Free Translator Free Translator
Translators Dictionaries Courses Other
Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




Flower   Listen
verb
Flower  v. i.  (past & past part. flowered; pres. part. flowering)  
1.
To blossom; to bloom; to expand the petals, as a plant; to produce flowers; as, this plant flowers in June.
2.
To come into the finest or fairest condition. "Their lusty and flowering age." "When flowered my youthful spring."
3.
To froth; to ferment gently, as new beer. "That beer did flower a little."
4.
To come off as flowers by sublimation. (Obs.) "Observations which have flowered off."






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"Flower" Quotes from Famous Books



... trees so regularly, as though by God's command, at His bidding flower; at His bidding send forth shoots, bear fruit and ripen it; at His bidding let it fall and shed their leaves, and folded up upon themselves lie in quietness and rest? How else, as the Moon waxes and wanes, as the Sun approaches ...
— The Golden Sayings of Epictetus • Epictetus

... the comparative values of "straights" and "pats," and this girl had turned and taunted him with the very words of that infernal, and he had hoped, forgotten game. Moreover, she, a brilliant, beautiful, practised woman of society, by no means the delicate and sensitive little desert flower whose worship he had won so readily, had dared to fence with him, had interested, piqued, fascinated, and now wellnigh bewitched him. He was not yet well of his wounds by any manner of means. He was still weak—far too weak to ride or climb or do much in the way of ...
— Tonio, Son of the Sierras - A Story of the Apache War • Charles King

... The Deacon, who loves an argument, exclaimed: "I thought I knew all about it. You told us that manure was the food of plants, and that the food of plants was composed of the above twelve elements; and now you tell us that man and beast, fruit and flower, grain and grass, root, stem, and branch, all are composed or made up of these same dozen elements. If I ask you what bread is made of, you say it is composed of the dozen elements aforesaid. If I ask what wheat-straw is made of, you answer, the dozen. If ...
— Talks on Manures • Joseph Harris

... a cod and yellowe flower, vines are bound therewith. Elaphium is like to Angelica, but not in smell, the hart thereon rubbeth his head when ...
— Hypnerotomachia - The Strife of Loue in a Dreame • Francesco Colonna

... of the many in a political leader is not different from its choice of a book or a flower or a fabric. A low vibration ...
— Child and Country - A Book of the Younger Generation • Will Levington Comfort

... but what is mundane, are answerable for the use of that power; so those gifted by superior means are answerable as they employ those means. Does the God above make a flower to grow, intending that it should not be gathered! No! neither does he allow supernatural aid to be given, if he did not intend that mortals ...
— The Phantom Ship • Frederick Marryat

... that she loved every nook and cranny of it, though they had owned it but five years. She thought, too, of Alice's disappointment should her old home again pass on to strangers. They had taken great pride in restoring the place, which had been much run down when they bought it. The flower garden was her especial pride and care. It was lovely now with clove pinks, sweet williams, mignonette, and a dozen more old-fashioned blossoms, as she looked up from her letter to rest her eyes lovingly ...
— Chicken Little Jane • Lily Munsell Ritchie

... figure, has ceased to exist. Line and structure and all that we have most cared for have disappeared. Even the color of flesh has ceased to count, and the most radiant blond skin of the fairest woman has become an insignificant pinkish spot no more important than a stone and not half so important as a flower. Humanity is ...
— Artist and Public - And Other Essays On Art Subjects • Kenyon Cox

... the sun-spot maximum the corona seems most developed over the spot-zones—i.e., neither at the equator nor the poles. The four great sheaves of light give it a square appearance, and are made up of rays or plumes, delicate like the petals of a flower. During a minimum the nebulous ring seems to be made of tufts of fine hairs with aigrettes or radiations from both poles, and streamers ...
— History of Astronomy • George Forbes

... single mutation somewhere back there. Just a tiny change of cell structure or metabolism that left one line of primates vulnerable to an invader no other would harbor. Why else should man have begun to flower and blossom intellectually—grow to depend so much on his brains instead of his brawn that he could rise above all others? What better reason than because somewhere along the line in the world of fang and claw he suddenly ...
— The Coffin Cure • Alan Edward Nourse

... one of those possessions which to have is sufficient. A man having it need not boast of what he has, or show it off before the world. But on that account he values it more. He had regarded Mary as a cutting duly taken from the Ullathorne tree; not, indeed, as a grafting branch, full of flower, just separated from the parent stalk, but as being not a whit the less truly endowed with the pure sap of that venerable trunk. When, therefore, he heard her true history he sat ...
— Doctor Thorne • Anthony Trollope

... bit of rising ground to the right, and half concealed by an intervening cluster of old rich-coloured pines, stood the manor-house—a big, box-shaped, whitewashed building, with a verandah in front, overlooking a small plot that might some day become a flower-garden. To the left of this stood the village, the houses grouping prettily with the big church, and a little farther in this direction was an avenue of graceful birches. On the extreme left were fields, bounded by a dark border of fir-trees. Could the spectator have raised himself ...
— Russia • Donald Mackenzie Wallace

... windows. But it was all of no use; no one stirred in the entire house. Then I put away my fiddle sadly, and seated myself upon the door-step, for I was very weary with my long march. The night was warm; the flower-beds before the house sent forth a delicious fragrance, and a fountain somewhere in the depths of the garden plashed continuously. I thought dreamily of azure flowers, of dim, green, lovely, lonely spots where brooks were ...
— The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries: - Masterpieces of German Literature Translated into English, Volume 5. • Various

... getting the money in the morning I passed the night at play, and I lost the five hundred sequins in advance. At day-break, being in need of a little quiet, I went to the Erberia, a space of ground on the quay of the Grand Canal. Here is held the herb, fruit, and flower market. ...
— The Memoires of Casanova, Complete • Jacques Casanova de Seingalt

... speak out. But though it would be so easy to humiliate the woman who had injured her, it looked too much like vengeance; and she remembered how she had told the sick woman that she forgave, with all her heart, meaning what she said, but it had been hard to keep the passion-flower of forgiveness from fading as soon as ...
— The White Sister • F. Marion Crawford

... for Lady Dauntrey seemed a strong woman; and, besides, the slight put upon her by Vanno had left a raw wound which appreciation from others helped superficially to heal. She had been so openly admired and flattered at Monte Carlo that vanity had blossomed in her nature like a quick-growing flower, though she had no idea that she had become vain. Men looked at her with the look which is a tribute from the whole sex. She could hardly bear it that the ...
— The Guests Of Hercules • C. N. Williamson and A. M. Williamson

... reflected that her head ached; then rise to dash cold water on her eyes and brow and hair till her backward curls were full of crystal beads, while she had dried her brow and looked out like a freshly-opened flower from among the dewy tresses of the woodland; then give deep sighs of relief, and putting on her little slippers, sit still after that action for a couple of minutes, which seemed to her so long, so full of things to come, ...
— Daniel Deronda • George Eliot

... the rose, the rose While yet in flower we find it; For summer smiles, but summer goes, And winter waits ...
— The Daughters of Danaus • Mona Caird

... "It lives in an empty house. The head which has never been visited by the heart is the house pride lives in. You are in error, my dear, and not in love. Drive out the knave pride, put a flower in your hair and ...
— The Crock of Gold • James Stephens

... indolent, trails across and dangles from the rocks; the river mangrove dispenses its sweetness in an unexpected locality; and from the heart of the jungle come wafts of warm breath, which, mingling with exhalation from foliage and flower, is diffused broadcast. The odour of the jungle is definite—earthy somewhat, but of earth clean, wholesome and moist—the smell of moss, fern and fungus blended ...
— The Confessions of a Beachcomber • E J Banfield

