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Family   Listen
noun
Family  n.  (pl. families)  
1.
The collective body of persons who live in one house, and under one head or manager; a household, including parents, children, and servants, and, as the case may be, lodgers or boarders.
2.
The group comprising a husband and wife and their dependent children, constituting a fundamental unit in the organization of society. "The welfare of the family underlies the welfare of society."
3.
Those who descend from one common progenitor; a tribe, clan, or race; kindred; house; as, the human family; the family of Abraham; the father of a family. "Go! and pretend your family is young."
4.
Course of descent; genealogy; line of ancestors; lineage.
5.
Honorable descent; noble or respectable stock; as, a man of family.
6.
A group of kindred or closely related individuals; as, a family of languages; a family of States; the chlorine family.
7.
(Biol.) A group of organisms, either animal or vegetable, related by certain points of resemblance in structure or development, more comprehensive than a genus, because it is usually based on fewer or less pronounced points of likeness. In Zoology a family is less comprehesive than an order; in botany it is often considered the same thing as an order.
Family circle. See under Circle.
Family man.
(a)
A man who has a family; esp., one who has a wife and children living with him and dependent upon him.
(b)
A man of domestic habits. "The Jews are generally, when married, most exemplary family men."
Family of curves or Family of surfaces (Geom.), a group of curves or surfaces derived from a single equation.
In a family way, like one belonging to the family. "Why don't we ask him and his ladies to come over in a family way, and dine with some other plain country gentlefolks?"
In the family way, pregnant. (Colloq. euphemism)






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Family" Quotes from Famous Books



... It really is impossible for the child to go over the country looking for Orion and Diana. Oh, what trouble I brought upon myself when I undertook the care of my brother's family!" ...
— A Little Mother to the Others • L. T. Meade

... of importance, that takes no little time to understand by the Martian student is the part played by the planet's satellites in the generation of Electro-Magnetic energy. The sun together with its circulating family of planets is a huge Electric motor, so a planet and its satellites are minor generators of Electric energy. Satellites have a higher importance and necessity than the ...
— The Planet Mars and its Inhabitants - A Psychic Revelation • Eros Urides and J. L. Kennon

... me, I am married; and if I have no children, I don't mind saying that it is Cibot's fault; he is too fond of me, but if I cared —never mind. What would have become of me and my Cibot if we had had a family, when we have not a penny to bless ourselves with after thirty years' of faithful service? I have not a farthing belonging to nobody else, that is what comforts me. I have never wronged nobody. —Look here, suppose now (there is no harm ...
— Poor Relations • Honore de Balzac

... the family is the only one present at the function, she can leave cards for the rest ...
— The Book of Good Manners • W. C. Green

... answers were shortened. Then he quit writing, and his Thursday letter ceased to come. He had thought the matter all over, and decided, no doubt, that he was doing what was best—both for himself and the girl; that his family's high ideas should not be outraged by a Mexican marriage. He had put a piece of flesh-colored court-plaster over his ...
— Danger Signals • John A. Hill and Jasper Ewing Brady

... years without crossing the bar of Gallinas! Three years after this interview, he left the coast for ever, with a fortune of near a million. For a while, he dwelt in Havana, engaged in commerce; but I understood that family difficulties induced him to retire altogether from trade; so that, if still alive, he is probably a resident of "Geneva la Superba," whither he went from the ...
— Captain Canot - or, Twenty Years of an African Slaver • Brantz Mayer

... sent to Cambridge by his father, a saddler, who imagined a genius had been born in the family. He travelled in France and Italy, and on his return held in contempt every pursuit but poetry and criticism. He haunted the literary coteries, and dropped into a galaxy of wits and noblemen. At a time when our literature, like our politics, was divided into two factions, ...
— Calamities and Quarrels of Authors • Isaac D'Israeli

... as a last and sole resource, to see and consult an old servant of our family; once my nurse, now housekeeper at a grand mansion not far from Miss Marchmont's. I spent some hours with her; she comforted, but knew not how to advise me. Still all inward darkness, I left her about twilight; a walk of two miles lay before me; it was a clear, frosty ...
— Villette • Charlotte Bronte

... not ask for the description of the discipline in situations where discipline there can be none. One slight anomaly I have heard of as varying pro tanto the uniform features of this picture. In Glasgow I have heard of an arrangement by which young academicians are placed in the family of a professor. Here, as members of a private household, and that household under the presiding eye of a conscientious, paternal, and judicious scholar, doubtless they would enjoy as absolute a shelter from peril and worldly contagion as parents ...
— Memorials and Other Papers • Thomas de Quincey

... son awaiting when he returned from the Citizens' Mass Meeting at midnight. Robert, insisting that he was "fit as a fiddle," had nevertheless been put to bed through the connivance of an anxious mother and the family physician, who found him to have suffered some severe contusions and lacerations in the morning's fray. But he was wide awake and curious when his father's latch key grated ...
— Port O' Gold • Louis John Stellman

... she had been entrusted with to lay out. The bristling difficulties seemed all the more unmanageable because the sunshine that afternoon was so bright, and the wind so fresh; while the boat that belonged to the Carnegy family lay tossing at anchor within sight, as if inviting the girl down for the greatest enjoyment of her life—a pull across ...
— The Captain's Bunk - A Story for Boys • M. B. Manwell

... that I was eating my breakfast I kept speculating as to what family of mankind they could belong to; and shortly there came an idea into my head, which brought the blood into my cheeks with excitement as I thought of it. Was it possible that they might be the lost ten tribes of Israel, of whom I ...
— Erewhon • Samuel Butler

... of the one family so near us who were neither gone nor going to the left bank of the Niger, and wondered how she ...
— Bleak House • Charles Dickens

... dollars, and I thought I could do the same, so I began, and won a little. Then I lost, and played on to get my money back. In just an hour I was cleaned out of all I had. Now I am penniless, and my poor family will suffer for ...
— Joe's Luck - Always Wide Awake • Horatio Alger, Jr.

... upon two separate occasions was ready to form an alliance with England. Probably neither one of them contemplated the possibility of the United States shirking its responsibilities as a member of the family of nations. Monroe's message contained the implied promise that if Europe would refrain from interfering in the political concerns of this hemisphere, we would abstain from all intervention in Europe. From that day ...
— From Isolation to Leadership, Revised - A Review of American Foreign Policy • John Holladay Latane

... been shut so long. She not only reproached her with her levity and indiscretion, but attacked her on the score of religion, declaring roundly that she was in a state of apostacy and reprobation; and finally, threatened to send her a packing at this extremity of the kingdom. All the family interceded for poor Winifred, not even excepting her slighted swain, Mr Clinker, who, on his knees, implored ...
— The Expedition of Humphry Clinker • Tobias Smollett

... is no moral code in all the world more rigidly observed than that of the Zulus." (R. H. Millward, quoted by Myers, History as Past Ethics, p. 11.) Compare this: "A Kafir feels that the 'frame that binds him in' extends to the clan. The sense of solidarity of the family in Europe is thin and feeble compared to the full-blooded sense of corporate union of the Kafir clan. The claims of the clan entirely swamp the rights of the individual." (Kidd, Savage Childhood, p. ...
— Problems of Conduct • Durant Drake

... mother deer are away feeding along the watercourses, and search the dingle from one end to the other, hoping to find the little ones again and win their confidence. But they were not there; and I took to watching instead a family of mink that lived in a den under a root, and a big owl that always slept in the same hemlock. Then, one day when a flock of partridges led me out of the wild berry bushes into a cool green island of the burned lands, I ran plump upon the deer and her fawns lying all together under a fallen treetop, ...
— Types of Children's Literature • Edited by Walter Barnes

... his partners. I must get it for them. It is the bargain I made. My own share will not be great, Ruth; I would gladly give a hundred times as much for your favor. But I am rich, girl. I have plenty salted away. I'll make my peace with my family, and we shall go home, to England. You'll be ...
— Fire Mountain - A Thrilling Sea Story • Norman Springer

