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Change   Listen
noun
Change  n.  
1.
Any variation or alteration; a passing from one state or form to another; as, a change of countenance; a change of habits or principles. "Apprehensions of a change of dynasty." "All the days of my appointed time will I wait, till my change come."
2.
A succesion or substitution of one thing in the place of another; a difference; novelty; variety; as, a change of seasons. "Our fathers did for change to France repair." "The ringing grooves of change."
3.
A passing from one phase to another; as, a change of the moon.
4.
Alteration in the order of a series; permutation.
5.
That which makes a variety, or may be substituted for another. "Thirty change (R.V. changes) of garments."
6.
Small money; the money by means of which the larger coins and bank bills are made available in small dealings; hence, the balance returned when payment is tendered by a coin or note exceeding the sum due.
7.
A place where merchants and others meet to transact business; a building appropriated for mercantile transactions. (Colloq. for Exchange.)
8.
A public house; an alehouse. (Scot.) "They call an alehouse a change."
9.
(Mus.) Any order in which a number of bells are struck, other than that of the diatonic scale. "Four bells admit twenty-four changes in ringing."
Change of life, the period in the life of a woman when menstruation and the capacity for conception cease, usually occurring between forty-five and fifty years of age.
Change ringing, the continual production, without repetition, of changes on bells, See def. 9. above.
Change wheel (Mech.), one of a set of wheels of different sizes and number of teeth, that may be changed or substituted one for another in machinery, to produce a different but definite rate of angular velocity in an axis, as in cutting screws, gear, etc.
To ring the changes on, to present the same facts or arguments in variety of ways.
Synonyms: Variety; variation; alteration; mutation; transition; vicissitude; innovation; novelty; transmutation; revolution; reverse.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Change" Quotes from Famous Books



... to his own nature, the master will benefit by freedom more than the freed-man. And just as the negro will never take the highest places in civilisation yet need not to be confined to the lowest, so, he argues, it will be with women.] "Nature's old salique law will never be repealed, and no change of dynasty will be effected," [although] "whatever argument justifies a given education for all boys justifies its application to girls ...
— The Life and Letters of Thomas Henry Huxley Volume 1 • Leonard Huxley

... sproporzionata' of Vasari is not, then, merely the wasting away of former leonine strength into thin rigidities of death? There is another change going on at the same time,—body ...
— Val d'Arno • John Ruskin

... and beasts, and honest, shrewd philosophizing as to what it all meant for him, an American. Here is a man content to take a walk, fill his mind with observation, and then come home to think. Repeat the walk, repeat or vary the observation, change or expand the thought, and you have Thoreau. No wonder he brought his first edition home, not seriously depleted, and made his library of it! Thoreau needs excerpting to be popular. Most nature books do. But not ...
— Definitions • Henry Seidel Canby

... international agreements: party to : Biodiversity, Climate Change, Endangered Species, Hazardous Wastes, Law of the Sea, Ozone Layer Protection, Wetlands signed, but not ...
— The 1997 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency.

... official approached Mr. Vard, who was looking vainly through the collection of books in the library for something he cared to read, and informed him, with many apologies, that it would be necessary for him to change his stateroom. Just what was wrong with No. 514 it was impossible to say; but it could not be denied that there was a bad odour there, whose source had not been discovered, and the only alternative seemed to be to shut it up until the end of ...
— The Destroyer - A Tale of International Intrigue • Burton Egbert Stevenson

... habit. Occasionally, quite by accident, they managed to achieve the same restaurant and the same table, but it was not a matter of prearrangement. Indeed, Starratt had always prided himself at his ability to keep Brauer at arm's length. A subtle change had occurred. Was it possible that a borrowed five-dollar bill could so reshape a relationship? Well, he would pay him back once he received his monthly salary, and get over with the obligation. His monthly ...
— Broken to the Plow • Charles Caldwell Dobie

... was silent, for there was a tangle of thoughts in my mind, and behind it all a vague, uncomfortable sense that I was come to judgment. From this sprang a sudden resolve to change the subject, which was unpleasant to me in more senses than one. So I said, after the ...
— Mad Shepherds - and Other Human Studies • L. P. Jacks

... the sadness of the leave-taking; and the receipt of many gifts, telegrams, and letters keeps up the excitement until after the departure of the pilot. But as the shore line recedes and we drift out to sea, there comes a realization of an entire change of environment and of the rending of former interests, which is, of itself, a fine preparation for the mental equipment necessary to assimilate the new ...
— Travels in the Far East • Ellen Mary Hayes Peck

... go to Dunkirk this afternoon and while I was there I heard that the Lusitania had been torpedoed and sunk with 1,600 souls on board her. What change will this make in the situation? Is America any use to us except in the matter of supplies, and are we not getting these through as it is? A nation like that ought to have an ...
— My War Experiences in Two Continents • Sarah Macnaughtan

... view in Porto Rico, and the general cultivation of the land, may powerfully contribute to purify the atmosphere and render it salubrious to man. The only difference of temperature to be observed throughout the island is due to altitude, a change which is common to every country under the ...
— The Story of the Philippines and Our New Possessions, • Murat Halstead

... your husband for keeping away from home so much lately? I see him everywhere but here," said Bernardo, willing to change the subject. ...
— Romola • George Eliot

... bad callin' neither!" returned Borkins with a grin. "But I knew you wasn't what you said you was, in a manner of speakin'. And if it 'adn't been for all this unpleasantness, it would 'ave bin a nice little change for yer, wouldn't it? Sorry to see the last of you, sirs, I am that. And that young gentleman of your'n. But I must say I'm glad to be ...
— The Riddle of the Frozen Flame • Mary E. Hanshew

... aside, and offered him a young fan-tail pigeon, when his long-expected brood was hatched, to change desks, if the teacher's permission could be obtained. Meanwhile Napoleon Nott, who generally was called Notty, and who had more imagination than all the rest of the boys combined, remarked, "I believe he's a foreign prince ...
— Harper's Young People, September 14, 1880 - An Illustrated Weekly • Various

... said, in his thin, old, highbred voice. "Much of your unhappiness was of your own making. You, and you only, know how much. But nothing that you have said can change the situation. I am merely compelled to make the decision alone, and soon. ...
— Long Live the King • Mary Roberts Rinehart

... Barlow "The History of the Two Dogs," which shows how vain it is to expect courage in those who lead a life of indolence and repose, and that constant exercise and proper discipline are frequently able to change contemptible ...
— The World's Greatest Books, Vol III • Arthur Mee and J.A. Hammerton, Eds.

