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Do   Listen
verb
do  v. t., v.  (past did; past part. done; pres. part. doing)  
1.
To place; to put. (Obs.)
2.
To cause; to make; with an infinitive. (Obs.) "My lord Abbot of Westminster did do shewe to me late certain evidences." "I shall... your cloister do make." "A fatal plague which many did to die." "We do you to wit (i. e., We make you to know) of the grace of God bestowed on the churches of Macedonia." Note: We have lost the idiom shown by the citations (do used like the French faire or laisser), in which the verb in the infinitive apparently, but not really, has a passive signification, i. e., cause... to be made.
3.
To bring about; to produce, as an effect or result; to effect; to achieve. "The neglecting it may do much danger." "He waved indifferently 'twixt doing them neither good not harm."
4.
To perform, as an action; to execute; to transact to carry out in action; as, to do a good or a bad act; do our duty; to do what I can. "Six days shalt thou labor and do all thy work." "We did not do these things." "You can not do wrong without suffering wrong." Hence: To do homage, honor, favor, justice, etc., to render homage, honor, etc.
5.
To bring to an end by action; to perform completely; to finish; to accomplish; a sense conveyed by the construction, which is that of the past participle done. "Ere summer half be done." "I have done weeping."
6.
To make ready for an object, purpose, or use, as food by cooking; to cook completely or sufficiently; as, the meat is done on one side only.
7.
To put or bring into a form, state, or condition, especially in the phrases, to do death, to put to death; to slay; to do away (often do away with), to put away; to remove; to do on, to put on; to don; to do off, to take off, as dress; to doff; to do into, to put into the form of; to translate or transform into, as a text. "Done to death by slanderous tongues." "The ground of the difficulty is done away." "Suspicions regarding his loyalty were entirely done away." "To do on our own harness, that we may not; but we must do on the armor of God." "Then Jason rose and did on him a fair Blue woolen tunic." "Though the former legal pollution be now done off, yet there is a spiritual contagion in idolatry as much to be shunned." "It ("Pilgrim's Progress") has been done into verse: it has been done into modern English."
8.
To cheat; to gull; to overreach. (Colloq.) "He was not be done, at his time of life, by frivolous offers of a compromise that might have secured him seventy-five per cent."
9.
To see or inspect; to explore; as, to do all the points of interest. (Colloq.)
10.
(Stock Exchange) To cash or to advance money for, as a bill or note.
11.
To perform work upon, about, for, or at, by way of caring for, looking after, preparing, cleaning, keeping in order, or the like. "The sergeants seem to do themselves pretty well."
12.
To deal with for good and all; to finish up; to undo; to ruin; to do for. (Colloq. or Slang) "Sometimes they lie in wait in these dark streets, and fracture his skull,... or break his arm, or cut the sinew of his wrist; and that they call doing him." Note:
(a)
Do and did are much employed as auxiliaries, the verb to which they are joined being an infinitive. As an auxiliary the verb do has no participle. "I do set my bow in the cloud." (Now archaic or rare except for emphatic assertion.) "Rarely... did the wrongs of individuals to the knowledge of the public."
(b)
They are often used in emphatic construction. "You don't say so, Mr. Jobson. but I do say so." "I did love him, but scorn him now."
(c)
In negative and interrogative constructions, do and did are in common use. I do not wish to see them; what do you think? Did Caesar cross the Tiber? He did not. "Do you love me?"
(d)
Do, as an auxiliary, is supposed to have been first used before imperatives. It expresses entreaty or earnest request; as, do help me. In the imperative mood, but not in the indicative, it may be used with the verb to be; as, do be quiet. Do, did, and done often stand as a general substitute or representative verb, and thus save the repetition of the principal verb. "To live and die is all we have to do." In the case of do and did as auxiliaries, the sense may be completed by the infinitive (without to) of the verb represented. "When beauty lived and died as flowers do now." "I... chose my wife as she did her wedding gown." "My brightest hopes giving dark fears a being. As the light does the shadow." In unemphatic affirmative sentences do is, for the most part, archaic or poetical; as, "This just reproach their virtue does excite."
To do one's best, To do one's diligence (and the like), to exert one's self; to put forth one's best or most or most diligent efforts. "We will... do our best to gain their assent."
To do one's business, to ruin one. (Colloq.)
To do one shame, to cause one shame. (Obs.)
To do over.
(a)
To make over; to perform a second time.
(b)
To cover; to spread; to smear. "Boats... sewed together and done over with a kind of slimy stuff like rosin."
To do to death, to put to death. (See 7.) (Obs.)
To do up.
(a)
To put up; to raise. (Obs.)
(b)
To pack together and envelop; to pack up.
(c)
To accomplish thoroughly. (Colloq.)
(d)
To starch and iron. "A rich gown of velvet, and a ruff done up with the famous yellow starch."
To do way, to put away; to lay aside. (Obs.)
To do with, to dispose of; to make use of; to employ; usually preceded by what. "Men are many times brought to that extremity, that were it not for God they would not know what to do with themselves."
To have to do with, to have concern, business or intercourse with; to deal with. When preceded by what, the notion is usually implied that the affair does not concern the person denoted by the subject of have. "Philology has to do with language in its fullest sense." "What have I to do with you, ye sons of Zeruiah?"






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Do" Quotes from Famous Books



... "Oh dear, I do wonder what it is! But there's the house at last, and dear old Lisbeth's round smiling face, and my darling Silky. Oh, it is good to be at home again!" And Marjory nestled close to her uncle for a moment, and then sprang out of the cart and began hugging ...
— Hunter's Marjory - A Story for Girls • Margaret Bruce Clarke

... do," supplemented the eminent lawyer coolly. "Merely a matter of business, you understand. You look as if a little business ...
— Garrison's Finish - A Romance of the Race-Course • W. B. M. Ferguson

... have not altogether discarded, while I have abridged, the legends relating to a hero who undoubtedly exercised considerable influence over his country and his time, because in those legends we trace, better than we could do by dull interpretations equally unsatisfactory though more prosaic, the effigy of the heroic age—not unillustrative of the poetry and the romance which at once formed and indicated important features in the character of the Athenians. Much of the national spirit of every people, even in its ...
— Athens: Its Rise and Fall, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... up, perplexed. "Sho, now! What does she mean by that? I didn't do nuthin'—nuthin' to ...
— Uncle William - The Man Who Was Shif'less • Jennette Lee

... subject to military law who commits manslaughter, mayhem, arson, burglary, robbery, larceny, embezzlement, perjury, assault with intent to commit any felony, or assault with intent to do bodily harm, shall be punished as ...
— Manual for Noncommissioned Officers and Privates of Infantry • War Department

... old scamp, Stilwell. Still, as long as we recruit our army as we do, we cannot look for morality as well as bravery, and I dare say your fellow is no worse than the rest. If you ever run against him in London you must bring him to me, and I will hear his story from ...
— The Bravest of the Brave - or, with Peterborough in Spain • G. A. Henty