... have this experience, but it is truly a blood-bought inheritance, provided and willed by our Father through Jesus Christ to every child of God. This blessed experience of regeneration, or the divine birth, inducts us into the family of God, making us a scriptural heir to all the good things of Father's possessions. Father has perfected every necessary provision for every one of his children to come into immediate possession of this inheritance. A will or testament must specify the nature of the inheritance, ...
— Sanctification • J. W. Byers

... limit that a woman can't vote on her own business?" said one girl too another after they had finished the one hundred and forty-fifth family and tried to explain their stake in the election to a bigoted "head ...
— How To Write Special Feature Articles • Willard Grosvenor Bleyer

... had their joyous gallops. Then came the spring, slow, shy, and reluctant as the springtide sets in on that high plateau in mid-continent, and Van had become even more thoroughly domesticated. He now looked upon himself as one of the family, and he knew the dining-room window, and there, thrice each day and sometimes at odd hours between, he would take his station while the household was at table and plead with those great soft brown eyes for sugar. Commissary-bills ran high that winter, and cut loaf-sugar was an item of untold ...
— Starlight Ranch - and Other Stories of Army Life on the Frontier • Charles King

... family of Doves came pattering over the roof, swaying their heads at every step. "We are so glad to see you back," said the father. "We had a long, cold winter, and we ...
— Among the Farmyard People • Clara Dillingham Pierson

... months of travel he reached France once again. When he came to Gascony he found the rightful ruler on the throne and the house of Sanscourt, well and happy. Great was the welcome given the knight by the happy family and a great feast was held for them. The Lady Jeanne was radiant with the happiness which ...
— In the Court of King Arthur • Samuel Lowe

... all their actions and habits appeared to be just the same as those of their northern cousins. And there was a most singular bird of the night that was quite numerous here, called the "chuck-will's widow," on account of the resemblance its note bore to those words. It belonged to the whippoorwill family, but was some larger. It would sound its monotonous call in the night for hours at a stretch, and I think its mournful cry, heard when alone, on picket at night out in dense, gloomy woods, is just the most lonesome, ...
— The Story of a Common Soldier of Army Life in the Civil War, 1861-1865 • Leander Stillwell

... she had for some time past neglected her religion. Fred went so far as to suggest that she ought to leave her present situation and enter a truly religious family. ...
— Esther Waters • George Moore

... he rose to join the little family circle, which now habitually gathered around a table on the veranda of the patio under the rays of a swinging lamp to take their chocolate. To his surprise the veranda was empty and dark; a light shining from the inner drawing-room showed him his aunt ...
— The Bell-Ringer of Angel's and Other Stories • Bret Harte

... Sepulchre." All these works are later than the altarpiece which Angelico painted (as before mentioned) for the choir connected with this convent, and which is now in the academy of Florence; it represents the Virgin with Saints Cosmas and Damian (the patrons of the Medici family), Dominic, Peter, Francis, Mark, John Evangelist and Stephen; the pediment illustrated the lives of Cosmas and Damian, but it has long been severed from the main subject. In the Uffizi gallery, an altarpiece, the Virgin (life-sized) enthroned, ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 2, Part 1, Slice 1 • Various

... not come as enemies to Spain, but only to free them from the yoke of France, and assist them in establishing themselves under the government of the house of Austria. These professions produced very little effect among the Spaniards, who were either cooled in their attachment to that family, or provoked by the excesses of the English troops. These having taken possession of Fort St. Catharine and Port St. Mary's, instead of protecting, plundered the natives, notwithstanding the strict orders issued by the duke of Ormond to prevent this scandalous ...
— The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.II. - From William and Mary to George II. • Tobias Smollett

... streets and before their palace. The Grand Duchess came to an open window, and was joined by her daughter, the Princess Victoria, who is eighteen. Then the Grand Duke soon came and stood behind them, and when the Heir Prince peeped over his father's shoulder, the picture of the ducal family was complete. ...
— Harper's Young People, September 14, 1880 - An Illustrated Weekly • Various

... the Russian, Austrian, English, Welsh, and American Gypsies; together with Papers on the Gypsies in the East, Gypsy Names and Family Characteristics, the Origin of the Gypsies, a Gypsy Magic Spell, Shelta, the Tinker's Talk; beside Gypsy Stories in Romany, with Translations. In one volume, ...
— Birds in the Bush • Bradford Torrey

... the Te Deum was finished between the 17th and 30th. Both works were publicly rehearsed at the Chapel Royal, Whitehall, on the 18th and 25th of the ensuing November, and formed part of the thanksgiving services on the 27th at the Chapel Royal of St. James, in the presence of the King and royal family. ...
— The Standard Oratorios - Their Stories, Their Music, And Their Composers • George P. Upton

... Although Mr. Bennett's family were out of town during the summer, he was obliged to remain most of the season, on account of his business. Up to this time he had not mentioned the fact of the breaking his engagement; indeed, he had avoided the subject whenever the two had met, because he knew he was wrong, ...
— The Continental Monthly, Vol. IV. October, 1863, No. IV. - Devoted to Literature and National Policy. • Various

... them all, every moment expecting the one who had tried to curry favour with me, for I had an instinctive assurance that I had not seen the last of him. Night drew on while I was still on the look-out, and yet he did not appear. The rest of the family went calmly to bed, taking no notice of my disquietude; but nothing could have induced me to curl myself round and shut my eyes. I was sure danger was near, and it was my part as a faithful guardian to ...
— Cat and Dog - Memoirs of Puss and the Captain • Julia Charlotte Maitland

... near the village, which it overlooks. It is built in the form of an open square, like all the other presidios, and was in a most ruinous state, with the exception of one side, in which the commandant lived, with his family. There were only two guns, one of which was spiked, and the other had no carriage. Twelve, half clothed, and half starved looking fellows, composed the garrison; and they, it was said, had not a musket apiece. The small settlement lay directly below the fort, composed of about ...
— Two Years Before the Mast • Richard Henry Dana

... regarded as benefices. This opinion is no longer tenable. Canon 1410 says:—"The endowment of a Benefice is constituted either by property, the ownership of which pertains to the Juridical entity itself, or by certain and obligatory payments of any family or moral personality, or by certain and voluntary offerings of the faithful which appertain to the rector of the benefice, or, as they are called stole fees, within the limits of diocesan taxation or legitimate custom, or choral distributions, exclusive of a third part ...
— The Divine Office • Rev. E. J. Quigley

... discussions of the articles and books which are read. At election time they discuss politics; they take up strikes and labor troubles; woman suffrage is occasionally touched upon; and they are even asked to suggest methods of making a given wage cover family needs. ...
— The New Education - A Review of Progressive Educational Movements of the Day (1915) • Scott Nearing

... was at the house of a friend, when a family was incidentally mentioned as being in great poverty and affliction. The father had been attacked with what is known as "black small pox," and was quite destitute of the comforts and attentions which his situation ...
— Woman's Work in the Civil War - A Record of Heroism, Patriotism, and Patience • Linus Pierpont Brockett

... had as many wives as he could obtain. He did not support them, but they supported him, and when children became too numerous he lessened his family by killing off a few. More than half the children were thus destroyed. Their enjoyments consisted of games with a kind of ball, and mock-fights, but especially in a wild dance they called the corrobboree. They were in general good-humoured when things went pleasantly; ...
— History of Australia and New Zealand - From 1606 to 1890 • Alexander Sutherland

... to the open piano in one corner of the room. Nora had taken music and so was the pianist of the family. She struck the opening chords, and then they all joined ...
— The Quest of Happy Hearts • Kathleen Hay

... conditions of his life with which he cannot grapple alone, and it is as good for him, as it is for you to know that you are doing it. For that is the brotherhood. And now you can see how that is the only thing that really helps. Charity may corrupt, correction may harden and estrange,—in the family they do neither. There you can give and take without offence. Children of one Father! Spin all the fine theories you like, build up systems of profound philosophy, of social ethics, of philanthropic endeavor; back to that you get—if you ...
— The Battle with the Slum • Jacob A. Riis

