Free Translator Free Translator
Translators Dictionaries Courses Other
Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




Deform   Listen
verb
Deform  v. t.  (past & past part. deformed; pres. part. deforming)  
1.
To spoil the form of; to mar in form; to misshape; to disfigure. "Deformed, unfinished, sent before my time Into this breathing world."
2.
To render displeasing; to deprive of comeliness, grace, or perfection; to dishonor. "Above those passions that this world deform."






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"Deform" Quotes from Famous Books



... meane,) Most lively lyke behold your semblant trew. Within my hart, though hardly it can shew Thing so divine to vew of earthly eye, The fayre idea of your celestiall hew And every part remaines immortally: And were it not that through your cruelty With sorrow dimmed and deform'd it were, The goodly ymage of your visnomy*, Clearer than cristall, would therein appere. But if your selfe in me ye playne will see, Remove the cause by which your fayre beames darkned be. [* ...
— The Poetical Works of Edmund Spenser, Volume 5 • Edmund Spenser

... youth are seen— But would they live, with armour more deform, Their love—o'erflowing breasts must learn to screen: "The bird that sweetest sings ...
— Zophiel - A Poem • Maria Gowen Brooks

... telescopes of moderate dimensions in view, was obliged, in order not to sacrifice any of the light, to place the great mirror so obliquely, that the image formed by its surface should fall entirely outside the tube of the instrument. So great a degree of inclination would certainly deform the objects. The front view construction is admissible ...
— Biographies of Distinguished Scientific Men • Francois Arago

... authority that "Woman is an animal that delights in the toilette," while Petrarch, in 1366, recognized the power of fashion over its votaries. "Who can see with patience," he writes, "the monstrous fantastical inventions which people of our times have invented to deform rather than adorn their persons? Who can behold without indignation their long pointed shoes, their caps with feathers, their hair twisted and hanging down like tails,... their bellies so cruelly squeezed ...
— Arts and Crafts in the Middle Ages • Julia De Wolf Addison

... of a storm A summer landscape doth deform, Making a livid shadow grow Athwart the ...
— Daisy Dare, and Baby Power - Poems • Rosa Vertner Jeffrey

... all very strange circumstances," said Mr. Utterson, "but I think I begin to see daylight. Your master, Poole, is plainly seized with one of those maladies that both torture and deform the sufferer; hence, for aught I know, the alteration of his voice; hence the mask and the avoidance of his friends; hence his eagerness to find this drug, by means of which the poor soul retains some hope of ultimate recovery—God grant that he be not deceived! There is my explanation; it is sad ...
— Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde • ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

... "Lies deform and obscure the soul," she thought, "yet my face bears no mark of the lies I have told this afternoon, nor the hell ...
— Blue Aloes - Stories of South Africa • Cynthia Stockley

... her more than I, Yet she ne'er shall make me die, If my flame can never warm her: Lasting beauty I'll adore, I shall never love her more, Cruelty will so deform her. ...
— Tudor and Stuart Love Songs • Various

... and for the world it carries the assurance that neither sorrow nor sin shall be permitted to deform for ever the face of this fair creation; but that the day comes when God's name being everywhere hallowed, and His will done on earth, and His kingdom set up, and all our wants supplied, and all our sins forgiven, and all temptations taken out of ...
— Expositions of Holy Scripture - Ezekiel, Daniel, and the Minor Prophets. St Matthew Chapters I to VIII • Alexander Maclaren

... least, can read as they run, chance to get wet, the raw shoddy forthwith shrivels miserably up, and the wearer's ankles and wrists stick out so betrayingly that a mere child might recognize the sinister source of the garments. But, anyhow, a few days' wear will so wrinkle and crease and deform the suit that it becomes unwearable, and the man might as conveniently and more prudently go about in shirt and drawers. Should he present himself in it requesting a job from some virtuous citizen, the latter is less likely to grant it than to step to the 'phone ...
— The Subterranean Brotherhood • Julian Hawthorne