... reasoning, held him for a few moments without movement, his beady eyes on Challoner. In midair Miki wagged his paws; he whined softly; his hard tail thumped the ground as he pleaded for mercy, and he licked his chops and tried to wriggle, as if to tell Neewa that he had no intention at all to do him harm. Neewa, facing Challoner, snarled defiantly. He drew himself slowly from over Miki. And Miki, afraid to move, still lay on his back with his paws in ...
— Nomads of the North - A Story of Romance and Adventure under the Open Stars • James Oliver Curwood

... could reasonably have been expected of them. But it was necessary to account in some way for their sudden desertion of the Duchess street house, and Mrs. Summers' sister was of an inquisitive disposition. By degrees she succeeded in getting at most of the facts, but to do her justice she did not proclaim them from the housetops, and for some time the secret was pretty well kept. The story would probably not have become generally known at all, but for a succession of circumstances ...
— The Gerrard Street Mystery and Other Weird Tales • John Charles Dent

... her eyes, the carriage of the slim, pliant figure with its suggestion of fine gallantry, challenged her former lover to do his worst. ...
— The Yukon Trail - A Tale of the North • William MacLeod Raine

... to move a busy community from one village to another, and if the other village was discovered, upon inquiry, not to be there, I should ask for ten to twelve months' time to do it in. The C.C. asked for a fortnight, hoping to get ten days; he got a week. "It is now the 31st. We should move to the new place about the 7th," said the Highest Authority. "Let it be April 7th." Thus April 7th became permanently and irrevocably fixed. For everybody except the C.C. and ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 152, May 2, 1917 • Various

... was published too important in this controversy to be passed over without notice. It is entitled A Candle in the Dark, or a Treatise concerning the Nature of Witches and Witchcraft; being Advice to Judges, Sheriffs, Justices of the Peace, and Grand Jurymen, what to do before they passe sentence on such as are arraigned for their lives as Witches. By Thomas Ady, M.A. London, printed for R.J., to be sold by Thomas Newberry, at the Three Lions in Cornhill, by the Exchange, 1656, 4to. Ady, of whom, unfortunately, nothing is known, presses the ...
— Discovery of Witches - The Wonderfull Discoverie of Witches in the Countie of Lancaster • Thomas Potts

... Central African Republic Ceuta Spain Ceylon Sri Lanka Chafarinas, Islas Spain Chagos Archipelago (Oil Islands) British Indian Ocean Territory Channel Islands Guernsey; Jersey Chatham Islands New Zealand Cheju-do Korea, South Cheju Strait Pacific Ocean Chengdu [US Consulate General] China Chesterfield Islands New Caledonia (Iles Chesterfield) Chiang Mai [US Consulate General] Thailand Chihli, Gulf of (Bo Hai) Pacific Ocean ...
— The 1991 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency.

... touching the very skies, Now sinking into the depths of ocean. Ah! if our souls but poise and swing Like the compass in its brazen ring, Ever level and ever true To the toil and the task we have to do, We shall sail securely, and safely reach The Fortunate Isles, on whose shining beach The sights we see, and the sounds we hear, Will be those of ...
— Elson Grammer School Literature, Book Four. • William H. Elson and Christine Keck

... mine. Just happened so. Tried to ram its nose in one of my pockets, and of course I had to take him in out of the wet. Pool's just full of them, too, and I wouldn't wonder if—oh, quit your talking, and do ...
— The Lost City • Joseph E. Badger, Jr.

... do you explain the merchants and bankers and princes of Italy being more interested in the revival-of-learning movement than the Church and university scholars? Do such classes to-day show the same type of ...
— THE HISTORY OF EDUCATION • ELLWOOD P. CUBBERLEY

... saltspoonful of soda. Boil rapidly until tender—about half an hour—just before they are done add a tablespoonful of salt. Drain them in a colander, and if it is not time to serve them stand the colander over steam to keep them hot. Do not let them remain in the water. When ready to serve put the sprouts in a vegetable dish and pour over them a pint ...
— The Golden Age Cook Book • Henrietta Latham Dwight

... to fancy young Wardlaw is his enemy. You might relax that, now he tells you he will co-operate with you as your husband. Now, Helen, tell the truth—is it a woman's work? Have you found it so? Will not Arthur do it better ...
— Foul Play • Charles Reade

... for ten thousand. And I made them come to me, James, to me. I made them come to this god-forsaken hole, just because it pleased my fancy. When you have the skewer in, always be sure to turn it around. I believe I'm heaven-born after all. The Lord hates a quitter, and so do I. I nearly quit myself, once; eh, Rajah, old top? But I made them come to me. That's the milk in the cocoanut, the curry on the rice. They almost had me. Two rupees! It truly is a ...
— Parrot & Co. • Harold MacGrath

... round pieces out of broken skulls, so as to get at the fragments which have been driven in, and lift them up. It has a handle like that of a gimlet, with a claw like a hammer, to lift with, I suppose, which last contrivance I do not see figured in my books. But the point I refer to is this: the old instrument, the trepan, had a handle like a wimble, what we call a brace or bit-stock. The trephine is not mentioned at all in Peter Lowe's book, London, 1634; nor ...
— Medical Essays • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

... we plan it? For Phil is a little proud and a good deal obstinate. Polly would know how to bring it about, she has such a keen wit. And Allin would like him, I know. Polly shall give you an invitation for him at her next dance. And you must come, even if you do not dance." ...
— A Little Girl in Old Philadelphia • Amanda Minnie Douglas

... to see what sort of stuff, respecting America, is thus submitted to the officers of her Majesty's Army and Navy. The style of a fellow who talks of his "fellow countrymen" (not meaning, as the words do, persons who live with him in rural neighborhoods), is scarcely deserving of criticism; but the silliness of the falsehoods of this latest English traveller among us, may be referred to as illustrating ...
— The International Magazine, Volume 2, No. 2, January, 1851 • Various

... catastrophes such as that which we have just witnessed. Well, it is the natural temperament of the Vesuviani to be fatalistic, despite their religious fervour; and acts of legislature cannot force them to abandon their old deep-rooted notions; all that the Italian Government can do therefore is to stand ready prepared to help, when the upheaval does occur, as ...
— The Naples Riviera • Herbert M. Vaughan

... "Do you think there was a deliberate attempt to kill you?" asked the Countess Dagmar. Beverly Calhoun was ...
— Beverly of Graustark • George Barr McCutcheon

... joke, Tom. I'm serious. Are you not a Radical at heart? Why do you make such a set against the poor women? What ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... soundless hills, Its fountained vales, its nights of starry calm, Its high chill dawns, its long-drawn golden days,— Was dearest to him. Here he dreamed high dreams, And felt within his sinews strength to strive Where strife was sorest and to overcome, And in his heart the thought to do great deeds, With power in all ways to accomplish them. For had not he done well to men, and done Well to the gods? ...
— In Divers Tones • Charles G. D. Roberts