... Adrian, whose health had always been weak, now suffered considerable aggravation of suffering from the effects of his wound. Idris could not endure to leave him in this state; nor was it right either to quit or take with us a young family for a journey of this description. I resolved at length to accompany Perdita. The separation from my Idris was painful—but necessity reconciled us to it in some degree: necessity and the hope of saving Raymond, and restoring him again to happiness and Perdita. No delay was to ensue. ...
— The Last Man • Mary Shelley

... already mentioned made the Bishop and Mrs. Selwyn promise to spend a few days at Feniton; and on the 19th of August the New Zealand guests arrived at Feniton. After joining in the family welcome, Coley went apart, and gave way to a great burst of tears, due, perhaps, not so mueh to disappointed ardour, as to the fervent emotion excited by the actual presence of a hero of the Church Militant, who had so long been the object ...
— Life of John Coleridge Patteson • Charlotte M. Yonge

... potato lotkes special for you, Benny," said Hanneh Breineh as the children gathered about the table for the family dinner given in honor of Benny's success with his new play. "Do you remember how you used to lick ...
— The Best Short Stories of 1919 - and the Yearbook of the American Short Story • Various

... ask you, after my death to take my heart and send it back to my people at Orme Castle, Gordon Arms, in England—you know where. It would be a kindness to the family." I gazed at him in a sort of horror, but he smiled and went on. "We're mediaeval to-day as ever we were. Some of us are always making trouble, one corner or the other of the world, and until the last Gordon heart comes home to rest, there's no peace for ...
— The Way of a Man • Emerson Hough

... laughed. "What about my delightful nieces and their home circle? You were always one to shrink from the truth, Ivan Andreievitch. You fancy that you can sink into the bosom of a charming family and escape the disadvantages.... Not at all. There are always disadvantages in a Russian family. I am the disadvantage in this one." He laughed again, and insisted on taking my arm once more. "If you feel ...
— The Secret City • Hugh Walpole

... roomy kitchen, where an older girl, called Kate, was flying about placing steaming dishes upon the table. There was also an older son, who had been at the farm chores. It was altogether a fine, vigorous, independent American family. So we all sat down and drew up our chairs. Then we paused a moment, and the father, bowing his head, said in a ...
— The Friendly Road - New Adventures in Contentment • (AKA David Grayson) Ray Stannard Baker

... neighbourhood of Tours, whilst I was at the seminary of Montpellier. After several years of separation, I had obtained permission to go and see her. I wrote, telling her of this good news, and I received her answer—full of joy and tenderness. My brother and sister were to be informed, it was to be a family meeting, a real festivity; and I started with a light and joyous heart. My impatience was so great, that, having stopped for supper at a village inn some ten leagues from Tours, I would not wait till the ...
— Celebrated Crimes, Complete • Alexandre Dumas, Pere

... proudly she spoke thus! The assistance of Marius was the justification of her conduct. She trembled with joy at the thought that it would, perhaps, be to the man whom she had alone and boldly selected, that her family would owe their salvation. Shaking his head, and making allusion to events of which ...
— Other People's Money • Emile Gaboriau

... have the right of way on a road. All the fields are open to the Ski runner and he should not monopolize a road. In most parts of Switzerland there is a law by which everyone has right of way everywhere where the snow lies—so long as it is not enclosed ground. This was brought home to my family rather vividly, when we lived at Davos, by a shooting gallery being set up on our land in front of our house. We had no power to prevent it and there it remained for the winter. At the same time, Ski runners should respect the property ...
— Ski-running • Katharine Symonds Furse

... that seeing myself infirm and sick, I wish to have a son-in-law and relatives who are doctors, in order to secure their kind assistance in my illness, to have in my family the fountain-head of those remedies which are necessary to me, and to be within reach ...
— The Imaginary Invalid - Le Malade Imaginaire • Moliere

... "justice, like charity, should begin at home. Do you justice to your wife and family, and think no more ...
— Guy Mannering • Sir Walter Scott

... have got a lot of human bones which I took from one of these battle-fields. I guess I will bring you some of them. I went with the American Minister and took dinner this evening with the King's Grand Chamberlain, who is related to the royal family, and though darker than a mulatto he has an excellent English education, and in manners is an accomplished gentleman. He is to call for me in the morning; we will visit the King in the palace, After dinner they called in the "singing girls," and we had ...
— Mark Twain, A Biography, 1835-1910, Complete - The Personal And Literary Life Of Samuel Langhorne Clemens • Albert Bigelow Paine

... when the death has been preceded by a long illness, and the family exchequer has sunk low, the neighbours come to the rescue, and with characteristic straightforwardness and goodnature avert impending disgrace. One such case occurred here recently. The father of the family had been hovering for months ...
— North, South and Over the Sea • M.E. Francis (Mrs. Francis Blundell)

... sense of that superiority on his brother's part. He had himself been so constantly made the object of his father's admiration and outspoken praises, and had always been so popular with all friends of the family and guests at the Manor-house, that anything like a feeling of inferiority to his brother was one which he found it very hard to allow a lodging in his heart and thoughts. So, while the generous impulse of the moment had led ...
— Amos Huntingdon • T.P. Wilson

... "Have you any family, Mr. Juxon?" inquired Mrs. Ambrose with a severity which startled the squire. Mrs. Ambrose thought that if there was a Mrs. Juxon, she had been unpardonably deceived. Of course Mr. Juxon should have said that he was married as soon ...
— A Tale of a Lonely Parish • F. Marion Crawford

... with an impetuous father; these things have been enlarged in his eyes by wicked men, who are conspiring for gain. Detectives, they call themselves, and so long as my father hesitates to publicly expose his family, these men feed upon his fears. I have good reason to believe that Mr. Hopkins, so long friendly to him—whose real name is James Hosley—is now his bitter enemy, for he has given information concerning him to the authorities. And my real name is ...
— Cupid's Middleman • Edward B. Lent

... delayed, Grown undecided suddenly. My mind Argued the matter coolly pro and con, And made resolve to speed his wooing on And grant him favor. He was good and kind; Not young, no doubt he would be quite content With my respect, nor miss an ardent love; Could give me ties of family and home; And then, perhaps, my mind was not above Setting some value on a titled name— Ambitious woman's weakness! Then my art Would be encouraged and pursued the same, And I could spend my winters all in ...
— Maurine and Other Poems • Ella Wheeler Wilcox

... but that in late October, when the Princess and Mr. Cloudwater got back to Paris, that if they could be persuaded to come to London, Sabine would accompany them, and make the acquaintance of Henry's mother and some of his family—who would be in ignorance of there being any tie between them, and the whole thing could be done casually ...
— The Man and the Moment • Elinor Glyn

... Johnson.—Among some papers I possess of the Digby family, I have an autograph poem on The Picture of the Minde of the Lady Venetia Digby, by Ben "Johnson." Is this the same as Ben "Jonson?" and if so, how comes it the "h" has been dropped from his name? Or was there some other Ben "Johnson," ...
— Notes & Queries, No. 41, Saturday, August 10, 1850 • Various

... an event which interests all the family, Don Gregorio, summoned to the house-top, ...
— The Flag of Distress - A Story of the South Sea • Mayne Reid

... five days the four friends found plenty to occupy their time. Then Miss Tolliver's school closed, and Phil Alden hurried home to her family in Hartford, Connecticut; Lillian returned to her home in Philadelphia, while Madge and Eleanor departed to spend a week with Mr. and Mrs. Butler in their old home in Virginia. Miss Jones, however, remained at the school. She made one hurried trip into Baltimore, and on another occasion had a ...
— Madge Morton, Captain of the Merry Maid • Amy D. V. Chalmers

... body-guard to M. le Comte d'Artois.-He came to Zurich with a prostitute, a seamstress of Zurich, established in Berne. He was living with her at the expense of the Zurich government. Having invited the family of this creature, that is to say a common horse-driver with his wife and some other persons, to dinner, they drank and committed such excesses that the driver's wife, who was big with child, gave birth to it in the midst of the banquet. ...
— The Origins of Contemporary France, Volume 4 (of 6) - The French Revolution, Volume 3 (of 3) • Hippolyte A. Taine