... Tordinona, and halted on the threshold with the crucifix, awaiting the appearance of the unhappy youths. Here a serious accident had nearly happened. As many persons were at the prison windows to see the prisoners come out, someone accidentally threw down a large flower-pot full of earth, which fell into the street and narrowly missed one of the Confraternity who was amongst the torch-bearers just before the crucifix. It passed so close to the torch as to extinguish the flame ...
— Celebrated Crimes, Complete • Alexandre Dumas, Pere

... opportunity of seeing anything beautiful. Beauty is God's handwriting—a way-side sacrament; welcome it in every fair face, every fair sky, every fair flower, and thank Him for it, who is the Fountain of all loveliness, and drink it in simply and earnestly with all your eyes; it is a charmed ...
— Daily Thoughts - selected from the writings of Charles Kingsley by his wife • Charles Kingsley

... (and I have often thought sae since syne) that the fire of hell was in his cheek and een. But he had left some of it with his mother, at ony rate. She entered the room like a woman demented, and the first words she spoke were, Elspeth Cheyne, did you ever pull a new-budded flower?' I answered, as ye may believe, that I often had. Then,' said she, ye will ken the better how to blight the spurious and heretical blossom that has sprung forth this night to disgrace my father's ...
— The Antiquary, Complete • Sir Walter Scott

... in quantities, and then he shortened the o and took the voice out of the s and spoke of her and to her as Rossa. The mother and the sisters refused to acknowledge what they regarded as a touch of shamrock and clung persistently to the English flower. The good gentleman did not call his son Sol[o]mon,[2] though this is the form which ought to be used by those who turn the traditional English 'Elk[)a]nah' into 'Elk[a]nah', 'Ab[)a]na' into 'Ab[a]na', and 'Zeb[)u]lun' into 'Zeb[u]lun'. If ...
— Society for Pure English Tract 4 - The Pronunciation of English Words Derived from the Latin • John Sargeaunt

... prepared beds out of doors, the common crown anemone may in many sunny, sheltered gardens be had in bloom all the year round. This is saying a great deal, but it is true; indeed, it is questionable if we have any other popular garden flower which is at once so showy, so hardy, and so continuous in its blossoming. A friend beside me says: "Ah! but what of violas?" To which I reply: "Grow both in quantity, since both are as variable as they are beautiful." But when viola shrinks in foggy November from the frost demon, anemone ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 458, October 11, 1884 • Various

... in some of the better families. As for the young ladies themselves, most were still of the age of school girls; though there were some of that equivocal age, when the bud is just breaking into the opening flower, and one or two that were even a little older; young women in forms and deportment, though scarcely so in years. One of a party of two of the last, appeared to me to possess all the grace of young womanhood, rendered radiant by the ingenuous laugh, the light-hearted playfulness, and the virgin ...
— Satanstoe • James Fenimore Cooper

... roots with their crowns two inches below the surface, filling in and treading firmly as each trench is planted. The precaution may be taken to pare off all the pointed prominent buds on each crown, as this will prevent the rise of flower-stems; but if this is neglected, the cultivator must take care to cut out all the flowering-shoots that appear, for the production of flowers will prove detrimental to the crop of Sea Kale in the following season. Our custom, when a plantation has been thus made, is to grow another crop with it ...
— The Culture of Vegetables and Flowers From Seeds and Roots, 16th Edition • Sutton and Sons

... over a flower bed with a great fat spider at the centre and the threads along which the spider runs to thrust its poisoned sting into the enmeshed butterfly is nature's most accurate symbol of the vast web of espionage ...
— The Blot on the Kaiser's 'Scutcheon • Newell Dwight Hillis

... that thou mightest have set down the other points of information equally necessary to our intercourse—Whence I come? And why? And I will not leave thee in the dark respecting them. Only let me caution thee—It is not required that the public should be taken into our confidence. I have seen a flower good to look upon, but viscous, and with a scent irresistible to insects. That flower represents the world; and what is the folly of its victims but the madness of men who yield themselves with ...
— The Prince of India - Or - Why Constantinople Fell - Volume 1 • Lew. Wallace

... of chilling, tree growth is very slow to start in the spring, and then only certain of the longer and stronger twigs may force into growth; water sprouts may develop on the trunks and main limbs; flower buds may not open but fall off; and even though the trees may flower the flowering period is long and few or no fruits or nuts may be set. The most effective chilling temperature is not known but we can be reasonably certain that temperatures of 45 deg.F. to 32 deg.F. are just ...
— Northern Nut Growers Association Report of the Proceedings at the Thirty-Eighth Annual Meeting • Northern Nut Growers Association

... the whole story and takes the consequences. She has made me more trouble, one time and another, than all the rest of them put together, and yet—" he hesitated, then he went on; "and yet, I honestly think she's the flower of ...
— Teddy: Her Book - A Story of Sweet Sixteen • Anna Chapin Ray

... an honoured guest. And the king respectfully asked her: "My good girl, what happy family does your friend adorn? What are the syllables of her name, which must be a delight to the ear? Or why at her age does she torture a body as delicate as a flower with a hermit's life in ...
— Twenty-two Goblins • Unknown

... (Ulpian) Flower of Fame, or bright Renoune and fortunate Raigne of King Henry VIII. b.l. with curious wood cuts: imp. by Will. Hoskin, ...
— Bibliomania; or Book-Madness - A Bibliographical Romance • Thomas Frognall Dibdin

... and everything has been taken away. Sometimes I am dreadfully sorry for her. Formerly I very much wanted Nicholas to marry her, but I always had a sort of presentiment that it would not come off. She is a sterile flower, you know—like some strawberry blossoms. Sometimes I am sorry for her, and sometimes I think she doesn't feel it as you ...
— War and Peace • Leo Tolstoy

... is a thing—and she has a nice pleasant handle too, if you just try to find it. And the children are 'things,' also, in one sense. All their handles are different. You know human beings aren't made just alike, like red flower-pots. We have to feel and guess before we can make out just how other people go, and how we ought to take hold of them. It is very interesting, I advise you to try it. And while you are trying, you will learn all sorts of things which will help you ...
— What Katy Did • Susan Coolidge

... young and handsome woman, and the ranger submitted to it with the awkward grace of one unaccustomed to feminine care. The knowledge that the girl was beneath him in birth, and that she was considered to be (in a sense) the lovely flower of a corrupt stock, made the manifest innocency of her voice and eyes the more appealing. He watched her moving about the room with eyes in which a furtive ...
— Cavanaugh: Forest Ranger - A Romance of the Mountain West • Hamlin Garland

... out of his bosom was the love he had for his wife. Flower-of-the-Maguey, she was called, and she was beautiful beyond all naming. She was daughter to the Chief Priest of the Bow, and young men from all the seven towns courted her. But though she was lovely and quiet she was not as she seemed to be. She was a Passing Being." The Condor ...
— The Trail Book • Mary Austin et al

... hemispheres of a Man and of a Chimpanzee of the same length, in order to show the relative proportions of the parts: the former taken from a specimen, which Mr. Flower, Conservator of the Museum of the Royal College of Surgeons, was good enough to dissect for me; the latter, from the photograph of a similarly dissected Chimpanzee's brain, given in Mr. Marshall's paper above referred to. 'a', posterior lobe; ...
— Lectures and Essays • T.H. Huxley

... the van came red-capped artillery. Not the new battery, though happily known to Flora and the Callenders; the Washington Artillery. Illustrious command! platoons and platoons of the flower of the Crescent City's youth and worth! They, too, that day received their battle-flag. They have the shot-torn ...
— Kincaid's Battery • George W. Cable