... a book from beginning to end, more often he glanced through it, turning a dozen pages at a time, and then pushed it on one side with a gesture displaying the contempt that was not shown by any change of expression. ...
— The Wonder • J. D. Beresford

... my letter Mrs. Stannard speaks of Mrs. Truscott as being so bright and well, and of their having such good times together, and being so charmed with Miss Sanford. It hardly seems there could have been so sudden a change in one day." ...
— Marion's Faith. • Charles King

... hosses first, but they wasn't enough change in it, then I went to Frisco an' give the dry-goods business a work-out. I tried the real estate business next; but, Spider, you'll be surprised to learn that I made more money out o' goats an' chickens than any ...
— Happy Hawkins • Robert Alexander Wason

... to observe the form of the waist (evidently innocent of corsets and tight dresses) of this model woman, and also that of the Greek Slave in the accompanying outlines. These forms are such as unperverted nature and the highest art alike require. To compress the waist, and thereby change its form, pushing the ribs inward, displacing the vital organs, and preventing the due expansion of the lungs, is as destructive to beauty as it ...
— Searchlights on Health: Light on Dark Corners • B.G. Jefferis

... silvery veils, Those sunny locks elude the sight,— Oh, not even then their glory fails To haunt me with its unseen light. Change as thy beauty may, It ...
— The Complete Poems of Sir Thomas Moore • Thomas Moore et al

... willing to give you to me. You know, dear, it is easier sometimes for a man to talk to another of his private worries, than to a woman, even the one nearest and dearest to him in all the world. I may possibly be of assistance to him. You told me last night that the change in him had been coming on gradually for several months. When did it first occur to you that he was ...
— The Crevice • William John Burns and Isabel Ostrander

... out of the question. The son chose, therefore, to make his mark as a man of learning. He would be a great philosopher or scientist. Doubtless he kept in mind the possibility of engaging in journalism, should the times change, and becoming a tribune of the people. Such bold ideas are the birthright ...
— The German Classics of The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Vol. X. • Kuno Francke

... I liked seeing the sea, and I do love rushing through the country in a motor; but I enjoyed the Tower very much, and I shall enjoy the Houses of Parliament next Saturday all the more for having had a change in between. Besides, it was delightful to get out of that awful fog; we could not have done anything to-day if we had stayed in London except sit in this little room with the gas lit. It was ...
— A City Schoolgirl - And Her Friends • May Baldwin

... of his experienced generals, and that Moritz von Dessau had implored him to put his army in another position, before attacking the enemy. He remembered the prince saying to him—"It would be impossible for an attack from this point to succeed," and his entreating him to draw back and change his position. He remembered, also, his riding up to the prince, with his naked sword, and inquiring, in a threatening tone, "whether he meant to obey or not?" And Prince Moritz von Dessau had obeyed; his prophecy had been ...
— Frederick The Great and His Family • L. Muhlbach

... Mandy. You'se a good gal in you'se way, but, law! you'se had yer spell. A culled gemmen kin change his min' when he sees ...
— Taken Alive • E. P. Roe

... Eustachius, himself an able discoverer, could join in the cry, it is no wonder if a lower soul, like that of Sylvius, led it open-mouthed. He was a mean, covetous, bad man, as George Buchanan well knew; and, according to his nature, he wrote a furious book, 'Ad Vesani calumnias depulsandas.' The punning change of Vesalius into Vesanus (madman) was but a fair and gentle stroke for a polemic, in days in which those who could not kill their enemies with steel or powder, held themselves justified in doing so, if possible, ...
— Health and Education • Charles Kingsley

... after half a century. He is astonished to find instead of his smooth-shorn boy's head an old bald pate with an ugly snout and savage bristles like a hedgehog; but he is still more astonished at the change in Rome. Lucrine oysters, formerly a wedding dish, are now everyday fare; for which, accordingly, the bankrupt glutton silently prepares the incendiary torch. While formerly the father disposed of his boy, ...
— The History of Rome (Volumes 1-5) • Theodor Mommsen

... belong to the United States, they shall not be retired, cancelled, or destroyed, but they shall be re-issued and paid out again and kept in circulation." When this Act was passed there were $346,681,016 of United States notes outstanding, and there has been no change in ...
— American Eloquence, Volume IV. (of 4) - Studies In American Political History (1897) • Various

... who is not able to change the ideas of the group and to make the herd follow, is annihilated and deserves annihilation. In the human economy he is only harmful ...
— The Bride of Dreams • Frederik van Eeden

... not what, nor where—ensued, Thrilling the sleeping solitude. The soldier cried: "Halt! Who goes there?" The answer came: "Death—in the air." "Advance, Death—give the countersign, Or perish if you cross that line!" To change his tone Death thought it wise— Reminded him they 'd been allies Against the Russ, the Frank, the Turk, In many a bloody bit of work. "In short," said he, "in every weather We've soldiered, you and I, together." The sentry would not let him pass. "Go back," he ...
— Shapes of Clay • Ambrose Bierce

... instantly to change his mind. "Stay!" He considered, his chin in his hand, his eyes dreamy. "Better not, perhaps. Better not tell anybody. Let us keep this to ourselves for the present. It has no direct bearing on the matter to be tried. By the way, when does ...
— The Snare • Rafael Sabatini

... as to prevent unevenness of shade. Wool and silk dyes cannot be used for cotton and linen, nor the reverse. Of course cloth already colored cannot be dyed a lighter shade of the same color and the original shade must be very light to enable one to change the color, say from red to blue, etc. The original color always modifies that of the dye somewhat and it is best to experiment first with a small portion of the dye and cloth. Rather dark shades are ...
— Textiles and Clothing • Kate Heintz Watson

... change in her tone? The letter gave me the strongest impression of a new, warm, almost anxious interest on her part. My fancies, as first at Wampsocket, began to play all sorts of singular pranks: sometimes she was rich and of an old family, sometimes moderately poor and ...
— Stories by American Authors, Volume 1 • Various

... stood before them in the dusk and saw on their countenances an incredible change of expression, he naturally mistook it, and spoke again ...
— The Reign of Law - A Tale of the Kentucky Hemp Fields • James Lane Allen

... the sores healed. After breakfast the king called me to go boating, when I used my grass throne, to the annoyance of the attendants. This induced the king to say before them, laughing, "Bana, you see, is not to be done; he is accustomed to sit before kings, and sit he will." Then by way of a change, he ordered all the drums to embark and play upon the waters; whilst he and his attendants paddled and steered by turns, first up the creek, and then down nearly to the broad waters ...
— The Discovery of the Source of the Nile • John Hanning Speke

... briefly, but with great earnestness and emotion, on the loss they had sustained, and the awful suddenness of death, urging upon all the necessity of preparation, as none knew the day nor hour when the change ...
— St. Nicholas Magazine for Boys and Girls, V. 5, April 1878 - Scribner's Illustrated • Various

... left that train in the big crowded depot at Edmonton next day, winter had descended upon the greater part of North America. The change was the more marked for Jan by reason that snow had come to Edmonton a full day earlier than it came to Lambert's Siding. Jan had seen snow before on the Sussex Downs; but that had been a kind of snow quite different from this. That snow had been soft and clammy. This ...
— Jan - A Dog and a Romance • A. J. Dawson

... regularly devote a small percentage of their time to accusing each other of mixing metaphors or announcing that they are themselves about to do so (What a mixture of metaphors! If we may mix our metaphors. To change the metaphor), the offence apparently being not to mix them, but to be unaware that you have done it. The odd thing is that, whether he is on the offensive or the defensive, the writer who ventures to talk of mixing metaphors often ...
— Tract XI: Three Articles on Metaphor • Society for Pure English