... it an ordinance forever." Oh! that as we have their service in hand, so we had their heads and their hearts, to manage it with rivers of tears, for our former vileness: that we could weep this day together, and afterward apart, as it is prophesied, "Every family apart, and our wives apart;" yea, and every soul apart, that we have dealt so evilly with so good a God, so unfaithfully with so faithful a God; that we could put our mouths in the dust, and smite upon our thigh, and be ashamed and confounded, for all the wickedness we ...
— The Covenants And The Covenanters - Covenants, Sermons, and Documents of the Covenanted Reformation • Various

... further space to this discussion of it in detail; but lest any one supposes that I have unfairly selected three accidental cases I will run briefly through a few others. Thus, certain sceptics wrote that the great crime of Christianity had been its attack on the family; it had dragged women to the loneliness and contemplation of the cloister, away from their homes and their children. But, then, other sceptics (slightly more advanced) said that the great crime of Christianity was forcing the family and marriage upon us; that it doomed women to the drudgery ...
— Orthodoxy • G. K. Chesterton

... were especially fatal to the House of Courtenay, no less than three Earls of Devon losing their lives for King Henry, and in consequence the elder branch of the family became extinct. ...
— Devon, Its Moorlands, Streams and Coasts • Rosalind Northcote

... an ideal or to have none, to have this ideal or that—this is what digs gulfs between men, even between those who live in the same family circle, under the same roof, or in the same room. You must love with the same love, think with the same thoughts as some one else if you are ...
— Leaves of Life - For Daily Inspiration • Margaret Bird Steinmetz

... to whom perhaps, remembering the date of his death, the words may apply, Tu vero felix non vitae tantum claritate sed etiam opportunitate mortis, was married at Cherry Burton, on the 22nd of October 1612, to Anne Pease, a member of a family destined to become widely known throughout the north of England. Of this marriage there were five children, all born at Winestead, viz. three daughters, Anne, Mary, and Elizabeth, and two sons, Andrew and John, the latter of whom died a year after his birth, and was ...
— Andrew Marvell • Augustine Birrell

... never been meant really to leave the moon. The ship stood upright under strange stars upon a stranger world, and all about it outside there were the resting forms of thousands upon thousands of creatures like cattle. And the dinner-table conversation was partly family-style jests about Babs' and Cochrane's new romantic status, and partly about a television broadcast which had to be ready for a certain number of Earth-hours yet ahead. And nobody paid any attention to Johnny Simms, glowering at the table ...
— Operation: Outer Space • William Fitzgerald Jenkins

... being shipwrecked on a desert island," said Hinpoha. "I think one can get beautifully shipwrecked on the inhabited mainland. We are experiencing all the thrills of Robinson Crusoe and the Swiss family ...
— The Campfire Girls Go Motoring • Hildegard G. Frey

... better not to try to explain these things," said she, with the unconscious haughtiness which maidens acquire who have not seen the world and are adored by their family. "They are great mysteries,—or else nothing." She now removed from her head the curious cap or helmet, ornamented with gold and with the green feathers of the humming-bird, which her companion had crowned ...
— The Golden Fleece • Julian Hawthorne

... story of "Ben, the Luggage Boy," professes to treat of life in the city streets, I must devote a single chapter to a very different place. I must carry the reader to Ben's home in Pennsylvania, and show what effect his running away had upon the family circle. ...
— Ben, the Luggage Boy; - or, Among the Wharves • Horatio Alger

... best he could. But compensation for all this were the new interests, hopes, ambitions, which centred in the life of his son. To see him a minister, a religious leader among men—that would be happiness enough for him. His family had always been a religious people. One thing he was already looking forward to: he wanted his son to preach his first sermon in the neighborhood church founded by the lad's great-grandfather—that would be the proudest hour of his life and in the lad's mother's. There were times in the past when ...
— The Reign of Law - A Tale of the Kentucky Hemp Fields • James Lane Allen

... the 19th Dr. Richardson, accompanied by Augustus, paid another visit to Terregannoeuck to see if he could obtain any additional information respecting the country to the eastward, but he was disappointed at finding that his affrighted family had not yet rejoined him, and the old man could add nothing to his former communication. The Doctor remarked that Terreganoeuck had a great dislike to mentioning the name of the Copper-Mine River, and evaded the question ...
— The Journey to the Polar Sea • John Franklin

... have said before, lived Miss Jack in a large forlorn ghost-like house in which her father and all her family had lived before her. And as a matter of course Maurice Cumming when he came up to attend to his duties as a member of the legislature took ...
— Miss Sarah Jack, of Spanish Town, Jamaica • Anthony Trollope

... and Sir Percival de Wode of Hastings, and such-like flights of heraldic fancy, and had augmented his popularity by his really brilliant suggestion of Wynkyn de Worde, the famous sixteenth-century printer, as a probable collateral relation of the family—it came to pass, I say, that the two gentlemen nodded over their port and chuckled, and winked at one another and agreed that the ...
— The Eagle's Shadow • James Branch Cabell

... to the dining-room, where our host insisted on waiting on us. It was a repetition of dinner, which the family had taken according to custom at two o'clock. The wife of Don Jose, and her maiden sister and three daughters, pretty, palefaced, black-eyed girls, with hair like the raven's wing, were present, as were the family priest and two gentlemen, cousins of our host. We first had an ...
— Manco, the Peruvian Chief - An Englishman's Adventures in the Country of the Incas • W.H.G. Kingston

... were complete, the whole might be compared to a long stable, with a double range of stalls, and a broad passage in the middle. Close to the sides, in each of these parts, is a little bench of boards, raised five or six inches higher than the rest of the floor, and covered with mats on which the family sit and sleep. These benches are commonly seven or eight feet long, and four or five broad. In the middle of the floor, between them, is the fire-place, which has neither hearth nor chimney. In one house, which was in the end of a middle range, almost ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume 16 • Robert Kerr

... instance, when Saladin won back Jerusalem, and the Guelph nobles volunteered in a body to serve against him, leaving Genoa to the Ghibellines, who established the foreign Podesta for the first time to rule the city. But this gave them no peace, for still the nobles fought together, and if one family became too powerful, confusion became worse confounded, for Guelph and Ghibelline joined together to bring it low. Thus in the thirteenth century you find Ghibelline Doria linked with the Guelph Grimaldi and Fieschi ...
— Florence and Northern Tuscany with Genoa • Edward Hutton

... among Separatists, separating himself not only from the English church, but from all who would not separate from it, and from all who would not separate from these, and so on, until he could no longer, for conscience' sake, hold fellowship with his wife in family prayers. After long patience the colonial government deemed it necessary to signify to him that if his conscience would not suffer him to keep quiet, and refrain from stirring up sedition, and embroiling the colony with the English government, he would have to seek freedom for that sort of conscience ...
— A History of American Christianity • Leonard Woolsey Bacon

... such terrible joys would be cheaply purchased so weary was she of her dreary existence, one day Dinah fell into the pit she had sworn to avoid. Seeing Monsieur de Clagny always sacrificing himself, and at last refusing a high appointment in Paris, where his family wanted to see him, she said to herself, "He loves me!" She vanquished her repulsion, and seemed willing ...
— The Muse of the Department • Honore de Balzac

... perfection as they ought. Others write plays with such heedlessness that, after they have been acted, the actors have to fly and abscond, afraid of being punished, as they often have been, for having acted something offensive to some king or other, or insulting to some noble family. All which evils, and many more that I say nothing of, would be removed if there were some intelligent and sensible person at the capital to examine all plays before they were acted, not only those produced in the capital itself, ...
— Don Quixote • Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra

... now it came to pass that the people of the Nephites did all return to their own lands in the twenty and sixth year, every man, with his family, his flocks and his herds, his horses and his cattle, and all things whatsoever did belong ...
— The Book Of Mormon - An Account Written By The Hand Of Mormon Upon Plates Taken - From The Plates Of Nephi • Anonymous

... comfortable finish to the scolding! Not that it was a finish though, for the thanks made Mrs. Crabbe afraid the family thought themselves forgiven, so she went on to declare they all would be pinched, and get into debt, and she should advise her god-daughter, Matilda, not to help them with a farthing of her wages, and as to going without their full meals, that was what none of them were fit to do. With which ...
— Friarswood Post-Office • Charlotte M. Yonge