... is the spryest child I ever saw," said the man with the court-plaster, as Flyaway hovered about the candy-jars, like a butterfly over a flower-bed. "She isn't a ...
— Dotty Dimple's Flyaway • Sophie May

... Miss Dunstable," said his lordship; "but why not own the power and trace the flower as well? perhaps one might help the other." Upon the whole, I am afraid that Lord Boanerges got the best of it. But, then, that is his line. He has been getting the best of it all ...
— Framley Parsonage • Anthony Trollope

... Helen entered the room where Geoffrey impatiently waited for her, but brief as it was, there was no sign of hurried travel about her. Her apparel was fresh and dainty, and there was even a flower from Mexico at her belt. She went straight to Geoffrey ...
— Thurston of Orchard Valley • Harold Bindloss

... not take any notice of such calumnies, my dear. You are in the flower of your age, and made for the service of love. For my part, I congratulate myself on being able to tell you that you are the first woman that inspired me with ...
— The Memoires of Casanova, Complete • Jacques Casanova de Seingalt

... For, just because her bosom fluttered still, It told me more than many rifled graves; Because I spoke too soon, she answered me, Her vain life ripened to this bud of death As the whole plant is forced into one flower, All her blank past a scroll on which God wrote His word of healing—so that the poor flesh, Which spread death ...
— Artemis to Actaeon and Other Worlds • Edith Wharton

... in the collection before me concerns one of Newman's brothers. Perhaps most of us can count a "Charles Robert" in our environment. Someone whose "worm i' the bud" of their character has so completely spoilt its early flower on account of the "one ruinous vice" of "censoriousness," of perpetual nagging, and fault-finding developed to such a pitch that it has eaten out at last the fair heart of human forbearance and kindness which is the birthright of everyone. Such a person makes the true, ...
— Memoir and Letters of Francis W. Newman • Giberne Sieveking

... lips—asking a question, giving an answer, with that shadowy smile—that men looked; they were sensitive lips, sensuous and sweet, and through them seemed to come warmth and perfume like the warmth and perfume of a flower. ...
— Forsyte Saga • John Galsworthy

... of the yam and granadillos climbing up them, with fences on either side, covered by numberless creepers, passion-flowers of varied sizes, and convolvuli of countless descriptions. The whole country seemed like an assemblage of orchards, composed of orange-trees in fruit and flower, lemon and citron trees, glossy-leaved star apples; the avocada, with its huge pear, and the bread fruit-tree bearing still vaster fruit, and leaves of proportionate size; while beneath them were seen in abundance the unfailing food of man in tropical ...
— The Three Lieutenants • W.H.G. Kingston

... nothing but stags and bears, quietly grazing. Our impatience to disembark increased at the sight. The ground was carpeted with plants similar to those of our climate, but more vigorous and green; most of them were in flower. At every step we found roses, red and yellow lilies, lilies of the valley, and almost all our field flowers. The summits of the mountains were crowned with pines, and oak-trees grew half way up, decreasing in size and vigour as they neared the sea. The rivers and streams were ...
— Celebrated Travels and Travellers - Part 2. The Great Navigators of the Eighteenth Century • Jules Verne

... a drop of me settle my brain, I believe the soggy clods shall become lovers and lamps, And a compend of compends is the meat of a man or woman, And a summit and flower there is the feeling they have for each other, And they are to branch boundlessly out of that lesson until it becomes omnific, And until one and all shall delight ...
— Leaves of Grass • Walt Whitman

... police, we came in sight of the large, rambling residence, built piecemeal, like many an English country-house. There is little to recommend it save the fine view of the sea and the surrounding shrubbery-ground. I can well understand how, with the immense variety of flower and fruit suddenly presented to his eyes, the gentleman fresh from England required six months to recover the free and full use of all his senses ...
— To the Gold Coast for Gold - A Personal Narrative in Two Volumes.—Vol. I • Richard F. Burton

... fed in the thickets of Lampeia, near the vast Erymanthian swamp, the boar bound with chains he put down from his huge shoulders at the entrance to the market-place of Mycenae; and himself of his own will set out against the purpose of Eurystheus; and with him went Hylas, a brave comrade, in the flower of youth, to bear his arrows and ...
— The Argonautica • Apollonius Rhodius

... reasons of the adversaries, and you will perceive that in God's judgment no calumnies against God's Word remain standing, as Isaiah says, 40, 6: All flesh is grass, and all the goodliness thereof is as the flower of the field [that their arguments are straw and hay, and God a consuming fire, before whom nothing but God's Word can abide, ...
— The Apology of the Augsburg Confession • Philip Melanchthon

... natures together. Just now she is all given up to another; but when he no longer calls upon her daily thoughts and cares, I warn you not to be surprised, if this bud of friendship open like the evening primrose, with a sound as of a sudden stolen kiss, and lo! the flower of full-blown love lies unfolded ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. IV, No. 26, December, 1859 • Various

... mockery of a title for the woman who had deliberately flung away from her as a worthless weed the white flower of love which ...
— A Forgotten Hero - Not for Him • Emily Sarah Holt

... chance could fashion but a little flower, With perfume for each tiny thief, And furnish it with sunshine and with shower, Then chance would be creator, with the power To build ...
— In His Image • William Jennings Bryan

... & Company have been receiving repeated requests for information about the life and books of Gene Stratton-Porter. Her fascinating nature work with bird, flower, and moth, and the natural wonders of the Limberlost Swamp, made famous as the scene of her nature romances, all have stirred much ...
— At the Foot of the Rainbow • Gene Stratton-Porter

... one needs to be ashamed of it. We are glad enough to own, to remember, to treasure up every little word of approval that fell from the lips of the woman we courted. Why should we forget the dear sounds now she is our wife? If we love her, she may be sure that any little compliment—an offered flower, a birthday gift, a song when we are weary, a smile when we are sad, a look which no eye but our own will see—will be treasured up, and will cheer us when she is not there. Judiciously used, this conduct is of the greatest effect in managing the husband. A little vanity ...
— Brave Men and Women - Their Struggles, Failures, And Triumphs • O.E. Fuller

... him a profound secret for his sake. If they were questioned about him in certain houses when they carried home the linen, they always spoke respectfully of the chevalier, and made him out older than he really was; they talked of him as a most respectable monsieur, whose life was a flower of sanctity; but once in their own regions they perched on his shoulders like so many parrots. He liked to be told the secrets which washerwomen discover in the bosom of households, and day after day these girls would tell him the cancans which were ...
— The Jealousies of a Country Town • Honore de Balzac

... a full half hour Self-poised upon that yellow flower; And, little Butterfly! indeed I know not if you sleep or feed. How motionless!—not frozen seas More motionless!—and then What joy awaits you, when the breeze Hath found you out among the trees, And calls you forth again! This plot ...
— Verse and Prose for Beginners in Reading - Selected from English and American Literature • Horace Elisha Scudder, editor

... strongest characteristic was an intense love of nature, Millet found an unconscious influence in the direction which his life was to follow. Millet recalled in after life that he would show him a blade of grass or a flower, and say: "See how beautiful; how the petals overlap; and the tree there, how strong and fine it is!" It was his father who was attentive to the youth's first rude efforts, and who encouraged him when the decisive step ...
— McClure's Magazine, Vol. VI., No. 6, May, 1896 • Various

