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Class   Listen
verb
Class  v. t.  (past & past part. classed; pres. part. classing)  
1.
To arrange in classes; to classify or refer to some class; as, to class words or passages. Note: In scientific arrangement, to classify is used instead of to class.
2.
To divide into classes, as students; to form into, or place in, a class or classes.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Class" Quotes from Famous Books



... became an immense favorite with all hands; and even Mr. Brewster, who at first looked upon my advent on board with an unfavorable eye, was forced to acknowledge that I no more resembled a ship's cousin than a Methodist class-leader does a midshipman. ...
— Graham's Magazine Vol XXXII. No. 3. March 1848 • Various

... collection of the author's works; and recently in a separate tract. The earliest edition that has been discovered bears the date of 1691; from which our copy has been prepared for the press. This is the first book of this class that was composed upon the broad basis of Christianity, perfectly free from sectarian bias or peculiarity. It is an exhibition of scriptural truths, before which error falls without the trouble of pulling it down. It is in the world, like the ark of God in the temple ...
— The Works of John Bunyan • John Bunyan

... time a young couple of the middle class. The man was a reckless scapegrace and spendthrift; but the woman was a pious, faithful, and virtuous housewife. Juan was the husband's name; Maria, the wife's. One of the worst things about Juan was that he spent on another woman the greater part of the money which Maria could with difficulty ...
— Filipino Popular Tales • Dean S. Fansler

... officers, and of men-of-war seamen, strong in professional sentiment, and admirably qualified in the main for the duties of a calling which in many of its leading characteristics was rapidly becoming obsolete. There was the spirit of youth, but the body of age. As a class, officers and men were well up in the use of such instruments as the country gave them; but the profession did not wield the corporate influence necessary to extort better instruments, and impotence to remedy produced ...
— From Sail to Steam, Recollections of Naval Life • Captain A. T. Mahan

... sale and punishment. Among them Nicholas is initiated, having, for the time being, received his first installment of blows, and takes his first lesson in the act of breaking stone, which profession is exclusively reserved for criminals of his class. Among the notable characters connected with this establishment is Philip Fladge, the wily superintendent, whose power over the criminals is next to absolute. Nicholas has been under Philip's guardianship but a few months, when it is found that he may be turned into an investment which will ...
— Our World, or, The Slaveholders Daughter • F. Colburn Adams

... now turn to those works which are of a somewhat graver class; and we will begin with Miss Drury's able and well-written story, entitled Eastbury, in which the heavy trials of Beatrice Eustace, mitigated and eventually overcome through the friendship and truthfulness of Julia Seymour, are told in a manner to delight all readers of the class of tales ...
— Notes and Queries, Issue No. 61, December 28, 1850 • Various

... manufactures of his country, and decrease the value of his own fortune. They alleged that the salt-tax particularly affected the poor, who could not afford to eat fresh provisions; and that, as it formerly occasioned murmurs and discontents among the lower class of people, the revival of it would, in all probability, exasperate them into open sedition. They observed, that while it was exacted in England, a great number of merchants sent their ships to Ireland, to be victualled for their respective voyages; that since it had been abolished, many ...
— The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.II. - From William and Mary to George II. • Tobias Smollett

... personal, an individual enemy is he who has done us a personal injury. The enemy, in a general or collective sense, are they—a people, a class or party—who are opposed to our interests, whose presence, doings or sayings are obnoxious to us for many natural reasons. Concerning these latter, it might be said that it is natural, oftentimes necessary and proper, to oppose them by all legitimate ...
— Explanation of Catholic Morals - A Concise, Reasoned, and Popular Exposition of Catholic Morals • John H. Stapleton

... of the occasion; and the same person who is seen to shrink with an almost feminine fear from ignoble and every-day perils, may be found foremost in the very jaws of danger where honour is to be either maintained or won. Nor does this remark apply only to the imaginative class, of whom I am chiefly treating. By the same calculating principle, it will be found that most men whose bravery is the result not of temperament but reflection, are regulated in their daring. The wise De Wit, though negligent of his life on great occasions, was not ashamed, we are told, of dreading ...
— Life of Lord Byron, Vol. 6 (of 6) - With his Letters and Journals • Thomas Moore

... fifth class, next in age and rank, were playing at rounders in an angle of the court, and I was supposed to be watching them. In reality I was more interested in a group of tall girls who were patrolling up and down under the shade of the trees at the head of their playground—where no boy but I dare enter, ...
— The Dew of Their Youth • S. R. Crockett

... hence the extraordinary life and brilliance of this, his first essay in fiction dealing with a remote time and obsolete manners. His opening, though it may seem long and uninviting to modern readers, is interesting for the sympathetic sketch of the gentle consumptive dominie. If there was any class of men whom Sir Walter could not away with, it was the race of schoolmasters, "black cattle" whom he neither trusted nor respected. But he could make or invent exceptions, as in the uncomplaining and kindly usher of the verbose Cleishbotham. Once launched in his legend, with the shooting ...
— Old Mortality, Complete, Illustrated • Sir Walter Scott

... mind, being pre-eminently and extraordinarily receptive, needed a stimulus from without. The moment I was sent to school, however, a curious metamorphosis took place in me. I may say that I became at once the most brilliant boy in my class. You know that to this day I have always been the most striking figure in any circle in which I ...
— The House of the Vampire • George Sylvester Viereck

... look on and enjoy in the meanwhile, savours a little of bravado and gasconade.[3] And yet this should not be. Idleness so called, which does not consist in doing nothing, but in doing a great deal not recognised in the dogmatic formularies of the ruling class, has as good a right to state its position as industry itself. It is admitted that the presence of people who refuse to enter in the great handicap race for sixpenny pieces, is at once an insult and a disenchantment ...
— Essays of Robert Louis Stevenson • Robert Louis Stevenson

... in these heretical and treasonable undertakings was one Agnes Simpson, or Samson, called the Wise Wife of Keith, and described by Archbishop Spottiswood, not as one of the base or ignorant class of ordinary witches, but a grave matron, composed and deliberate in her answers, which were all to some purpose. This grave dame, from the terms of her indictment, seems to have been a kind of white witch, affecting to cure diseases by words and charms, a dangerous profession considering the times ...
— Letters On Demonology And Witchcraft • Sir Walter Scott

... grew too big for his room to hold, and he then began to have a class at the Ragged Schools. The mud-larks of Gravesend needed no coaxing to go to "The Kernel's" class. Here was a teacher who did not only try to teach them to be good and manly, and straight and true, and gentle men, ...
— The Story of General Gordon • Jeanie Lang

... national event: and in those days of relaxed prison management the utmost license was allowed to the rejoicing. This indulgence was extended to prisoners of all classes, though, of course, under more restrictions with regard to the criminal class. Ten o'clock came—the hour at which we had been instructed to hold ourselves in readiness. We had been long prepared. Agnes had been dressed by Hannah in such a costume externally (a man's hat and cloak, &c.) ...
— Narrative And Miscellaneous Papers • Thomas De Quincey

... This, however, is not all their praise; they have laboured to add to her brightness of imagery, her purity of sentiments. The poets have had Dr. Watts before their eyes; a writer, who, if he stood not in the first class of genius, compensated that defect by a ready application of his powers to the promotion of piety. The attempt to employ the ornaments of romance in the decoration of religion, was, I think, first made by Mr. Boyle's Martyrdom of Theodora; but Boyle's philosophical ...
— Life Of Johnson, Vol. 1 • Boswell

... of land. The first class is the level land, which belongs to the plough now and for all time. The third class, which is the unploughable steep mountain and hill land, is probably as great in area as the level land, and between ...
— Northern Nut Growers Association, Report of the Proceedings at the Third Annual Meeting • Northern Nut Growers Association