... pale and agitated as he came in. The family were all assembled—his father at the head of the table, with the Bible open before him, and the maid-servants and serving-men at the other end of the room; and Harry felt that every eye was upon him as he took ...
— Hayslope Grange - A Tale of the Civil War • Emma Leslie

... we look back to little speeches as presentimental of, or contrasted with, an affecting event! Even so, Shakspeare, as secure of being read over and over, of becoming a family friend, provides this passage for his readers, and leaves ...
— Literary Remains, Vol. 2 • Coleridge

... as pulling the flesh from the bones; and that not only because I am somewhat too fond of these great mercies, but also because I should often have brought to my mind the many hardships, miseries, and wants my poor family was like to meet with, should I be taken from them; especially my poor blind child, who lay nearer to my heart than all beside. Poor child, thought I, thou must be beaten, thou must beg, thou must suffer hunger, cold, nakedness, and a thousand calamities, though I cannot now endure ...
— The Life of John Bunyan • Edmund Venables

... that it shall or may [be] lawful for the said Gyles and for his wife and family, upon lawful request therefor made to the said James Burbage, his executors or assigns, to enter or come into the premises, and there in some one of the upper rooms to have such convenient place to sit or stand to see ...
— Shakespearean Playhouses - A History of English Theatres from the Beginnings to the Restoration • Joseph Quincy Adams

... plated show Not far away a "villa" gleams, And here a family few may know, With book and pencil, viol and bow, Lead ...
— Poems of the Past and the Present • Thomas Hardy

... to losing their temper in the bosom of their family will sooner or later lose it in public. Families which exert neither courtesy nor charm when alone, can no more deceive other people into believing that either attribute belongs to them than they could hope to make painted faces ...
— Etiquette • Emily Post

... pots standing on the sills. From a clothesline hitched to the rigging there fluttered a row of little shirts, and seated on a box near by there was a fat, friendly looking woman with two small children playing by her side. The father of the family ...
— The Belgian Twins • Lucy Fitch Perkins

... schools. The numerous works of the founder indicate a practical temperament inclined not to mysticism or doctrinal subtlety but to biography, literary history and church government. Thus he continued the series called Memoirs of Eminent Monks and wrote on the family and country of the Buddha. He compiled a catalogue of the Tripitaka, as it was in his time, and collections of extracts, as well as of documents relating to the controversies between Buddhists and Taoists.[843] Although he ...
— Hinduism and Buddhism, An Historical Sketch, Vol. 3 (of 3) • Charles Eliot

... time that the famous reunion of the Beecher family described in Lyman Beecher's "Autobiography" occurred. Edward made a visit to the East, and when he returned he brought Mary (Mrs. Thomas Perkins) from Hartford with him. William came down from Putnam, Ohio, and George from Batavia, ...
— The Life of Harriet Beecher Stowe • Charles Edward Stowe

... sat down to some needlework, stitching away busily, and giving me all sorts of information about her family—how she had two boys out at work at Bandy's, taking it for granted that I knew who Bandy's were; that she had her eldest girl in service, and the next helping her aunt Betsey, and the other four were ...
— Patience Wins - War in the Works • George Manville Fenn

... without a human being to whom she could appeal, not daring to disclose her own identity lest graver results might follow; he, prostrate before her, naked to his inmost bone, with all his perfidy exposed. Of his cursing her conscientious scruples and family pride, her milk-and-water principles, demanding again that she should write her father and that very night, ending his entreaties with a blow of his fiat hand on her cheek which sent her reeling toward her ...
— Felix O'Day • F. Hopkinson Smith

... after much peeping and spying about, and apparently much anxious consultation, cautiously proceed to work. In less than half an hour, it would seem that wool enough has been brought to supply the whole family, real and prospective, with socks, if needles and fingers could be found fine enough to knit it up. In less than a week, the female has begun to deposit her eggs,—four of them in as many days,—white tinged with purple, with black spots on the larger end. After ...
— A Book of Natural History - Young Folks' Library Volume XIV. • Various

... being in their turn called to by their friends, and in truth not greatly caring to venture into the dark parts of the grounds, where they might be easily surprised and taken, if any of the neighbours or retainers of the family were watching them from among the trees, soon abandoned the idea, and hastily assembling such men as they found of their mind at the ...
— Barnaby Rudge • Charles Dickens

... the observation of the Americans any more than of ourselves. "It cannot be doubted," says Chancellor Kent in his Treatise on American Law, "that the division of landed estates must produce great evils when it is carried to such excess that each parcel of land is insufficient to support a family; but these disadvantages have never been felt in the United States, and many generations must elapse before they can be felt. The extent of our inhabited territory, the abundance of adjacent land, and the continual stream of emigration flowing from the shores of the Atlantic ...
— American Institutions and Their Influence • Alexis de Tocqueville et al

... take me; I have neither credentials nor conventional clothing. For the same reason I couldn't get a private tutorship in a rich family. No, no; it's all right. I keep myself alive, and I get on with my work.—By-the-bye, I've decided to write a book called "Mr ...
— New Grub Street • George Gissing

... agitation a matter of great consequence to me and my family, which I should not obtrude upon the world, were it not that the part which Dr. Johnson's friendship for me made him take in it, was the occasion of an exertion of his abilities, which it would be injustice to conceal. That what he wrote upon the subject ...
— Life Of Johnson, Vol. 2 • Boswell

... known through Scotland, that Sir Malcolm Fleming and the Lady Margaret de Hautlieu were to be united at the court of the good King Robert, and the husband invested with the honours of Biggar and Cumbernauld, an earldom so long known in the family of Fleming. ...
— Waverley Volume XII • Sir Walter Scott

... Beverly's clear-sighted eyes saw swarming round the temple of his civilization, pushing down the aisles, climbing over the backs of the benches, walking over each other's bodies, and seizing those front seats which his family had sat in since New York had been New York; and so the wise fellow very prudently took every step that would insure the Replacers' inviting him to occupy one of his own chairs. I had almost forgotten little Gazza, the Italian nobleman, who ...
— Lady Baltimore • Owen Wister

... the case, and was not with the man in the story I mentioned. This man lived a few miles away and his farm was practically all of this peaty swamp land type. He heard of this experiment field and came with his family to see it. ...
— The Story of the Soil • Cyril G. Hopkins

... sentences about bears. Each child at the close of the year could write on the blackboard a story of two or more sentences. They made pictures of bears in all sorts of postures with colored crayon and from free-hand cuttings. They modeled the bears in clay over and over again, keeping up a large family in ...
— Primary Handwork • Ella Victoria Dobbs

... of smoke. '. . . After all, it's all in the game, y' know.' 'All in the game,' the chaplain said when he had gone; 'a cruel game, but gallantly played out. And he's the fourth son to go in this war—and the last male of his line except his father, the old earl. A family that has made its mark on a good few history pages—and this is the end of it. You think it's ...
— Between the Lines • Boyd Cable

... sewing there was not an ornament, save the etching he had brought. The clock stood on a small shell, its dial so much defaced that one could not tell the time of day; and when it struck, it was with noticeably disproportionate deliberation, as if it wished to correct any mistake into which the family might have fallen by reason ...
— Main-Travelled Roads • Hamlin Garland

... of the same household: and therefore, since Kant always countenanced the idea that Jupiter had not quite finished the upholstery of his extensive premises, as a comfortable residence for a man, Jupiter having, in fact, a fine family of mammoths, but no family at all of 'humans,' (as brother Jonathan calls them,) Kant was bound, ex analogo, to hold that any little precedency in the trade of living, on the part of our own mother Earth, could not count ...
— Narrative And Miscellaneous Papers • Thomas De Quincey

... regretted the feelings of superiority she had experienced over her own relations by her marriage into such an ancient race as the Belfronts. She felt ashamed of the contempt she had felt for the industrious founders of her own family's wealth, and at that moment would have preferred the blue coat and brass buttons of her uncle Samson, to all the escutcheons and shields of the Norman conquest; and at that moment, luckily, the identical coat and ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, No. 341, March, 1844, Vol. 55 • Various