... Michael Angelo of this objection, "Do you not know," he said, "that chaste women retain their fresh looks much longer than those who are not chaste? How much more, therefore, a virgin in whom not even the least unchaste desire ever arose? And I tell you, moreover, that such freshness and flower of youth besides being maintained in her by natural causes, it may possibly be that it was ordained by the Divine Power to prove to the world the virginity and perpetual purity of the Mother. It was not necessary in the Son; but ...
— Michael Angelo Buonarroti • Charles Holroyd

... until an ill-timed effort of the emigrant noblesse gave to the Convention the prestige of a decisive victory over Royalists and foreigners combined. On the 27th of June, 1795, an English fleet landed the flower of the old nobility of France at the Bay of Quiberon in southern Brittany. It was only to give one last fatal proof of their incapacity that these unhappy men appeared once more on French soil. Within three weeks ...
— History of Modern Europe 1792-1878 • C. A. Fyffe

... villages, call to tell him of the trouble they are having over the new schools, and the conflict in the parish as to whether they shall or shall not have a school board. Clergymen from outlying vicarages come to mention that a cottage flower show, a penny reading, a confirmation, or some such event, is impending, and to suggest the propriety of a full and special account. Occasionally a leading landed proprietor is closeted with him, for at least an hour, ...
— Hodge and His Masters • Richard Jefferies

... botanical garden here. It is new; and there are no groves, no heavy timber, no shade; but the finely laid-out grounds,—alternations of lawn and flower-bed,—offer everywhere surprising sights. You observe curious orange-colored shrubs; plants speckled with four different colors; plants that look like wigs of green hair; plants with enormous broad leaves that seem made of colored crystal; ...
— Two Years in the French West Indies • Lafcadio Hearn

... clear naked flower Is faded and dead; The green-leafed willow, Drooping her head, Whispers low to the shade Of her boughs in the stream, Sighing a beauty, Secret ...
— Peacock Pie, A Book of Rhymes • Walter de la Mare

... situated in London on the Thames. The smooth emerald-green, well-trimmed lawn with the multi-colored flower-borders, and the blue porcelain vases, extended to the water, and there on summer afternoons the family sat on the cane chairs partaking of tea, feeding the swans swimming by, and watching the gay traffic, - the multitude of graceful little crafts with fashionably dressed ...
— The Bride of Dreams • Frederik van Eeden

... from certain trees, which has seeds that must be transported by certain birds, and which has flowers with separate sexes absolutely requiring the agency of certain insects to bring pollen from one flower to another, it is equally preposterous to account for the structure of this parasite with its relations to several distinct organic beings, by the effect of external conditions, or of habit, or of the volition of the plant itself" ("Natural ...
— Life and Habit • Samuel Butler

... dandelions in the grass; flowers were in the woods, though the two sisters had not gone to see them this year; the apple orchards around Shadywalk were in a cloud of pink blossoms; and the sun was warm upon flower and leaf everywhere. ...
— What She Could • Susan Warner

... represent her. If he had heard the organ indeed!—but he knew no instrument save the violin: the piano he had only heard through the window. For a few moments her face brooded over the bush, and her long, finely-modelled fingers travelled about it as if they were creating a flower upon it—probably they were assisting the birth or blowing of some beauty—and then she raised herself with a lingering look, and vanished from the ...
— Robert Falconer • George MacDonald

... followed by hordes of little girls with starved eyes. My good samaritan picked the poorest and the most wistful for his largesse of roses. And to each one as he handed the flower he repeated the famous line from the work of the great ...
— The Best Short Stories of 1919 - and the Yearbook of the American Short Story • Various

... character, according to Owen, which absolutely distinguishes fishes and reptiles—the inflection of the angle of the jaws in Marsupials—the manner in which the wings of insects are folded—mere colour in certain Algae—mere pubescence on parts of the flower in grasses—the nature of the dermal covering, as hair or feathers, in the Vertebrata. If the Ornithorhynchus had been covered with feathers instead of hair, this external and trifling character ...
— On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection • Charles Darwin

... went down to Dockett, where I stayed till Monday, Cyril Flower spending with me the day of Sunday, July 12th. On Monday, July 13th, I again presided at my Royal Commission, and again dined ...
— The Life of the Rt. Hon. Sir Charles W. Dilke, Vol. 2 • Stephen Gwynn

... hanging at the end of pendulous stalks springing from the top of a stiff reed-like stem. One field was bare, its surface of an ochreish colour deeper than that of clay, broken and smoothed as perfectly as the surface of the most carefully tended flower-bed. Across this was ranged a row of birds, differing, though where and how I had hardly leisure to observe, from the form of any earthly fowl, about twice the size of a crow, and with beaks apparently at least as powerful but very much ...
— Across the Zodiac • Percy Greg

... matter of the telegrams. It was an utterly foolish thing to do; because they fell to drinking perfumed brandy against the Law of the Prophet, and Mahbub grew wonderfully drunk, and the gates of his mouth were loosened, and he pursued the Flower of Delight with the feet of intoxication till he fell flat among the cushions, where the Flower of Delight, aided by a smooth-faced Kashmiri pundit, searched him from head ...
— Kim • Rudyard Kipling

... mailed hand. Desperate the conflict: 'tis for life or death; And many a pass will tell to after years Of glorious victories sealed in foemen's blood. [25] The peasant throws himself with naked breast, A willing victim on their serried lances. They yield—the flower of chivalry's cut down, And freedom waves her conquering ...
— The Works of Frederich Schiller in English • Frederich Schiller

... my devices already. But since you are here, let me ask you a question in your own profession: how comes it to pass that the victorious arms of England, quartered with the conquered coat of France, are not placed on the dexter side, but give the flower-de-luce the better hand? ...
— A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. IX • Various

... manners may be found, Shall be constrained to love thee. Though thy clime Be fickle, and thy year most part deformed With dripping rains, or withered by a frost, I would not yet exchange thy sullen skies, And fields without a flower, for warmer France With all her vines; nor for Ausonia's groves Of golden fruitage and her myrtle bowers. To shake thy senate, and from height sublime Of patriot eloquence to flash down fire Upon thy foes, was never meant my task: But I can feel thy fortunes, and partake Thy joys and sorrows with ...
— The World's Best Poetry, Volume 8 • Various

... mount three stately flights of stone steps until you reached the first terrace, which was flagged near the house and bordered with stiff flower-beds. Here you might turn and look back due west upon a view of exquisite beauty—an undulating fertile country beneath, and then in the far distance a ...
— Halcyone • Elinor Glyn

... the garden that night, but found no sign of the intruder, save that just under the window a single footmark was visible in the flower-bed. But for that one trace, we might have thought that our imaginations had conjured up that wild, fierce face. We soon, however, had another and a more striking proof that there were secret agencies at work all round us. The ...
— The Sign of the Four • Arthur Conan Doyle

... cried Toinette, as she tossed down the last half of her absinthe and twitched her flower-crowned head. "A kingdom must have a king, ma mere; and Dieu: but he is handsome, this Monsieur Gaston Merode! And if he carries out his part of the work to-night he will be worthy of the ...
— Cleek: the Man of the Forty Faces • Thomas W. Hanshew

... those slim, reluctant feet, Falling as lightly on the careless street As the white petals of a wind-worn flower, Will bring you here, ...
— India's Love Lyrics • Adela Florence Cory Nicolson (AKA Laurence Hope), et al.