... undergo! The deepest pity seemed to inspire the fairer sex; but my soul was not less wounded by this than by the contumely of the young, and the proud disdain of the old, especially of those stout and well-fed men, whose dignified shadows seemed to do them honour. A lovely, graceful maiden, apparently accompanying her parents, who seemed not to look beyond their own footsteps, accidentally fixed her sparkling eyes upon me. She obviously started as she remarked my shadowless figure; she hid her beautiful ...
— Peter Schlemihl • Adelbert von Chamisso

... you know not what? Are you assured Of constancy?—as one who has endured? God claims your soul for Him!—Now! Now! To-day! The fruit to-morrow yields—oh, who shall say? Our God is just, but do His grace and power Descend on recreants with equal shower? On darkened souls His flame of light He turns, Yet flame neglected soon but faintly burns, And dying embers fade to ashes cold If we the heart His spirit wooes withhold. Great Heaven retains the fire no ...
— Polyuecte • Pierre Corneille

... part of my book I wish to preface is the last part,—the foreign sketches,—and it is not much matter about these, since if they do not contain their own proof, I shall not attempt ...
— Winter Sunshine • John Burroughs

... think we ought to do our best to console him. Don't you think he might go away for a ...
— The Hero • William Somerset Maugham

... circumstances are against him. Even though he is an intimate friend of our mayor, the commune preferred to be rid of him. He begged not to be sent back to Germany, so he went sadly enough to a concentration camp, pretty well convinced that his career here was over. Still, the French do forget easily. ...
— A Hilltop on the Marne • Mildred Aldrich

... which nearly ended in a serious quarrel. The gentlemen requested the old sailor to give them a few feet of old planking, to repair some damage which their boat had sustained the day before. This the captain could not do. They seemed to think his refusal intentional, and took it as a personal affront. In no very gentle tones, they ordered him instantly to prepare his boats, and put his ...
— Roughing it in the Bush • Susanna Moodie

... on account of the servants, and that he was glad to take this opportunity of treating Elsie as her birth and education deserved. In vain he pointed out that French ladies conducted themselves to their dependants with less distance and hauteur than Englishwomen, and that in France it was proper to do as the French did. Mrs. Phillips felt offended, and, for the first time in her life, a little jealous—not very jealous, for she was so conscious of her own beauty, and so unconscious of her defects ...
— Mr. Hogarth's Will • Catherine Helen Spence

... blasphemies but endeavored to drag down with him to his own perdition, all who came within the evil spell of his power. And though Tiberius came in the succession of the Caesars, and though unmatchable Tacitus has embalmed his carrion, yet do I account this Yankee Jackson full as dignified a personage as he, and as well meriting his lofty gallows in history; even though he was a nameless vagabond without an epitaph, and none, but I, narrate ...
— Redburn. His First Voyage • Herman Melville

... collective self-defense confirm the legitimacy of the international community's campaign to eradicate terrorism. We will use UNSCR 1373 and the international counterterrorism conventions and protocols to galvanize international cooperation and to rally support for holding accountable those states that do ...
— National Strategy for Combating Terrorism - February 2003 • United States

... is he going to leave me? or is he simply going to pass these last hours in play and drink? He might have stayed with me. Ah! my friend, you do little for me, who do so much for you; who commit murder, and—Heaven help me!—suicide for you!.... But I suppose he knows best. At all events, he will ...
— Continental Monthly, Vol. 5, Issue 2, February, 1864 • Various

... Bors in his arms, and said: Gentle cousin, ye are right welcome to me, and all that ever I may do for you and for yours ye shall find my poor body ready at all times, while the spirit is in it, and that I promise you faithfully, and never to fail. And wit ye well, gentle cousin, Sir Bors, that ye and I will never depart asunder whilst our lives may ...
— Le Morte D'Arthur, Volume II (of II) - King Arthur and of his Noble Knights of the Round Table • Thomas Malory

... have explained clearly and concisely in what sense I cling to the God-fable, and I should like to know if I have convinced my Horseherd. I belong, above all, to those who do not consider the world an irrational chaos, and also to those who cannot concede that there can be reason without a reasoner. Reason is an activity, or, as others have it, an attribute, and there can neither ...
— The Silesian Horseherd - Questions of the Hour • Friedrich Max Mueller

... he did not use them in the known and received sense. To a Materialist indeed, or to those who deny all knowledges not resolvable into notices from the five senses, these terms as applied to spiritual beings must appear inexplicable or senseless. But so must spirit. To me, (why do I say to me?) to Bull, to Waterland, to Gregory Nazianzen, Basil, Athanasius, Augustine, the terms, Word and generation, have appeared admirably, yea, most awfully pregnant and appropriate;—but still as the language of those who ...
— Coleridge's Literary Remains, Volume 4. • Samuel Taylor Coleridge

... years younger than you are even now. Our Master was a very good teacher and a very good man, and he liked to have his scholars go on learning and improving out of school, as well as in, and to behave well also. So he told all the boys and girls, except the little ones, to do, every week, two things, and let him see, each Monday, which had done ...
— Charley's Museum - A Story for Young People • Unknown

... us to make war. You are starving us; two wheat vessels were stopped to-day. You want us to save you when no English soldiers shed their blood for Serbia, when scarcely an English rifle has been fired. We do not ...
— The Story of the Great War, Volume IV (of 8) • Francis J. (Francis Joseph) Reynolds, Allen L. (Allen Leon)

... prove true. But Scipio demonstrating, as it were, to them, by his preparations, the coming victory, and, being found merely to be living pleasantly with his friends, when there was nothing else to do, but in no respect because of that easiness and liberality at all the more negligent in things of consequence and moment, without impediment, ...
— Plutarch's Lives • A.H. Clough

... so startled at its sudden appearance and its malignant aspect that I darted back without giving it time to bite. Do you ...
— The Missing Merchantman • Harry Collingwood

... may as well observe, though I do not name him, of the highest eminence in his profession, and one in whose skill, from past personal experience, I had the best ...
— J. S. Le Fanu's Ghostly Tales, Volume 4 • Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu

... stands for the mobilization of the Catholic army for manoeuvres, and does not mean a mere pageant, a complacent exhibition of our numbers, the platonic rehearsal of our past glories and great achievements. "We are here to do a work, and not to make a show," should ...
— Catholic Problems in Western Canada • George Thomas Daly

... that knows God? Do you presume that you know full well what He is, what He has done for you, and what He still does for you every day? Every moment you receive His gifts: your life is due to His beneficence and His love, you are carried in the bosom of His providence as in the arms of your ...
— Serious Hours of a Young Lady • Charles Sainte-Foi

... man began to shake—he had an Irish man's superstition. "I do, your honour. But the saints be between us and harm," he continued, with the same gesture of ...
— The Wild Geese • Stanley John Weyman

