola described by that backbone accurately ...
— The Arena - Volume 4, No. 22, September, 1891 • Various

... is the tale of the Blankshires bold, the famous charge they made; This is the tale of the deeds they did whose glory never will fade; They only numbered X hundred men and the German were thousands (Y), Yet on the battlefield of Z they made the foeman fly. ...
— Punch or the London Charivari, Vol. 147, November 25, 1914 • Various

... was for light; Through all that dark and desperate fight The blackness of that noonday night He asked but the return of sight, To see his foeman's face. ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

... now, except sitting down in a growing puddle till someone came along to hoist him under the armpits, and then arriving at the general's late, with his seat black-wet.... You unhorse your foeman, curvet up to the royal box to receive the victor's chaplet, swing from your saddle, and fall ...
— A Matter of Proportion • Anne Walker

... work is done! What to him is friend or foeman, Rise of moon, or set of sun, Hand of man, or kiss of woman? Lay him low, lay him low, In the clover or the snow: What cares he? he ...
— The Continental Monthly, Vol 3 No 3, March 1863 - Devoted To Literature And National Policy • Various

... Consul Cinna hath restor'd The doubtful course of your betrayed state, And waits your present swift approach to Rome, Your foeman Sylla posteth very fast With good success from Pontus, to prevent Your speedy entrance into Italy. The neighbouring cities are your very friends; Nought rests, my lord, ...
— A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. VII (4th edition) • Various

... the hour, or ere nine days had sped, If he declined the combat, and refused Upon the instant to come forth with them, And so, for honour's sake, Ferdiah came. For he preferred to die a warrior's death, Pierced to the heart by a proud foeman's spear, Than by the serpent sting of slanderous tongues— By satire and abuse, and foul reproach. When to the court he came, where the great queen Held revel, he received all due respect: The sweet intoxicating cup went round, And soon Ferdiah ...
— Poems • Denis Florence MacCarthy

... the bugle, though loudly it blows; It calls but the warders that guard thy repose; Their bows would be bended, their blades would be red, E'er the step of a foeman draws ...
— Rhymes Old and New • M.E.S. Wright

... Disconus against those five fought like a madman. His sword brake, and he took a great blow on his helmet that bore him down. Then the foeman thought to slay him outright; but Le Beau Disconus was minded suddenly of his axe that was at his hinder saddle-bow. He quitted himself like a true knight: three steeds he hewed ...
— The Junior Classics, V4 • Willam Patten (Editor)

... sunshine of long and dreary years of peace, who never hear the note of the bugle nor see the flash of the foeman's steel from one year's end to another, know not what it was to live in those stirring times and all the joy of the strife. You should have seen us then, when ...
— The Tory Maid • Herbert Baird Stimpson

... reading his evening paper, imparting occasional choice bits to his wife and his eldest daughter, Julia, who were dealing with a heap of mending. The two younger children were playing lotto, while Ned was having a hand-to-hand tussle with his Cicero, a foeman likely to prove worthy of ...
— A Bookful of Girls • Anna Fuller

... terrible," they said, "to see that little handful of men rush on fearless of death, fearless of everything." It was bravery of the highest kind, and they admired it, as only brave men do admire courage in a foeman. The people of Britain who read extracts taken from Boer newspapers, extracts which ridicule British pluck and all things British, must not blame the Boers for those statements. In nearly every case the papers published ...
— Campaign Pictures of the War in South Africa (1899-1900) - Letters from the Front • A. G. Hales

... and that little craft steamed boldly out from behind the "Minnesota," and sent two huge iron balls, weighing one hundred and seventy pounds each, against the side of the "Merrimac." The shot produced no effect beyond showing the men of the "Merrimac" that they had met a foeman worthy of their steel. The "Merrimac" slowed up her engines, as though to survey the strange antagonist thus braving her power. The "Monitor" soon came up, and a cautious fight began; each vessel sailing round the other, advancing, backing, making quick dashes here and ...
— The Naval History of the United States - Volume 2 (of 2) • Willis J. Abbot

... deck your mantle. Blue and gold shall be your colors— Blue, for purity of purpose; Gold, for worth of soul and spirit. While you stand above the harbor, While you call the fog and west-wind, While you wear your cloak of poppies, Never shall a foeman enter Through the Golden Gate with war-boats. Pluck the petal, let it flutter To the ground. Your wish is granted. Stand forever, native daughters, As Twin Peaks, to guard ...
— The Legends of San Francisco • George W. Caldwell

... peaceful mien, Trusts to his feathers, shining golden-green, When the dark plumage with the crimson beak Has rustled shadowy from its splintered peak,— So trust thy friends, whose babbling tongues would charm The lifted sabre from thy foeman's arm, Thy torches ready for the answering peal From bellowing ...
— The Poetical Works of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Complete • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

... sure, he plunges his hand into the pocket, where he deposited both letter and photograph—after holding the latter before the eyes of his dying foeman, and witnessing the fatal effect. With all his diabolical hardihood, he had been awed by this—so as to thrust the papers into ...
— The Death Shot - A Story Retold • Mayne Reid