... the Danish ship, which was to have put in at the haven of Wick, in Caithness. Careless where he settled down, however, when cast upon the shores of Pomona, he had taken root here, like a weed in a flower garden. He seemed to have had a store of money in the big chest which he claimed from among the wreckage, and circumstances enabled him to purchase the little farm of Crua Breck, together with a fishing boat. The fishing, and a previous knowledge of the Orkney channels, had given him ...
— The Pilots of Pomona • Robert Leighton

... the so-called "Trident of Neptune," is "sometimes crowned with a trilobate lotus flower, or with three lotus buds; in other cases it is depicted in a shape that may well represent a fishing spear" (Blinkenberg, op. cit., ...
— The Evolution of the Dragon • G. Elliot Smith

... at that which is the very pride of my garden, and which well deserves the name bestowed on it by a poetic-minded friend—'the patrician flower:' I mean the beautiful Cobea scandens; and here we are introduced to quite a different class of holdfasts from either of those which we have examined. The blossom of the cobea is formed of a curious and elegantly-formed calyx of five angles, exquisitely veined, and of a tender ...
— Chambers's Edinburgh Journal, No. 454 - Volume 18, New Series, September 11, 1852 • Various

... presented, would have been accepted may be questioned; but it was never destined to reach her for whom it was intended. Scarcely was the flower-laden crook uplifted, than a man of singularly stern aspect, with gray hair cut close to the head, grizzled beard, and military habiliments of ancient make, suddenly appeared behind Aveline, and seizing the nosegay, cast it angrily and contemptuously forth; ...
— The Star-Chamber, Volume 1 - An Historical Romance • W. Harrison Ainsworth

... cacique looked with interest on the hangings of his ship-bed, and made a present of them to him, in return for his offering, with some amber beads from his own neck, some red shoes and a flask of orange flower water. ...
— The Life of Christopher Columbus from his own Letters and Journals • Edward Everett Hale

... stone Flower-pot, containing in the original soil, Unja's last footprints, when he embarked from Mardi for parts unknown. (One ...
— Mardi: and A Voyage Thither, Vol. II (of 2) • Herman Melville

... accepted. The bright, hot summer days came and went, but no flower of July ever opened as rapidly and richly and warmly as his chilled, retarded nature. New thoughts and instincts came with every morning's sun, and new conclusions were reached with every evening's twilight. Yet as the wheat harvest drew ...
— Beauty and The Beast, and Tales From Home • Bayard Taylor

... will of God, the total acceptance by our nature of the mastery of Jesus Christ. Oh! how this world has perverted words and meanings, that the mastery of Jesus Christ should seem to be the imprisonment and not the enfranchisement of the soul! When I bring a flower out of the darkness and set it in the sun, and let the sunlight come streaming down upon it, and the flower knows the sunlight for which it was made and opens its fragrance and beauty; when I take a dark pebble and put it into the stream and let the silver water go coursing down over ...
— Addresses • Phillips Brooks

... hot winds come in the summer and burn the buffalo grass to a tinder and the monotony of the plains weighs on you as it does now, there's a common, low-growing cactus scattered over the prairie that blooms into the gayest red flower you ...
— O Henry Memorial Award Prize Stories of 1919 • Various

... to Hubbard, "that with two such lights of the art world as Peter Calvin and Alfred Irons on the committee, the new statue will be regarded as the flower of Boston culture. Of all droll things," he added, "nothing could be funnier than coupling those two men. It is more striking than the lion and ...
— The Philistines • Arlo Bates

... said Constantia, half-extending her hand to take the flower, her eyes shining with just the trace of tears. "But you and I are a pair of humbugs, Roddy. To begin with you—I don't believe there are any such things as ...
— Foe-Farrell • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... clove-trees. The clove-tree belongs to the order of myrtles. The trunks of the full-grown trees were about twelve inches in diameter. Their topmost branches were from forty to fifty feet from the ground. However, we found some very small ones, fully loaded with fruit. The clove is the flower bud, and it grows in clusters at the end of the twigs. Our guide told us that the annual yield of a good tree is about four pounds and a half. When the buds are young, they are nearly white; when more mature, they change to a light green, ...
— In the Eastern Seas • W.H.G. Kingston

... maiden's grace, And made her beauty half divine. So fair of face, so fair of form Was she the peerless forest born. Nature is kindly to her own, To this Canadian cottage lone, A back-wood settler's lot to bless, She brought this flower of loveliness, Seldom such beauty does she bring To grace the ...
— Verses and Rhymes by the way • Nora Pembroke

... music mute,— Music's flower and fruit, Music's creature— Form and feature— Music's lute. Music's lute be thou, Maiden of the starry brow! (Keep thy heart true to know how!) A Lute which he alone, As all in good time shall be shown, Shall prove, and thereby make his own, Who is god ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 17, No. 101, March, 1866 • Various

... him—from his dark blue cap, like a big columbine flower, to his bare, hairy feet. At ...
— Puck of Pook's Hill • Rudyard Kipling

... thereupon All the devices blazoned on the shield, In their own tinct, and added, of her wit, A border fantasy of branch and flower. ...
— The Light of Scarthey • Egerton Castle

... his knees, he proceeded to examine the ground with great care and attention. For nearly half an hour he crawled from place to place, absorbed in grass, shrub, and flower-bed. Finally he penetrated half into the ...
— Malcolm Sage, Detective • Herbert George Jenkins

... ease and grace of movement. It is possible that Miss Rose had adopted a scantier and lighter method of attire than had prevailed with preceding dancers. She had been caricatured, yet not very unkindly, by Gillray, the drawing bearing the motto, "No flower that blows is like the Rose." The bishop's speech was not without effect. Indeed, he had announced his intention upon some future day to move an address to the king praying that all opera-dancers might be ordered ...
— A Book of the Play - Studies and Illustrations of Histrionic Story, Life, and Character • Dutton Cook

... either end of the terrace flourished a thicket of gum-cistus, syringa, stephanotis, and geranium bushes, and the wall itself, dropping sheer down to the road, was bordered with the customary Florentine hedge of China roses and irises, now out of bloom. Great terra-cotta flower-pots, covered with devices, were placed at intervals along the wall; as it was summer, the oranges and lemons, full of wonderfully sweet white blossoms and young green fruit, were set there in the sun ...
— Tales from Many Sources - Vol. V • Various

... softened, gracious, kindly,—showing the greatest tenderness and forethought for others, even in small, every-day trifles; while for himself he took no care. He wore his fame as lightly as a child might wear a flower, just plucked and soon to fade,—his intelligence seemed to expand itself into a broad, loving, sympathetic comprehension of the wants and afflictions of human-kind; and he was writing a new poem, of which Villiers ...
— Ardath - The Story of a Dead Self • Marie Corelli

... force was mustered in the plains of Bithynia, the knights and their martial attendants on horseback amounted to one hundred thousand fighting men, completely armed with the helmet and coat of mail. The value of these soldiers deserved a strict and authentic account; and the flower of European chivalry might furnish, in a first effort, this formidable body of heavy horse. A part of the infantry might be enrolled for the service of scouts, pioneers, and archers; but the promiscuous crowd were lost in their own ...
— The History of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire - Volume 5 • Edward Gibbon

... singer, no ballroom warbler. And why? Because I am practical. Mine is no squalor of song that cannot transmute itself, with proper exchange value, into a flower-crowned cottage, a sweet mountain- meadow, a grove of redwoods, an orchard of thirty-seven trees, one long row of blackberries and two short rows of strawberries, to say nothing of a quarter of a mile of gurgling brook. ...
— Love of Life - and Other Stories • Jack London

... Daisy coming!" exclaimed Margaret, her face lighting up with pleasure as the two youngest children entered, and, indeed, little Gertrude's golden hair, round open face, fresh red and white complexion, and innocent looks, had so much likeness to the flower, as to promote the use of the pet name, though protests were often made in favour of her proper appellation. Her temper was daisy-like too, serene and loving, and able to bear a great deal of spoiling, and resolve as they might, who ...
— The Daisy Chain, or Aspirations • Charlotte Yonge

