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Call   Listen
noun
Call  n.  
1.
The act of calling; usually with the voice, but often otherwise, as by signs, the sound of some instrument, or by writing; a summons; an entreaty; an invitation; as, a call for help; the bugle's call. "Call of the trumpet." "I rose as at thy call, but found thee not."
2.
A signal, as on a drum, bugle, trumpet, or pipe, to summon soldiers or sailors to duty.
3.
(Eccl.) An invitation to take charge of or serve a church as its pastor.
4.
A requirement or appeal arising from the circumstances of the case; a moral requirement or appeal. "Dependence is a perpetual call upon humanity." "Running into danger without any call of duty."
5.
A divine vocation or summons. "St. Paul himself believed he did well, and that he had a call to it, when he persecuted the Christians."
6.
Vocation; employment. Note: (In this sense, calling is generally used.)
7.
A short visit; as, to make a call on a neighbor; also, the daily coming of a tradesman to solicit orders. "The baker's punctual call."
8.
(Hunting) A note blown on the horn to encourage the hounds.
9.
(Naut.) A whistle or pipe, used by the boatswain and his mate, to summon the sailors to duty.
10.
(Fowling) The cry of a bird; also a noise or cry in imitation of a bird; or a pipe to call birds by imitating their note or cry.
11.
(Amer. Land Law) A reference to, or statement of, an object, course, distance, or other matter of description in a survey or grant requiring or calling for a corresponding object, etc., on the land.
12.
The privilege to demand the delivery of stock, grain, or any commodity, at a fixed, price, at or within a certain time agreed on. (Brokers' Cant)
13.
See Assessment, 4.
At call, or On call, liable to be demanded at any moment without previous notice; as money on deposit.
Call bird, a bird taught to allure others into a snare.
Call boy
(a)
A boy who calls the actors in a theater; a boy who transmits the orders of the captain of a vessel to the engineer, helmsman, etc.
(b)
A waiting boy who answers a cal, or cames at the ringing of a bell; a bell boy.
Call note, the note naturally used by the male bird to call the female. It is artificially applied by birdcatchers as a decoy.
Call of the house (Legislative Bodies), a calling over the names of members, to discover who is absent, or for other purposes; a calling of names with a view to obtaining the ayes and noes from the persons named.
Call to the bar, admission to practice in the courts.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Call" Quotes from Famous Books



... some unexplainable manner the ribbon caught and wound itself about the boy's feet, tying his head to his heels, and rendering a full stroke impossible. With all his might he struggled and tore, but the bond only grew tighter. He was in deep water, no help within call, and the awful thought came that there, in the budding of his bright young life, he must be cut off and die a helpless prisoner. He stayed his struggles, almost paralysed at the thought, and that instant the ribbon gave ...
— Fletcher of Madeley • Brigadier Margaret Allen

... Sunday—to seeking God, and devote all the rest of the week to seeking worldly prosperity, it is no wonder if our religion languishes, and is mainly a matter of forms, as it is with such hosts of people that call themselves Christians. ...
— Expositions Of Holy Scripture - Volume I: St. Luke, Chaps. I to XII • Alexander Maclaren

... of September wee arriued at the great and most stately Citie of Constantinople, which for the situation and proude seate thereof, for the beautifull and commodious hauens, and for the great and sumptuous buildings of their Temples, which they call Moschea, is to be preferred before all the Cities of Europe. And there the Emperour of the Turkes then liuing, whose name was Amurat, kept his Court and residence, in a marueilous goodly place, with diuers gardens and houses of pleasure, which is at the least two English ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, - and Discoveries of The English Nation, v5 - Central and Southern Europe • Richard Hakluyt

... that my faith has been seriously shaken," David admitted. "But about the furniture? And about my telephone call from Mr. Gates's town house? And about my adventure taking place in the very next house to the one taken by him at Brighton? And about Miss Gates's agitation when she learnt my identity? Do you ...
— The Crimson Blind • Fred M. White

... blows fresh on him; The waves dance gladly in his sight; The sea-birds call, and wheel, and ...
— The Sea Lions - The Lost Sealers • James Fenimore Cooper

... should see that all his men thoroughly understand that whenever they are away from the center of the patrol they must look to the nearest man for signals at least once every minute. It should never be necessary for the patrol leader to call to a man in order to get his attention. All movements of men at a distance should be regulated by signals and the men should constantly be on the lookout ...
— Manual of Military Training - Second, Revised Edition • James A. Moss