... Never before or since had the soil of England been trodden by a hostile foot. Never had a British peer been forced to feel that his own castle was not safe from the invader. Jones, with his handful of American tars, had accomplished a feat which had never before been accomplished, and which no later foeman of England has dared to repeat. It is little wonder that the British papers described ...
— The Naval History of the United States - Volume 1 (of 2) • Willis J. Abbot

... she would see it when she went out for early mass the next morning. As he expected, Kriemhild discovered her dead lord and fell senseless upon him. Recovering, she cried out that he had been murdered: no foeman in a fair fight could have ...
— Famous Tales of Fact and Fancy - Myths and Legends of the Nations of the World Retold for Boys and Girls • Various

... the sword Compell'd to win me bread, A soldier's life of storm and strife For forty years I led, Yet ne'er by this reluctant arm Has friend or foeman bled. ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, No. 327 - Vol. 53, January, 1843 • Various

... will follow on all the day Where the bonnie Prince has led, Till we drive the Winter foeman away And throne my Prince instead: And sing willaloo! With the birds, willaloo! For the ...
— Ballads of Peace in War • Michael Earls

... muttered. "Then, durn it, I'm in luck, fer all they've got agin me is pot-shootin' at a nigger soger up in ther mountings; en thet ain't much, 'cause I didn't hit ther durned cuss. Blame sorry tew, fer 'Who spills the foremost foeman's life, his party conquers in the strife.' Thet's Scott agin, Cap. Dew ye ever read Sir Walter? I tell ...
— My Lady of the North • Randall Parrish

... nations! Famine long hath dealt their rations. To the wall, with hate and hunger, Numerous as wolves, and stronger, On they sweep. O glorious city! Must thou be a theme for pity? Fight like your first sire, each Roman! Alaric was a gentle foeman, Matched with Bourbon's black banditti. Rouse thee, thou eternal city! Rouse thee! Rather give the torch With thine own hand to thy porch, Than behold such hosts pollute Your ...
— Library of the World's Best Literature, Ancient and Modern, Vol. 7 • Various

... related—a history, too, that could be read and understood alike by all, the wise and the ignorant, the learned and the unlearned. But those histories are gone. They can be read no more forever. They were a fortress of strength; but what invading foeman could never do the silent artillery of time has done—the leveling of its walls. They are gone. They were a forest of giant oaks; but the all-restless hurricane has swept over them, and left only here and there a lonely trunk, despoiled of its verdure, shorn of its foliage, unshading and unshaded, ...
— The Papers And Writings Of Abraham Lincoln, Complete - Constitutional Edition • Abraham Lincoln

... what are we waiting? There are three words to speak; WE WILL IT, and what is the foeman but the ...
— Poems By The Way & Love Is Enough • William Morris

... him not. The strength whereby The patriot girds himself to die; The unconquerable power which fills The foeman battling on his hills: These have one fountain deep and clear, The same whence gush'd that ...
— The Illustrated London Reading Book • Various

... it is over, over, I think it is over at last, Voices of foeman and lover, The sweet and the bitter have passed— Life, like a tempest of ocean Hath outblown its ultimate blast. There's but a faint sobbing seaward While the calm of the tide deepens leeward, And behold! like the welcoming quiver Of heart-pulses throbbed thro' the river, ...
— Songs from the Southland • Various

... sons of the Roman, The sound of whose step was as fate to the foeman! Whose realm, save the air and the wave, had no wall, As he strode through the world like a lord in his hall; Though your fame hath sunk down to the night of the grave, It shall rise from the field like the sun from the wave. Breeze fill our ...
— Rienzi • Edward Bulwer Lytton

... treacherous Afghan or the base African. If you took up the mallet to smite upon a spring and make proof of how far you could send a ball flying upwards, your blow descended upon the head of some other recent foeman. Try your fist at the indicator of muscularity, and with zeal you smote full in the stomach of a guy made to represent a Russian. If you essayed the pop-gun, the mark set you was on the flank of a wooden donkey, ...
— The Nether World • George Gissing

... himself, however, skillful boxer that he was, was not deceived. He realized, as he rested in his corner, that he had met a foeman worthy of the best he had to offer. As yet, though, he had no means of telling what the lad had in store for an attack of his own; but he realized that Jack's defense ...
— The Boy Allies Under Two Flags • Ensign Robert L. Drake

... is, "A sail! a sail!" Brace high each nerve to dare the fight, And boldly steer to seek the foeman; One secret prayer to aid the right, And many a secret thought to woman Now spread the flutt'ring canvas wide, And dash the foaming sea aside; The cry's, ...
— The Red Rover • James Fenimore Cooper

... listed field, A sight both sad and fair; We saw Lord Marmion pierce his shield, And saw his saddle bare; We saw the victor win the crest He wears with worthy pride; And on the gibbet-tree, reversed, His foeman's scutcheon tied. Place, nobles, for the Falcon-Knight! Room, room, ye gentles gay, For him who conquered in the ...
— Marmion: A Tale of Flodden Field • Walter Scott