... the Tuttle family, this place is, I suppose," says Tink. "It got father, and it has almost got me. Some folks can breathe brass filings and carbon dioxide and thrive on it; but we can't. So I gave up and hid myself away in here to work out one of my silly dreams. Last spring ...
— Torchy • Sewell Ford

... internal evidence of Dante's works, as to the reality of Beatrice Portinari as the beloved of our poet is offered first by Boccaccio who was acquainted with Dante's daughter Beatrice, a nun who lived near enough to the poet to get information from the Portinari family. Certainly Boccaccio did not hesitate when chosen in 1373 by the Florentines to lecture on Dante, to make the very positive statement that the boy Dante, "received the image of Beatrice Portinari into his heart with such affection that from that day forward as long as he lived it ...
— Dante: "The Central Man of All the World" • John T. Slattery

... of a field-officer, who formerly belonged to the same regiment as her father, had taken the child in charge at the death of its mother; and under the care of this lady Mabel had acquired some tastes and many ideas which otherwise might always have remained strangers to her. Her situation in the family had been less that of a domestic than of a humble companion, and the results were quite apparent in her attire, her language, her sentiments, and even in her feelings, though neither, perhaps, rose to the level of those which would ...
— The Pathfinder - The Inland Sea • James Fenimore Cooper

... villeinage. The serf or villein was attached to the glebe or soil, and could not be severed from it, deprived of his family, or sold to another as a chattel; being retained as part of the indivisible feudal community. But the chattel slave is a "thing" incapable of family relations, and may be sold when, where, or how ...
— Is Slavery Sanctioned by the Bible? • Isaac Allen

... if they indeed suspect my arrival. Besides, it was the advice of Henri to go at once and present to the king the respects of the family; that once done, I am free, and can receive ...
— The Forty-Five Guardsmen • Alexandre Dumas

... latter case I took a wraith and dubbed it my enemy; that, thinking I followed a foe, I followed a friend instead"—He threw away the bits of bark, and straightened himself. "A friend!" he said, drawing his breath. "Save for this Quaker family, I have had no friend for many a year! And I cannot talk to them of honor and warfare and the wide world." His speech was sombre, but in his eyes there was ...
— Audrey • Mary Johnston

... still extant to disgrace his memory.) It is doubtful if his "Willie brew'd a peck o' Maut" ever made a drunkard, but it is certain that his "Cottar's Saturday Night" has converted sinners, edified the godly, and made some erect family altars. It has been worth a thousand homilies. And, taking his songs as a whole, they have done much to stir the flames of pure love, of patriotism, of genuine sentiment, and of a taste for the beauties of nature. And it is remarkable that all his followers ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volume IV. - The Songs of Scotland of the Past Half Century • Various

... General Council made the following declarations with respect to secret societies: "1. Though mere secrecy in association be not in itself immoral, yet as it is so easily susceptible of abuse, and in its abuse may work, as it has often worked, great mischief in family, Church and State, we earnestly beseech all good men to ponder the question whether the benefits they believe to be connected with secret societies might not be equally reached in modes not liable to the same ...
— American Lutheranism - Volume 2: The United Lutheran Church (General Synod, General - Council, United Synod in the South) • Friedrich Bente

... was born in London, and spent his youth amid the political and religious dissensions of the times of Mary and Elizabeth. For all this turmoil Spenser had no stomach; he was a man of peace, of books, of romantic dreams. He was of noble family, but poor; his only talent was to write poetry, and as poetry would not buy much bread in those days, his pride of birth was humbled in seeking the patronage ...
— Outlines of English and American Literature • William J. Long

... finishing it the afternoon before we sailed. It was his last continuous reading. I noticed, when he slept, that his breathing was difficult, and I could see from day to day that he did not improve; but each evening he would be gay and lively, and he liked the entire family to gather around, while he became really hilarious over the various happenings of the day. It was only a few days before we sailed that the very severe attacks returned. The night of the 8th was a hard one. The doctors were summoned, and it was only after repeated injections ...
— Mark Twain, A Biography, 1835-1910, Complete - The Personal And Literary Life Of Samuel Langhorne Clemens • Albert Bigelow Paine

... was carried by his men, in a litter, thirty or forty miles to his own house, below the present town of Herkimer, where he died, from an unskillful amputation, having just concluded reading to his family the ...
— Personal Memoirs Of A Residence Of Thirty Years With The Indian Tribes On The American Frontiers • Henry Rowe Schoolcraft

... he resigned, he would still from time to time attend the Dinners, at which he was always made welcome by the publishers and his late colleagues. When, during this period, he was pleading for assistance for the family of one of the Staff who had passed away, he took pleasure in admitting that—"It is through my connection with Punch that I owe the good chances that have lately befallen me, and have had so many kind offers of help in my own days of trouble that I would thankfully ...
— The History of "Punch" • M. H. Spielmann

... enough,' said the centurion. 'Enough for safety, but not for dignity. Remember that, while on the one hand you are the wife of the imperator Sergius Vanno, you are also a daughter of the house of Porthenus—a family which was powerful in the far-off days of the republic, long before the house of Vanno had begun to take root,' he continued, in a tone of pride. For then, as now, poverty consoled itself for its privations by dreams—whether well or ill founded, it mattered but little—of grandeurs ...
— The Continental Monthly, Vol. 5, No. 5, May, 1864 - Devoted To Literature And National Policy • Various

... individual is proud in the abstract. A Frenchman is proud of France, and therefore may think himself unworthy of France. But a German is proud of being a German; and he cannot be too unworthy to be a German when he is a German. In short, mere family pride flatters every member of the family; it produced the arrogance of the Germans, and it is capable of producing a much subtler kind of arrogance in the Jews. From this particular sort of self-deception the more savage man of the desert is free. If he is not considering ...
— The New Jerusalem • G. K. Chesterton

... family, including the son who was a deputy sheriff, was glad to see Tom. Jed said he had "been on the job" ever since the mysterious robbery of Tom had taken place, but though he had seen many red automobiles he had no ...
— Tom Swift and his Motor-cycle • Victor Appleton

... calm reasonableness of temper, ruled his feelings and guided his action. Although by political creed a moderate Tory, he had none of the wrong-headedness of the party zealot; and the growing alienation between those whom he, like his brother, regarded as of one family, caused only distress and an earnest desire to avert coming evils. Influenced by these sentiments, he sought the acquaintance of Franklin, then in London as a commissioner from the colonies; and the interviews between them, ...
— Types of Naval Officers - Drawn from the History of the British Navy • A. T. Mahan

... perhaps!" But Mrs. Sutton had looked miserably discontented. "Yet to be frank with you, Rosa, Winston is not apt to be conciliatory in his measures when he takes it into his head that the family honor is assailed. I am afraid he has written haughtily, if ...
— At Last • Marion Harland

... yours, to use your een and lend your lugs to these guid auld says, that shine with wail'd sense, and will as lang as the world wags. Gar your bairns get them by heart; let them hae a place among your family books; and may never a window-sole through the country be without them. On a spare hour, when the day is clear, behind a rick, or on the green howm, draw the treasure frae your pouch and enjoy the pleasant companion. Ye happy herds, while your hirdsels are feeding on the ...
— The Proverbs of Scotland • Alexander Hislop

... deal with sex. The old law forbade adultery, the infringement of family life, and stopped there. Jesus goes back of the act to the lustful imaginations and the wandering eye, which may lack opportunity but which are the real spring of all uncleanness. He runs the line of ...
— The Social Principles of Jesus • Walter Rauschenbusch

... or his pavilion, the Arctic bear contemplates—not his native rocks and solitudes, the crashing of icebergs, and the Polar seas, alternately lashed into terrific fury or hemmed in by accumulating precipices of ice; but—monkeys of almost every size, form, and family, which gambol in the woods of Numidia or Gundwana; in the loftiest trees of Sumatra; on the mountains of Java; by the rivers of Paraguay and Hindustan; of South America and South Asia; among the jungly banks of the Godavery and the woody shores of the Pamoni, of the Oroonoko, and ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 19, - Issue 552, June 16, 1832 • Various