... I mean. When you smell the rich red flower of the rose, or look at the pure white petals of the lily, or the sweet-smelling blossoms of the orange or the jasmine, you are simply seeing or smelling leaves. The fruit itself, whether in the form of an ...
— The Wonder Island Boys: Exploring the Island • Roger Thompson Finlay

... fire, applying the tiny flame to his opened lantern. Quietly Mr. Allen opened the shield, and a long, bright gleam swept noiselessly out into the darkness, revealing with almost painful distinctness the outlines of every stem of grass and flower. Then, far at the end of the path of light, something moved. There were two small, luminous spots, then in an instant two more, a little larger. Slowly the shifting lights and shadows took shape, and there, before them, stood two deer—a doe and ...
— Buffalo Roost • F. H. Cheley

... would not attempt for her pleasure. He went to the tops of trees after some vacant bird nest or hanging flower, he chased rabbits and hunted squirrels that she might get a glimpse ...
— The Boy from Hollow Hut - A Story of the Kentucky Mountains • Isla May Mullins

... and that they must all be realised. The lower forms are those in which the best, which means the most human, faculties of our nature are undeveloped. The highest has not yet been realised. "The flower of humanity, captive still in its germ, will blossom out one day into the true form of man like unto God, in a state of which no terrestrial man can imagine the greatness and the ...
— The Idea of Progress - An Inquiry Into Its Origin And Growth • J. B. Bury

... me that talk should be, Like water, sprinkled sparingly; Then ground that late lay dull and dried Smiles up at you revivified, And flowers—of speech—touched by the dew Put forth fresh root and bud anew. But I'm not sure that any flower Would thrive beneath Niagara's shower! So when a friend turns full on me His verbal hose, may I not flee? I know that I am arid ground, But I'm ...
— The Wit and Humor of America, Volume VII. (of X.) • Various

... and tender a flower to have any such hardship put upon her, and it almost crazes a man, and makes him temporarily out of his head, to see women do anything to hazard that inheriant delicacy of hern, that always appealed so to ...
— Samantha on the Woman Question • Marietta Holley

... foreign to her nature. She is, rather, of a poetic and dreamy temperament. Perhaps it is the fragile quality of her beauty which gives an almost wistful expression to the face. She is like a delicate flower which a chill ...
— Van Dyck - A Collection Of Fifteen Pictures And A Portrait Of The - Painter With Introduction And Interpretation • Estelle M. Hurll

... think, mamma," asked Flossie, "that daisies and violets make a lovely garden? I have a round place in the middle of our wild flower bed just full of light ...
— The Bobbsey Twins in the Country • Laura Lee Hope

... thee, love flower, what love is? It is the gold of noon, and the silver of night, the might of the lion, and the soft cooing of the gentle dove. As the slender vine around the straight palm, so will my love twine around thy heart. Yea, and even as the banyan tree sends out branches to draw dew ...
— Leonie of the Jungle • Joan Conquest

... examining the other pictures. Two of these were simple flower studies. Watson scarcely knew which puzzled him most; the blossoms or their containers. For the vases were like large-sized loving cups, broad as to body, and provided with a handle on either side. Their colours were unfamiliar. As for the blossoms—in ...
— The Blind Spot • Austin Hall and Homer Eon Flint

... thunder, was a long stream of light, just like the tail of a comet! I tell you, I felt happy! She's regenerated me, thought I; and I, too, am one of the "shining hosts"! And then directly, without any warnin' or noise of any kind, all around began to look about the color of a yaller sun-flower, and I began to scent a powerful smell ...
— Strange Visitors • Henry J. Horn

... the early morning hours before milking time at the farm, or in the grey of the twilight, Morva was free to work in her own garden, while Sara only tended her herb bed. There at the further end was the potato bed in purple flower, here were rows of broad beans, in which the bees were humming, attracted by their sweet aroma that filled the evening air; there was the leek bed waving its grey green blades, and here, in the sunniest corner of all, was Sara's herb bed, which she tended with special care, whose products ...
— Garthowen - A Story of a Welsh Homestead • Allen Raine

... the flower of a prickly-pear cactus, full of sunlight from behind, which a fairy took the fancy to ...
— The Vicar's Daughter • George MacDonald

... man?" She wrinkled her nose. Then she flushed, conscious that he was a bit surprised at her tone of disdain. "Why, he will wear a frock-coat and a flower in the buttonhole and will bow in my customers. You didn't think my young man was ...
— Blow The Man Down - A Romance Of The Coast - 1916 • Holman Day

... the same time prepared rich provision for her owner's family. Such was the wise and considerate allotment which the landlords and the farmers had here made for the labouring poor. The wholesome vegetable, the medicinal herb, and the sweet-scented flower, intermingled as they grew around these little dwellings, and reminded me, as I looked upon them, how comfortable is the lot of the industrious poor, whose hearts have learned the lesson of gratitude in the ...
— The Annals of the Poor • Legh Richmond

... of those golden-haired maidens who danced at his fete would he show favor, though upon his birthnight. And when the Lady Beata had asked him shyly why he wore a white rose in his doublet, he had told her saucily, 'The meaning of the flower is silence.'" ...
— A Golden Book of Venice • Mrs. Lawrence Turnbull

... softly, but she goeth sure, She stumbles not, as stronger creatures do. Her journey's shorter, so she may endure Better than they which do much farther go. She makes no noise, but stilly seizeth on The flower or herb appointed for her food, The which she quietly doth feed upon While others range and glare, but find no good. And though she doth but very softly go, However, 'tis not fast nor slow, but sure; And certainly ...
— The Works of John Bunyan • John Bunyan

... mistress?" said the stranger; "that was far from my purpose.—I will put my question otherwise.—Are the good dames of Woodstock so careless of their pretty daughters as to let the flower of them all wander about the wild chase without a mother, or a somebody to prevent the fox from running away with the lamb?—that carelessness, ...
— Woodstock; or, The Cavalier • Sir Walter Scott

... refreshing beverage for him in one of the excavations of the rock. We had taken on board at Atures an Indian basket called a mapire, filled with sugar, limes, and those grenadillas, or fruits of the passion-flower, to which the Spaniards give the name of parchas. As we were absolutely destitute of large vessels for holding and mixing liquids, we poured the water of the river, by means of a calabash, into one of the holes ...
— Equinoctial Regions of America V2 • Alexander von Humboldt

... escutcheon, and the Cardinal found graven upon this escutcheon his own arms the Sforza lion and the flower of the quince. Instantly those dark, thoughtful eyes of his grew keen as they flashed upon ...
— The Historical Nights' Entertainment • Rafael Sabatini

... tastefully planned in every respect that it well deserved the title of a mansion in miniature. It stood on a rising ground which was crowned with trees; and the garden in front, the summer-house, the porch, the trellis-work fence, the creepers, the flower-beds—everything in fact, told that it had been laid out and planned by ...
— Wrecked but not Ruined • R.M. Ballantyne

... the flower sweet, and it drops off into withered leaves. And her eyes looked askance at M'sieu Ralph, yet she hath a husband. Come, eat of thy bird and bread, and to-morrow maybe thou wilt run about lest thy limbs stiffen ...
— A Little Girl in Old Quebec • Amanda Millie Douglas

... market which her productions are always struggling to enter through every opening in the tariff wall, for exclusion from which no distant market either in England or elsewhere can compensate her, the want of which brings on her commercial atrophy, and drives the flower of her youth by thousands and tens ...
— Newfoundland and the Jingoes - An Appeal to England's Honor • John Fretwell