... don't hear of the sheriff huntin' him to give it back, nor do I reckon Kelly handed it over to the Express it was taken from. I heard YOU won suthin' from him a spell ago. I reckon you've been huntin' him to find out whar you should return it." The laugh was clearly against Clinch. He was about to make some rallying ...
— Snow-Bound at Eagle's • Bret Harte

... mess room. But nobody, even the youngest, was thinking of waltzes. They all spoke to one another something after this fashion: "The drum-horse hasn't hung over the mantelpiece since '67." "How does he know?" "Mildred, go and speak to him again." "Colonel, what are you going to do?" "Oh, dry up, and give the poor devil a chance to pull himself together!" "It isn't possible, ...
— Short-Stories • Various

... Brer Rabbit man 'nuff ter do dat, den he kin git de gal en thanky, too. Wid dat, Brer Rabbit jump up en crack he heels tergedder, en put out fer ter fine Brer Fox. He aint git fur 'fo' he see Brer Fox comin' down de road all primp up. Brer Rabbit, he sing ...
— Nights With Uncle Remus - Myths and Legends of the Old Plantation • Joel Chandler Harris

... possible customers were Americans. Of their unprecedented dislike for novelty in the domain of the intellect I have often discoursed in the past, and so there is no need to go into the matter again. All I need do here is to recall the fact that, in the United States, alone among the great nations of history, there is a right way to think and a wrong way to think in everything—not only in theology, or politics, or economics, but in the most trivial matters of everyday life. Thus, in the average American ...
— In Defense of Women • H. L. Mencken

... remember of General Maney meeting Gary. I do not know who Gary was, but Maney and Gary seemed to be very glad to see each other. Every time I think of that retreat I think ...
— "Co. Aytch" - Maury Grays, First Tennessee Regiment - or, A Side Show of the Big Show • Sam R. Watkins

... strengthen himself by the thought of loyalty in friendship; that he had renounced. Yet he strove to think of Basil, and, in doing so, knew that he still loved him. For Basil he would do anything, suffer anything, lose anything; but when he imaged Basil with Veranilda, at once his love turned to spleen, a sullen madness possessed him, he hated ...
— Veranilda • George Gissing

... make it grow to show what He can do for us. Miss Zell," he said, in an awed whisper, "my ole heart was as brack as dat ground, but de blessed Jesus turn it as white as dis rose. Miss Edie, Lor' bless her, telled me 'bout Him, and I'se found it all true. Now, doesn't I know 'bout it? I knows dat de good Jesus can turn de ...
— What Can She Do? • Edward Payson Roe

... as they reached the road, crowding their horses close together and reining them in to a walk. "What do you make of this, girls? If this man is really one of those artists that played at that big concert, then he is famous and there is something more than strange in his hiding up here ...
— The Outdoor Girls in the Saddle - Or, The Girl Miner of Gold Run • Laura Lee Hope

... "How do you know?" asked Jim, still puzzled. It did not occur to him that there was anything unfriendly in the conversation—"You never ...
— Purple Springs • Nellie L. McClung

... bow, shooting afar, now walked on craggy Cynthus, and now kept wandering about the island and the people in them. Many are your temples and wooded groves, and all peaks and towering bluffs of lofty mountains and rivers flowing to the sea are dear to you, Phoebus, yet in Delos do you most delight your heart; for there the long robed Ionians gather in your honour with their children and shy wives: mindful, they delight you with boxing and dancing and song, so often as they ...
— Hesiod, The Homeric Hymns, and Homerica • Homer and Hesiod

... themselves as good as their betters. Now that the insurrection had still further stirred up their jealousy of gentlefolk, it was to be expected that they would be quite past getting on with at all, and for all Mrs. Edwards could see, ladies must make up their minds to do their own work ...
— The Duke of Stockbridge • Edward Bellamy

... case he must have been recognised as a man of original and energetic genius; but it was his strong and truthful moral nature, his intellectual sincerity, the abiding conscientiousness of his imagination, which enabled that genius to do its great work, and bequeath to the England of the future the most solid mass of deep-hearted and authentic poetry which has been the gift to her of any poet since the Elizabethan age. There was in his nature a veracity, which, had it not been combined with an idealising imagination ...
— The Prose Works of William Wordsworth • William Wordsworth

... the scale of events, we need to have figures of population. There are no figures for the years around A.D. 220, and we must make do with those of 140; but in order to show the relative strength of the three states it is the ratio between the figures that matters. In 140 the regions which later belonged to Wei had roughly 29,000,000 inhabitants; those ...
— A history of China., [3d ed. rev. and enl.] • Wolfram Eberhard

... T. (to his neighbour—one of the Shop-ladies). So you come from Birmingham? Dear me, now. I used to be there very often on business at one time. Do you know the Rev. Mr. PODGER there? A good old gentleman, he is. I used to attend his Chapel regular—most improving discourses he used to give us. I am fond of a good Sermon, ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 103, October 15, 1892 • Various

... was around him now, even over that new suit. It circled him like a snake. He took it off, his lips working in another splendid speech. "And I don't wear it ever again," he declared, looking down at Barber. "Do y' understand that?" He flicked a big arm with the leather, though not ...
— The Rich Little Poor Boy • Eleanor Gates

... choice, require a great expense of time and of labour, to supply their consumption; all those who are idly employed in the train of persons of rank; all those who are engaged in the professions of law, physic, or divinity, together with all the learned who do not, by their studies, promote or improve the practice of some lucrative trade. The value of every person, in short, should be computed from his labour; and that of labour itself, from its tendency to procure and amass the means of subsistence. The arts ...
— An Essay on the History of Civil Society, Eighth Edition • Adam Ferguson, L.L.D.

... had been going over his own engine feverishly. "Do you see that?" he asked suddenly, holding up in the light of a lantern a little nut which he had picked out of the complicated machinery. "It never belonged to this engine. Some one placed it there, knowing it would work its way into a vital part ...
— The War Terror • Arthur B. Reeve

... Sabines and Marsi,(10) and of the Volsci, who to the south of the Rutuli settled around Ardea, and of the Latins extending southward as far as Cora, possessed the coast almost as far as the river Liris along with the adjacent islands and in the interior the whole region drained by the Liris. We do not intend to narrate the feuds annually renewed with these two peoples—feuds which are related in the Roman chronicles in such a way that the most insignificant foray is scarcely distinguishable from a momentous war, and historical connection is totally disregarded; it is sufficient to indicate ...
— The History of Rome (Volumes 1-5) • Theodor Mommsen

... dress; He set her on a golden throne, He gave her playthings for her own. But still she wept the livelong day, She would not laugh, and would not play. 'This is most tiresome to behold; What shall I do?' ...
— Fairy Tales from the German Forests • Margaret Arndt

... "What do you say to a swim?" asked Sam, of Jack, as they filed out from the auditorium where Dr. Mead ...
— Jack Ranger's Western Trip - From Boarding School to Ranch and Range • Clarence Young