... Gordon was born on January 28, 1833, at Woolwich, so that he began his life among soldiers. He was the fourth son of General Henry William Gordon, who was in the Royal Artillery. His father came from a good family, which for centuries had been associated with the army. The old General appears to have been a good officer and a kind-hearted man, and doubtless the son inherited not only the instincts of a soldier, but a certain nobility of character which was conspicuous in ...
— General Gordon - A Christian Hero • Seton Churchill

... now 31, is the youngest Brother of the family; there never was any Sister but this dying one, who is four years older. Ernst August has some tincture of soldiership at this time (Marlborough Wars, and the like), as all his kindred had; but ultimately he got the Bishopric of Osnabruck, that singular spiritual heirloom, or HALF-heirloom ...
— History Of Friedrich II. of Prussia, Vol. I. (of XXI.) - Frederick The Great—Birth And Parentage.—1712. • Thomas Carlyle

... structure, and practically unjust,—that it is wholly inconsistent with our ideas of equality to suppose that the business or profession, by which any one earns the daily bread of himself or of his family, is so much more honorable than the business of other members of the community as to prevent him from receiving a fair compensation for his services on that account.[42] It has been pronounced ridiculous to attempt to perpetuate a monstrous legal fiction, by which the hard-working lawyers of ...
— An Essay on Professional Ethics - Second Edition • George Sharswood

... says she, "for I am the daughter of a king and a queen. There is nothing of thy poverty that you should not get me (i.e. thy poverty is not so great that thou art not able to get me) from my family; and it shall be my choice accordingly to go to thee, it is thou whom I have loved. And take thou with thee this ring," says the daughter, "and it shall be between us for a token. My mother gave it to me to put by, and I shall say that I put it astray." Each of them accordingly goes apart ...
— Heroic Romances of Ireland Volumes 1 and 2 Combined • A. H. Leahy

... finest, of its length, in any modern poet; ranking with Keats' 'La Belle Dame sans Merci' and the other masterpieces of the condensed and hinted order so dear to imaginative minds." The use of the family name Keith in Rossetti's "Rose Mary" was a coincidence. His poem was published (1854) some years before Dobell's. He thought of substituting some other name for Keith, but could find none to suit ...
— A History of English Romanticism in the Nineteenth Century • Henry A. Beers

... when, at the age of thirty-one he took up his residence in the ancient castle of his line, was a most enviable one. His marriage with Beatrix, Countess von Falkenstein, had added the lustre of a ruling family to the prestige of his own, and the renown of his valour in the East had lost nothing in transit from the shores of the Mediterranean to the banks of the Rhine. The Counts of Schonburg had ever been the most conservative in counsel and the most radical ...
— The Strong Arm • Robert Barr

... I started on. There was the great double log-house on the corner. I remembered the broken, blighted family that used to live there. The strong, hard face of the mother, with its wilderness of hair, rose before me. She had driven her husband away, and while I taught school a strange man lived there, big and jovial, and people ...
— The Souls of Black Folk • W. E. B. Du Bois

... family meal of the day—the one meal at which Johnny encountered his younger brothers and sisters. It partook of the nature of an encounter, to him, for he was very old, while they were distressingly young. He had no patience with their excessive and amazing juvenility. ...
— When God Laughs and Other Stories • Jack London

... dumb resentment, which is increased by the fact that one can hardly explain or justify it. Of this John Weightman was not conscious. It lay beyond his horizon. He did not take it into account in the plan of life which he made for himself and for his family as the sharers ...
— The Unknown Quantity - A Book of Romance and Some Half-Told Tales • Henry van Dyke

... paper—always late here—brings the startling news of the assassination of the Crown Prince of Austria. What an unlucky family that has been! Franz Josef must be a tough old gentleman to have stood up against so many shocks. I used to feel so sorry for him when Fate dealt him another blow that would have been a "knock-out" for most people. But he has stood so many, and outlived ...
— A Hilltop on the Marne • Mildred Aldrich

... 1806-1873, was born in Norfolk County, England. His father died when he was young; his mother was a woman of strong literary tastes, and did much to form her son's mind. In 1844, by royal license, he took the surname of Lytton from his mother's family. Bulwer graduated at Cambridge. He began to publish in 1826, and his novels and plays followed rapidly. "Pelham," "The Caxtons," "My Novel," "What will he do with it?" and "Kenelm Chillingly" are among the best known of his numerous novels; and "The Lady of Lyons" and "Richelieu" ...
— McGuffey's Sixth Eclectic Reader • William Holmes McGuffey

... the kind and friendly words you have uttered. I thank you, and all of you for your cordiality and bounteous hospitality. As I am soon to leave this city, where I and my family have been welcomed so warmly and have been made so happy, let me take this opportunity to return to you and to the Government and to the people of Buenos Ayres our most sincere and heartfelt thanks for all your kindness ...
— Latin America and the United States - Addresses by Elihu Root • Elihu Root

... at last came round, and Mrs. Leslie, who had been busy packing up and arranging things for some weeks, now resolved to shut up the house for a whole month and, with the family, set ...
— The Good Ship Rover • Robina F. Hardy

... country and cultivation are abandoned, and this year in particular, from the excessive drought of the season, deductions of many lacs having been allowed to the farmers, who are still left unsatisfied"; and then he proceeds with a long detail of his own distress, and that of his family and all his dependants; and adds, "that the new-raised brigade is not only quite useless to my government, but is, moreover, the cause of much loss both in revenues and customs. The detached body of troops under European officers bring nothing ...
— The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. II. (of 12) • Edmund Burke

... the chairman, "I don't know anything about what's going on in your family, here, and I don't care. I know your grandson is a straight and square young chap, a worker, and a good business man, but he's no politician. I'm not going to stand for his butting in at this stage of ...
— The Ramrodders - A Novel • Holman Day

... in the hour of Charles's total abandonment and distress, this gallant family laid aside all selfish prudence. The old chief, in spite of age and ill-health, came immediately to the wretched hut where Charles had taken refuge, bringing with him Spanish wines, provisions, shoes, and stockings. He found the young man, whom he reverenced as his ...
— The True Story Book • Andrew Lang

... of course; isn't it the very recognition of that fact that separates us from the people who see it tout d'une piece? If they are right—if marriage is sacred in itself and the individual must always be sacrificed to the family—then there can be no real marriage between us, since our—our being together is a protest against the sacrifice of the individual to the family." She interrupted herself with a laugh. "You'll say ...
— The Greater Inclination • Edith Wharton

... wandering, by sea, to Mitylene, in great melancholy for the loss of wife and child, hears Marina sing. He learns that she is his daughter. The goddess Diana bids him go to her temple at Ephesus. He goes, and finds Thaisa. The play ends happily with the reuniting of the family. ...
— William Shakespeare • John Masefield

... come here again. It will be enough for my family to look at my coffin. I feel better to think you will ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 5, No. 31, May, 1860 • Various

... highly social; and he almost always spent his evenings in the company of his family and his domestic visiters, or in that of some neighbouring friends. He was fond of the pleasures of the table; and probably, in the course of the whole year, few days passed in which he did not meet some social party, round the festive board, either at home or abroad. At such times his dress was ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, No. 333 - Vol. 12, Issue 333, September 27, 1828 • Various

... silk mercer, in Cheapside, who, when he died, left his son, who was his only child, a fortune of one hundred thousand pounds and a splendid business; the son, however, had no inclination for trade, the summit of his ambition was to be a country gentleman, to found a family, and to pass the remainder of his days in rural ease and dignity, and all this he managed to accomplish; he disposed of his business, purchased a beautiful and extensive estate for fourscore thousand pounds, built upon it the mansion to which I had the honour of welcoming ...
— Lavengro - The Scholar, The Gypsy, The Priest • George Borrow

... great value to the Eskimos. But for it and the seal these poor members of the human family could not exist at all in those frozen regions. As it is, it costs them a severe struggle to keep the life in their bodies. But they do not complain of what seems to us a hard lot. They have been born to it. They know no happier condition ...
— Fast in the Ice - Adventures in the Polar Regions • R.M. Ballantyne