... careful preparation. In both capacities Fettes enjoyed and deserved his notice, and by the second year of his attendance he held the half-regular position of second demonstrator or sub- assistant in his class. ...
— Tales and Fantasies • Robert Louis Stevenson

... mountaineers I ever knew. He was as loyal as anybody, but honest in his dealings with the Indians, and that was often a fault in the eyes of those at Washington who controlled these agents. Kit Carson was of the same honest class as Boone, and he, too, was removed ...
— The Old Santa Fe Trail - The Story of a Great Highway • Henry Inman

... Fall. Next him sits George Hanford. Han, as the boys call him, is eighteen, also a senior, and also a football player. He is big and rangey, good-natured and popular, and is president of the senior class. ...
— The Adventure Club Afloat • Ralph Henry Barbour

... to another class of trees—pecan trees in their native woods and thickets, and in some cases hickories, viz.: Hicoria tomentosa, H. alba, and H. aquatica, may be top-worked. Our knowledge is not sufficiently advanced ...
— The Pecan and its Culture • H. Harold Hume

... much of the unpopularity into which he has fallen with a certain class of critics, is owing to their not allowing ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 196, July 30, 1853 • Various

... must be good. He seemed to understand perfectly, and walked quietly by her side to the schoolroom door. When she opened the door everybody looked up; there was a murmur of astonishment, and before she could stop him Toby had bounded from her, and was barking furiously at the infant class. All the children screamed. Jane did her best to catch him, but he got away from her. The big girls jumped on tables and forms, the little ones huddled behind each other. Miss Courtney stood on ...
— The Weans at Rowallan • Kathleen Fitzpatrick

... age at which it occurs case illustrating causes and characteristics class of child affected by condition of the child during frequency of attacks migraine in association with nervous system in ...
— The Nervous Child • Hector Charles Cameron

... have heard a word from it in reply—should be all up in arms, every sword leaping from its scabbard, and every man looking about for his pistols and his blunderbusses? I think the conduct pursued—and I have no doubt just the same is pursued by a certain class in America—is much more the conduct of savages than of Christian and civilized men. No, let us be calm. You recollect how we were dragged into the Russian war—how we "drifted" into it. You know that I, at least, have not upon my head any of the guilt ...
— Public Speaking • Irvah Lester Winter

... backed by her own spotless ideals, was faithfully carried out by Miss Vesta. Miss Phoebe, by right of her position as elder sister and martyr to rheumatism (though she sometimes forgot her martyrdom in these days), took charge of the upper class of preparation; examined the lace curtains in search of a possible stitch dropped in the net, "did up" the frilled linen bags that formed the decent clothing of the window-tassels, the tidies, and the entire stock of "laces" owned by her and her sister. One could ...
— Geoffrey Strong • Laura E. Richards

... agent because in making a difficult settlement he got all you wanted, and a free option on something further that everybody else wanted! Do you know of any other civilized nation of the first or even of the second class that wouldn't jump at that option on the Philippines? Ask Russia. Ask Germany. Ask Japan. Ask England or France. Ask little Belgium![1] And yet, what one of them, unless it be Japan, has any conceivable interest in the Philippines to be compared with that ...
— Problems of Expansion - As Considered In Papers and Addresses • Whitelaw Reid

... be necessary to observe, that as several authors have treated of various subjects, it may be difficult to place them under any particular class; Plutarch, for instance, who was an historian, a political writer, and a philosopher. The most advisable method then is to range them under the head of Miscellaneous Authors, with proper references to each subject, but this will ...
— How to Form a Library, 2nd ed • H. B. Wheatley

... have to do all those things if you married Mr. Yoritomo Ito," said Mr. Campbell. "It's very evident that he belongs to the most conservative Japanese class and clings to the old notions about wives and fancy dress ...
— The Motor Maids in Fair Japan • Katherine Stokes

... watched his two sons with secret delight. To his eye, both were perfect specimens of their class, intelligent, well-looking, resourceful. He was intensely proud of them. He was never happier, never more nearly jovial, never more erect, more military, more alert, and buoyant than when in the company of his two sons. He honestly ...
— The Octopus • Frank Norris

... the romp of the school; Mary Bateman, a stolid-looking girl of fourteen; Bertha Kennedy, who had only lately been raised to the rank of the Upper school; Edith King, a handsome, graceful girl, who competed with Mabel for the honors of the head of her class; and Kitty Sharston, who had only lately come, and who had some Irish blood in her, and was very daring and very much inclined to break the rules. She was a hobbledehoy sort of girl, having outstripped her years, which were only thirteen, ...
— A Bunch of Cherries - A Story of Cherry Court School • L. T. Meade

... religion is needed today as never before, to foster love and fellow-feeling among humanity so that it may be prepared to use the great gifts in store for it wisely and well. This need of religion is specially felt in a certain class where the ether is more loosely knit to the physical atoms than in the majority, and on that account they are now beginning to sense ...
— The Rosicrucian Mysteries • Max Heindel

... uncle Pascal. 'In spring, you see, the blood is active. But you are sound enough. By-the-bye, I saw your brother Octave at Marseilles last month. He is off to Paris, where he will get a fine berth in a high-class business. The young beggar, a nice life ...
— Abbe Mouret's Transgression - La Faute De L'abbe Mouret • Emile Zola

... love of music, he had certainly at this time a love of fine literature; and Mr. Cameron tells me that he used to read Shakespeare to my father in his rooms at Christ's, who took much pleasure in it. He also speaks of his "great liking for first-class line engravings, especially those of Raphael Morghen and Muller; and he spent hours in the Fitzwilliam Museum in looking over the ...
— The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin, Volume I • Francis Darwin

... poets sang of the loveliest rose in the world, and each one named his own; and intelligence was sent far round the land to every heart that beat with love, to every class and condition, and to ...
— Bible Stories and Religious Classics • Philip P. Wells

... and far into the succeeding night had the renewed flight continued; the sufferings had been 5 greater than before, for the cold had been more intense, and many perished out of the living creatures through every class except only the camels—whose powers of endurance seemed equally adapted to cold and heat. The second morning, however, brought an alleviation to 10 the distress. Snow had begun to fall; and, though ...
— De Quincey's Revolt of the Tartars • Thomas De Quincey

... I saw the freshman class, barefooted and with pantaloons rolled up to the knees, stand in line under the ever uplifted rod, and I heard them sing the never-to-be-forgotten b-a ba's. They sang them in the olden times, and this is the way they sang: "b-a ...
— Gov. Bob. Taylor's Tales • Robert L. Taylor

... across his shoulder, to gather the abundant crumbs of the table, but he never penetrated beyond the kitchen. The poor widow of the neighborhood appeared regularly for the broken victuals that were almost the sole sustenance of her brood of little orphans, but she was a model woman of her class, not given to gossip and so devoted to her benefactors that she would repeat nothing likely to satisfy the vulgar curiosity of outsiders. The farmers and villagers, of Pointe-aux-Trembles were kept so busy providing food and lodgings for ...
— The Bastonnais - Tale of the American Invasion of Canada in 1775-76 • John Lesperance

... short. The brevity of their term, however, was atoned for by the greatness of their authority, for in the suppression of disturbances no resistance was suffered. Their persons were sacred, and if in the execution of their duty they struck even a chief of the second class they ...
— The Red Man's Continent - A Chronicle of Aboriginal America, Volume 1 In The - Chronicles Of America Series • Ellsworth Huntington

... The second class of Roman divinities were those manufactured by the pontiffs for utilitarian purposes,—almost the only instance in the history of religion of such a deliberate piece of god-making. The purpose of the pontiffs was excellent; but the result, ...
— Ten Great Religions - An Essay in Comparative Theology • James Freeman Clarke