... her head. "Now then, what do you want now?" she said hurriedly, her bitter tone beginning on the ordinary pitch, but rising rapidly to a shrewish scream. "It's the rent, I suppose; and I suppose we're to have notice to quit? It's all one to me. I've got no money and ...
— The Malady of the Century • Max Nordau

... 13.—I think there will certainly be at least one cabinet more in the end of the week. My position is what would commonly be called uncomfortable. I do not know how long the Maynooth matter may be held over. I may remain a couple of months, or only a week—may go at any time at twenty-four hours' notice. I think on the whole it is an even chance whether I go before or after ...
— The Life of William Ewart Gladstone, Vol. 1 (of 3) - 1809-1859 • John Morley

... Captain," growled the veteran, "either as regards hospitality or diversion. Out of bare eight weeks that I have lived here, six have been spent in prison; and now that they have let me out, I can find nothing better to do than to count the pebbles ...
— St George's Cross • H. G. Keene

... "The splendid bouquet there—do you suppose that she even looked at it? Bright pinks, red roses, and stately lilies in the centre. Where were they obtained, since April is scarcely past? And yet she threw the costly birthday gift aside as if the flowers were apple parings. It was not she, but I, who afterward ...
— Uarda • Georg Ebers

... there appears to be but one issue. The proposition, that the Duke of Wellington is mortal, is evidently an inference, it is got at as a conclusion from something else; but do we, in reality, conclude it from the proposition—All men are mortal? ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, No. CCCXXXVI. October, 1843. Vol. LIV. • Various

... Leonora with languid good nature. He paid his homage in form to the mistress of the house; raised his eyebrows at Milly, who returned the gesture; smiled upon Ethel, who feebly waved a hand as if too exhausted to do more; and then sat down on the piano-stool, carefully easing the strain on his trousers at the knees and exposing an inch of fine wool socks above his American boots. He was a familiar of the house, and had had the unconditional entree ...
— Leonora • Arnold Bennett

... or highway, or when it compels vaccination, or when it drafts soldiers for the national defense and sends them to their death. When a man volunteers to risk his life or to endure pain for his fellows we rightly applaud his act. In such a case the ill effects above-mentioned do not follow, and the gain is clear; in addition, the stimulating value of the voluntary self-sacrifice is great. The American soldiers, who risked their lives to rid Cuba and the world of yellow fever, ...
— Problems of Conduct • Durant Drake

... girl at Mr. Sack's because she wasn't very strong, and when I was four or five years old she died. I was big enough to do little things for Mr. Sack and his daughter, so they kept me at the mansion, and I helped the house boys. Time I was nine or ten Mr. Sack's daughter was getting to be a young woman—fifteen or sixteen years old—and that was old enough to get married off in them ...
— Slave Narratives, Oklahoma - A Folk History of Slavery in the United States From - Interviews with Former Slaves • Various

... as you always do To the uniforms we meet, You'll never find Willy among all the soldiers In even ...
— Georgian Poetry 1916-17 • Various

... who have charge of the temples are learned men, and eat nothing which suffers death, neither flesh nor fish, nor anything which makes broth red, for they say that it is blood. Some of the other Brahmans whom I mentioned, who seek to serve God, and to do penance, and to live a life like that of the priests, do not eat flesh or fish or any other thing that suffers death, but only vegetables[394] and butter and other things which they make of fruit,[395] with their rice. They are all married, and have very beautiful ...
— A Forgotten Empire: Vijayanagar; A Contribution to the History of India • Robert Sewell

... was certainly the character of Park: having himself experienced what it was to suffer unrelieved, he was ready to sympathize with his suffering fellow-creatures, and to endure every hardship and privation when humanity called upon him to do so. But his liberality was a great enemy to his purse, and for a considerable time, all he could do was barely enough to earn a livelihood. Such difficulties every one, generally, who enters upon this arduous profession must lay his ...
— Life and Travels of Mungo Park in Central Africa • Mungo Park

... his head. I don't think it's worse than that," she remarked. "I guess we can't do ...
— Partners of the Out-Trail • Harold Bindloss

... agree with you," said hot-headed Nora. "And I don't think you should have noticed him, beyond being merely civil, without an introduction. Do you, Grace?" ...
— Grace Harlowe's Senior Year at High School - or The Parting of the Ways • Jessie Graham Flower

... lights subdued, endured in the semi-darkness that suffering which curses but does not pardon. Ah, but that sight was painful to him! And, in order that she might at least know how he felt, he took their son in his arms, and, pressing him to his breast, said: "If you see your mother before I do, you will tell her that we spent a very lonesome evening without her, ...
— Cosmopolis, Complete • Paul Bourget

... she objected, slipping quickly from his arms. "What are we going to do about the Pygmy Planet? Those monsters might come again, even if you did wreck their god. And Dr. Whiting, poor fellow—But we mustn't ...
— The Pygmy Planet • John Stewart Williamson

... were wandering back to the crabbed page in his hand, and when Stephen impatiently wound up his history with the invitation to supper on Easter Sunday, the reply was, "Nay, brother, thanks, but that I cannot do." ...
— The Armourer's Prentices • Charlotte M. Yonge

... sense which excited general admiration. Over Lotte's personal appearance Goethe is not rapturous as in the case of Friederike; he simply says that she had a light and graceful figure, and in the same cool tone remarks that she was one of those women who do not inspire ardent passion, but who give general pleasure. So he chose to say in the retrospect, but neither his contemporary words nor actions permit us to believe that his feeling to Lotte was merely a calm regard. In the case of Lotte his situation was materially ...
— The Youth of Goethe • Peter Hume Brown

... add, however, by way of justification of French politeness, that our fellow-countrymen are, when traveling, models of good manners in comparison with the abominable English, who seem to have been brought up by stable-boys, so much do they take care not to incommode themselves in any way, while they always ...
— A Comedy of Marriage & Other Tales • Guy De Maupassant

... toar my hair and stamped my feet and made faces and snarled auful and Hiram done the same. they kep back out of reech and father sed well if them is the kind of things fellers see whitch has the delirim tremens i never shall taik another drink what do you say Talor and they laffed and went out. well we scart peeple all that day and had a grate time. at dinner he closed the tent and give us sumthing to eat and drink and then in the afternoon we done ...
— Brite and Fair • Henry A. Shute

... this?" he said to the vicar after reading it. "It appears that written documents already exist between you and Mademoiselle Gamard. Where are they? and what do ...
— The Celibates - Includes: Pierrette, The Vicar of Tours, and The Two Brothers • Honore de Balzac

... I do not think that any one will care to know why I turned soldier. This much I may say, though; my native village was not far off some barracks within twenty miles of London; I had often watched the soldiers at drill, and had talked ...
— Taking Tales - Instructive and Entertaining Reading • W.H.G. Kingston