... Return Visitin' Nurses' association, composed entirely iv victims iv th' parent plant. 'Twill be worth lookin' at to see th' ladies fr'm th' stock yards r-rushin' into some wretched home down in Peerary avenue, grabbin' th' misthress iv th' house be th' shouldhers an' makin' her change her onhealthy silk dhress f'r a pink wrapper, shovelin' in a little ashes to sprinkle on th' flure, breakin' th' furniture an' rollin' th' baby in th' coal box. What th' r-rich needs is intilligint ...
— Mr. Dooley's Philosophy • Finley Peter Dunne

... Brocas. The sight of those well-equipped men-at-arms, all loyal and full of affectionate enthusiasm for their youthful lord, showed these rude retainers how greatly to their advantage would be this change of masters; and before Gaston had dismounted and walked across the courtyard towards the portal of the Castle, he felt, with a swelling of the heart that Raymond well understood, that Saut ...
— In the Days of Chivalry • Evelyn Everett-Green

... cultivated while the plants are small. After they begin to shade the ground, they need but little hoeing or plowing. 7. The moisture and earthy matter, drawn through the roots, become sap. This passes through the stalk, and enters the leaves. There a great change takes place which results in the starting of the ears and the growth of the grain. 8. The maize plant bears two kinds of flowers,—male and female. The two are widely separated. The male flowers are ...
— McGuffey's Third Eclectic Reader • William Holmes McGuffey

... mankind's better half—"varium et mutabile semper femina"—might have been written of this fickle shape of rock and ice and vapor. One tries vainly, year after year, to define it in his own mind. The daily, hourly change of distance, size and aspect, tricks which the Indian's mountain {p.018} god plays with the puny creatures swarming more and more about his foot; his days of frank neighborliness, his swift transformations from smiles to anger, his fits of sullenness and ...
— The Mountain that was 'God' • John H. Williams

... and the greater part of the colonies had fallen into the hands of the English. San Domingo, the most important of them all, after throwing off the yoke of the whites, had continued the American revolution, which having commenced in the English colonies, was to end in those of Spain, and change the colonies of the new world into independent states. The blacks of San Domingo wished to maintain, with respect to the mother country, the freedom which they had acquired from the colonists, and to defend themselves against the ...
— History of the French Revolution from 1789 to 1814 • F. A. M. Mignet

... finally concluded that Van Bibber was poor and couldn't afford any more, which, as it happened to be more or less true, worried that young gentleman; so much so, indeed, that when the waiter brought him a check for fifteen cents, Van Bibber handed him a half-dollar and told him to "keep the change." ...
— Van Bibber and Others • Richard Harding Davis

... creature in confinement. Nuts and fruits of all kinds it eagerly devours, as well as bread, cake and potatoes. It manifests no hesitation at a meal of rabbit, rat, squirrel, or bird, and rather likes it for a change, and when he can partake of a dessert of honey or molasses his enjoyment knows no bounds. Frogs, fresh water clams, green corn, and a host of other delicacies come within the range of his diet, and he may sometimes be seen digging from the sand the eggs of the ...
— Camp Life in the Woods and the Tricks of Trapping and Trap Making • William Hamilton Gibson

... droned on, those three wiseacres—two oldish gentlemen and a middle-aged man, thinking they could change or check or dam the course of true love. While inside at the piano on the tide of music that was washing in from God only knows what bourne where words are useless and passions speak the primitive language of souls, Lila and Kenyon were solving all the problems set for ...
— In the Heart of a Fool • William Allen White

... out already?" The change in subject was not so unexpected as might appear. Like most millionaires, the magnate kept closer account of his expenditures than ...
— A Man of Two Countries • Alice Harriman

... not, we may begin to suspect the life does not suit you. But what I want specially to urge is that there's no use in comparing one's feelings between one day and the next; you must allow a reasonable interval, for the direction of change ...
— The Life and Letters of Lewis Carroll • Stuart Dodgson Collingwood

... the first place, if he gained control, he would have no desire to change it; in the second, my Executive Committee is made up of men of too high principle to permit him or any other man to operate the Companies upon other ...
— The Lever - A Novel • William Dana Orcutt

... means of my father were by no means sufficient to support two establishments, his family invariably attended him wherever he went, so that from my infancy I was accustomed to travelling and wandering, and looked upon a monthly change of scene and residence as a matter of course. Sometimes we lived in barracks, sometimes in lodgings, but generally in the former, always eschewing the latter from motives of economy, save when the barracks were inconvenient and uncomfortable; and they must ...
— Lavengro - The Scholar, The Gypsy, The Priest • George Borrow

... I can assure you. I should change places with you any time." In my heart I remarked, "Yes, I am worth a hundred thousand dollars, while he is probably struggling to make a living, but I can beat him at his own intellectual game, too, even if he ...
— The Rise of David Levinsky • Abraham Cahan

... to her all these years a boy in an Eton suit, should now present himself as a grown man. But for all that the transformation had something of the effect of a conjuring-trick. It was not only the alteration in his appearance that startled her: it was the amazing change in his personality. Wally Mason had been the bete noire of her childhood. She had never failed to look back at the episode of the garden-hose with the feeling that she had acted well, that—however she might have strayed in those ...
— The Little Warrior - (U.K. Title: Jill the Reckless) • P. G. Wodehouse

... widowhood had, in a subtle way, softened these little angularities of her spiritual contour. And bodily, the curves of her slim figure had become more rounded. She was no longer the young Diana of a year ago. The change into the gracious woman who had passed through the joy and the sorrow of life was obvious even to me, to whom it had been all but imperceptibly gradual. After a while she rarely spoke of her husband. The name of Leonard Boyce was never mentioned between us. With her as with me, the weeks ...
— The Red Planet • William J. Locke

... just powers from the consent of the governed"—it is a manifest violation of the Supreme Law of the land for males to govern females without their consent; and therefore do we demand, of the people of New York, such a change in the Constitution of the State, as will secure to women the right of suffrage which is now so ...
— History of Woman Suffrage, Volume I • Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Matilda Joslyn Gage

... children to school, daily in summer, twice a week in winter. Frederick the Great at the close of the Seven Years' War, 1764, insisted again upon compulsory school attendance, and prescribed books, studies, and discipline. At the beginning of the nineteenth century began a great change in the primary schools due to the influence of Pestalozzi, and in the secondary schools owing to the efforts of Herder, Frederic August Wolf, William Humboldt, and Suenern. Humboldt was the Prussian minister ...
— Germany and the Germans - From an American Point of View (1913) • Price Collier

... you know," she answered, in a low voice. "More, I think, than I know. How are such things to be measured, put into words? You have effected some change in me which defies analysis, a change of attitude,—to attempt to dogmatize it would ruin it. I prefer to leave it undefined—not even to call it an acquisition of faith. I have faith," she said, simply, "in what you have become, and which has made you dare, superbly, to cast ...
— The Crossing • Winston Churchill