... though he was not aware of it, while he was talking he had actually relaxed his efforts.—(Not an unusual circumstance. People, when talking, too often forget to do. There is no lack of talkers in the world. Doers are much rarer. We want our readers to belong to the latter class.)—Taking Mr Shobbrok's advice, Walter did not utter another word, but rowed away as hard as he could. Their united exertions made the raft move at a considerable rate through the water. They were still at some distance, ...
— The South Sea Whaler • W.H.G. Kingston

... better class of buildings appeared. What were called hotels began to flourish; but it was long before the monotony of bacon, bread, and dried apples was varied by a potato. And for sleeping accommodations, a limited space was ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 18, No. 106, August, 1866 • Various

... uncomfortable trip. One had to stand at the door and snap the food as it was carried to the table, not to do so meant going without. On arriving at ——, I put up at a boarding house, which was far from being first class. I called on the Postmaster, and told him my name. When he heard it he became very pale, and agitated, and showed great uneasiness. He invited me into his office, where I stated my business, and added that if my money was not forthcoming at once I would report him. He then told me that he ...
— Reminiscences of Queensland - 1862-1869 • William Henry Corfield

... should rise rapidly. Opportunity, they told me, was now all that I wanted, and for that I must wait with patience. I waited with as much patience as I could. I had many friends; some among the judges, some among a more powerful class of men, the attorneys: some of these friends made for me by Mr. Devereux and Lady Geraldine; some by Lord Y——; some, may I say it? by myself. Yet the utmost that even the highest patronage from the bench can do for a young barrister is, to give him an ...
— Tales and Novels, Vol. IV • Maria Edgeworth

... after school to the dog pound, And then been fishing with Fred Lee; so, probably, it was at the bottom of the frog pond! Well, off to school I went, and came in after every schoolmate; So, to pay me off, the schoolmaster and all the boys called me Bobby Toolate! But that wasn't all; for the class was just up for spelling, And I didn't know the lesson, and Tommy Shafter prompted me to spell boots butes; and that's all I got for telling, Besides going to the foot of the class, and having to get the lesson ...
— Neighbor Nelly Socks - Being the Sixth and Last Book of the Series • Sarah L. Barrow

... and rise above the distant hills and mountain-peaks in the broad landscape which is spread out below, with fields, rivers, harbors, cities, castles, churches, towns and villages, and ships upon the seas and in the ports. Its body and limbs are made up of countless human figures, of every class, all bending reverently toward the sovereign head. Its arms stretch forward to the foreground. In one hand it holds a magnificent crosier, in the other a mighty sword, which reach across and cover the whole. It is surrounded with emblems of power, of which it ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 15, No. 88, February, 1865 • Various

... society is now keenly alive to the need for control of personal desire and individual activity within channels of social usefulness. It is beginning to be clearly seen that society has a right to demand from any person or class of persons that form of community service which definitely inheres in the social function which is assumed by, or which devolves upon, such person or class of persons. In the old days of "status," when each and every person found himself in a place set ...
— The Family and it's Members • Anna Garlin Spencer

... attachments. The necessity of being agreeable is a check upon the captious, and the desire to lessen the dulness of the scene a stimulus to the lively; and though the noble divine and Jane could not possibly be ranked in either class, the effect was the same. The noble man was much enamored, and Jane unconsciously gratified. It is true, love had never entered her thoughts in its direct and unequivocal form; but admiration is so consoling to those laboring under self-condemnation, ...
— Precaution • James Fenimore Cooper

... the parsons, as you style them, sent to raise our thoughts to God and heaven by preaching Christ? I admit that some of them don't raise our thoughts high, and a few of them help rather to drag our thoughts downward. Still, as a class, they are God's servants; and for myself I feel that I don't consider sufficiently what they have to tell us. I don't wish to sermonise; I merely wish to ventilate my own thoughts and get light if I can. ...
— The Red Man's Revenge - A Tale of The Red River Flood • R.M. Ballantyne

... epicures: nevertheless, we are free to confess that we were somewhat disappointed with its contents. We did not, it is true, expect to find, in this quarto, any new historical, or even romantic ballads of the first or highest class. The literature of Elizabeth and James is remarkably sterile in productions of this nature; and the few which are intrinsically excellent have long since become familiar and have lost the gloss of novelty. But the didactic ballad and the canzonet were then ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 61, No. 379, May, 1847 • Various

... visitors who came to complain to him of the state of their neighbours' souls, and to vaunt their own spiritual gifts and happy security. To these he could be of no use, nor is it any reflection on his learning and abilities, to say he was often posed by a class of disputants, who, wanting a previous acquaintance with those general topics of information which are necessary to a clear and true view of the question, presume to handle the most abstruse and profound topics ...
— The Loyalists, Vol. 1-3 - An Historical Novel • Jane West

... on excellently well with the young women of the rich, idle middle-class. He was a companion for them, a sort of depraved servant, only more free and confidential, who gave them instruction and roused their envy. They had hardly any constraint with him: and, with the lamp of Psyche in their hands, they made a careful ...
— Jean Christophe: In Paris - The Market-Place, Antoinette, The House • Romain Rolland

... if He were talking like a vulgar demagogue, flattering the poor, and inveighing against the rich. Matthew's view of the force of the expressions is involved in Luke's making them an address to the disciples., 'Ye poor' at once declares that our Lord is not thinking of the whole class of literally needy, but of such of these as He saw willing to learn of Him. No doubt, the bulk of them were poor men as regards the world's goods, and knew the pinch of actual want, and had often had to weep. But their earthly poverty ...
— Expositions Of Holy Scripture - Volume I: St. Luke, Chaps. I to XII • Alexander Maclaren

... to the origination of new species, I am very glad to find that you think it probable that it may be carried on through the intervention of intermediate causes. I left this rather to be inferred, not thinking it worth while to offend a certain class of persons by embodying in words what would only be a speculation." (In the same sense, see the letter to Whewell, March 7, 1837, volume ii., ...
— The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin, Volume I • Francis Darwin

... white-bait fish, which, mixed with rice, constitutes the daily diet of the lower class of natives in the Philippine ...
— The Story of the Philippines and Our New Possessions, • Murat Halstead

... some champion, to kill these monsters for them. It was not the sport but the duty of. Kings, and was in itself a title to be a ruler of men. Theseus, who cleared the roads of beasts and robbers; Hercules, the lion killer; St. George, the dragon-slayer, and all the rest of their class owed to this their everlasting fame. From the story of the Tsavo River we can appreciate their services to man even at this distance of time. When the jungle twinkled with hundreds of lamps, as the shout went on from camp to camp that the first lion was ...
— The Man-eaters of Tsavo and Other East African Adventures • J. H. Patterson

... not be possible," he answered. "Democracy there is confined to politics. In other respects, our class prejudices are far more rigid than yours. But then I see a great change in this country since I was here ...
— The Great Prince Shan • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... accident or necessity, in the game, he protested, there was but one line of procedure, and that was to bring to illicit activity that continuous intelligence which marked the conduct of those who stood ready to combat it. Society, he declared, owed its safety to the fact that the criminal class, as a rule, was made up of its least intelligent members. When criminality went allied with a shrewd mind and a sound judgment—and a smile curled about Keenan's melancholy Celtic mouth as he spoke—it became transplanted, practically, to the sphere and ...
— Phantom Wires - A Novel • Arthur Stringer

... and here, whatever credit that worthy and excellent personage may lose in certain eyes, his historian is bound to confess that his anxiety for Sibyll did not entirely distract his attention from interest or ambition. To become the head of his class, to rise to the first honours of his beloved city of London, had become to Nicholas Alwyn a hope and aspiration which made as much a part of his being as glory to a warrior, power to a king, a Eureka to a scholar; and, though more mechanically ...
— The Last Of The Barons, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... to be said about the physical examination; it was negative in most respects. She is of rather slight type; weight 110 lbs., height 5 ft. 1 in. Delicate features of mature type. Expression intelligent and decidedly refined for her social class. Gynecological examination made by a specialist revealed nothing abnormal and no evidence of immorality. Menstruation said to have taken place at 13 years and to ...
— Pathology of Lying, Etc. • William and Mary Healy