... Madelon, during the days of their betrothal, were as closely beset by spies on every hand as a party of Madelon's old kindred might have been, encamped in a wooded country, where every bush veiled savage eyes and every tree stood in front of a foeman, but they did not know it. Folk knew when Mrs. Gordon went to visit her son's betrothed, though 'twas on a dark evening. They knew what she wore, and how long she stayed. They knew when Madelon returned her visit; they knew, to remember, in many cases, more details ...
— Madelon - A Novel • Mary E. Wilkins Freeman

... one with eyes that look below The battle-smoke to glimpse the foeman's charge, We through the dust of downward years may scan The onslaught that awaits this idiot world Where blood pays blood for nothing, and where life Pays life to madness, till at last the ports Of gilded helplessness be battered through By the ...
— The Children of the Night • Edwin Arlington Robinson

... they fell they lay— Struck down in the dreadful strife; And the latest look they wore in life Death had not taken away: Some with a pleasant smile, Foeman with foemen at peace, Croat, and Frank, and Tyrolese, All in one ghastly pile, From the Seine, the Po, and the Land of Song, Oh, where were the souls of ...
— Canadian Wild Flowers • Helen M. Johnson

... Baker, now a Senator from Oregon, left the halls of Congress for a Union command. At the head of the California volunteer regiment he charged the enemy at Ball's Bluff and fell, his body pierced by half a dozen bullets. Curiously different was the record of Broderick's old foeman, William Gwin. In October, 1861, he started East via the Isthmus of Panama, accompanied by Calhoun Benham, one of Terry's seconds in the fateful duel. On the same steamer was General Sumner, relieved of his command ...
— Port O' Gold • Louis John Stellman

... and ill report he cleaved his way. Right onward, with his face set toward the heights, Nor feared to face the foeman's dread array,— The lash of scorn, the sting of petty spites. He dared the lightning in the lightning's track, And answered ...
— The Complete Poems of Paul Laurence Dunbar • Paul Laurence Dunbar

... officers, none too soon, for with vengeful howls every Indian in the valley seems at the instant to open fire, and once more the little command is encircled by the cordon of savage sharpshooters. Holding their own fire except where some rabid young foeman too daringly exposes himself, the men wait and listen. Little by little the fury of the attack draws away, and only scattering shots annoy them. They can see, though, that already many Indians are ...
— Marion's Faith. • Charles King

... The neighbor who oppressed you as a foe Secure an ever-grateful friend. And you, The deputies of the august republic, Saddle your steeds of fire! Leap to your seats! To you expand high fortune's golden gates; I will divide the foeman's spoil with you. Moscow is rich in plunder; measureless In gold and gems, the treasures of the Czar; I can give royal guerdons to my friends, And I will give them, too. When I, as Czar, Set foot within the Kremlin, then, I swear, The poorest of you all, that follows me, Shall robe himself in velvet ...
— Demetrius - A Play • Frederich Schiller

... Raising the wounded from their helplessness, And bearing life draughts to the sinking soul! O Mother Earth! thine arms will fondle her When ingrate man hath drain'd her spirit dry, Fashioned in weakness, yet in weakness strong Where honour were the foeman, what is she Before the onslaught of satanic serfs?— The mirror of her purity obscured, Polluted by lust's pestilential breath— Pluck'd like a flower to while an hour away, Then cast to wither on the barren ground, Shattered and bruised beneath ...
— Eidolon - The Course of a Soul and Other Poems • Walter R. Cassels

... them, to plunderers, who stripped them bare. Their defeats were the result of His having thus ceased to regard them as His. But though He had 'sold' them, He had not done with them; for it was not only the foeman's hand that struck them, but God's 'hand was against them,' and its grip crushed them. His judgments were not occasional, but continuous, and went with them 'whithersoever they went out.' Everything went wrong with them; there were no gleams breaking the black thunder-cloud. God's anger ...
— Expositions Of Holy Scripture - Volume I: St. Luke, Chaps. I to XII • Alexander Maclaren

... other women. No servant of Xerxes seemed outwardly more obedient than he. Night and day he wrought for the glory of Persia. Therefore, Glaucon looked on him with dread. In him Themistocles and Leonidas would find a worthy foeman. ...
— A Victor of Salamis • William Stearns Davis

... That where they revelled once shrew-mice may feed, And moles make palaces, and bats keep house. And if thou art of spleen so slow to rouse As quit thy score by thieving from a thief And leave him scatheless else, thou art no chief For Tydeus' son, who sees no end of strife But in his own or in his foeman's life." So he. Then Pyrrhos spake: "By that great shade Wherein I stand, which thy false Paris made Who slew my father, think not so to have done With Troy and Priam; for Peleides' son Must slake the sword that cries, and still the ghost Of him that haunts the ingles ...
— Helen Redeemed and Other Poems • Maurice Hewlett

... native France, With flaming torch and cruel sword And boisterous drums her foeman comes, I curse him and his vandal horde! Yet, what avail accrues to her, If we assume the garb of woe? Let's merry be,—in laughter we May rescue somewhat from ...
— A Little Book of Western Verse • Eugene Field