... touch— Dissolving snows in livid torrents lost— The mountains lift their green heads to the sky. As yet the trembling year is unconfirmed, And Winter oft at eve resumes the breeze, Chills the pale morn, and bids his driving sleets Deform the day delightless; so that scarce The bittern knows his time, with bill engulfed, To shake the sounding marsh, or from the shore The plovers when to scatter o'er the heath And sing their wild notes ...
— English Poets of the Eighteenth Century • Selected and Edited with an Introduction by Ernest Bernbaum

... as he had remembered, or as he had anticipated. Here, at his feet, under his eyes, are the olive gardens and the blue sea. Nothing can change the eternal magnificence of form of the naked Alps behind Mentone; nothing, not even the crude curves of the railway, can utterly deform the suavity of contour of one bay after another along the whole reach of the Riviera. And of all this, he has only a cold head knowledge that is divorced from enjoyment. He recognises with his intelligence that this thing and that thing is beautiful, while in his heart of hearts ...
— Virginibus Puerisque • Robert Louis Stevenson

... works, "The Honest Whore" comes nearest to some reasonable degree of unity and harmony in conception and construction; his besetting vice of reckless and sluttish incoherence has here done less than usual to deform the proportions and deface the impression of his design. Indeed, the connection of the two serious plots in the first part is a rare example of dexterous and happy simplicity in composition: the comic underplot ...
— The Age of Shakespeare • Algernon Charles Swinburne

... attractive. The Manchus seem a vigorous and self-confident people; they are taller than the Chinese, but wear Chinese dress with fur caps on their heads. The women seldom appear out of doors; they wear their hair gathered up in a high knot on the crown, and, in contrast to the Chinese women, do not deform their feet. Among the swarming crowds one sees Chinamen, merchants, officers, and soldiers in semi-European fur-lined uniforms, policemen in smart costumes with bright buttons, Japanese, Mongols, and sometimes a European. Tramcars drawn by horses ...
— From Pole to Pole - A Book for Young People • Sven Anders Hedin

... dies in youth and vigor, dies the best, Struck through with wounds, all honest on the breast. But when the Fates* in fulness of their rage Spurn the hoar head of unresisting age, In dust the reverend lineaments deform, And pour to dogs the life-blood scarcely warm: This, this is misery! the last, the worst, That man can feel! man, ...
— Journeys Through Bookland - Volume Four • Charles H. Sylvester

... mortal Sin, by declining the stated Custom of burning my self on my Husband's Funeral-pile? What could tempt me, in short, to a Prolongation of my Life, I can't imagine, I, who am grown a perfect Skeleton, all wrinkled and deform'd. She paus'd, and pulling off, with a negligent but artful Air, her long silk Gloves; She display'd a soft, plump, naked Arm, and white as Snow: You see, Sir, said she, that all my Charms are blasted. Blasted, Madam, said the luscious Pontiff; No! Your Charms are still ...
— Zadig - Or, The Book of Fate • Voltaire

... sense and virtue: and so they do till they grow up to a majority, till a similitude of character assures them of the protection of the great. But then vice and folly such as prevail in our country, corrupt our manners, deform even social life, and contribute to make us ridiculous as well as miserable, will claim respect for the sake of the vicious and the foolish. It will be then no longer sufficient to spare persons; for to draw even characters ...
— Letters to Sir William Windham and Mr. Pope • Lord Bolingbroke

... to direct the flame partly on the main tube in the two crotches, so that both tubes blow out a little and give space for the gases to turn in, as indicated in c, Fig. 7, and at the same time increase the mechanical strength of the job. On the other hand, care is taken not to deform the main tube, and not to produce such a bulge or bulb at the joint as will prevent the finished tube from lying ...
— Laboratory Manual of Glass-Blowing • Francis C. Frary