... see. What made her change her mind so suddenly? You say, or you gather from what Mr. Ellery told you, that she had all but agreed to marry him. She cares for him, that's sure. Then, all at once, she throws him over and accepts Nat. Of course her uncle's sudden seizure was a shock and he wanted Nat ...
— Keziah Coffin • Joseph C. Lincoln

... that he was ready for breakfast. He always breakfasted alone with a heap of newspapers around him, and so he did on this day. He soon found the paragraph alluding to himself in the 'Pulpit,' and read it without a quiver in his face or the slightest change in his colour. There was no one to see him now,—but he was acting under a resolve that at no moment, either when alone, or in a crowd, or when suddenly called upon for words,—not even when the policemen with their first hints of arrest should come ...
— The Way We Live Now • Anthony Trollope

... slight change in our arrangements, rather for the better, by hiring a large boat for ourselves and handing our own over to the servants and ...
— Diary of a Pedestrian in Cashmere and Thibet • by William Henry Knight

... he, "much of this blessed change is already wrought. No one in my city of Tronyem now fears the angry and cunning fire-giant Loke; but every citizen closes his eyes in peace when he hears the midnight cry of the watch, 'Except the Lord keep the city, the watchman waketh but in vain.' [The watchman's call in the towns of Norway.] ...
— Feats on the Fiord - The third book in "The Playfellow" • Harriet Martineau

... one to General Joubert; but, needless to say, I did not indulge in much hope of the result, for I was firmly convinced that the Boer authorities regarded me as a kind of hostage, who would make a pleasing addition to the collection of prisoners they were forming against a change of fortune. I therefore continued to search for a path of escape; and indeed it was just as well that I did so, for I never received any answer to either of my applications while I was a prisoner, although I have since heard that one arrived by a curious coincidence the very day ...
— London to Ladysmith via Pretoria • Winston Spencer Churchill

... influence of any change in external conditions by observing the modifications it produces in ...
— Response in the Living and Non-Living • Jagadis Chunder Bose

... importance of the manner of doing it. "Man wears a special dress to kill, to govern, to judge, to preach, to mourn, to play. In every age the fashion in which he retains or discards some portion of this dress denotes a subtle change in his feelings." All visible things are emblematic of invisible forces. Man fixed the association of colours with grief and gladness, he made ornaments the insignia of office, he ordained that fabric should ...
— Americans and Others • Agnes Repplier

... So the change already had started here! The unfamiliar books were gone and that fitted in the pattern ... for it would be the least familiar things that would ...
— The Street That Wasn't There • Clifford Donald Simak

... IN ROTTEN ROW.—There is no change as yet in Mr. Pulvertoft's condition. The unfortunate gentleman is still lying unconscious at his rooms in Park Street; and his medical attendants fear that, even if he recovers his physical strength, the ...
— The Talking Horse - And Other Tales • F. Anstey

... he was continuing. He was regretting that he had been wearing what he could not be describing. He was seeing what he would not be wearing and seeing what he would not be wearing he was improving in aspiring. He did wear something and he did change the way of wearing that thing and he did then clearly describe that he was wearing what he was wearing in the way he wore what he wore. He did wear something and wearing something he was attacking what he would be wearing if he wore what he could wear. He was not attacking ...
— Matisse Picasso and Gertrude Stein - With Two Shorter Stories • Gertrude Stein

... came when the house was finally closed and the old life was at an end. Lester traveled with Jennie to Sandwood. He spent some little while in the house trying to get her used to the idea of change—it was not so bad. He intimated that he would come again soon, but he went away, and all his words were as nothing against the fact of the actual and spiritual separation. When Jennie saw him going down the brick walk that afternoon, his solid, conservative ...
— Jennie Gerhardt - A Novel • Theodore Dreiser

... high was it, that a very respectable gentleman, sitting not far from Smooth, bowed, and suggested that the little Lord Mayor must have mistaken the present company for his dining senate. 'Now,' continued his worship, emphatically, 'nothing could more happily 'ave affected a change in my mind, than the beholding with my own eyes the lovely fair ones and respectable persons here present. To that great country, Hamerica, shall I hereafter look for the noblest results to civilization and mankind. ...
— The Adventures of My Cousin Smooth • Timothy Templeton

... words. But the change did not clearly indicate to her mother what was passing in her mind. From that moment she met with silence nearly every thing that ...
— Home Lights and Shadows • T. S. Arthur

... the unanimous opinion, and a few minutes later the young people had all sought their beds, leaving instructions with the physician and the servants that they were to be called if any change for the worse occurred ...
— The Broncho Rider Boys with Funston at Vera Cruz - Or, Upholding the Honor of the Stars and Stripes • Frank Fowler

... instance of the truth of this lament, one may make some quotations from Mr. Campbell's valuable article, "The Transvaal, Old and New." He says, "The advent of British folk and British gold and brains led to a change, and land, by reason of British purchases, became more valuable, and beacons and boundaries became necessary." Here we may see the thin end of the wedge. We may picture the first lawyer and the first financier advancing with Arcadia parchment ...
— South Africa and the Transvaal War, Vol. 1 (of 6) - From the Foundation of Cape Colony to the Boer Ultimatum - of 9th Oct. 1899 • Louis Creswicke

... received me with politeness and told me that his Government refused to exchange me for a citizen. I then expressed to him my belief that I could through the influence of my friends effect a change in the treatment of the Privateers could I be sent with the assurance of a willingness to reciprocate. By his advice I made the application in writing through him to the Confederate Secretary of War. I expect to ...
— Ball's Bluff - An Episode and its Consequences to some of us • Charles Lawrence Peirson

... ruled alone. There was no intendant or bishop to hamper him, for both Talon and Laval had gone to France in 1672. But in 1675 Laval returned to the colony, and in the same year a new intendant, Jacques Duchesneau, was appointed. With this change in the situation at Quebec the friction began in earnest, for Frontenac's imperious temper did not make him a cheerful sharer of authority with any one else. If the intendant and the bishop had been men of conflicting ideas and dispositions, ...
— Crusaders of New France - A Chronicle of the Fleur-de-Lis in the Wilderness - Chronicles of America, Volume 4 • William Bennett Munro

... unhistorical to assert, and unphilosophical to assume, that in the change or reversion noted at the end of the last chapter, Mr Arnold had any consciousness of relinquishment, still more to hint any definite sense of failure on his part. He would probably have said (if any one ...
— Matthew Arnold • George Saintsbury

... to see a pair of English sailors, lazily playing, in a shady place by the side of the road, at hole-penny. One of them seemed to have his pocket cleared out, for just as Sir Duncan was passing, he cried, "Here, Jack, you give me change of one of them, and I'll have at you again, my boy. As good as a guinea with these blessed niggers. Come back to their home, I b'lieve they are, same as I wish I ...
— Mary Anerley • R. D. Blackmore