... not hate, we never cursed, Nor spoke a foeman's word Against a man in Ireland nursed, Howe'er we thought he erred; So start not, Irish-born man, If you're to Ireland true, We heed not race, nor creed, nor clan, We've hearts ...
— Thomas Davis, Selections from his Prose and Poetry • Thomas Davis

... things might well believe Scotland was once again the same free land, which had hailed in the same town the coronation of Alexander the Third, some years before. Little would they deem that the foreign foeman still thronged her feudal holds and cottage homes, that they waited but the commands of their monarch, to pour down on all sides upon the daring individual who thus boldly assumed the state and solemn honor of a king, and, armed but by his own high heart and a handful of loyal followers, ...
— The Days of Bruce Vol 1 - A Story from Scottish History • Grace Aguilar

... Bobbies. The fair FAWCETTA then must be thrown over; PENTHESILEA finds no hero-lover In either host. PRIAM, abroad, is dumb. Ah, maiden-hosts, man's love for you's a hum. Each fears you—in the foeman's cohorts thrown, But neither side desires you in its own! The false GLADSTONIUS first, he whom you nourish, A snake in your spare bosoms, dares to flourish Fresh arms against you; potent, though polite, He fain would bow you out of ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 102, April 30, 1892 • Various

... lips and fierce scowl gave expression to the anger within, and showed that when once aroused Stephen Verne was "a foeman ...
— Marguerite Verne • Agatha Armour

... in the wood he disappears, Plunging into the maze with hurried pace; And thither, whence he lately issued, steers, And, desperate, of death returns in trace. Cries and the tread of steeds this while he hears, And word and threat of foeman, as in chase; Lastly Medoro by his voice is known, Disarmed, on foot, ...
— Library Of The World's Best Literature, Ancient And Modern, Vol. 2 • Charles Dudley Warner

... for blows, * And the fire of a fight kindled he and his band, I smote him in fury with right and with left, * And his hide, till well satisfied, curried and tanned: Then in fear I fled forth and lay hid in my house, * To escape from the snares which my foeman had spanned: So the King of the country proclaimed my arrest; * When access to me a good Chamberlain fand: And warned me to flee from the city afar, * Disappear, disappoint what my enemies planned: Then we fled from our home 'neath ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 2 • Richard F. Burton

... flanking and turning movements were planned, attempted and failed; huge masses of men were hurled against each other in every formation known to military skill; myriads of lives and millions of money were sacrificed in historic endeavors to breach the enemy's front—but ever the foeman held his ground and neither side could claim decided advantage. Intrenchments such as the world has never seen before covered the countryside for fifty miles. Teuton, Gaul and Anglo-Saxon, Turco and Hindu, literally "dug themselves in," and refused ...
— America's War for Humanity • Thomas Herbert Russell

... visitors, but also by many Americans. This denial, however, rests on a limited and traditional use of the word picturesque. America has not the European picturesqueness of costume, of relics of the past, of the constant presence of the potential foeman at the gate. But apart altogether from the almost theatrical romance of frontier life and the now obsolescent conflict with the aborigines, is there not some element of the picturesque in the processes of readjustment ...
— The Land of Contrasts - A Briton's View of His American Kin • James Fullarton Muirhead

... the mine Must burn before its surface shine,[dz][112] But plunged within the furnace-flame, It bends and melts—though still the same; Then tempered to thy want, or will, 'Twill serve thee to defend or kill— A breast-plate for thine hour of need, Or blade to bid thy foeman bleed; But if a dagger's form it bear, 930 Let those who shape its edge, beware! Thus Passion's fire, and Woman's art, Can turn and tame the sterner heart; From these its form and tone are ta'en, And what they make it, must remain, But ...
— The Works Of Lord Byron, Vol. 3 (of 7) • Lord Byron

... hath resisted me, Give me thy gold, if thou hast any gold, For I have bought it with an hundred blows.— But let me see;—is this our foeman's face? Ah, no, no, no! it is mine only son!— Ah, boy, if any life be left in thee, Throw up thine eye; see, see what showers arise, Blown with the windy tempest of my heart, Upon thy wounds that kill mine eye and heart!— O, pity, God, this miserable age!— What stratagems, how fell, how butcherly, ...
— King Henry VI, Third Part • William Shakespeare [Rolfe edition]

... she could refrain from bridge drives and dinner dances. This Wild Man from Wyoming, so strong of stride, so quietly competent, whose sardonic glance had taken her in so directly and so keenly, was a foeman worthy ...
— Tangled Trails - A Western Detective Story • William MacLeod Raine

... fair palaces, thy country's glory, Thy tuneful bards were banished or were slain, Some rest in glory on their deathbeds gory, And some have lived to feel a foeman's chain. ...
— The Purcell Papers - Volume I. (of III.) • Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu

... and indecisive; but it raised William's reputation for courage and ability to the highest pitch, and drew from his veteran opponent one of those compliments a brave soldier is always glad to pay a foeman worthy of his steel. "The Prince of Orange," said Conde, "has acted in everything like an old captain, except in venturing his life too like a ...
— Claverhouse • Mowbray Morris

... stirring in the land, And kings must castles build, To guard them from the foeman's hand With fire ...
— The Book of Saints and Friendly Beasts • Abbie Farwell Brown