... as the wearing of long hair, after the manner of the ruffians and barbarous Indians, has begun to invade New England," and declaring "their dislike and detestation against wearing of such long hair as a thing uncivil and unmanly, whereby men do deform themselves, and offend sober and modest men, and do corrupt ...
— The Loyalists of America and Their Times, Vol. 1 of 2 - From 1620-1816 • Egerton Ryerson

... danger to the beauty of American women does not lie, as the writer of the Post contends, in an overworking of the physical system which shall stunt and deform; on the contrary, American women of the comfortable classes are in danger of a loss of physical beauty from the entire deterioration of the muscular system for want of exercise. Take the life of any American girl in one of our large towns, and see what it is. ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 17, No. 101, March, 1866 • Various

... Unhappy? Nay, is not 'life itself a disease, knowledge the symptom of derangement'? Have not the poets sung 'Hymns to the Night' as if Night were nobler than Day; as if Day were but a small motley-coloured veil spread transiently over the infinite bosom of Night, and did but deform and hide from us its pure transparent eternal deeps." "We, the whole species of Mankind, and our whole existence and history, are but a floating speck in the illimitable ocean of the All ... borne this way and that way by its deep-swelling tides, and ...
— Browning as a Philosophical and Religious Teacher • Henry Jones

... Delia, to the main Runs the sweet tide without a stain, Unsullied as it seems; The nymphs of many a sable flood Deform with streaks of oozy mud The bosom ...
— By-ways in Book-land - Short Essays on Literary Subjects • William Davenport Adams

... knee: if not properly dried these strings cause some inflammation: the strings are ornamental, light, and when worn in small numbers graceful, but when dozens are employed, and all the upper ones loose, they deform the figure much; some of the women, perhaps anxious to restrain the protuberance of their calves, tie two or three ...
— Journals of Travels in Assam, Burma, Bhootan, Afghanistan and The - Neighbouring Countries • William Griffith

... sky; One star alone shot forth a spark To prove thee—not Eternity. That beam hath sunk—and now thou art A blank—a thing to count and curse Through each dull tedious trifling part, Which all regret, yet all rehearse. One scene even thou canst not deform— The limit of thy sloth or speed When future wanderers bear the storm Which we shall sleep too sound to heed. And I can smile to think how weak Thine efforts shortly shall be shown, When all the vengeance thou canst wreak ...
— The Works Of Lord Byron, Vol. 3 (of 7) • Lord Byron

... before your eyes," returned the scout; "and he who owns it is not a niggard of its use. I have heard it said that there are men who read in books to convince themselves there is a God. I know not but man may so deform his works in the settlement, as to leave that which is so clear in the wilderness a matter of doubt among traders and priests. If any such there be, and he will follow me from sun to sun, through the windings of the forest, ...
— The Last of the Mohicans • James Fenimore Cooper

... individual thus alluded to, separating himself from the throng, galloped up to the speaker, and displayed a person which excited the envy even of the manly looking Forrester. He was a man of at least fifty years, but as hale as one of thirty, without a single gray hair to deform the beauty of his raven locks, which fell down in masses nearly to his shoulders. His stature was colossal, and the proportions of his frame as just as they were gigantic; so that there was much in his appearance of real native majesty. Nothing, in fact, could be well ...
— Nick of the Woods • Robert M. Bird

... of fair proportion, Cheated of feature by dissembling nature, Deform'd, unfinished, sent before their time Into this breathing world, scarce half made up, And that so lamely and unfashionable, That ...
— The Secrets Of The Great City • Edward Winslow Martin

... to alter. His gaiety was undamped, his generosity unchilled; and though the space which had intervened between our parting and reunion was but brief, yet at the period of life at which we were, even a shorter interval than that of three years has frequently served to form or DEform a character. ...
— The Purcell Papers - Volume I. (of III.) • Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu

... th' nation. The Good Old Cause, which some believe To be the Dev'l that tempted EVE With Knowledge, and does still invite 105 The world to mischief with new Light, Had store of money in her purse When he took her for bett'r or worse; But now was grown deform'd and poor, And fit to be turn'd out of ...
— Hudibras • Samuel Butler