... constitutional law in the language. But these works hardly belong to pure literature, and are remarkable only as early, though not very good, examples of English prose in a barren time. The 15th century was an era of decay and change. The Middle Age was dying, Church and State were slowly disintegrating under the new intellectual influences that were working secretly under ground. In England the civil wars of the Red and White Roses were breaking up the old feudal society by decimating ...
— Brief History of English and American Literature • Henry A. Beers

... travel do not greatly change one's nature. Either at Dearborn or Montreal, I am still Toinette. But, Messieurs, I have been told of a camp quite close at hand,—and yet you leave me here in the sand to famish ...
— When Wilderness Was King - A Tale of the Illinois Country • Randall Parrish

... notwithstanding my reindeer coat, my heart growing chill, my limbs stiffening, my feet freezing in triple woolen socks; I have seen my sleigh horses covered with a coating of ice, their breath congealed at their nostrils. I have seen the brandy in my flask change into hard stone, on which not even my knife could make an impression. But my sleigh flew like the wind. Not an obstacle on the plain, white and level farther than the eye could reach! No rivers to stop one! Hard ice everywhere, ...
— Michael Strogoff - or, The Courier of the Czar • Jules Verne

... Narayana. On earth they are seen by men as two separate forms, though in reality they are both possessed but by one soul. With the mind alone, that invincible pair, of world-wide fame, can, if only they wish it, destroy this host. Only, in consequence of their humanity they do not wish it.[23] Like a change of the Yuga, the death of Bhishma, O child, and the slaughter of the high-souled Drona, overturn the senses. Indeed, neither by Brahmacharya, nor by the study of the Vedas, nor by (religious) rites, nor by weapons, can any one prevent death. ...
— The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 2 • Kisari Mohan Ganguli

... rose. They wheeled and soared and flew, a bevy of winged black specks hurrying to the north. They had seen something approaching over the veld. The great bird hanging motionless, purposeful, lower down, became aware of his comrades' change of tactics. With one downward stroke of his powerful wings, he shot upwards, and with a hoarse, croaking cry ...
— The Dop Doctor • Clotilde Inez Mary Graves

... nervy thing to do, and there are bigger boys in the Academy who would not have done it. But I say, Jack, it is getting pretty rough along here. I am afraid we may have to change our route." ...
— The Hilltop Boys on Lost Island • Cyril Burleigh

... in half a minute. Anything for a change. And what change more delightful than a plunge ...
— Follow My leader - The Boys of Templeton • Talbot Baines Reed

... So the change was made. Flossie had a seat near one window, and Freddie near another, and Mr. Bobbsey sat with his "little fireman," while Mrs. Bobbsey took the other half of the seat with the "little fat fairy." Nan and Bert were together, and so there was peace at last. On rushed the train taking ...
— Bobbsey Twins in Washington • Laura Lee Hope

... the advice was good and should be followed. I needed a change of air. London may have suited Doctor Johnson, but in the summer time it is not for the ordinary man. What I wanted, to enable me to give the public of my best (as the reviewer of a weekly paper, dealing with my last work, had expressed a polite hope that I would continue ...
— Love Among the Chickens • P. G. Wodehouse

... by a southerly wind. Against this we continued to beat till the morning of the 23d, when, finding that we made but little progress, and that there was no appearance of an alteration of wind, I determined to put into Long Hope, in the Orkney Islands, to await a change in our favour, and accordingly ran in and anchored there as soon as ...
— Three Voyages for the Discovery of a Northwest Passage from the • Sir William Edward Parry

... I have spoken in the former part of 'The Age of Reason,' and already in this, where I have said that the word for prophet is the Bible-word for Poet, and that the flights and metaphors of those poets, many of which have become obscure by the lapse of time and the change of circumstances, have been ridiculously erected into things called prophecies, and applied to purposes the writers never thought of. When a priest quotes any of those passages, he unriddles it agreeably to his ...
— The Writings Of Thomas Paine, Complete - With Index to Volumes I - IV • Thomas Paine

... were treated more conservatively than those in the modern text. The most common change was adding or removing a ...
— A Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary - For the Use of Students • John R. Clark Hall

... where Adrian Cantemir played upon the grand harpsichord a dashing piece that was intended to charm at least, the beauteous Katherine, who stood near. Lord Cedric leant over and begged the Russian count to change the tune to a gavotte. He did so, and Cedric brought forth Katherine and placed her fair to watch his step till she might catch the changes. Thus he trained her carefully and with precision, and when Cantemir saw the trap that held him where he was and gave Lord Cedric the upper-hand, he ...
— Mistress Penwick • Dutton Payne

... amount of gelatinising pectose. Dr. Johnson was specially fond of veal pie with plums and sugar. He taunted Boswell about the need of gardeners to produce in Scotland what grows wild in England. "Pray, Sir," said he, "are you ever able to bring the Sloe to perfection there?" On Change a hundred thousand pounds are whimsically known as "a plum," and a million of money is "a marigold." Lately a Chicago physician whilst officiating at a Reformatory found that the boys behaved themselves much better when taking prunes ...
— Herbal Simples Approved for Modern Uses of Cure • William Thomas Fernie

... swirling taxi-ride back to the Grantham, and a rapid change into her most fetching evening gown (she had not even a thought of dinner) to play her bold part in the drama which she was excitedly writing in her mind and for which she had just engaged her cast. She was on fire with terrible suspense: would the ...
— Children of the Whirlwind • Leroy Scott

... are only different temperatures of man. We can change the temperature of passion, but God only can ...
— Serbia in Light and Darkness - With Preface by the Archbishop of Canterbury, (1916) • Nikolaj Velimirovic

... committee completely establishes that Miss Anna Ella Carroll was the author of this change of plan, which involved a transfer of the national forces to their new base in north Mississippi and Alabama, in command of the Memphis and Charleston railroad. That she devoted time and money in the autumn of 1861 to the investigation of its feasability ...
— A Military Genius - Life of Anna Ella Carroll of Maryland • Sarah Ellen Blackwell

... choice,—the laws we reverence are our brave fathers' legacy,—the faith we follow teaches us to live in bonds of charity with all mankind, and die with hope of bliss beyond the grave. Tell your invaders this; and tell them too, we seek no change; and, least of all, such change as they would ...
— The American Union Speaker • John D. Philbrick

... said Vince, gazing up at the towering rocks, dotted with yellow ragwort and sea-pink, by which they were surrounded; "but it's a change. I wouldn't care if they only knew at home about our being safe. I say, isn't it likely that some one may come along the cliffs and be searching for us, and then we can signal ...
— Cormorant Crag - A Tale of the Smuggling Days • George Manville Fenn

... shoes on the sand of the cove, and swam to the ship without taking time to undress. He slipped over the taffrail, and had scarcely time to get below and change his clothes ...
— The Adventures of Captain Horn • Frank Richard Stockton

... upon him eagerly; he no longer represented for her the everyday dullness, he was the fairy-story that might take her by surprise when the need was greatest. He felt he could hardly pay too dearly for this change. Women were not made for adversity and solitude; they were flowers that only opened fully when happiness kissed them. Ellen might shift the responsibility over onto ...
— Pelle the Conqueror, Complete • Martin Andersen Nexo