... the handmill (of Fate) grind down our tribe We will bear it, O Thou (Allah) that aidest to bear! But if the mill grind the foeman tribe, We will pound and pound them ...
— The Land of Midian, Vol. 1 • Richard Burton

... his limbs, but what * Disease firm fixt ever tortureth. His tears are flowing, his vitals burning; * Yet for all his tongue still he silenceth. All foemen in pity beweep his woes; * Ah for freke whom the foeman pitieth!" ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 7 • Richard F. Burton

... of war came the habit of shaving. A beard offered too handy a grip to a foeman who had gotten to close quarters, therefore, warriors who had no true hardihood of soul preferred cutting off their beards to the honourable labour of defending their chins. Many ancient races effected a compromise in order to retain a fitting ...
— Here are Ladies • James Stephens

... fire, CARADOC rushed upon the foe; He reared his arm—he laid the mighty low! O'er the plain see him urge his gore-bathed steed! They bleed, the Romans[68] bleed! 230 He lifts his lance on high, They fly! the fierce invaders fly! Fear not now the horse or spear, Fear not now the foeman's might; Victory the cry shall hear Of those who for their country fight; O'er the slain That strew the plain, Stern on her sable war-horse shall she ride, And lift her red right hand, in their heart's blood deep dyed! 240 Return, my Muse! ...
— The Poetical Works of William Lisle Bowles, Vol. 1 • William Lisle Bowles

... spake: "Me too," she cried, "in act To perish 'mid the shock of neighbouring hordes, Did Stilicho defend, when the wild Scot All Erin raised against me, and the wave Foamed 'neath the stroke of many a foeman's oar. So wrought his pains that now I fear no more Those Scottish darts, nor tremble at the Pict, Nor mark, where'er to sea mine eyes I turn, The Saxon coming on ...
— Early Britain—Roman Britain • Edward Conybeare

... lethargy irresistibly stealing over him; to shake the leaden movements from his limbs. He vainly endeavored to penetrate the mist falling before his eyes and to overcome the dizziness that made his foeman seem like a figure in a dream. Was it through loss of blood, or weariness, or both?—but he was cognizant his thrusts had lost force, his plunges vitality, and that even an element of chance prevailed in his parries. But he uttered no sound. When would that mist ...
— The Strollers • Frederic S. Isham

... in anger / far off was heard the blow, And flew from off the helmet, / as if 'twere all aglow, The fiery sparks all crackling / beneath his hand around. Each warrior in the other / a foeman worth ...
— The Nibelungenlied - Translated into Rhymed English Verse in the Metre of the Original • trans. by George Henry Needler

... appeared mightier than the youth of other people. It would be hard to discover, I imagine, any one who in the prime of manhood was as formidable to his foes as Agesilaus when he had reached the limit of mortal life. Never, I suppose, was there a foeman whose removal came with a greater sense of relief to the enemy than that of Agesilaus, though a veteran when he died. Never was there a leader who inspired stouter courage in the hearts of fellow-combatants than ...
— Agesilaus • Xenophon

... Simonides slow-climbing, thoughtfully, Looked forth on sea and shore and sky. And then, his cheeks with tears bedewed, And heaving breast, and trembling foot, he stood, His lyre in hand and sang: "O ye, forever blessed, Who bared your breasts unto the foeman's lance, For love of her, who gave you birth; By Greece revered, and by the world admired, What ardent love your youthful minds inspired, To rush to arms, such perils dire to meet, A fate so hard, with loving smiles to greet? Her children, why so joyously, ...
— The Poems of Giacomo Leopardi • Giacomo Leopardi

... brow). As you desire then. With this kiss, my son, That last appeal I grant. Indeed, wherein Now have we need of such a sacrifice That war's ill-fortune only could compel? Why, in each word that you have spoken, buds A victory that strikes the foeman low! I'll write to him, the plighted bride is she Of Homburg, dead because of Fehrbellin; With his pale ghost, before our flags a-charge, Let him do battle for her, on ...
— The German Classics of The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Vol. IV • Editor-in-Chief: Kuno Francke

... longer now she spurned at mean revenge, Or stayed her hand for conquered foeman's moan; As when, the fates of aged Rome to change, By Caesar's side she crossed the Rubicon. Nor joyed she to bestow the spoils she won, As when the banded powers of Greece were tasked To war beneath the Youth of Macedon: No seemly veil ...
— Some Poems by Sir Walter Scott • Sir Walter Scott

... murders—these informations—these lettres de cachet—these seizures of papers—these confiscations of presses. The red flag floats for a week from the balcony of the Hotel-de-Ville, like as in times of old, the banners torn from the grasp of the dying foeman floated from the arched roof of our temples." In another part he says, "Marat's presses have been seized—the name of the author should have sufficed to protect the typographer. The press is sacred, as sacred as the cradle of the first-born, which even the officers of the law have ...
— History of the Girondists, Volume I - Personal Memoirs of the Patriots of the French Revolution • Alphonse de Lamartine