... beheld thee, sweet, Madcap Love came gayly flying Where the woods and meadows meet: Then I straightway fell a-sighing. Fair, I said, Are hills and glade And sweet the light with which they're laden, But ah, to me, Nor flower nor tree Are half so sweet as ...
— In the Days of Drake • J. S. Fletcher

... distinction. To the child the tree and the lamp-post are as natural and as artificial as each other; or rather, neither of them are natural but both supernatural. For both are splendid and unexplained. The flower with which God crowns the one, and the flame with which Sam the lamplighter crowns the other, are equally of the gold of fairy-tales. In the middle of the wildest fields the most rustic child is, ten to one, playing at steam-engines. And the only spiritual ...
— Heretics • Gilbert K. Chesterton

... not examined the carvings so as to assign, with any decision, the several masters' work; but in general the flower and leaf design in the traceries will be by the two head menuisiers, and their apprentices; the elaborate Scripture histories by Avernier, with variously completing incidental grotesque by Trupin; and the joining and fitting by the common workmen. No nails are used,—all is morticed, and ...
— Our Fathers Have Told Us - Part I. The Bible of Amiens • John Ruskin

... to see the two whom he had left in that flower-embowered lovers' nook at the end of the piazza ...
— Kidnapped at the Altar - or, The Romance of that Saucy Jessie Bain • Laura Jean Libbey

... the trembling herd of them distracted, talked of the thousand dangers that awaited them if they didn't mend their ways, made them fly to their lucky charms to ward off ill-luck, when she offered them a yellow flower, with great pomp, or some broken glass in a jewel-box. Then she talked to the Three Graces, those big girls who always astonished her with their cloistered existence—Nunkie before everything—and who amused themselves by measuring one another round the biceps, round the chest, ...
— The Bill-Toppers • Andre Castaigne

... actual experience goes, I have only met one man in my life who might fitly be quoted in the same breath with Andrew Fairservice,—though without his vices. He was a man whose very presence could impart a savour of quaint antiquity to the baldest and most modern flower-plots. There was a dignity about his tall, stooping form, and an earnestness in his wrinkled face, that recalled Don Quixote; but a Don Quixote who had come through the training of the Covenant, and been nourished in his youth on "Walker's Lives" ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson, Volume 9 • Robert Louis Stevenson

... thus she began, 'The field's chief flower, sweet above compare, 8 Stain to all nymphs, more lovely than a man, More white and red than doves or roses are; Nature that made thee, with herself at strife, Saith that the world hath ending with ...
— Venus and Adonis • William Shakespeare

... beauties seemed to have been little more than attempted; though indeed it might be questioned whether the finest heart could have bettered the effect of what the overtasked hand of affection had left half done. Mrs. Chauncey, however, after a while, began slowly to take a flower or two from the foot, and place them on other parts ...
— The Wide, Wide World • Elizabeth Wetherell

... Henne Roesel was not unknown to my mother. She often came to the store, to beg, under pretence of borrowing, a little flour or sugar or a stick of cinnamon. On the occasion of the betrothal she had arrived late, dressed in indescribable odds and ends, with an artificial red flower stuck into her frowzy wig. She pushed and elbowed her way to the middle of the table, where the shadchan sat ready with paper and ink to take down the articles of the contract. On every point she had some comment to make, till a dispute arose over a note which my grandfather ...
— The Promised Land • Mary Antin

... the twins were late in rising only to find it a summer's day, apparently, so balmy indeed that the deck seemed to be blossoming out into a flower-bed, as group after group of ladies appeared in gay lawns and organdies, while all the Mohammedan helpers were busy stretching double awnings where there had been single ones, or none at all, and rigging up the punkahs ...
— All Aboard - A Story for Girls • Fannie E. Newberry

... his esteem to the man who has tasted the cup of luxury, and, in the flower of youth and in the height of his career, can dash it from his lips, and say, "I will not drink it; I prefer the charms of a tranquil life to all the noise and well-bred hate of a court? I am too irritable to rule my fellow-citizens, ...
— The Lawyers, A Drama in Five Acts • Augustus William Iffland

... well-furnished room, called the quadro, which was the usual reception-room; and beyond it were the dining and sleeping rooms, and the nursery. They all opened into an inner court-yard, the walls of which were ornamented with fresco paintings; and part of it was laid out as a flower-garden, with a fountain in the centre. From it one door led to the kitchen, and another to the stable. The windows were mostly in the roof, as were those in Pompeii and many ancient cities; indeed it was ...
— Manco, the Peruvian Chief - An Englishman's Adventures in the Country of the Incas • W.H.G. Kingston

... or dissolved in woe? Does it witness our grief, and share our sorrows? Or is the mysterious tie that linked it with mortality forever broken? And the remembrance of earthly scenes, are they indeed to the enfranchised spirit as the morning dream, or the dew upon the early flower? Reflections such as these naturally arise in every breast. Their influence is felt, though their import cannot always be expressed. The principle is in all the same, however it may differ in ...
— Marriage • Susan Edmonstone Ferrier

... well to repeat in prose, what has already been said in verse, that Grass of Parnassus, the pretty Autumn flower, grows in the marshes at the foot of the Muses' Hill, and other hills, not at the ...
— Grass of Parnassus • Andrew Lang

... is better than any they have. So our business here being ayre, this is the best way, only with a little mixture of statues, or pots, which may be handsome, and so filled with another pot of such or such a flower or greene as the season of the year will bear. And then for flowers, they are best seen in a little plat by themselves; besides, their borders spoil the walks of another garden; and then for fruit, the best way is to have walls built circularly ...
— The Diary of Samuel Pepys • Samuel Pepys

... in the lowest ignorance. Their young men of talent were glad to get situations as clerks in the stores of white merchants. Their young ladies of beauty and accomplishments were fortune-made if they got a place in the white man's harem. These were the highest stations to which the flower of their youth aspired. The rest sank beneath the discouragements, and grovelled in vice and debasement. If a colored person had any business with a white gentleman, and should call at his house, "he must take off his hat, and wait at ...
— The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Omnibus • American Anti-Slavery Society

... like those of Rubens. There is a Saint Christopher by Titian, a kind of bronzed and bowed Atlas with his four limbs straining to bear the weight of a world, and on his neck by an extraordinary contrast, the tiny, soft, and laughing bambino, whose infantine flesh has the delicacy and grace of a flower. Above all, there are a dozen mythological and allegorical paintings by Tintoret and Veronese, of such brilliancy and such intoxicating fascination that a veil seems to fall from our eyes and we discover an unknown world, a paradise of delights ...
— Great Pictures, As Seen and Described by Famous Writers • Esther Singleton

... of us met again, however, in Vienna, the insulation had been entirely rubbed off and we rushed madly into one another's arms and exchanged names and addresses; and, babbling feverishly the while, we told one another what our favorite flower was, and our birthstone and our grandmother's maiden name, and what we thought of a race of people who regarded a cup of ostensible coffee and a dab of honey as constituting a man's-size breakfast. And, being pretty tolerably homesick by that time, we leaned in toward a ...
— Europe Revised • Irvin S. Cobb

... the rich to buy, and the poor had no money. The poor had come lean and hungry out of the terrible winter that followed the World's Fair. In that beautiful enterprise the prodigal city had put forth her utmost strength, and, having shown the world the supreme flower of her energy, had collapsed. There was gloom, not only in La Salle Street where people failed, but throughout the city, where the engine of play had exhausted the forces of all. The city's huge garment was too large for it; miles of empty stores, hotels, flat-buildings, showed its shrunken ...
— The Web of Life • Robert Herrick