... left, at a moment's warning, generations ago; since then this strange dry air had been breathed by no human nostrils, these various objects had remained untouched and motionless; nothing but time had dwelt in the chamber; and yet what a change, subtle but mighty, had been wrought! Mere stillness—mere absence of life—was an appalling thing, the boy thought. And why had this secret been suffered to pass into oblivion? And why had fate selected him to discover it? And now, what use would he make of it? "At all events," ...
— Archibald Malmaison • Julian Hawthorne

... breakfast-bell came clanging up through the house. She hurried to her side of the curtained recess. Hanging there were her old red stockinette jersey and her blue skirt... never again... just once more... she could change afterwards. Her brown, heavy best dress with puffed and gauged sleeves and thick gauged and gathered boned bodice was in her hand. She hung it once more on its peg and quickly put on her old things. The jersey was shiny with wear. "You darling old things," she muttered ...
— Pointed Roofs - Pilgrimage, Volume 1 • Dorothy Richardson

... due experience, will prefer the Turkish chibouque. He should possess many, never use the same for two days running, change his bowl with each pipe-full, and let the chibouque be cleaned every day, and thoroughly washed with orange flower water. All this requires great attention, and the paucity and cost of service ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 20, - Issue 566, September 15, 1832 • Various

... joy. That rare something which made every man who knew him love him, bubbled out of him as ceaselessly as the ascending commotion in the golden vintage. Moreover, this good fellow was overjoyed at the change in his host; he felt that Thayor's splendid health was ...
— The Lady of Big Shanty • Frank Berkeley Smith

... been for so long to Venice. The Habsburgs had exploited them, but the Croats felt that they were bound by all the blood which they had shed and by the military glory they had won in Austria's service. Had not Tomasi['c] and Milutinovi['c] been the Generals—both Croats—who were sent to change Napoleon's Dalmatia into a province of the Habsburgs? And the list is endless. Jella[vc]i['c] was very probably deceived by Francis Joseph, who kept dangling before his eyes a vision of a "Greater Croatia." But, by an irony of history, this hope of union of ...
— The Birth of Yugoslavia, Volume 1 • Henry Baerlein

... for her one of the best suites, which had just been vacated by a Russian princess. "I guess you better cable to your folks where you ah', Clementina," she said. "Because if you're satisfied, I am, and I presume we sha'n't want to change as long as we stay in Florence. My, but it's sightly! "She joined Clementina a moment at the windows looking upon the Arno, and the hills beyond it. "I guess you'll spend most of your time settin' at this winder, and I sha'n't ...
— Henry James, Jr. • William Dean Howells

... our meeting, and without any change taking place in my feelings. One day, when I was out walking with a friend of my mother, I accidentally met my old master; both of us involuntarily halted, but for a long time we could not speak. At length he contrived to subdue his emotions. As for myself, I was too much disturbed to be able to ...
— Celebrated Women Travellers of the Nineteenth Century • W. H. Davenport Adams

... can any thing ally'd to thee offend? Thou art so sacred and so innocent, That but to know thee, and to look on thee, Must change even Vice to Virtue. Oh my Florella! So perfectly thou dost possess my Soul, That ev'ry Wish of thine shall be obey'd: Say, wou'dst thou have thy Husband share my Crown? Do but submit to love ...
— The Works of Aphra Behn, Vol. II • Aphra Behn

... left the heath and had turned into the by-road, where there was less to see, the ideas naturally engendered by the approaching change in my habits and occupations gradually drew more and more of my attention exclusively to themselves. By the time I had arrived at the end of the road I had become completely absorbed in my own fanciful visions of Limmeridge House, of Mr. Fairlie, and of the two ladies whose practice in the ...
— The Woman in White • Wilkie Collins

... indescribable afflictions; [1] and while I was recovering my breath and endeavouring to resume the habit of my art, I had great pleasure in re-writing the Capitolo. Afterwards, with a view to re-establishing my strength, I determined to take a journey of a few days for change of air. My good friend the Cardinal gave me permission and lent me horses; and I had two young Romans for my companions, one of them a craftsman in my trade, the other only a comrade in our journey. We left Rome, and took the ...
— The Autobiography of Benvenuto Cellini • Benvenuto Cellini

... his own convenience, and until he had to decide whether he should petition to be clothed as a novice Mark did not feel that he was called upon to take himself too seriously as a monk. For that reason he did not change his name, but preferred to stay Brother Mark. The little ceremony of reception was carried through in Chapter before the brethren went into the Oratory to say Terce, and Brother Walter was so much excited when he heard himself addressed as Brother Simon that for a moment it seemed ...
— The Altar Steps • Compton MacKenzie

... by the difficulties he encountered in printing his book on Anatomy, that he made the rash vow that he would never publish anything more; but, like many other authors, he broke his word. Poets are especially liable to this change of intention, as La ...
— Books Fatal to Their Authors • P. H. Ditchfield

... room I began thinking and reasoning about a wonderful change that I knew had crept all through me. If God should now come at any moment of the day or night and turn over every secret page of heart and mind, He would not find one thought or glimmer of any sort or kind of lust, whether of the eye, ...
— The Prodigal Returns • Lilian Staveley

... transmission and low pressure direct current for distribution; and this is exactly the practice that has been adopted in all the great cities of the country to-day. There seems no good reason for believing that it will change. It might perhaps have been altogether better for Edison, from the financial standpoint, if he had not identified himself so completely with one kind of current, but that made no difference to him, as it was a matter of ...
— Edison, His Life and Inventions • Frank Lewis Dyer and Thomas Commerford Martin

... from Lucien, however, caused them to change their tactics. He directed them suddenly to "hold water," and stop the canoe, at the same time telling them that the birds ahead were the very sort about which they had been conversing—the "canvass-backs." He had no doubt of it, judging ...
— Popular Adventure Tales • Mayne Reid

... a new house, Susy Minchin, and as perhaps you do not know of the change, will you tell your Mother this is my new address," and then she repeated it slowly twice to the child: "5, George-street, Bloomsbury. Now, you will remember that, little girl, won't you? and when I want your Mother to ...
— A Big Temptation • L. T. Meade

... Haredale stood alone in the mail-coach office at Bristol. Although but a few weeks had intervened since his conversation with Edward Chester and his niece, in the locksmith's house, and he had made no change, in the mean time, in his accustomed style of dress, his appearance was greatly altered. He looked much older, and more care-worn. Agitation and anxiety of mind scatter wrinkles and grey hairs with ...
— Barnaby Rudge • Charles Dickens

... not be room for all, but the room that is will become less and less; and when the moment of the maximum is at hand, there will be no room at all. Capitalistic production will have overreached itself, and a change of direction ...
— War of the Classes • Jack London

... change in the history of the world. By some means a rise in the bottom seems to have cut off a great part of the internal sea from the outer ocean and to have converted it into a widespread shallow bay, much like the sounds which lie back of the islands that line the Atlantic Coast from New Jersey ...
— The Meaning of Evolution • Samuel Christian Schmucker