... their offensive weapons. Every man has a lance and a sword. The LANCE is a stout weapon with a solid wooden butt, about six feet long in all. It is really too heavy to use as a javelin. It is most effective as a pike thrust fairly into a foeman's face, or past his shield into a weak spot in his cuirass. The sword is usually kept as a reserve weapon in case the lance gets broken. It is not over 25 inches in length, making rather a huge double-edged vicious knife than a saber; but it is terrible ...
— A Day In Old Athens • William Stearns Davis

... her ear, Flatter, entreat, promise, protest, and swear: Yet ever, as he greedily assay'd To touch those dainties, she the harpy play'd, 270 And every limb did, as a soldier stout, Defend the fort, and keep the foeman out; For though the rising ivory mount he scal'd, Which is with azure circling lines empal'd, Much like a globe (a globe may I term this, By which Love sails to regions full of bliss), Yet there with Sisyphus he toil'd in vain, Till gentle ...
— The Works of Christopher Marlowe, Vol. 3 (of 3) • Christopher Marlowe

... to look as though the boys had found a foeman worthy of their steel in this sly trick monkey; and they would possibly have all the fun they could want during the balance of their little Easter outing, in ...
— Chums of the Camp Fire • Lawrence J. Leslie

... swearing cat, which emanated from the sack. Instantly that formidable sheep was upon its feet and had taken in the military situation at a glance. In a few moments it had approached, stamping, to within fifty yards of the swinging foeman, who, now retreating and anon advancing, seemed to invite the fray. Suddenly I saw the beast's head drop earthward as if depressed by the weight of its enormous horns; then a dim, white, wavy streak of sheep prolonged itself from that spot in a generally horizontal direction to within about ...
— The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce, Volume 8 - Epigrams, On With the Dance, Negligible Tales • Ambrose Bierce

... soldier, and a swell, But—the Gaboon can scarce surpass Pall-Mall In vicious, gibbering vulgarity Of coarse vituperation. Decency, Courtesy, common-sense, all cast aside! Pheugh! GARNER, in his cage, would open wide His listening ears, did Jacko of the forest So "slate" a foeman when his head was sorest. Strange that to rave and rant, like scullion storm, Like low virago scold, should seem "good form" To our Society Simians, when one name Makes vulgar spite oblivious of its shame! "Voluntary and deliberate," their speech, "Articulate too"—those Apes! Then ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 103, October 1, 1892 • Various

... have schooled myself to suffer, unrepining, whatever Providence, in its infinite wisdom, sees fitting to inflict. If I have a soul for the dangers of the field, I have also, I think, the courage to confront those trials that pierce the heart with keener agonies than any the steel of a foeman can inflict. Fear not to ...
— The Three Brides, Love in a Cottage, and Other Tales • Francis A. Durivage

... way, together with the seemingly too narrow space between the fatal buoy and the shore for manoeuvre in case of need, gave the order to starboard the helm, and head directly for the watchful Tennessee, waiting with lock-strings in hand to salute the monitor as she closed—gallant foeman worthy of her steel! So near and yet so far, for hardly had the Tecumseh gone a length to the westward of the sentinel buoy, than the fate, already outlined, overwhelmed her, and her iron walls became coffin, shroud, and winding-sheet to Craven and most ...
— The Bay State Monthly - Volume 1, Issue 4 - April, 1884 • Various

... softly, softly slips toward the shore; Loves she well the murdered brother, loves his hated foeman more, Loves, and longs to give the wampum; And she meets him on ...
— Flint and Feather • E. Pauline Johnson

... found that Grace was a foeman worthy of her steel. The young girl's arm was steady, and she delivered her strokes with decision. Grace came out two ...
— Grace Harlowe's Sophomore Year at High School • Jessie Graham Flower

... roses With pride she 'll ne'er forego, The rose has oft been trodden By foot of haughty foe; But the thistle in her bonnet blue, Still nods outow'r the fell, And dares the proudest foeman To ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volume II. - The Songs of Scotland of the past half century • Various

... the days for commanders! What glories my grandfather won, Ere bigots, and lackeys, and panders The fortunes of France had undone! In Germany, Flanders, and Holland,— What foeman resisted us then? No; my grandsire was ever victorious, My grandsire ...
— Ballads • William Makepeace Thackeray

... could defy an army, for but a single foeman could advance upon me at a time, nor could he know that I was awaiting him until he came full upon me around the corner of the turn. About me lay scattered stones crumbled from the cliff above. They were of various sizes and shapes, ...
— At the Earth's Core • Edgar Rice Burroughs

... the wet eyes of woman Will fill with the falling tear, Yet, facing old Death, our foeman, We shout our reviving cheer. Though high beat the hearts we cherish, The dead we most highly prize: Hurrah for the first to perish! Three cheers for the ...
— Soldier Songs and Love Songs • A.H. Laidlaw

... of Galena did not quail. Neither did he doubt. His pictures of this epoch show him with mouth more close shut than ever; but otherwise there was no sign. Lee for his part knew that another foeman was now come, and if we mistake not he divined that the end of the Confederacy, involving the end of his own military career, was not far ahead. It is to the credit of his genius that he did not weaken ...
— Notable Events of the Nineteenth Century - Great Deeds of Men and Nations and the Progress of the World • Various