... undertaking a job of civil engineering with no sort of preparation, but they'll tackle a dangerous proposition in burglary without a thought, and pay for failure with years of imprisonment, and once out try it again. That's one kind of criminal—the ninety-nine per-cent class—incurably stupid! There's another class, men whose imagination forewarns them of dangers and whose mental training, technical equipment and sheer manual dexterity enable them to attack a formidable proposition like a modern safe—by way of illustration—and force its ...
— The Lone Wolf - A Melodrama • Louis Joseph Vance

... childhood had held but one figure, that of an adored mother, and "home" had been represented by a couple of meager rooms at the top of a big warren of a place known as Wallater's Buildings, tenanted principally by families of the artisan class. ...
— The Hermit of Far End • Margaret Pedler

... Edna dryly, "but Tavia likes it. May she have a real account of the little lamb story for the English class to-morrow." ...
— Dorothy Dale's Camping Days • Margaret Penrose

... They believed absolutely that their conduct was right. There was no question about it, no discussion. They were convinced that they were the saviours of society, and that it was they who made happiness for the many. And they drew pathetic pictures of what would be the sufferings of the working class were it not for the employment that they, and they alone, by their wisdom, provided ...
— The Iron Heel • Jack London

... Pen, some clever turns of phrases, pithy expressions, and amusing images. It also contains incisive criticism of corruption in the Church, of declining respect for Christianity, and, what seems to Lloyd almost the same thing, of a collapsing class structure. The Church wardens, "uncivil and unbred! / Unlick'd, untaught, un-all-things—but unfed!" are "but sweepers of the pews, / The Scullions of the Church, they dare abuse, / And rudely treat their betters" (pp. 16-17). They show a ...
— The Methodist - A Poem • Evan Lloyd

... feelings. I give it, therefore, before it was forgotten. England had not budged. Had it been winter instead of early spring, I might sum up for you what I mean in one short sentence: I travelled to London in a third-class railway carriage that ...
— The Garden of Survival • Algernon Blackwood

... hundred and ten thousand livres, in about five hundred and twenty years. The ecclesiastical patronage of the abbey, at the time of the revolution, extended over twelve churches. Its monks, who were of the order of St. Benedict, continued till the year 1663 to belong to the class of Benedictines, called unreformed; but the Duchess of Longueville, wife of the then abbot, introduced at that period the brethren of the congregation of ...
— Architectural Antiquities of Normandy • John Sell Cotman

... colleges have their own distinctive cries, and for oddness they quite equal those of the men. And now the high schools, and even the separate classes and school societies are indulging in original cries. But so long as these things keep up the class spirit and make for sound lungs and high spirits, why should ...
— Healthful Sports for Boys • Alfred Rochefort

... say that this clause swept away at a blow that pernicious class of hired advocates who had for ages grown rich on the weakness and the dishonesty of their fellow-men. In after years it was found that the abolition of the professional lawyer had furthered the cause of peace and progress quite as efficiently as the prohibition ...
— The Angel of the Revolution - A Tale of the Coming Terror • George Griffith

... seemed in doubt as to their duties in the matter, and two women. Of one of these there was nothing to remark except her distress. She wept as she stood at the door of the waiting-room. Like the second woman, she wore the dress of the shopkeeping class throughout Europe, with the local black lace veil in place of a bonnet over her hair. It is of the second woman—O unfortunate creature!—that this record is made—a record without sequel, without consequence; but ...
— The Rhythm of Life • Alice Meynell

... class of men, who are pleased to consider themselves antagonists of the foregoing, and whom we may term hypergelasts; the excessive laughers, ever-laughing, who are as clappers of a bell, that may be rung by a breeze, ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... the fun to myself, Ernest," said Luke. "We'll give him a lesson he won't soon forget. If I told the boys they'd hang him up in short order. I don't want to take the fellow's life, but I'll give him a first-class scare." ...
— A Cousin's Conspiracy - A Boy's Struggle for an Inheritance • Horatio Alger

... Miss Lind, that means No. Honestly, then, what has Susanna to lose by disregarding your rules of behavior? Even if, by marrying, she conciliated the notions of your class, she would only give some man the right to ill-treat her and spend her earnings, without getting anything in return—and remember there is a special danger of that on the stage, for several reasons. She would not really conciliate you by marrying, for you wouldnt associate with ...
— The Irrational Knot - Being the Second Novel of His Nonage • George Bernard Shaw

... head clerk at the Ministry of Finances, and applied for leave in order that I might help my wife to take our son Gustave to Lourdes. The dear lad places all his hope in the Blessed Virgin, to whom we pray morning and evening on his behalf. We are in a second-class compartment of the carriage just ...
— The Three Cities Trilogy, Complete - Lourdes, Rome and Paris • Emile Zola

... a class, could never be induced to eat some of the little birds—the mauviettes, the alouettes, the sparrows baked in a pie, that so delight the Frenchman. Also, it is a question whether snails, even if it were possible to obtain the superior Burgundian, fat and juicy ...
— Twenty-four Little French Dinners and How to Cook and Serve Them • Cora Moore

... on a striped India shawl, such as ladies wore in travelling, and a straw bonnet, from which the veil had blown back. These were not things worn by servants; besides, her air and walk convinced me that this woman was of another class. As she entered the door I saw her face for a single moment, but long enough to show me that I had never ...
— The Old Countess; or, The Two Proposals • Ann S. Stephens

... Sunday school, Archie told the boys that he was going to New York on the morrow, and from that moment he was the hero of the class. The boys looked at him with wondering admiration, and seemed scarcely able to realise that one of their number was to go so far from home. The city was in reality little more than a hundred miles, but to their boyish minds this distance seemed ...
— The Adventures of a Boy Reporter • Harry Steele Morrison

... casually, or in fragmentary parts. That work, however, in its entirety, was far too costly for the larger and ever-widening circle of M. Dore's admirers, and to meet the felt and often-expressed want of this class, and to provide a volume of choice and valuable designs upon sacred subjects for art-loving Biblical students generally, this work was projected and has been carried forward. The aim has been to introduce subjects of general interest—that ...
— The Dore Gallery of Bible Illustrations, Complete • Anonymous

... before she had gone to one of the many meetings of working-women, which had made some stir of late. Not a first visit, for she was much interested in the subject and full of sympathy for this class of workers. ...
— Work: A Story of Experience • Louisa May Alcott

... Vest, Bill Nelson, J. West Goodwin, Jedge Broadhead and the rest; Bid them be steadfast in the faith and pay no heed at all To Joe McCullagh's badinage or Chauncy Filley's gall; And urge them to retaliate for what I'm suffering here By cinching all the alien class ...
— John Smith, U.S.A. • Eugene Field

... perilous, it outrages every feeling of an honest dog. It is hard for him to live at all without the approval and the cordial consent of men. The human order hostile, he quickly loses his self-respect and drops to the pariah class. Already wee Bobby had the look of the neglected. His pretty coat was dirty and unkempt. In his run across country, leaves, twigs and burrs had become entangled in his long hair, and his legs and ...
— Greyfriars Bobby • Eleanor Atkinson

... the same lady informs us: 'The liberty which the first class had was so great that if we attended our tutor in his study for an hour or two every morning . . . no human being ever took the trouble to inquire where else we spent the rest of the day between our meals. ...
— Jane Austen, Her Life and Letters - A Family Record • William Austen-Leigh and Richard Arthur Austen-Leigh