... with our names we received a most cordial reception. She is, however, a most charming woman, combining both amiability and affability, with a venerable appearance; and, notwithstanding her immense fortune and gold plate, still wears the large Frison cap of the good old times. She was anxious to do the honours of the collection in person, and immediately sent for her son, so that we ...
— A Wanderer in Holland • E. V. Lucas

... said he was a story-teller,' sobbed Dora. 'And now you say the same of me! Oh, what shall I do! ...
— David Copperfield • Charles Dickens

... "I'll do your bidding," answered Mr Jager, and shaking hands with Lord Reginald and his two subordinates, he returned in ...
— The Rival Crusoes • W.H.G. Kingston

... arm. "We must do something at once," said he. "I will go up to barracks now: call for me there in an hour's time; I shall have decided ...
— M. or N. "Similia similibus curantur." • G.J. Whyte-Melville

... see not, that it would still require the Revolution of many Ages; deep, and long Experience, for any Man to Emerge that Perfect, and Accomplish'd Artist Gardiner they boast themselves to be: Nor do I think, Men will ever reach the End, and far extended Limits of the Vegetable Kingdom, so incomprehensible is the Variety it every Day produces, of the most Useful, and Admirable of all the Aspectable Works of God; since almost ...
— Acetaria: A Discourse of Sallets • John Evelyn

... consented Confounding progress with discord, liberty with license Contempt for men is the beginning of wisdom Cried out, with the blunt candor of his age Dangers of liberty outweighed its benefits Demanded of him imperatively—the time of day Do not get angry. Rarely laugh, and never weep Every cause that is in antagonism with its age commits suicide Every one is the best judge of his own affairs Every road leads to Rome—and one as surely as ...
— Serge Panine • Georges Ohnet

... he would spend my money. Though he should have spent every farthing of it, I regret it; though he should have made me a beggar, I regret it. They told me that he would ill-use me, and desert me,—perhaps beat me. I do not believe it; but even though that should have been so, I regret it. It is better to have a false husband than to ...
— Can You Forgive Her? • Anthony Trollope

... and two stationary machine-guns firing through the propeller. These chasing escadrilles (Jagdstaffeln) are essentially fighting units. Each Jagdstaffel comprises eighteen airplanes, and sometimes twenty-two, four of which are reserves. These airplanes do not generally travel alone, at least when they have to leave their lines, but fly in groups (Ketten) of five each, one of them serving as guide (Kettenfuhrer), and conducted by the most experienced pilot, regardless of rank. German aviation tactics ...
— Georges Guynemer - Knight of the Air • Henry Bordeaux

... a better servant to his Master, the best he possibly can; and to do more work for Him; the most ...
— The End of a Coil • Susan Warner

... probability, that he wrote this surprising Volume on Clothes. Additional particulars: of his age, which was of that standing middle sort you could only guess at; of his wide surtout; the color of his trousers, fashion of his broad-brimmed steeple-hat, and so forth, we might report, but do not. The Wisest truly is, in these times, the Greatest; so that an enlightened curiosity leaving Kings and such like to rest very much on their own basis, turns more and more to the Philosophic Class: nevertheless, what reader expects that, with all our writing ...
— Sartor Resartus - The Life and Opinions of Herr Teufelsdrockh • Thomas Carlyle

... was filled with fresh alarms and fears at the prospect, there seemed nothing else to do. She longed to flee, to hide in some dark hole, to cover her shame from her father and the world, but in the hands of this determined man she felt herself powerless. What he willed, she ...
— In the Shadow of the Hills • George C. Shedd

... "I'll tell the world this is great stuff! It must be gonna cost you a bunch of money. Where do ...
— Alex the Great • H. C. Witwer

... of others' lives, for our idea of the earth's surface and the doings of foreign nations, of all past history and its scene, and the events of primaeval nature which were even before man was. So far as we realize the world at all beyond the limit of our private experience of it, we do so by the power of the imagination acting on the lines of reason. It fills space and time for us through all their compass. Nor is it less operative in the practical pursuits of men. The scientist lights his way with it; the statesman ...
— Heart of Man • George Edward Woodberry

... Such expansion may be pursued in practical life, in art, in science, in contemplation, so long as the contemplation is of the real processes of the real world in time. To that expansion I see no limit except death. And I do not know what comes after death. But I am clear that whatever comes after, the command of Life is the same—to expand out of oneself into the life of the world. This command—I should rather say this impulse—seems to me absolute, the one certain thing ...
— Appearances - Being Notes of Travel • Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson

... stranger, not an enemy: Nor is it prudence to prolong thy breath, When all my hopes depend upon thy death; Yet none shall tax me with base perjury: Something I'll do, both for myself and thee; With vowed revenge my soldiers search each tent, If thou art seen, none can thy death prevent; Follow my steps with silence and ...
— The Works of John Dryden, Vol. II • Edited by Walter Scott

... not his custom to rise quite so early to do this, but circumstances over which he alone had any control, namely the mountain fly, had driven him out of bed. There are no mosquitoes on the mountains; consequently many householders will not go to the ...
— In the Mist of the Mountains • Ethel Turner

... Christianity which towards the east was set. Wherefore, most holy Father, we, sharing in the general jubilee at your honors, and celebrating with devout praise the bounties of the divine Majesty, will lay open to you our desires, confiding as we do, with filial devotion, in your paternal goodness. For, if the carnal son exposeth to his father, in confidence, his carnal desires, how much more should not the spiritual son do so with regard to his spiritual one? Assuredly, among other desires of our heart, we do not ...
— Pope Adrian IV - An Historical Sketch • Richard Raby

... vividly. "I haven't decided on the name yet, but it can't matter to you, as I do not expect you to buy the book when it comes out; nor need you be afraid that you will figure in the pages. If I were to call my book 'In Search of—anything,' it would be, 'In ...
— The Princess Passes • Alice Muriel Williamson and Charles Norris Williamson

... gentlemen who were not sharp enough to fleece the government to turn upon and fleece one another, and to let strangers look elsewhere for mercy. Elated that he was a minister, our hero took up his valise and straightway proceeded to the Gilmore House, since it would not do for so famous a diplomatist to put up at one of your shabby hotels. And here, having entered with all the pomp of his nature, he slyly whispered to the clerk who he was, and desired that he would enter his name in this wise: ...
— The Life and Adventures of Maj. Roger Sherman Potter • "Pheleg Van Trusedale"

... every time," Smoke panted back. "That's what I'm here for, just to hold you. Where do you think Shorty's getting to ...
— Smoke Bellew • Jack London

... What do we mean by the word? The Church has nowhere defined it, and we are not tied to any one interpretation; but the Bible itself suggests a ...
— The Church: Her Books and Her Sacraments • E. E. Holmes