... that he was awake, an Irishman scorned and insulted, he dashed in to the attack. Both fists shot out from the brawny shoulders; both missed the agile dodger; then off went the blanket, and with two lean, red, sinewy arms the Sioux had "locked his foeman round," and the two were straining and swaying in a magnificent grapple. At arms' length Pat could easily have had the best of it, for the Indian never boxes; but, in a bear hug and a wrestle, all chances favored the Sioux. Cursing and straining, honors even on both for a while, Connaught ...
— A Daughter of the Sioux - A Tale of the Indian frontier • Charles King

... long with them without showing the effect of the struggle. Even in his most exhausted condition he was, however, brilliant at repartee; but one night, at a supper of journalists given to the late George D. Prentice, a genius of the same mold and the same unfortunate habit, he found a foeman worthy of his steel in General John Cochrane. McDougall had taken offense at some anti-slavery sentiments which had been uttered—it was in war times—and late in the evening got on his legs for ...
— Toaster's Handbook - Jokes, Stories, and Quotations • Peggy Edmund & Harold W. Williams, compilers

... murder; they mastered him fully. He was easy to find then who otherwhere looked for 25 A pleasanter place of repose in the lodges, A bed in the bowers. Then was brought to his notice Told him truly by token apparent The hall-thane's hatred: he held himself after Further and faster who the foeman did baffle. 30 [2]So ruled he and strongly strove against justice Lone against all men, till ...
— Beowulf - An Anglo-Saxon Epic Poem • The Heyne-Socin

... you're never likely to have to do," said the quartermaster, with sarcastic emphasis, and he was a man who never yet had had to face a foeman in the field, and Dean said nothing more, but felt right well he had no friend ...
— Warrior Gap - A Story of the Sioux Outbreak of '68. • Charles King

... bears no sigh, No wounded warrior meets the eye— Death is his sleep by Erie's wave, Of Raisin's snow we heap his grave! How many hopes lie murdered here— The mother's joy, the father's pride, The country's boast, the foeman's fear, In wilder'd havoc, side by side. Lend me, thou silent queen of night, Lend me awhile thy waning light, That I may see each well-loved form, That sunk beneath the ...
— Graham's Magazine Vol XXXII No. 1 January 1848 • Various

... (recking not how time had fled) Of the lurking savage foeman from whose musket it ...
— Ballads • Horatio Alger, Jr.

... fading embers Now the foeman's cheek turns white, When his heart that field remembers, Where we tamed his tyrant might. Never let him bind again A chain; like that we broke from then. Hark! the horn of combat calls— Ere the golden evening falls, May we pledge that horn in triumph round![1] Many a heart that now beats high, ...
— The Complete Poems of Sir Thomas Moore • Thomas Moore et al

... townspeople fleeing in disorder; but there was as yet no sign of any foeman ready to attack, and Dick judged he had some time before him to make ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 8 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... not that gaunt Professor Noting his man; that stark Assessor Of faulty play in the bat's possessor Clapped for his foeman, We who had seen that figure splendid Guarding the stumps so well defended Wept and cheered when by craft was ended Innings ...
— More Cricket Songs • Norman Gale

... dragon of a thousand talons kind as well as cruel? Had it not friends as well as enemies? Yes. That was it: the outlook of young men, of colored young men in particular, was all wrong,—they had gone at the world in the wrong spirit. They had looked upon it as a terrible foeman and forced it to be one. He would do it, oh, so differently. He would take the world as a friend. He would even take the old, old world under ...
— The Strength of Gideon and Other Stories • Paul Laurence Dunbar

... Their breath Swept the foeman like a blade, Though ten thousand men were paid To the hungry purse of Death, Though the field was wet with blood, Still ...
— A Treasury of War Poetry - British and American Poems of the World War 1914-1917 • Edited, with Introduction and Notes, by George Herbert Clarke

... ends in 'le triomphe de l'ombre,' a phrase in which the literal and the figurative are subtly blended together. On the other hand, how everything sparkles and gleams in Le Mariage de Roland! Olivier's sword-point glitters like the eye of a demon, while Durandal shines as he falls on his foeman's head; the sunshine is all round them in the day, and the night passes quickly; sparks fly from the weapons as they strike one another, and light up the very shadows with a dull flash. Take again La Rose de l'Infante. Everything round the little princess ...
— La Legende des Siecles • Victor Hugo

... Here was a foeman worthy of any man's steel. To beat Archibald Forbes would be, as it seemed then, to crown oneself with everlasting glory, and I was not altogether without hope of doing it. For one thing, I was native ...
— The Making Of A Novelist - An Experiment In Autobiography • David Christie Murray

... defenders of the young Republic, none may take higher rank, since none is entitled to it, than that known as the battle of Mier. Though they there lost the day—a defeat due to the incapacity of an ill-chosen leader—they won glory eternal. Every man of them who fell had first killed his foeman—some half a score—while of those who survived there was not one so craven as to cry "Quarter!" The white flag went not up till they were overwhelmed and overpowered by sheer disparity ...
— The Free Lances - A Romance of the Mexican Valley • Mayne Reid