... small and suitable Ice Chest could be constructed solely to preserve the butter in a congealed and therefore palatable state, both to children and to adults. The former would take it with great avidity, and the benefit to health resulting therefrom would be incalculable. Even in some of the better-class houses Ice is looked upon too much as a luxury, and not as it should be, a necessity; indeed, the money saved from gas during the summer months might well ...
— The Art of Living in Australia • Philip E. Muskett (?-1909)

... wrong, the meaning was right. They are, as every one knows, an enormously military people, and, if they want to fight at all, they have to be a military people, for the vast majority of them are not a warlike people. A first-class army could never have been fashioned in Germany out of volunteer civilians, like our army on the Somme. That army has a little shaken the faith of the Germans in their creed. Again I must quote one of our soldiers: 'I don't say', he ...
— England and the War • Walter Raleigh

... of sunshine for a few minutes, remove themselves and their glasses to another table. When I knew Dominick better, and other bosses in this republic of ours, I knew that the boss is never above the weaknesses of the monarch class for a rigid and servile court etiquette. My own lack of this weakness has been a mistake which might have been serious had my political power been based upon men. It is a blunder to treat men without self-respect as ...
— The Plum Tree • David Graham Phillips

... clients. One of them was to the effect that the simplest division it is possible to make of the human race is into the people who take things hard and the people who take them easy. He perceived very quickly that Miss Chancellor belonged to the former class. This was written so intensely in her delicate face that he felt an unformulated pity for her before they had exchanged twenty words. He himself, by nature, took things easy; if he had put on the screw of late, ...
— The Bostonians, Vol. I (of II) • Henry James

... disappointed look on the young face; broken engagements, forgotten promises, a wasted life,—this is what it has all come to. "Hard upon dancing"? yes, I certainly have reason. Do I not find it right in the way of some of my Bible Class who might else become Christians? do I not know how it tarnishes the Christian profession of others? Do not the careless young men in the class boast that they can get the Church members to go with them anywhere—for ...
— Tired Church Members • Anne Warner

... Doris, for all her sturdy self-reliance, began to feel a little nervous inwardly. She had been quite well-educated, first at a good High School, and then in the class-rooms of a provincial University; and, as the clever daughter of a clever doctor in large practice, she had always been in touch with the intellectual world, especially on its scientific side. And for nearly ...
— A Great Success • Mrs Humphry Ward

... virgin, and establish a position to face both the windy quarters. It was when his negotiations to this end had reached maturity, when the contract for his espousals with the honourable lady, Monna Margherita degli Ughi, had actually been signed, that Messer Cino of Pistoja was late for his class, got cold feet, and ...
— Little Novels of Italy • Maurice Henry Hewlett

... I dare say, on the other hand, many could be told of who fail to do their work in single life, and who fail to get happiness in it as well. Put the one class over against the other, and then consider the many, many women who marry for no other reason than from the fear of living single, it will go far to account for the many unhappy marriages that we see, and far to prove that marriage is the natural and proper ...
— Janet's Love and Service • Margaret M Robertson

... undertake to read my work in similar fashion, and methodically to recall to his mind any members of superior social classes whom he has met, and carefully to observe whether there exists any resemblance between one such class and another, and whether, at times, there may not be repeated in a higher sphere what is done in a lower, and likewise to note any additional fact in the same connection which may occur to him (that is to say, any fact pertaining to the higher ranks of society which would seem ...
— Dead Souls • Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol

... difficult to find the train for Chesterham, because it was waiting all ready at the platform; but when they got to the train it took Jones a long time to find Jimmy a suitable first-class compartment. At last he stopped at one which contained an old gentleman and two ladies. The old gentleman was sitting next to the door, reading a newspaper, and he did not look at all glad when Jimmy sat ...
— The Little Clown • Thomas Cobb

... heliotropic reactions identical with those of animals, it is not surprising that certain tissue-cells also show reactions which belong to the class of tropisms. These reactions of tissue-cells are of special interest by reason of their bearing upon the inheritance of morphological characters. An example of this is found in the tiger-like marking of the yolk-sac ...
— Darwin and Modern Science • A.C. Seward and Others

... veneration and affection by the whole Iximayan community, probably as living specimens of an antique race so nearly extinct. Their position, as an order of priesthood, it is now known, had not been higher, for many ages, if ever, than that of religious mimes and bacchanals, in a certain class of pagan ceremonies, highly popular with the multitude. This, indeed, is evident from their characteristics in the sculptures. Their ancient college, or hospital, otherwise vacant and forlorn, was now chiefly occupied by a much higher order of priests, ...
— Memoir of an Eventful Expedition in Central America • Pedro Velasquez

... quota of passengers, many of whom disembarked at Singapore, among them a number of Indians, Ceylonese, Chinamen, Malays, and Portuguese, mostly second-class travellers. ...
— Around the World in 80 Days • Jules Verne

... vanity. The details of her folly are too unpleasant to dwell on; but the silly ambition of playing the fine lady, after the pattern of certain European novels, themselves chiefly representing the worst members of the class they claim to depict, was the cause of her ruin. She had so recklessly trifled with her reputation, that although her immediate friends did not believe the worst, yet with the world her character was irretrievably lost. At five-and-twenty she had already ...
— Elinor Wyllys - Vol. I • Susan Fenimore Cooper

... mail and the evening papers, but no one was in a hurry to read them. The news of the day seemed behind the times compared with the dazzling future. Maxime however took up the popular middle-class sheet, and threw his eye over the columns. He started at the latest items and exclaimed; "Hullo! War is declared." No one listened to him: Clerambault was dreaming over the last vibrations of his verses; Rosine lost in a calm ecstasy; the mother alone, who could not fix her ...
— Clerambault - The Story Of An Independent Spirit During The War • Rolland, Romain

... Villarbenoit, his old school and college in one; but first he went to Avalon Castle, where his stout backers and brothers, William and Peter, ruled over their broad lands, who always had heartened and encouraged him in his battles for the liberties of the Church. Here "nobles, middle-class men, and the lowest people" received him with delight, and he spent two days at this his birthplace, and so on to Villarbenoit, and a fine dance his coming made for them all. He gave the Church a noble Bible worth ten silver marks, and passed to the cell of St. Maximin. Here aged ...
— Hugh, Bishop of Lincoln - A Short Story of One of the Makers of Mediaeval England • Charles L. Marson

... background of lawn and shrubberies. Two huge marquees had been erected for the commonalty—one for the school-children, the other for the villagers. There were long tables in the billiard-room for the farming class; and for the quality there was the horse-shoe table in the dining-room, as at Roderick's birthday dinner. But on this occasion the table was decorated only with hardy ferns and flowers. The orchids ...
— Vixen, Volume I. • M. E. Braddon

... you, Provost of Paris and Provost of the Merchants and Aldermen...." He named them by name and greeted them in eloquent language. These letters were regarded as an artifice intended to render the townsfolk suspicious of the aldermen and to incite one class of the populace against the other. The only answer sent to the Duke was a request that he would not spoil any more paper ...
— The Life of Joan of Arc, Vol. 1 and 2 (of 2) • Anatole France

... not canned chicken till I'm cooked, And hope still rooms in this pneumatic chest, While something's doing underneath my vest That makes me think I'm squiffier than I looked. Mayhap Love knew my class when I was booked As one shade speedier than second best To knock the previous records galley west, While short-end suckers on ...
— The Love Sonnets of a Hoodlum • Wallace Irwin

... in this manner is pretty sure to end badly, as most of us know. All the morning through, things seemed to go wrong. Katy missed twice in her grammar lesson, and lost her place in the class. Her hand shook so when she copied her composition, that the writing, not good at best, turned out almost illegible, so that Mrs. Knight said it must all be done over again. This made Katy crosser than ever; and almost before ...
— What Katy Did • Susan Coolidge