... conduit. Examinations of newly laid drains have developed many instances where tiles were at first half filled with silt, and three months later were entirely clean. The muddiness of the flow indicates what the doctors call "an effort of nature to relieve herself," and nature may be trusted to succeed, at least, until she abandons the effort. If we are sure that a drain has been well laid, we need feel no anxiety because it fails to take the water from the ground so completely as it should do, until it settles into ...
— Draining for Profit, and Draining for Health • George E. Waring

... history that one would wish to see again—at the head of whom were Pontius Pilate, Sir Thomas Browne, and Dr. Faustus—but we black-balled most of his list! But with what a gusto would he describe his favourite authors, Donne, or Sir Philip Sidney, and call their most crabbed passages delicious! He tried them on his palate as epicures taste olives, and his observations had a smack in them, like a roughness on the tongue. With what discrimination he hinted a defect in what he admired most—as in saying ...
— Hazlitt on English Literature - An Introduction to the Appreciation of Literature • Jacob Zeitlin

... went to it every morning as regularly and punctually as he went to his. He judged that whatever her business was she must be well paid for it, or must possess means of her own; nobody, man or woman, could possibly live at that boarding-house, or private hotel, as its proprietors preferred to call it, for anything less than four guineas a week. Well—here was the explanation of Miss Slade's business; she was evidently private secretary to Mr. Franklin Fullaway, and competent to do business at a place like Rothschild's. And why not?—yet ... why did she call herself Miss Slade at the boarding-house ...
— The Rayner-Slade Amalgamation • J. S. Fletcher

... I will still call him, spoke with difficulty, but some secret impulse, it seemed, made him anxious to disburden his mind. "I make these confessions to you, Burton," he said, "because I want you to convey to my poor wife, should you ever return to England, the expression of my sorrow for the way I treated her; and ...
— Ben Burton - Born and Bred at Sea • W. H. G. Kingston

... that be?" said I, drawing her arm closer through mine. "No, no—tomorrow I will call on the admiral; and as you are all going to England in the fleet at any rate, I will ask his leave ...
— Tom Cringle's Log • Michael Scott

... will begins, "I, John Shakspeare," &c., and ends, "by me, William Shakspeare." I have no doubt that the will of John Shakspeare is a forgery altogether; but the taking three paragraphs of it, and substituting them for the two first paragraphs of William Shakspeare's genuine will, is what I call, and what no doubt "Mr. BOLTON CORNEY" will think, on this explanation of the facts, "an audacious fabrication." The best guess I can make as to how, or with what design, the Irish editor should have perpetrated so complicated, and yet so manifest a blunder, is this:—Malone printed the fragment ...
— Notes and Queries, No. 28. Saturday, May 11, 1850 • Various

... asleep while thinking of all the lovely things she could collect to put in the book, which Uncle Steve had told her she must call her Memory Book. ...
— Marjorie's Vacation • Carolyn Wells

... her own temple and her own worship, the name was also applied to this strange Oriental goddess who came in the train of the debauched Roman army on its return from the East. But though men might call this new-comer by the name of a sacred old national goddess and worship her in private as they pleased, the religion of the state, even in its sunken condition, refused to admit her among its deities, and the priests, the Fanatici, with their wild ...
— The Religion of Numa - And Other Essays on the Religion of Ancient Rome • Jesse Benedict Carter

... sight a rooster in a farm-yard near by crowed vigorously, and a dozen bugles answered the challenge with the brisk, cheery notes of the reveille, and from all parts of the city the church bells jangled out the call for early mass, and the little world of Santa Clara seemed to stretch itself and to wake to welcome the day ...
— Notes of a War Correspondent • Richard Harding Davis

... the full the pleasure of living and seeing others live, and a great part of his pleasure consisted in observing how men differed in their habits and foibles. He tells how Ben Jonson did not understand why young Mr. Hyde should neglect the delights of his company at the call of business; how Selden, with all his stupendous learning, was never more studious of anything than his ease; how Earle gave a wrong impression by the negligence of his dress and mien, whereas no man was more wary and ...
— Characters from 17th Century Histories and Chronicles • Various

... so has Scotland been prolific, throughout her lower orders, of men who have made a figure in her literature and her history; but to Burns nature gave a finer organization, a more powerful heart, and an ampler brain, imbued with that mystery we call genius, and he stands forth conspicuous above ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 56, Number 347, September, 1844 • Various