... received, in the midst of the very scenes related—a history, too, that could be read and understood alike by all, the wise and the ignorant, the learned and the unlearned.—But those histories are gone. They can be read no more forever. They were a fortress of strength; but what invading foeman could never do, the silent artillery of time has done—the levelling of its walls. They are gone. They were a forest of giant oaks; but the all-restless hurricane has swept over them, and left only here and there a lonely trunk, despoiled of its ...
— Lincoln's Inaugurals, Addresses and Letters (Selections) • Abraham Lincoln

... a fume. 'It's not meself that'll do it; d'ye hear, Masters? I'll go like the biggest gentleman of all, or like the sleuth I am, but no child-rescuing and kid-copping for me! Let his honour give us,' with a theatrical gesture, 'a foeman ...
— Against Odds - A Detective Story • Lawrence L. Lynch

... his work is done! What to him is friend or foeman, Rise of moon or set of sun, Hand of man ...
— Modern Eloquence: Vol II, After-Dinner Speeches E-O • Various

... succeeded, had it been reported verbatim, deserved to be recorded in local history. Deacon Baxter had met in Jane Tillman a foeman more than worthy of his steel. She was just as crafty as he, and in generalship as much superior to him as Napoleon Bonaparte to Cephas Cole. Her knowledge of and her experiences with men, all very humble, it is true, but decidedly varied, enabled her ...
— The Story Of Waitstill Baxter • By Kate Douglas Wiggin

... we sailed, Till reached was Afric's strand; At Cape Town for some weeks we stayed, Not yet on foeman's land. ...
— A Yeoman's Letters - Third Edition • P. T. Ross

... hornbook?" Again the sardonic laugh. "Enough: let what I have said obscure or enlighten your guesses, we come back to the same link of union, which binds man to man, bids States arise from the desert, and foeman embrace as brothers. I need you and you need me; without your aid my life is doomed; without my secret the breath will have gone from the lips of your Lilian before the sun of to-morrow is ...
— A Strange Story, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... with dim and darksome coverture. And now she lets him whisper in her ear, Flatter, entreat, promise, protest and swear; Yet ever, as he greedily assayed To touch those dainties, she the harpy played, And every limb did, as a soldier stout, Defend the fort, and keep the foeman out. For though the rising ivory mount he scaled, Which is with azure circling lines empaled, Much like a globe (a globe may I term this, By which love sails to regions full of bliss) Yet there with Sisyphus he toiled in vain, Till gentle ...
— Hero and Leander • Christopher Marlowe

... not in Pleasure's beam; It may sparkle for a while, But 'tis transient as a dream, Faithless as a foeman's smile. ...
— Heart Utterances at Various Periods of a Chequered Life. • Eliza Paul Kirkbride Gurney

... his broad breast rang, As before the host he came; When there, through the foeman's first all sprang Like a ...
— Golden Days for Boys and Girls, Vol. XIII, Nov. 28, 1891 • Various

... stabbed them, they would surely have shot or stabbed me. And are not his Majesty's fellow-subjects shooting and stabbing one another at this instant moment[A] in the American plantations? No; I always fought fair, and never refused Quarter when mine enemy threw up his point; nor, unless a foeman's death were required for Lawful Reprisals, did I ever deny ...
— The Strange Adventures of Captain Dangerous, Vol. 1 of 3 • George Augustus Sala

... a man's fair form, then might my sighs Be echoed swiftly through that ivory shell, Thine ear, and find thy gentle heart; so well Would passion arm me for the enterprize: But ah! I am no knight whose foeman dies; No cuirass glistens on my bosom's swell; I am no happy shepherd of the dell Whose lips have trembled with a maiden's eyes; Yet must I dote upon thee,—call thee sweet. Sweeter by far than Hybla's honied roses When steep'd ...
— Poems 1817 • John Keats

... inspired the resistance of their revolutionary forefathers. His hatred of the Yankee, as he contemptuously styled the Northerner, was even more bitter than the wrath which Washington's soldiers felt towards England; and it was intensified by the fact that his detested foeman had not only dared to invade the South, but had proclaimed his intention, in no uncertain tones, of dealing with the Sovereign States exactly as ...
— Stonewall Jackson And The American Civil War • G. F. R. Henderson

... name is lost! The peasant only knows that here Bold Alfred scoop'd thy flinty bier, And pray'd a foeman's prayer, and tost His auburn, head, and said 'One more Of England's foes ...
— The Visions of England - Lyrics on leading men and events in English History • Francis T. Palgrave

... most to the taste of the middle classes of Great Britain. Music, sculpture, and painting add not their charms to the Englishman's dull and respectable devotions. Cross the Channel and behold his whilom hereditary foeman, but now firm ally, the Frenchman! He is a dainty feeder and the most accomplished of cooks. He etherealizes ordinary fish, flesh, and fowl by his exquisite cuisine. He educates the palate to a daintiness whereof the gross-feeding ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 17, No. 101, March, 1866 • Various



Words linked to "Foeman" :   opposer, armed forces, enemy, foe, opponent, military machine, armed services, antagonist, military, war machine, opposition, adversary, besieger



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