... ask. Private Secretaryships to Ministers, or societies, or great Clubs, are not invariably given to the first applicant who comes along, even if he appeals to testimonials in the Junior Mathematical Class from Professor MCGLASHAN of St. Mungo's. But SAUNDERS was not daunted. He would write to one notable, informing him that his grandmother had been at a parish school with the notable's great uncle—on which ground of ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 103, December 3, 1892 • Various

... and Schuyler), but the tutor's name was Oscar Maironi, and he was charging his pupils five dollars an hour each for his instruction. Do not think this excessive. Oscar could have tutored a whole class of irresponsibles, and by that arrangement have earned probably more; but Bertie and Billy had preempted him on account of his fame or high standing and accuracy, and they could well afford it. All three sophomores alike had ...
— Philosophy 4 - A Story of Harvard University • Owen Wister

... there had come a second, Lizzie had helped. But now there were three, the total weight of them something over sixty pounds; and the street-car line was some distance away, and also it hurt Jimmie in his class-consciousness to pay twenty cents to a predatory corporation. They had tried the plan of paying something to a neighbour to stay with the babies; but the first they tried was a young girl who got tired and went away, leaving the little ones ...
— Jimmie Higgins • Upton Sinclair

... persons who keep the biggest sin for the end of their confession: others, on the contrary, are in a hurry to be relieved of their anxiety, and make an end of it as soon as they can. M. Folgat belonged to this latter class. ...
— Within an Inch of His Life • Emile Gaboriau

... Professor. "In fact, I am accustomed, in talking to my class, to give them a very clear idea, by simply taking as our root ...
— Defenders of Democracy • The Militia of Mercy

... prosperity. If you think this ridiculous, remember that it is not Margaret who is telling you about it; and let me hasten to add that they were in plenty of time for the train; that Mrs. Munt, though she took a second-class ticket, was put by the guard into a first (only two seconds on the train, one smoking and the other babies—one cannot be expected to travel with babies); and that Margaret, on her return to Wickham Place, was confronted with the ...
— Howards End • E. M. Forster

... some interest in the fortune of that country which so cruelly oppressed them, they served their guns merrily when it came to fighting, and they had the readiest ear for a bold, honourable sentiment, of any class of men the ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition - Vol. 2 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... of reason, and to render those who should have remembered their manhood, the slaves of the basest passions. Even the most confident and the stoutest hearts began to think the issue of the contest was becoming doubtful; and that abject class was hourly increasing in numbers, who thought they foresaw all the possessions of the English crown in America subdued by their Christian foes, or laid waste by the ...
— The Last of the Mohicans • James Fenimore Cooper

... academy? or a State theatre? Should gambling be legal? Should potatoes be boiled in their skins? should dynamiters? Should newspapers publish racing tips? or divorce cases? or comment? The New Journalism. What is the best ninth move in the Evans gambit? Would Morphy have been a first-class chess-player to-day? Is the Steinitz gambit sound? Do plants dream? Ought we to fill up income-tax papers accurately? Shelley and Harriet and Mary. Swift and Vanessa and Stella. Lord and Lady Byron. Did Mrs. Carlyle deserve it? The limits of biography; ...
— Without Prejudice • Israel Zangwill

... organisations. It was the latter method of simple assignation that Gracchus chose. There was felt to be no particular need for new political creations; for the pacification of Italy seemed to be accomplished, and the new farming class would perform their duty to the State equally well as members of the territory of Rome or of that of the existing municipia and coloniae of Roman citizens. There is some evidence that the new proprietors were not all to be attached ...
— A History of Rome, Vol 1 - During the late Republic and early Principate • A H.J. Greenidge

... Announcing in a loud voice that it was his intention to refresh the surface of his body by the purifying action of heated vapour, and then to proceed to his mixing-floor, the merchant withdrew. The demon, being an earth-dweller with the ineradicable objection of this class of creatures towards all the elements of moisture, at once relinquished its hold, and going direct to the part of the works indicated, it there awaited its victim with the design of resuming its ...
— Kai Lung's Golden Hours • Ernest Bramah

... By many kinds of detraction they sought to weaken his influence and damage his popularity. And as the members of this party, though they had lost their monopoly of political power, still remained the dominant class in society, the disparaging tone which they set was taken up not only in the colony itself, but also by travellers who visited it, and by them carried back to infect opinion in England. The result was that persons at home, who had the highest appreciation of Lord Elgin's capacity as ...
— Canadian Notabilities, Volume 1 • John Charles Dent

... into her usual tone; "husbands are an inferior class of men, who require keeping ...
— Middlemarch • George Eliot

... hazards all that occurs to her, seems to think the world at her feet, and is so young and gay and handsome that she is not much mistaken. She is, in short, an inferior Lady Honoria Pemberton;(155) somewhat beneath her in parts and understanding, but strongly in that class of character. I had no conversation with her myself; but her voice is loud and deep, and all she said was for ...
— The Diary and Letters of Madame D'Arblay Volume 1 • Madame D'Arblay

... were an ordinary imposture, the machinery would be arranged for results that would but little vary; if it were a supernatural agency permitted by the Almighty, it would surely be for some definite end. These phenomena belong to neither class; my persuasion is, that they originate in some brain now far distant; that that brain had no distinct volition in anything that occurred; that what does occur reflects but its devious, motley, ever-shifting, half-formed thoughts; in short, that it has been but the dreams of such ...
— The Best Ghost Stories • Various

... poetry which attempts the description of feats at arms which were points in the welfare of nations—when, for instance, Germany was struggling to have her middle class against the privileges of the barons—is more interesting than all the modern songs which nicely depict soldiers' moods. Language itself was fighting for recognition, as well as industrial and social rights. The verses mark successive steps of a people into consciousness and civilization. Some of ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 10, No. 57, July, 1862 - A Magazine Of Literature, Art, And Politics • Various

... of the emancipation act, consisted in torturing and tormenting them with impunity. They cannot endure to witness the elevation to the rank of free, intelligent, and well-behaved fellow-citizens, of a class of beings whom they were accustomed to treat a myriad of times worse than they did the "beasts that perish." Having pronounced them incapable of civilization, and strangers to all the better feelings of our nature, they deem it a sort of duty to themselves to employ ...
— The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Omnibus • American Anti-Slavery Society

... and obedient, but she cries easy. You have got to take good traits and bad ones in folks. She can't help it. She always cries in class meetin', or anywhere—has cried time and agin a-tellin' how she would be trompled on and lay down and have her head chopped off ...
— Samantha at the World's Fair • Marietta Holley

... casts on shelves, sketches in all stages of progress on the wall, a tea-kettle singing over a bright fire in a stove, and a curtain enclosing a corner used as a bedroom, completed the list of furniture. It was a night-school for lady artists. The class had finished for the evening, and a number of the students were moving about or seated near the fire, talking in an unlimited number ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science - February, 1876, Vol. XVII, No. 98. • Various

... living male relative of the suitable age except two second cousins that I don't see much of—praise God!" said Peter, fervently; "and Hugh Van Orden looks about half-past ten, whereas I class John Charteris among the lower orders ...
— The Cords of Vanity • James Branch Cabell et al

... had not the British nation at its back. The electoral body, indeed, to which they owed their parliamentary majority, was but a fraction of the population, and the public opinion which supported them may seem but the voice of a privileged class in these days of household suffrage. But there is little reason to doubt that, if household suffrage had then prevailed, their foreign policy would have received a democratic sanction; nor is it at all certain that some ...
— The Political History of England - Vol XI - From Addington's Administration to the close of William - IV.'s Reign (1801-1837) • George Brodrick

... that we are savage,' cried Atlee. 'I contend for it that all our civilisation is higher, and that class for class we are in a more advanced culture than the English; that your chawbacon is not as intelligent a being as our bogtrotter; that your petty shopkeeper is inferior to ours; that throughout ...
— Lord Kilgobbin • Charles Lever