... Joe Egan, a stunted, starved-looking sprissawn of a lad, perhaps the most appreciative of his admirers was big Hugh McInerney, whom people were apt to call an omadhawn. He also was, comparatively speaking, a stranger at Lisconnel, having come there only that spring to give John O'Driscoll a hand with the building of his mud cabin, after which he stayed about doing what odd jobs offered at that slack season of the year. Now and then he tramped on distillery ...
— Strangers at Lisconnel • Barlow Jane

... where I found, also waiting to see the Secretary of State, a gentleman, whom, from his likeness to his pictures and the loss of an arm, I immediately recognised as Lord Nelson. He could not know who I was, but he entered at once into conversation with me, if I can call it conversation, for it was almost all on his side and all about himself, and in, really, a style so vain and so silly as to surprise and almost disgust me. I suppose something that I happened to say may have made him guess that I was somebody, and he went out ...
— The Life of Nelson, Vol. II. (of 2) - The Embodiment of the Sea Power of Great Britain • A. T. (Alfred Thayer) Mahan

... probably as satisfactory as in any other part of the world. Both generally marry from love, and whatever may be the general effect of love-matches, it cannot be denied that more than any others they tend to promote pleasant relations between the 'two contracting parties,' as the French would call them. Amongst the wealthy, as everywhere else, there cannot of course be the close marital intimacy of the middle classes; but not only is infidelity less common than in London, but moreover, the proportion of the wealthy who keep up the style which produces the quasi-separation ...
— Town Life in Australia - 1883 • R. E. N. (Richard) Twopeny

... determined by the cost at which they can be brought to market. But for all temporary purposes, it is the supply in the market which governs the price, and that supply in this country is exceedingly variable. After a commercial crisis, 1866 for example, two things happen: first, we call in the debts which are owing to us in foreign countries; and we require these debts to be paid to us, not in commodities, but in money. From this cause principally, and omitting minor causes, the bullion ...
— Lombard Street: A Description of the Money Market • Walter Bagehot

... or the want of it as makes a wife think much or little of her husband,' replied my father, evidently unwilling to give up a project which had taken deep root in his mind. 'It's a something I don't rightly know how to call it—if he's manly, and sensible, and straightforward; and I ...
— Cousin Phillis • Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell

... that I hold dear in it!—c'est pis que la cage de fer de Tamerlan. I would prefer being delivered up to the Bourbons. Among other insults," said he,—"but that is a mere bagatelle, a very secondary consideration—they style me General! They can have no right to call me General; they may as well call me 'Archbishop,' for I was Head of the Church as well as of the Army. If they do not acknowledge me as Emperor they ought as First Counsul; they have sent ambassadors to ...
— Memoirs of Napoleon Bonaparte, Complete • Louis Antoine Fauvelet de Bourrienne

... "Call back the sweet home-joys of old That gladdened many a Christmas-tide— The faces hidden in the mould, The dear lost loves that changed or died! O, gentle spirits, gone before, Come, from the undiscovered lands, And bring ...
— The Poets and Poetry of Cecil County, Maryland • Various

... till it is put down. In the present case, the only coercion called for is the protection of the public property and the collection of the federal revenues. If it be necessary to send troops to do this, they will not be sectional, as it is the fashion nowadays to call people who insist on their own rights and the maintenance of the laws, but federal troops, representing the will and power of the whole Confederacy. A danger is always great so long as we are afraid of it; and mischief ...
— Atlantic Monthly Volume 7, No. 40, February, 1861 • Various

... plural. This usage is common in Carlyle. Here, however, and elsewhere in Shakespeare, as in Much Ado about Nothing, II, iii, 100, the plural 'behaviours' may be regarded as denoting the particular acts which make up what we call 'behavior.' See Clar.] ...
— The New Hudson Shakespeare: Julius Caesar • William Shakespeare

... of the land has been deposited, and which has determined the form of the continent. Thus we speak habitually of chains of mountains. Mountains, however, do not always present a continuous ridge, from which the peaks or more elevated summits rise, but occasionally, the groups we call chains, are composed of separate mountains divided by valleys; such are the mountains of Scotland, of Sweden, and Norway; and such is the general structure of the chain of mountains called in the state of New-York ...
— The American Quarterly Review, No. 17, March 1831 • Various

... of a week, we left for New Orleans, the place of our final destination, which we reached in two days. Here the slaves were placed in a negro-pen, where those who wished to purchase could call and examine them. The negro-pen is a small yard, surrounded by buildings, from fifteen to twenty feet wide, with the exception of a large gate with iron bars. The slaves are kept in the buildings ...
— The Narrative of William W. Brown, a Fugitive Slave • William Wells Brown