... his change, and counts it with a great air of wisdom. The epiciere breaks into a rapid recital—it sounds rather like our curate at home getting to work on When the wicked man—of the beauty and succulence of her other wares. Up ...
— The First Hundred Thousand • Ian Hay

... lived through before one learns that God indeed doeth all things well. The poor Revolutionists thought that they must have rapid changes, and their hysterical visions appeared to them like perfectly wise and accurate glances into the future. They were in a hurry, forgetting that we cannot change our marvellous society on a sudden, any more than we can change a single tissue of our bodies on a sudden—hence their frantic hopes and frantic despair. If we gaze coolly round, we see that, in spite of a muttering, threatening France and a watchful Germany, ...
— The Ethics of Drink and Other Social Questions - Joints In Our Social Armour • James Runciman

... excepting what was most needed, — a flannel suit, carefully rolled in a water-proof cloth. I knew that I must change my wet clothes for dry ones, or perish. This was no easy task to perform, with hands benumbed and limbs paralyzed with the cold. O shade of Benjamin Franklin, did not one of thy kinsmen, in his wide experience as a traveller, foresee this very disaster, and did he not, ...
— Voyage of The Paper Canoe • N. H. Bishop

... pot, you do have enemies, ah yes, many enemies, you and the gold entrusted to you! As matters stand, pot, the best thing I can do for you is to carry you off to the shrine of Faith: I'll hide you away there, just as cosy! You know me, Faith, and I know you: don't change your name, mind, if I trust this to you. Yes, I'll go to you, Faith, relying on your faithfulness. ...
— Amphitryo, Asinaria, Aulularia, Bacchides, Captivi • Plautus Titus Maccius

... broad back was turned did Helen notice that the hunter looked different. Then she saw he wore a lighter, cleaner suit of buckskin, with no coat, and instead of the high-heeled horseman's boots he wore moccasins and leggings. The change made him ...
— The Man of the Forest • Zane Grey

... alarm for her," continued the doctor, "and desired no change. Frank is your son, and it is for you to look to him. You thought proper to do so by desiring Mary to ...
— Doctor Thorne • Anthony Trollope

... I meant —To be just, And the passion I had raised To content. Since he chose to change Gold for dust, If I gave him what ...
— Browning's Heroines • Ethel Colburn Mayne

... as he read the news. What strange new century lay ahead? What convulsing throes of change? What was in store for his children? Tighter set ...
— His Family • Ernest Poole

... An instant change swept over him. His staring eyes closed, his head fell forward, his whole body collapsed like an empty sack. He fell, twitched once or twice, and was dead—dead ere the attackers could reach the door of steel where his bestial masters had ...
— The Air Trust • George Allan England

... together, and formed a natural community, ready to help and enliven one another. They were farmers at home, in Western New York, and both men and women knew how to work. Yet even here the women did not like the change, but they were willing, "as it might be best for the young folks." Their hospitality was great: the houseful of women and pretty children ...
— At Home And Abroad - Or, Things And Thoughts In America and Europe • Margaret Fuller Ossoli

... supposed to collect their materials and to assume determinate forms. Within the last few years, however, our ideas of vital processes have undergone profound modifications; and the interest, and even disquietude, which the change has excited are amply evidenced by the discussions and protests which are now common, regarding the phenomena of vitality. In tracing these phenomena through all their modifications, the most advanced philosophers ...
— Fragments of science, V. 1-2 • John Tyndall

... no question of my resignation at the present moment. Your majesty took up your pen just now to send me to the Bastile,—why should you change your intention?" ...
— Louise de la Valliere • Alexandre Dumas, Pere

... been together an hour, and I had acquired sufficient ease to change my seat, and to look at a picture or two, which adorned the walls, and which were said to be originals, from the Old World; for, to own the truth, the art of painting has not made much progress in the colonies. ...
— Satanstoe • James Fenimore Cooper

... had been in, and yet was under, nor having heard anything of me since I had been there before in another garb, were not forward at first to lay sudden hands on me, which I observed, and did not dislike. But as they came to see a change in me, not in habit only, but in gesture, speech, and carriage, and, which was more, in countenance also (for the exercise I had passed through, and yet was under, had imprinted a visible character of gravity upon my face), they were exceedingly ...
— The History of Thomas Ellwood Written by Himself • Thomas Ellwood

... short skirt, which had come home in February, and which she had worn only four times because the spring had been warm. It was undoubtedly "old" for she could not wear it in summer, and next winter the fashion would change; and it had rained all the morning, so that the air was damp and cold. Besides, the costume fitted her slender figure to perfection—it was such a pity that it was old already, for she might never have another as smart. The ...
— The Heart of Rome • Francis Marion Crawford

... This inner change had been gradually prepared by many painful experiences during the last few years. I owed the recovery of my old vigour and spirits to the deep impression the rendering of the Ninth Symphony had made on me when performed in a way I had never dreamed of. This important event in my ...
— My Life, Volume I • Richard Wagner

... ticket-office. The little theatre they had chosen enjoyed a considerable vogue, and the man at the window could offer nothing less than a box. Shelby was staggered, but recalling his affluence, flirted a bill through the opening and neglected to count his change. Not until the usher had brought them to their box did Mrs. Hilliard comprehend the situation. She whispered, "Oh, Ross!" hesitated an instant, then entering, laid aside her wraps under the opera glass inquisition invited ...
— The Henchman • Mark Lee Luther

... are not so bad as you think," said Ben. "Just come in and change your clothes and go home to bed. You can get in as you have done before, and who is to know that you were out of the house all night? I say that you shouldn't be in too great a fright; still you must go away for a time, till the matter has blown over. I'll ...
— Taking Tales - Instructive and Entertaining Reading • W.H.G. Kingston

... defies definition by mere enumeration of its materials. The peculiarity of life is that it lives; and thought also, when living, passes out of itself and directs itself on the ideal, on the eventual. It is an activity. Activity does not consist in velocity of change but in constancy of purpose; in the conspiracy of many moments and many processes toward one ideal harmony and one concomitant ideal result. The most rudimentary apperception, recognition, or expectation, is already a case of representative cognition, ...
— The Life of Reason • George Santayana

... that the Hitchcock position had given her in Chicago, showed markedly in contrast with the tentativeness of Mrs. Hitchcock. Louise Hitchcock handled her world with perfect self-command; Mrs. Hitchcock was rather breathless over every manifestation of social change. ...
— The Web of Life • Robert Herrick

... thing. Then I change my formula. Instead of 'Do not get yourself killed,' I will say,—'Do not get ...
— Ten Years Later - Chapters 1-104 • Alexandre Dumas, Pere

... my son, while yet thy days are long, And this fair change of seasons passes slow, Gather and treasure up the good they yield— All that they teach of virtue, of pure thoughts And kind affections, reverence for thy God And for thy brethren; so when thou shalt come ...
— St. Nicholas Magazine for Boys and Girls, Vol. 5, September 1878, No. 11 • Various

... I change mine. I am tired of a religion that makes me plait my hair for eight hours of the day and sends no ...
— The Turquoise Cup, and, The Desert • Arthur Cosslett Smith