... by, a woodland path brought the disorderly party, about forty in number, including their servants and the ruffians who always followed whenever plunder was to be scented, out upon a pretty French village of the better class, built round a green shaded with chestnuts, under which, sure enough, were hay-carts, cows, sheep, and goats, and their owners, taking refuge in a place thought to be out of the ...
— The Caged Lion • Charlotte M. Yonge

... won't any of us be as ignorant as one of the boys was in my class last term. It wasn't Sammy, for he was home sick, you know," she hastened to add, fearful that Sammy Pinkney might suspect ...
— The Corner House Girls Growing Up - What Happened First, What Came Next. And How It Ended • Grace Brooks Hill

... year, with a pension. This was a first-rate permanent appointment in the service of the Saxon State, carrying an assured professional position and livelihood with it In 1848, the year of revolutions, the discontented middle class, unable to rouse the Church-and-State governments of the day from their bondage to custom, caste, and law by appeals to morality or constitutional agitation for Liberal reforms, made common cause with the starving wage-working class, and resorted to armed rebellion, which ...
— The Perfect Wagnerite - A Commentary on the Niblung's Ring • George Bernard Shaw

... diversity of opinion as to what was meant by resumption. The commercial and banking classes generally treated resumption as if it involved the payment and cancellation of United States notes and all forms of government money except coin and bank notes. Another class was opposed to resumption, and favored a large issue of paper money without any promise or expectation of redemption in coin. The body of the people, I believe, agreed with me in opinion that resumption meant, not the cancellation and withdrawal ...
— Recollections of Forty Years in the House, Senate and Cabinet - An Autobiography. • John Sherman

... Protestant-Irish descent, in the Abbeville District in South Carolina. He was not a patrician, according to the ideas of rich planters. He had but a slender school education in boyhood, but was prepared for college by a Presbyterian clergyman, entered the Junior Class of Yale College in 1802, and was graduated with high honors. He chose the law for his profession, studied laboriously for three years, spending eighteen months at the then famous law school at Litchfield, Connecticut, and gave great promise, in his remarkable logical ...
— Beacon Lights of History, Volume XII • John Lord

... following day, a real festival of the people, if ever a festival deserved the name. The people themselves attend and arrange it; and if representatives of the upper classes appear on this occasion, they may do so only in their capacity as members of the populace. There is no possibility of class discrimination; at least there was none some ...
— The German Classics of The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Vol. VI. • Editor-in-Chief: Kuno Francke

... social entertainments had frequent sing-songs and "buck dances"—that is, dances in which there were no ladies to take part—at Faahan's Club Hotel in the town, some one and a half miles distant. "Hotel" was rather too high-class a name, for it was by no means an imposing structure, hessian and corrugated iron taking the place of the bricks and slates of a more civilised building. The addition of a weather-board front, which was subsequently erected, greatly enhanced ...
— Spinifex and Sand - Five Years' Pioneering and Exploration in Western Australia • David W Carnegie

... Nowhere is class privilege more appreciated and more jealously guarded than in the sergeants' mess. It is the most enclusive of all military circles. Realising this, Barry was glad to accept the invitation. The hut was filled with sergeants in easy deshabille, ...
— The Sky Pilot in No Man's Land • Ralph Connor

... of a simpler and swifter mode of writing is felt by all who have much writing to do—by newspaper men, by legal gentlemen, by clergymen, by students in taking class lectures and making notes of many things valuable for future "refreshment," authors and scientific men in ...
— Miss Dexie - A Romance of the Provinces • Stanford Eveleth

... who, like Topsy, merely 'growed' without pedigree as a pauper in a village of the upper Hudson, about eighty-five years ago, there descended 673 children, grandchildren and great grandchildren, of whom 200 were criminals of the dangerous class, 280 adult paupers, and 50 prostitutes, while 300 children of her lineage died prematurely. The last fact proves to what extent in this family nature was kind to the rest of humanity in saving it from a still larger aggregation or undesirable and costly members, ...
— Searchlights on Health - The Science of Eugenics • B. G. Jefferis and J. L. Nichols

... country yielding them nothing, no money, no clothes, no provisions,—for they were nothing but militia. They were not enrolled on the Continental pay list. That they should seek the field at all, thus circumstanced, will be ever a wonder to that class of philosophers who found their systems upon the simple doctrine ...
— The Life of Francis Marion • William Gilmore Simms

... treachery; the climbing plant strangles the tree, the desert-sand chokes the meadows, stars fall from heaven, and earthquakes swallow up cities. You believe in the gods—and so do I after my own fashion—and if they have so ordered the course of this life in every class of existence that the strong triumph over the weak, why should not I use my strength, why let it be fettered by those much-belauded soporifics which our prudent ancestors concocted to cool the hot blood of such men as I, and to paralyze our ...
— Uarda • Georg Ebers

... much impressed by the opportunity that lies before students as a class in this matter. In most of our universities and colleges men and women meet in the freest way, and they only and for themselves can discover how this new kind of life is best conducted. College rules and regulations are not ...
— Men, Women, and God • A. Herbert Gray

... and Liberal Trade Unions; Federation of Belgian Industries; numerous other associations representing bankers, manufacturers, middle-class artisans, and the legal and medical professions; various organizations represent the cultural interests of Flanders and Wallonia; various peace groups such as Pax Christi and ...
— The 2005 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency

... themselves—the class from which you make your pick of troopers—clearly according to the law you are bound to enrol "the ablest" you can find "in point of wealth and bodily physique"; and "if not by persuasion, then by prosecution ...
— The Cavalry General • Xenophon

... ("lean and hungry Cassiuses,") and who have double pupils in their eyes, or in one eye a double pupil and in the other the figure of a horse. Perhaps Mr. Squeers and all of his kind come within this class, as having more than one pupil always in their eye,—but, specially, this rule would seem to warn us against jockey schoolmasters, with a horse in one eye and several pupils in the other. Those, too, are dangerous, according to Didymus, who have hollow, pit-like ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 5, No. 32, June, 1860 • Various

... fellow in our bay asked last night how much an admiral's pay was a month and when we told him he yawned, turned over on his side and said, "Not enough." He added that he could pick up that much at a first-class parade any time. We all tightened our wrist watches. Been blinking at the blinker all evening. Can't make much sense out of it. The bloomin' thing is always two blinks ahead of me. It's all very nice, I dare say, but I'd much rather get my messages on scented paper. I got one to-day. ...
— Biltmore Oswald - The Diary of a Hapless Recruit • J. Thorne Smith, Jr.

... character of the circulation of HARPER'S YOUNG PEOPLE will render it a first-class medium for advertising. A limited number of approved advertisements will be inserted on two inside pages ...
— Harper's Young People, May 4, 1880 - An Illustrated Weekly • Various

... Revolutionary Era. How much of the nation's energy then went forth in justifiable discontent and futile efforts at repression has already appeared. Up to the year 1798 the struggle against France was largely one of the governing class against a nation; and for this the King and the British oligarchy, not Pitt, were responsible. Personal charm and the magnetic gift of evoking enthusiasm have in some monarchs counterbalanced defects of narrowness and intolerance. George was not deficient in courtly grace and tact—witness ...
— William Pitt and the Great War • John Holland Rose

... such men as were neither now nor ever likely to become so. The two last classes, being separated from the first, were not to exercise their functions, but were lodged in separate houses; those of the second class were instructed in the doctrine, but the third only in the practice of piety. As this could not but be very expensive, the good people opened their purses and contributed liberally. The Cardinal was so disturbed when he heard of it that he ...
— The Memoirs of Cardinal de Retz, Complete • Jean Francois Paul de Gondi, Cardinal de Retz

... aroused, and the cause of England was generally held to be just. The landed gentry and the professions of the Church, the army, and the law were strongly on the king's side. Self-interest largely decided the attitude of the mercantile class: some of its members were opposed to the war because it injured their trade; others were in favour of it; for trade generally was brisk and was increased by the demands brought by war. In London and Bristol the opposition had ...
— The Political History of England - Vol. X. • William Hunt