... his closely-trimmed mustachios, and his head-cloth, worn like a turban, made me take him at first sight for a Moslem. He has a cunning eye, which does not belie his reputation. His fad is to take money and to do no work for it; he now wants us to pay for the clearing of an uncleared path. The villagers fear him on account of certain fetish-practices which, in plain English, mean poison; and he keeps up their awe by everywhere displaying the outward signs of magic and sorcery. A man with this ...
— To The Gold Coast for Gold, Vol. II - A Personal Narrative • Richard Francis Burton and Verney Lovett Cameron

... days as guests on board the boat. I saw them quite frequently, though I have no recollection of having had any conversation whatever with them on the subject of their mission. It was something I had nothing to do with, and I therefore did not wish to express any views on the subject. For my own part I never had admitted, and never was ready to admit, that they were the representatives of a GOVERNMENT. There had been ...
— Memoirs of Three Civil War Generals, Complete • U. S. Grant, W. T. Sherman, P. H. Sheridan

... finally able to turn back. "Oh quite. There's nothing going on. No one comes but the Americans at Thrupp's, and they don't do much. They don't seem to have a secret in ...
— In the Cage • Henry James

... arrangement, the voters assemble in different parts of the community, they could not listen to financial reports and vote taxes, as they do in the town and the village. Hence it would be necessary to endow the council with increased powers, including the power to levy taxes without the direct authorization of ...
— Studies in Civics • James T. McCleary

... "Surely, Madonna, you do not understand that we are your friends, that you can so abuse us. But you will be faint, Madonna," he cried, with a fresh and deep solicitude. "A cup of wine." And he waved ...
— The Shame of Motley • Raphael Sabatini

... here?—I tell you, one and all, I mean to do my duty, as I ought; With eager satisfaction let us clear the decks for action And fight the ...
— Modern British Poetry • Various

... to do with tones, sounds selected on account of their musical quality and relations. These tones, again, before becoming music in the artistic sense, must be so joined together, set in order, controlled by the human imagination, that they express sentiment. Every manifestation ...
— A Popular History of the Art of Music - From the Earliest Times Until the Present • W. S. B. Mathews

... that such things may happen, and do not blame any one for what has occurred," said the countess, gently. "Tell me now, have you room and beds for ...
— Napoleon and the Queen of Prussia • L. Muhlbach

... I have said, nowhere in the records of purely Mexican, that is, Aztecan, Nagualism do we find the word nagual employed in the sense given in the passage quoted from Herrera, that is as a personal guardian spirit or tutelary genius. These tribes had, indeed, a belief in some such protecting power, and held that ...
— Nagualism - A Study in Native American Folk-lore and History • Daniel G. Brinton

... which by day is always unlocked, we found ourselves in the church itself. As I have said, it is of pure Lombard architecture, and very good of its kind; I do not think it has been touched since the beginning of the eleventh century, except that it has been re-roofed and the pitch of the roof altered. At the base of the most westerly of the three piers that divide the nave from the aisles, ...
— Alps and Sanctuaries of Piedmont and the Canton Ticino • Samuel Butler

... again, muttering, as he passed me, "Bad lookout for all of us when that surly old beast is captain. No gentle blood in him, no hospitality, not even pleasant language, nor a good new oath in his frowzy pate! I've a mind to cut the whole of it; and but for the girls I would do so." ...
— Library Of The World's Best Literature, Ancient And Modern, Vol. 5 • Various

... well, and very right. That was the old school of service, Barbara, which you would do well to imitate.—This is a child, Menteith, that ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson, Volume XV • Robert Louis Stevenson

... Jurgen, "I am sad to-night. For I am thinking of what life will do to us, and what offal the years will make of you ...
— Jurgen - A Comedy of Justice • James Branch Cabell

... a pack of City lubbers!" returned Stephen. "Don't we know a quagmire when we see one, better than they do?" ...
— The Armourer's Prentices • Charlotte M. Yonge

... sacristy, where there are wagon-loads of gold!" added a vagabond, whose name, we regret to say, we do not know. ...
— Notre-Dame de Paris - The Hunchback of Notre Dame • Victor Hugo

... cavil, it is that the topics of religious consolation, however beautiful, are repeated till a sort of triteness attends them. It seems as if you were forever losing Friends' children by death, and reminding their parents of the Resurrection. Do children die so often and so good in your parts? The topic taken from the consideration that they are snatched away from possible vanities seems hardly sound; for to an Omniscient eye their conditional failings must be one with their actual. But ...
— The Best Letters of Charles Lamb • Charles Lamb

... my fate to fret away my years in this country. Not for a second do I regret being American—indeed, I think that a regret typical of very vulgar people, and I feel sure we are the great coming nation—yet"—and she sighed—"I feel my life should have drowsed away close to an older, mellower civilization, a land of ...
— This Side of Paradise • F. Scott Fitzgerald

... really amend your ways and your deeds, if ye faithfully execute justice between a man and his neighbor, if ye oppress not the resident alien, the fatherless and the widow, and shed not innocent blood in this place, and do not go after other gods to your hurt; then I will cause you to dwell in this place, in the land that I gave to your fathers, forever ...
— Stories of the Prophets - (Before the Exile) • Isaac Landman

... the Victoria at once. I'll do anything in reason for you, old top; but no pig in a poke. Enschede's daughter. Things happen out this way. That's a ...
— The Ragged Edge • Harold MacGrath

... and criticism commonly directed against artists and authors falls under this general objection, and is essentially valueless. Authors both great and small are, like everything else in existence, upon the whole greatly under-rated. They are blamed for not doing, not only what they have failed to do to reach their own ideal, but what they have never tried to do to reach every other writer's ideal. If we can show that Browning had a definite ideal of beauty and loyally pursued it, it is not necessary to prove that he could have written In ...
— Robert Browning • G. K. Chesterton

... rehearsals with this piece, it appeared, as a chorus-man, and had become a pianist, thanks to the interposition of Fate (the real pianist had fallen suddenly and desperately ill), and to his own irresistible assurance that he could do anything. He could keep time and he hit perhaps a third of ...
— The Real Adventure • Henry Kitchell Webster

... P-Q4 at once. For if White takes the pawn, he leaves Black in possession of the pawn in the centre. If he does not do so but plays B-QKt5 instead, Black's reply would be Q-K2 and the exchange of pawns at K 5 would follow. White's P- B3 is ...
— Chess Strategy • Edward Lasker

... obstat Res angusta domi: [They do not easily rise whose virtues are held back by the straitened ...
— Hudibras • Samuel Butler

... as I did, for Alcides to do a thing over and over again with the persistency of a mule, in order to maintain what he thought was his amour-propre. As it was, on that occasion, the canoe swerved round with such force that she nearly turned over, and got so filled with water that we had to struggle out ...
— Across Unknown South America • Arnold Henry Savage Landor