... by the Prince, the good fairy carried away one of the children, and no one knew anything about it save the Princess and the fairy. When the remaining child was two years old the Princess died. The child from then on grew like a wild flower. The Prince did his best to spoil her, but the good fairy watched over her, just as carefully as she watched over the child she had hidden away. By and by the wicked Prince died. The child reached womanhood. The good fairy went away and left her; perhaps she now gave her whole ...
— Arms and the Woman • Harold MacGrath

... an excursion that seemed to present fresh beauties at every yard. As a rule the forest came down to the flowing water on both sides in waves of verdure, with grand trees which every now and then presented the aspect of some gorgeous flower garden, here red, there blue, at other times in lovely wreaths of white, while it seemed, Joe Cross said to the lads, as if one of the blossoming trees took flight every now and then and came skimming over the boat, filling the sky with ...
— The Ocean Cat's Paw - The Story of a Strange Cruise • George Manville Fenn

... the street, not without alarm, and stood by the entrance to the Central London Railway. There were some flower-sellers sitting by the railings, but they had no resemblance to the flower-girls of whom Uncle Matthew had often told him. He glanced at them with distaste. "It's queer," he thought, "how disappointed I am with everything!" and then, as ...
— The Foolish Lovers • St. John G. Ervine

... of climbers clustered round the trees, twisting in a thousand fantastic windings, and finally running down to the ground, where they took fresh root and formed props to the dead tree their embrace had killed. Not a flower was to be seen, but ferns grew by the roadside in luxuriance. Butterflies were scarce, but dragonflies darted along like sparks of fire. The road had the advantage of being shady and cool, but the heavy rain and traffic had made it everywhere slippery, and in ...
— By Sheer Pluck - A Tale of the Ashanti War • G. A. Henty



Words linked to "Flower" :   portulaca, flower girl, peacock flower, browallia, effloresce, Lonas annua, satin flower, basket flower, flower-cup fern, centaury, Malcolmia maritima, bluebottle, Claytonia virginica, flower store, cyclamen, sweet alison, flower garden, scorpionweed, Moehringia mucosa, bellwort, Layia platyglossa, shortia, helmet flower, Arctotis venusta, globe flower, flame flower, blanket flower, tassel flower, peacock flower fence, narrow-leaved flame flower, pyrethrum, white-topped aster, brass buttons, hot water plant, butter-and-eggs, cudweed, angiosperm, old maid, calendula, New Flower, pinwheel flower, floral envelope, perianth, blood flower, pasque flower, sea poppy, pilewort, shall-flower, bouncing Bess, Centaurea imperialis, garland flower, paradise flower, Ranunculus ficaria, xeranthemum, Polianthes tuberosa, windflower, gazania, painted daisy, flower petal, silene, Glaucium flavum, gentian, ovary, golden age, leather flower, Dame's violet, wandflower, ageratum, everlasting flower, flower head, baby's breath, western wall flower, period of time, spathe flower, marigold, fennel flower, Zantedeschia aethiopica, apetalous flower, sweet sultan, sweet alyssum, tidytips, aquilege, chlamys, Texas star, cardinal flower, sandwort, flower stalk, Dahlia pinnata, evening trumpet flower, pincushion flower, tuberose, Senecio cruentus, Malcolm stock, helianthus, corydalis, anemone, bush violet, Erysimum arkansanum, Cheiranthus asperus, dahlia, velvet flower, treasure flower, Saponaria officinalis, campion, Nepal trumpet flower, Tellima affinis, carrion flower, Centranthus ruber, snail-flower, China aster, umbrellawort, Pericallis hybrida, ray floret, florest's cineraria, verbena, blue marguerite, mistflower, ursinia, sweet rocket, artificial flower, stamen, bachelor's button, Carolina spring beauty, paeony, marguerite, flower bed, white daisy, billy buttons, old maid flower, kingfisher daisy, ammobium, Lobularia maritima, Swan River daisy, Townsendia Exscapa, peak, Christmas flower, Saponaria vaccaria, Stokesia laevis, inflorescence, poor man's orchid, honey-flower, garden pink, schizopetalon, streptocarpus, Siberian wall flower, Amberboa moschata, cuckoo flower, Anemonella thalictroides, Mexican sunflower, guinea-hen flower, fiesta flower, crepe flower, damask violet, floweret, Leucanthemum vulgare, gand flower, finger-flower, horn poppy, flowering, four o'clock, aster, wallflower, blue cardinal flower, lace-flower vine, composite, mist-flower, rue anemone, soapwort, petunia, Conoclinium coelestinum, burst forth, stemless daisy, carpel, flower-of-an-hour, Tanacetum coccineum, nutmeg flower, Christmas bells, snapdragon, perigonium, catananche, shell-flower, sun marigold, Lindheimera texana, Claytonia caroliniana, Erysimum cheiri, Adonis annua, babies'-breath, coneflower, balloon flower, fig marigold, cornflower aster, shad-flower, oxeye daisy, slipperwort, reproductive structure, spider flower, efflorescence, nigella, wild snapdragon, rocket larkspur, blossom, moon daisy, delphinium, prime, Linaria vulgaris, trumpet flower, Lithophragma affine, Moehringia lateriflora, heyday, Eupatorium coelestinum, floral leaf, floret, bartonia, horned poppy, Centaurea moschata, cape marigold, tail-flower, gerardia, Cheiranthus cheiri, Felicia amelloides, globe amaranth, pebble plant, tongue-flower, yellow horned poppy, bloom, aquilegia, sowbread, orchid, begonia, Virginia stock, Virginia spring beauty, Erysimum asperum, flower arrangement, flush, wild flower, zinnia, blue daisy, lyre-flower, Mentzelia lindleyi, merry bells, filago, flowering plant, sunflower, spathiphyllum, stokes' aster, develop, prairie rocket, hedge pink, arum lily, devil's flax, cotton rose, cineraria, butterfly flower, Chrysanthemum coccineum, Lonas inodora, cow cockle, Sparaxis tricolor, flower bud, Vaccaria pyramidata, Eastern pasque flower, commelina, pheasant's-eye, Delphinium ajacis, Easter daisy, star of the veldt, heliophila, Mentzelia livicaulis, calla lily, lychnis, flower power, flower people, yellow ageratum, cowherb, French honeysuckle, peace lily, redbird flower, guinea flower, Virginian stock, flower gardening, Bessera elegans, schizanthus, red valerian, Chrysanthemum leucanthemum, cornflower, cosmea, calla, Cyclamen neopolitanum, paper flower, Arctotis stoechadifolia, Felicia bergeriana, toadflax, daisy, Cyclamen purpurascens, Schizopetalon walkeri, Saintpaulia ionantha, wonder flower, vervain, time period, Gomphrena globosa, African violet, veronica, orchidaceous plant, calceolaria, Pericallis cruenta, Alsobia dianthiflora, lesser celandine, Hesperis matronalis, pistil, flower cluster, African daisy, Centaurea cyanus, blazing star, blue-eyed African daisy, composite plant, achimenes, chigger flower, flamingo flower, Mentzelia laevicaulis, canarybird flower, speedwell, Consolida ambigua, scabious, snail flower, valerian, Clatonia lanceolata, gillyflower, wild oats, scarlet musk flower, moccasin flower, Vaccaria hispanica, Brachycome Iberidifolia, Cyclamen hederifolium, Venus's flower basket, flowery, bud, scorpion weed, tithonia, flower child, bloomer, compass flower, Cotula coronopifolia, stock, cosmos, peony, starfish flower, coral drops, woodland star, swan-flower, scabiosa



Copyright © 2019 Free-Translator.com