... reputed, "Old Sauerkraut" (this was the name he got behind his back) had spies in all the companies, the adage about listeners was abundantly confirmed. In the secrecy of Jack's tent, however, the subject was freely discussed. Nick Marsh, the poet of the class, as became the mystic tendencies of his tribe, was for poisoning the detested Pomeranian—Oswald was a compatriot of Bismarck, often boasting, as the then slowly emerging statesman became more widely ...
— The Iron Game - A Tale of the War • Henry Francis Keenan

... He "takened lessons in Byrdstown," and being especially fond of singing hymns, he acquired the name of "The Singing Elder." He teaches a Sunday School class and did even before he went to war. He admits smilingly that his fight with "small politicians" who wanted to use him and his war record was a worse battle than that of the Argonne Forest. Alvin York married his childhood sweetheart, Gracie Williams, upon returning from war, and the Governor ...
— Blue Ridge Country • Jean Thomas

... at the top of his class. His mental powers were now thoroughly awakened, his mind was quick, his memory retentive, and he soon out-distanced all competitors. Every evening during the session he had found his way into the carpenter's ...
— The Story of Garfield - Farm-boy, Soldier, and President • William G. Rutherford

... a struggle, an avalanche of baggage, and Godfrey found himself in the arms of Miss Ogilvy in a reserved first-class carriage. From those kind supporting arms he slid gently and slowly ...
— Love Eternal • H. Rider Haggard

... wide-awake off, the same fine, soft, black hair came to light—here, worn rather long and curly—the same glittering black eyes, ivory-white skin, short, straight nose; and, as he gazed, an offshoot of Mahony's consciousness wondered from what quarter this middle-class English family fetched its ...
— Australia Felix • Henry Handel Richardson



Words linked to "Class" :   subclass Acnidosporidia, subclass Teleostei, class Phaeophyceae, adult education, pigeonhole, histocompatibility complex, phylum, Pantotheria, class Amphibia, Teleostei, subclass Liliidae, class-action suit, class Tiliomycetes, class Hirudinea, Phytomastigina, subdivision Ginkgophyta, Asteridae, dichotomize, elective course, Turbellaria, Gnetophytina, class Sporozoa, class Cyanophyceae, Asteroidea, course of study, class Filicopsida, subclass Caryophyllidae, class Bryopsida, class Psilotatae, subclass Actinopoda, class Coniferopsida, first-class, class Dicotyledonae, class Placodermi, class Merostomata, subclass Asteridae, first-class honours degree, Copepoda, Monocotyledonae, firing line, Deuteromycetes, class Hepaticae, junior class, unitise, class Pteridospermopsida, class Pyrenomycetes, Phasmidia, class list, class Tentaculata, middle class, size, class war, Lycopsida, Ulvophyceae, class Thaliacea, society, Thaliacea, Opisthobranchia, didactics, first class, Coniferopsida, class structure, class Lamellibranchia, childbirth-preparation class, class Diplopoda, categorize, class Symphyla, subclass Archaeornithes, graduating class, Dibranchia, Magnoliidae, family, lower-class, class Ciliophora, estate, trade, Euglenophyceae, group, class Charophyceae, class Ulvophyceae, class Chlorophyceae, second class, conference, Dicotyledones, class Pauropoda, reclassify, Lepidosauria, Malacostraca, Anapsida, education, class Dicotyledones, grade, Pinopsida, woman, workshop, subdivision Coniferophytina, class Crinoidea, compare, Symphyla, Chilopoda, economy class, Gnetophyta, class Osteichthyes, correspondence course, subclass Dibranchiata, class Gnetopsida, Pauropoda, class Insecta, class Myxomycetes, Taxophytina, class Anthoceropsida, second-class, course session, Cirripedia, Liliopsida, lecture, woodwind family, shop, upper class, subclass Anapsida, amphibia, unitize, Metatheria, superclass Myriapoda, Myriapoda, Gnathostomata, Anthozoa, Mastigophora, superphylum, subclass Zoomastigina, subclass Hamamelidae, class Cestoda, class Holothuroidea, demimonde, Eumycetes, directed study, subclass Archosauria, Holothuroidea, subclass Pantotheria, middle-class, Pteridospermopsida, educational activity, Ciliophora, Elasmobranchii, subclass Dipnoi, Ascomycetes, class period, subdivision Ginkgophytina, Telosporidia, Polychaeta, gathering, class Flagellata, subclass Branchiopoda, Infusoria, conjugation, division Anthophyta, first-class mail, class Larvacea, class Eumycetes, subclass Crossopterygii, propaedeutics, course of lectures, subdivision Taxophytina, Hymenomycetes, orientation course, lesson, denomination, estate of the realm, Agnatha, classy, subdivision Gnetophytina, sergeant first class, master class, subclass Dibranchia, elegance, Rosidae, extension course, stratum, class struggle, lecturing, class Actinozoa, market, seminar, class action, course of instruction, Bacillariophyceae, cabin class, third class, subclass Copepoda, immigrant class, Tentaculata, subclass Phytomastigina, Hexapoda, instruction, Arachnida, subclass Ophiurida, Cnidosporidia, class fellow, class Polyplacophora, Echinoidea, subclass Amphineura, Arecidae, assemblage, Oomycetes, upper-class, class Myriapoda, class Lycopodineae, Pyrenomycetes, division Magnoliophyta, Cestoda, Charophyceae, class Trematoda, class Zygomycetes, class Psilopsida, closed-class word, class Arachnida, ruling class, class Cryptophyceae, class Sarcodina, Hemiascomycetes, Crustacea, Aves, Zygomycetes, class Scaphopoda, womanhood, superclass Gnathostomata, class Mastigophora, subclass Infusoria, class Gasteromycetes, class Pinopsida, Placodermi, class Cyanobacteria, refer, stamp, Psilopsida, Liliidae, syntactic category, Trematoda, home study, subclass Dilleniidae, biology, class Polychaeta, catalog, Euryalida, form, teaching, fair sex, class Schizomycetes, grammatical category, Dicotyledonae, Gymnospermae, Zoomastigina, Hyalospongiae, sort out, class Oomycetes, class Hexapoda, Filicinae, Hemimetabola, 1st-class mail, proletariat, form class, Cryptophyceae, Cycadophytina, Euascomycetes, Magnoliophyta, Archosauria, working class, substitution class, class Ophiuroidea, division Gymnospermophyta, class act, class Taxopsida, class Bacillariophyceae, sophomore class, class Sphenopsida, class Pelecypoda, class Angiospermae, Sporozoa, Dipnoi, Lycopodineae, Ciliata, Branchiopoda, booboisie, division, taxon, third-class mail, Hepaticae, class Deuteromycetes, Crossopterygii, class Monocotyledones, socio-economic class, class Monocotyledonae, Heterobasidiomycetes, taxonomic category, underworld, Reptilia, class Mammalia, subclass Euascomycetes, Basidiomycetes, Homobasidiomycetes, center, class Ciliata, class Cycadopsida, working-class, subclass Rosidae, class Ginkgophytina, Sarcodina, separate, subdivision Cycadophyta, subclass Eutheria, class Ascidiaceae, class Aves, Amphineura, craft, ranalian complex, stereotype, elective, old school, Gasteromycetes, subclass Ostracoda, subclass Cnidosporidia, upper-middle-class, Exopterygota, Psilotatae, Chlorophyceae, assort, the three estates, sort, Equisetatae, open-class word, Alismatidae, subclass Entomostraca, subclass Metatheria, Crinoidea, Chondrichthyes, 1st class, violin family, Ophiuroidea, Ascidiaceae, class Turbellaria, Actinozoa



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