... ground, writes: "The prostitute fulfils a social mission. She is the guardian of virginal modesty, the channel to carry off adulterous desire, the protector of matrons who fear late maternity; it is her part to act as the shield of the family." "Female Decii," said Balzac in his Physiologie du Mariage of prostitutes, "they sacrifice themselves for the republic and make of their bodies a rampart for the protection of respectable families." In the same way Schopenhauer called prostitutes "human sacrifices on the altar of ...
— Studies in the Psychology of Sex, Volume 6 (of 6) • Havelock Ellis

... notice of on the several occasions in these notes. Accordingly, the chief captain confesses to St. Paul that "with a great sum he had obtained his freedom," Acts 22:28; as had St. Paul's ancestors, very probably, purchased the like freedom for their family by money, as the same author ...
— The Antiquities of the Jews • Flavius Josephus



Words linked to "Family" :   family Actinidiaceae, torchwood family, buckbean family, broken home, familial, family Elaeocarpaceae, ginger family, family Furnariidae, type family, family Gelechiidae, family Acanthisittidae, family Dactyloscopidae, family Dactylopteridae, family Caproidae, hemp family, maple family, family Clupeidae, Bunyaviridae, violet family, family Chlamydomonadaceae, sisal family, spiderwort family, mangrove family, family Blenniidae, family Hamamelidaceae, redwood family, family Cotingidae, family Aizoaceae, family Canidae, family Coraciidae, valerian family, association, family Characeae, family Cynipidae, rosid dicot family, family Belostomatidae, yew family, heath family, kin group, family Actinomycetaceae, family Cucurbitaceae, aggregation, family Cestidae, family Centriscidae, family Agavaceae, wintergreen family, caper family, stonecrop family, water-milfoil family, nuclear family, family Chaetodontidae, gesneria family, family Enterobacteriaceae, family Gentianaceae, family Formicariidae, family Armadillidiidae, family Atropidae, mint family, family Cyperaceae, iris family, family Cyprinodontidae, syndicate, rose family, grammatical category, family Dasyuridae, family Elopidae, family Eschrichtiidae, peony family, family Dugongidae, gangdom, hydrangea family, family Cyatheaceae, Bittacidae, geranium family, family Gavidae, family Alaudidae, family Belemnitidae, family Cupressaceae, family Dermochelyidae, family Cruciferae, family Cleridae, sib, family Cetorhinidae, family Burseraceae, pitcher-plant family, family Gyrinidae, family Apodidae, family Cypraeidae, Bronte sisters, family Cryptocercidae, gooseberry family, family Fistulariidae, family Bovidae, liliid monocot family, mahogany family, descent, family Balaenicipitidae, family Gesneriaceae, family Andrenidae, elm family, loosestrife family, category, magnoliid dicot family, family Antilocapridae, family Flacourtiaceae, sedge family, family Canellaceae, nasturtium family, Endamoebidae, milkweed family, family Engraulidae, family Geoglossaceae, family Fagaceae, family Helicidae, ovulation method of family planning, Salvadora family, family Cerambycidae, family Amaryllidaceae, family Asteraceae, fellowship, family Dennstaedtiaceae, couple, family Eleotridae, sundew family, saxifrage family, family Cuterebridae, family Gramineae, family Gasterosteidae, family Dacninae, ancestry, quassia family, zamia family, family Desmidiaceae, family Amaranthaceae, family doctor, family Corvidae, family Ctenizidae, conjugal family, potato family, family Argonautidae, family Grossulariaceae, passionflower family, witch-hazel family, family Glossinidae, family Dracunculidae, house, grass family, natural family planning, family Araucariaceae, family Cercopithecidae, home, epacris family, family Cracidae, bur-reed family, custard-apple family, family Haemodoraceae, pondweed family, family Capitonidae, family Dactylopiidae, family Batidaceae, biology, family Diapensiaceae, family Apiaceae, family Gavialidae, sept, liliopsid family, family Callionymidae, conjugation, tea family, family Coprinaceae, family Electrophoridae, plane-tree family, bladdernut family, accumulation, family Clethraceae, family Cortinariaceae, family Geomyidae, family Boraginaceae, family Dematiaceae, family Bittacidae, family Belonidae, family Alcidae, cyrilla family, family Convallariaceae, banana family, kid, hamamelid dicot family, mates, basal body temperature method of family planning, family Amphiumidae, agave family, myrtle family, family Alstroemeriaceae, quillwort family, family Chrysopidae, koinonia, kinsperson, eelgrass family, buckthorn family, folk, family Dasyatidae, family Dasypodidae, family Azollaceae, nettle family, horsetail family, family Carapidae, denomination, family Ceratophyllaceae, family Eriocaulaceae, family Ebenaceae, foster family, family Aristolochiaceae, family Cyrilliaceae, staff-tree family, family Acaridae, phratry, family Carchariidae, family Asphodelaceae, oleaster family, family Agonidae, birch family, combretum family, plantain family, arum family, family Dipsacaceae, family Equisetaceae, amaranth family, assemblage, mulberry family, family Caricaceae, family Branchiostegidae, family Euglenaceae, family Fasciolidae, sea-lavender family, family Babesiidae, family Congridae, dogwood family, family Coryphaenidae, family Bryaceae, family Geastraceae, family Ardeidae, cycad family, family Centrarchidae, family Coccidae, family Cicadidae, family Chrysomelidae, family Haloragidaceae, married couple, family Caviidae, family Gempylidae, family Campanulaceae, spindle-tree family, family Acipenseridae, family Gerrididae, family Ginkgoaceae, family Cichlidae, family Gruidae, rue family, family Anhimidae, ctenophore family, family Capromyidae, dilleniid dicot family, Cosa Nostra, reptile family, family Asclepiadaceae, borage family, family Araliaceae, gymnosperm family, crowfoot family, family Alligatoridae, family Blechnaceae, family Clavariaceae, family Callithricidae, mammal family, family Gigartinaceae, man and wife, family Crocodylidae, family Alismataceae, Goodenia family, mustard family, madder family, family Fabaceae, family Anomalopidae, histocompatibility complex, family Accipitridae, extended family, family Glareolidae, ebony family, family Chalcidae, family Cynoglossidae, flax family, family Dicksoniaceae, family Ameiuridae, family Characinidae, family Aepyornidae, family Araceae, family Cheloniidae, carrot family, family Drepanididae, moonseed family, family Balsaminaceae, magnoliopsid family, mignonette family, family Erythroxylaceae, lobelia family, family Gadidae, family Coccinellidae, nutmeg family, family Culicidae, family Gnetaceae, begonia family, family Dryopteridaceae, mob, screw-pine family, family Cyclopteridae, Panorpidae, coelenterate family, family Erethizontidae, family Brevicipitidae, pokeweed family, family Aloeaceae, family Gliridae, family Arctiidae, family Ambrosiaceae, echinoderm family, family Ambystomatidae, family Camelidae, styrax family, marriage, magnolia family, milkwort family, arthropod family, mafia, stamp, protea family, dogbane family, bladderwort family, family Ascaphidae, family Cebidae, family Fregatidae, family Chamaeleonidae, kinship group, water-shield family, family Cicindelidae, subfamily, family Cervidae, family Atrichornithidae, taxonomic group, elaeocarpus family, family Cordylidae, aloe family, lizard's-tail family, family Argasidae, family Chamaeleontidae, winter's bark family, family Balanidae, family Ephippidae, palm family, family Branchiobdellidae, family Giraffidae, family business, family Cistaceae, family Eurylaimidae, menage, lineage, family Gerridae, family Entolomataceae, family Convolvulaceae, yam family, royal family, aster family, sapodilla family, family Cicadellidae, family Funkaceae, walnut family, family line, family Callitrichaceae, family Falconidae, family Colchicaceae, family Columbidae, family Aplysiidae, fish family, Arenaviridae, family Anguillidae, tribe, parentage, cunonia family, family Bufonidae, family Cercidiphyllaceae, family Bignoniaceae, family Chytridiaceae, titi family



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