... better-half's attire. No wonder, then, that nine-tenths of the top-knotted consorts look regular bags as they walk about. The national costume itself, it must be confessed, does rather tend to deform the appearance of the human body, which it is supposed to adorn. First, there is a huge pair of cotton trousers, through each leg of which one can pass the whole of one's body easily, and these trousers are padded all over ...
— Corea or Cho-sen • A (Arnold) Henry Savage-Landor

... its wide desolation, And threatened the land to deform, The ark then of Freedom's foundation, Columbia, rode safe through the storm, With her garlands of vict'ry around her, When so proudly she bore her brave crew, With her flag proudly floating before her, The boast of the Red, White, ...
— The Good Old Songs We Used to Sing, '61 to '65 • Osbourne H. Oldroyd

... son was levell'd by a shot; His third was sabred; and the fourth, most cherish'd Of all the five, on bayonets met his lot; The fifth, who, by a Christian mother nourish'd, Had been neglected, ill-used, and what not, Because deform'd, yet died all game and bottom, To save a sire who blush'd that ...
— Don Juan • Lord Byron

... injured strains endured, Unown'd by Science, and by years obscured: 10 Fair Fancy wept; and echoing sighs confess'd A fix'd despair in every tuneful breast. Not with more grief the afflicted swains appear, When wintry winds deform the plenteous year; When lingering frosts the ruin'd seats invade 15 Where Peace resorted, and ...
— The Poetical Works of William Collins - With a Memoir • William Collins

... be remembered that I and the other Teacups, in common with the rest of our fellow-citizens, have had our sensibilities greatly worked upon, our patriotism chilled, our local pride outraged, by the monstrosities which have been allowed to deform our beautiful public grounds. We have to be very careful in conducting a visitor, say from his marble-fronted hotel to the City Hall.—Keep pretty straight along after entering the Garden,—you will not care to inspect the little figure of the military ...
— Over the Teacups • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

... And, to avoid its fault, must fly from you. Therefore, believe me, could you raise me high As most fantastic woman's wish could reach, And lay all nature's riches at my feet; I'd rather run a savage in the woods, Amongst brute beasts, grow wrinkled and deform'd, So I might still enjoy my honour safe, From the destroying wiles ...
— The Orphan - or, The Unhappy Marriage • Thomas Otway

... exact sciences for the perusal of such controversial and metaphysical writings of the schoolmen as his master's library afforded. The smattering of Latin which he acquired only served in after years to deform his treatises with barbarous, ill-adapted, and erroneous citations. "As to myself," said he, in his letter written in old age to Anthony Wood, who had inquired whether he was an Oxonian graduate, "my faults are no disgrace to a university, for I was of none; ...
— The Complete Works of Whittier - The Standard Library Edition with a linked Index • John Greenleaf Whittier

... how vile an idol proves this god! Thou hast, Sebastian, done good feature shame. In nature there 's no blemish but the mind; None can be call'd deform'd but the unkind. Virtue is beauty; but the beauteous evil Are empty trunks, o'erflourish'd by ...
— Twelfth Night; or, What You Will • William Shakespeare [Hudson edition]

... good Milo, and come help me dress; that is the matter now in hand. Unclasp these trunks and find something that shall not deform me.' ...
— Zenobia - or, The Fall of Palmyra • William Ware



Words linked to "Deform" :   dinge, deformation, wring, roll, wrench, form, gnarl, unfold, distort, change, protrude, alter, morph, crank, stretch out, convolute, draw, strain, modify, grain, shape, furl, flex, flatten, incurvate, stretch, granulate, roll up, bulge out, taper, dent, change shape, jaundice, batter, turn, sharpen, bend, indent, unbend, change form, twist, pop, come out, pop out, bug out, contort, bulge, extend



Copyright © 2021 Free-Translator.com