... feel inwardly for you, Lady Caroline; but my friend makes the subject delicate. Let us change it. Did you observe the steeple upon the hill, at the end of the ...
— John Bull - The Englishman's Fireside: A Comedy, in Five Acts • George Colman

... his own field of learning. He and I were looking at some of Dickens's MSS. They were full of erasions and corrections. I said, "How unlike Scott!" whose first draft of his novels exactly answered to the players' description of Will's "copy." My friend said, "Browning scarcely made an erasion or change in writing his poems," and referred to Mr. Browning's MSS. for the press, of which examples were lying near us. "But Browning must have made clean copies for the press," I said: which was as new an idea to my learned friend as it was undreamed of by the Players:- ...
— Shakespeare, Bacon and the Great Unknown • Andrew Lang

... seemed satisfied with their new masters, and the partial change of government which ensued; so that King Ferdinand returned to Seville, leaving the subdued city in apparent tranquillity. This calm was, however, but of short duration. Strong symptoms of disaffection were soon observable in the conduct of the vanquished Moors, and the murmurs ...
— Gomez Arias - The Moors of the Alpujarras, A Spanish Historical Romance. • Joaquin Telesforo de Trueba y Cosio

... in dismay! The more I strove to change the subject the more our fat wag, fancying he was teasing me to the delight of the others, harped on the one string, until with pure apprehension of what Fontenette might presently do or say, my blood ran hot and ...
— Strong Hearts • George W. Cable

... must admit that I'm a conscientious officer," was her mother's reply. "To change the subject, would you like to go ...
— Marjorie Dean - High School Sophomore • Pauline Lester

... change in him he remarked a development in her which was a little short of wonderful. She was at that age when the woman is breaking through the beautiful chrysalis of girlhood. In those two months a remarkable ...
— The Man Who Knew • Edgar Wallace

... the Daisy, "and I am sure the fields will look much more beautiful with you a golden color than white; besides that, we shall be seen to better advantage; so both of us will gain by the change." ...
— Sandman's Goodnight Stories • Abbie Phillips Walker

... the niece of the rich Cardinal de Segur, who had sent and brought her from Louisiana. This is why Madelaine had such large privileges at the convent. She told me she was engaged to the young Count Louis le Pelletrier de la Houssaye, and I, with some change of color, ...
— Strange True Stories of Louisiana • George Washington Cable

... true of her in Paris was also true of her in London. Mrs. John Hemingway's promise to look after a young man hall-marked him. She was more beautiful and no less kind than of old, and absence had not had the power to change his feelings for her. As simply and whole-heartedly as he had loved her then, he loved her now. So he looked at her with shining eyes. Reticence was ingrained in Peter, but the knowledge that she liked and understood him had the effect of sunlight ...
— The Purple Heights • Marie Conway Oemler

... definition, for books of whatever character to be proscribed. There was no appeal against the decision of the Stationers' Hall representatives, who had the power entirely in their own hands. Afew months after Mary's futile attempt at checking the freedom of the press, adiametrically objective change occurred, and with Elizabeth's accession to the throne in November, 1558, the licensed stationers conveniently veered around and were as industrious in suppressing Catholic books as they had been a few weeks previously in endeavouring to ...
— Printers' Marks - A Chapter in the History of Typography • William Roberts

... merely for having exceeded bounds in the contest." Appius Claudius himself was the only one of the patricians who made light both of the tribunes and commons and his own trial. Neither the threats of the commons, nor the entreaties of the senate, could ever persuade him not only to change his garb, or address persons as a suppliant, but not even so far as to soften or relax any thing from the usual asperity of his style, when his cause was to be pleaded before the people. The expression of his countenance was the same; the ...
— The History of Rome, Books 01 to 08 • Titus Livius



Words linked to "Change" :   camp, invert, diversify, civilize, Americanize, cool down, dissonate, demythologize, condense, devalue, destress, develop, policy change, civilise, inseminate, demulsify, inflate, collimate, affect, change of course, depersonalise, barbarize, compensate, death, transfer, humble, eternise, breakup, alkalinize, inform, destabilization, fill up, de-emphasise, flocculate, colourise, freeze, brutalize, deactivate, harshen, exasperate, bolshevise, change-of-pace ball, industrialise, glamourise, exchange, land, change surface, exteriorise, debase, gear up, industrialize, decarboxylate, capture, devilise, chump change, coarsen, alienate, achromatize, oil change, confuse, automate, contaminate, exteriorize, change of life, fertilise, animize, alchemise, interchange, alcoholise, shift, constitutionalize, decimalize, break down, digitise, archaize, acerbate, elaborate, contract, damage, change taste, discolor, intransitivise, alcoholize, bear on, complicate, arterialise, amalgamate, demist, etherialise, form, dope, glamourize, acetylate, corrupt, centralize, eroticize, change state, awaken, disturb, beef up, dissolve, change-up, counterchange, evaporate, indispose, conventionalize, alien, change over, digitalize, deepen, hydrogenate, cool, change shape, fertilize, occurrence, change hands, domesticize, disaffect, natural event, break up, calcify, habituate, deaden, activate, change owners, impart, easing, enable, acceleration, improve, fill out, domesticate, change of shape, cry, ease up, color in, change course, barb, change intensity, desensitise, decrepitate, commercialize, change of mind, change magnitude, Islamise, eternalize, aerate, internationalize, demoralise, alchemize, dry, deodourise, incapacitate, happening, chill, inactivate, change posture, Americanise, decorate, deodorize, centralise, modification, pitching change, acetylize, hide, barbarise, degauss, demonize, destabilize, lace, change form, cook, sex-change operation, constitutionalise, denature, animise, darken, heat, classicise, denaturalize, allegorize, extend, domesticise, animalise, depolarize, democratize, edit out, drop-off, deodorise, lessen, phase change, cut, check, temperature change, Europeanise, colly, democratise, boil, equate, assimilate, edit, draw, effeminize, decentralise, glamorize, hue, change ringing, grime, dynamise, depress, cause to sleep, begrime, colour in, automatise, dynamize, deceleration, dissimilate, sea change, change of magnitude, bear upon, fortify, even, disintegrate, blot out, emulsify, internationalise, bureau de change, digitalise, fatten out, blind, short-change, freshen, gelatinise, defog, immortalize, modify, iodinate, antique, accelerate, changer, global climate change, desensitize, alteration, de-emphasize, bring, crush, brighten, individualise, glorify, decease, flesh out, isomerize, disorder, destabilise, dismiss, effeminise, Europeanize, fill, change of location, bestialize, concentrate, allegorise, eternize, animalize, demoralize, blur, occurrent, color, blister, demonise, dull, harmonize, devilize, decimalise, grace, fecundate, conventionalise, disarray, disqualify, customize, equalize, feminize, archaise, switch, commix, glamorise, add, achromatise, crack, externalize, Frenchify, exacerbate, circularize, feminise, diabolize, incandesce, gelatinize, deprave, elevate



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