... on any but Conservative principles; and while, on the one hand, Peel can say to the violent Tories that they have seen the impotence of their efforts, and ought to be convinced that by firmness and moderation they may do anything, but by violence nothing, on the other, Melbourne and John Russell may equally admonish the Radicals of the manifest impossibility of carrying out their principles in the teeth of such a Conservative party, besides the resistance that would be offered by all the Conservative leaven ...
— The Greville Memoirs (Second Part) - A Journal of the Reign of Queen Victoria from 1837 to 1852 - (Volume 1 of 3) • Charles C. F. Greville

... Chaldees are frequently mentioned in Scripture and in ancient writers. Xenophon speaks of the Carduchi as inhabitants of the mountains of Armenia, and as making incursions thence to plunder the country, just as the Curds do now. He says they were found there by the younger Cyrus, and by the ten thousand Greeks. The Greeks, in their retreat, were obliged to fight their way through them, and found them very skilful archers. So did the Romans under Crassus ...
— Ten Great Religions - An Essay in Comparative Theology • James Freeman Clarke

... tavern, his conscience was not altogether easy, when he recalled a certain passage in his letter to his mother, which had assured her that he was on the high road to reformation already. "I'll make a clean breast of it to Blyth, and do exactly what he tells me, when I meet him at the turnpike." Fortifying himself with this good resolution, Zack arrived at Kirk Street, and knocked at the private door of ...
— Hide and Seek • Wilkie Collins

... do so," said the Knight. "It would only be unnecessary exposure; and an enemy, if it be one, would have every possible advantage in waiting for thee—he knowing thy ...
— The Knight of the Golden Melice - A Historical Romance • John Turvill Adams

... "Say, bo. Do you recollect gittin' a little present? Well, listen, dere's a Christmas tree of dem presents comin' to you ef ye tries any more of dis stuff. I'm in right in dis district, don't fergit it. Ye tink's I'm going to de Island? Wipe dat off yer memory, too. ...
— Traffic in Souls - A Novel of Crime and Its Cure • Eustace Hale Ball

... "What did you do that for?" demanded the fallen one, scrambling to his knees. I heard a sound from the dingy's stern as if the young lady was trying to stifle her merriment. ...
— The Rise of Roscoe Paine • Joseph C. Lincoln

... could stand their heckling no longer. "Looky here, you two," he bawled angrily. "I got a hunch I picked up a lemon, but I'm a-willin' to tackle the deal with Neils if you two think I didn't do right by the syndicate a-runnin' up a bill of expense towing this craft into port. I ain't goin' to stand for no kiddin', even if we are in a five-hundred-dollar towage bill. Man is human an' ...
— Captain Scraggs - or, The Green-Pea Pirates • Peter B. Kyne

... and only I can ever know I in any first-hand and immediate way. Between your consciousness and mine there exists a wide gap that cannot be bridged. Each of us lives apart. We are like ships that pass and hail each other in passing but do not touch. We may work together, live together, come to love or hate each other, and yet our inmost selves forever stand alone. They must live their own lives, think their own thoughts, and arrive at their ...
— The Mind and Its Education • George Herbert Betts

... night, which we shall often do, for Remy has told him that the freshness of the evening is good for his wounds, then, as this evening, from time to time, I will stay behind, and we will tell each other, with a rapid pressure of the hands, all our thoughts of each other during ...
— Chicot the Jester - [An abridged translation of "La dame de Monsoreau"] • Alexandre Dumas

... experience, its creative factors, then the revival of worship will be a prime step in creating a more truly spiritual society. I am convinced that a homilizing church belongs to a secularizing age. One cannot forget that the ultimate, I do not say the only, reason for the founding of the non-liturgical churches was the rise of humanism. One cannot fail to see the connection between humanistic doctrine and moralistic preaching, or between the naturalism of the moment and the mechanicalizing of the church. "The Christian congregation," ...
— Preaching and Paganism • Albert Parker Fitch

... we should start to dig," said the professor, "is near the spot where the top of the mountain casts a shadow when the sun is one hour high. At least that is the direction given in the old manuscripts. So, though we can do little without the map, we might make a ...
— Tom Swift in the Land of Wonders - or, The Underground Search for the Idol of Gold • Victor Appleton

... another word, trading men: such are, whether wholesale or retail, our grocers, mercers, linen and woollen drapers, Blackwell-hall factors, tobacconists, haberdashers, whether of hats or small wares, glovers, hosiers, milliners, booksellers, stationers, and all other shopkeepers, who do not actually work upon, make, or manufacture, the goods ...
— The Complete English Tradesman (1839 ed.) • Daniel Defoe

... sat up and saw that Roger was standing in the stern just as he had stood before, his feet spread far apart, his arms folded, his chin out-thrust. "Do you, sir," he said slowly, "happen to have a bottle of wine ...
— The Mutineers • Charles Boardman Hawes

... that I am a mean hypocrite!" she cried. "Do you think that because I delight in—in pretty things and old associations, I must give up all my convictions? Shall I find no poor at Mellor—no work to do? It is unkind—unfair. It is the way all reform ...
— Marcella • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... bade they / 'fore Siegmund's Hall to lead, And maidens fair a many / down from gallant steed Helped they there dismounting. / Full many a man was there To do them willing service / as ...
— The Nibelungenlied - Translated into Rhymed English Verse in the Metre of the Original • trans. by George Henry Needler



Words linked to "Do" :   underachieve, do-it-yourself, optimize, solfa syllable, well-to-do, fulfil, vulgarise, do drugs, stooge, practise, do-si-do, regulate, extemporize, vulgarize, pretend, improvize, exaggerate, fall over backwards, arrange, do up, effect, qualify, cut corners, fulfill, come, bash, make as if, backslap, cause, sentimentalize, to-do, set up, ramp, go around, engender, sauce, facilitate, storm, cut, do by, doggy do, piffle, breed, locomote, move, effectuate, puff up, appear, do work, swash, do-gooder, make out, dissemble, lead, act as, do it, quack, unmake, bob, propel, get along, do good, relax, lose it, brawl, scamp, churn out, do in, work, coiffure, live up to, wanton, go all out, execute, do the dishes, satisfy, neaten, initiate, motivate, fare, provoke, accomplish, spend, groom, ply, mold, dress, rage, curry, derring-do, do away with, pipe up, render, toy, do well by, sentimentize, shamanise, go a long way, ut, dawdle, freeze, carry through, tide over, shape, romanticize, premiere, ad-lib, do justice, do well, tae kwon do, prompt, stunt, create, serve, extemporise, premier, go, do a job on, footle, determine, keep going, shamanize, give one's best, rehearse, make-do, loosen up, follow, proceed, behave, direct, optimise, interpret, jest, dog do, act reflexively, call forth, can-do, pioneer, swell, give full measure, frivol, improvise, play, coif, click off, admit, swagger, sentimentalise, do one's best, party, evoke, bridge over, act involuntarily, ne'er-do-well, pass, do-or-die, blaze away, do-nothing, hugger mugger, star, incite, underperform, overachieve, carry out, Doctor of Osteopathy, measure up, travel, doh, presume, joke, action, dally, suffice



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