... my mouth to call to him, but before the words left my lips he had let out an ear-splitting yell of terror and bounded down the steps and past us, with arms flying in every direction, running like one possessed. Nor did he return during the few hours that we ...
— Under the Andes • Rex Stout

... started on a lonely and somewhat dangerous tramp of several miles up the road to the next station to call for the snow-plough, and the rest of us settled down to spend the night. Certainly we could not hope to be extricated before the next evening, especially as the storm then gave no signs of abating. We all went up to the front of the car and sat around the stove ...
— A Little Book for Christmas • Cyrus Townsend Brady

... you give me this money? The other answered, Because I am appointed by our great and exalted Master to do so. Mr. Hog asked his name, and upon his refusing to tell it, Mr. Hog said, Sir, it is not curiosity that prompts me to ask, but I hope to be enlarged, and then I shall account it my duty to call for you at your dwelling in this city, for I suppose you are a citizen in London. The other replied, You must ask me no more questions, but be faithful to the death, and thou shalt have a crown of life. Then he retired, and Mr. Hog never saw nor heard of any him more. ...
— Biographia Scoticana (Scots Worthies) • John Howie

... different qualities of each, according to the actual market price in every different county. This institution rendered it sufficiently safe for the tenant, and much more convenient for the landlord, to convert, as they call it, the corn rent, rather at what should happen to be the price of the fiars of each year, than at any certain fixed price. But the writers who have collected the prices of corn in ancient times seem frequently to have mistaken what is called ...
— An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations • Adam Smith

... passion, as also the Gentiles who know not God. (6)That no one go beyond and defraud his brother in any matter[4:6]; because the Lord is the avenger for all these things, as we also told you before, and testified. (7)For God did not call us to uncleanness, but in sanctification. (8)Therefore he that rejects, rejects not man, but God, who also gave to you ...
— The New Testament of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. • Various

... every wight; Stand as still as stone in wall, Whiles ye are present in my sight, That none of ye clatter nor call; For if ye do, your death is dight. I warn it you both great and small, With this brand burnished so bright, Therefore in peace look ye ...
— Everyman and Other Old Religious Plays, with an Introduction • Anonymous

... could get his wish in another way. "Give me paper, then, and I will write to the lady," he said. "There will be an answer, and it must be brought to me quickly, for already I have stopped longer than I expected, and Captain Sabine, who knows I have come to call upon you and fetch a friend, ...
— The Golden Silence • C. N. Williamson and A. M. Williamson

... it could hold no more, Bishop Hatto, he made fast the door; And while for mercy on Christ they call, He set fire to the barn and burned ...
— Poems Every Child Should Know - The What-Every-Child-Should-Know-Library • Various

... me: have you heard, By dusk or moonset have you never heard Sweet voices, delicate music? Never seen The passage of the lordly beautiful ones Men call the Shee?" ...
— The Book of Hallowe'en • Ruth Edna Kelley

... Yes, you did!" Edwin nearly shouted now. "You starve me for money, until I haven't got sixpence to bless myself with. You couldn't get a man to do what I do for twice what you pay me. And then you call me a thief. And then you jump down my throat because I spend a bit of money of my own." He snorted. He knew that he was quite mad, but there was a strange drunken pleasure in ...
— Clayhanger • Arnold Bennett

... their answer ready-made. They quote Paul's own statement in Romans 2:13, "The doers of the law shall be justified." Very well. But let us first find out who the doers of the law are. They call a "doer" of the Law one who performs the Law in its literal sense. This is not to "do" the Law. This is to sin. When our opponents go about to perform the Law they sin against the first, the second, and the third commandments, in fact they sin against the whole Law. ...
— Commentary on the Epistle to the Galatians • Martin Luther

... learn, painfully, that a ship, snugly moored in the south-east corner of the Queen's Dock (stern-on to a telephone call-box), and the same craft, labouring in the teeth of a Cape Horn gale, present some points of difference; that it is a far cry from 58 deg. South to the Clyde Repair Works, and that the business of shipping is not ...
— The Brassbounder - A Tale of the Sea • David W. Bone

... perception of individual traits and moods in character, with variety and vivacity, an ease, grace and gentleness, that diffuse their sweetness insensibly through every nook of an assembly, and call out reciprocal sweetness wherever there is any to ...
— Woman in the Ninteenth Century - and Kindred Papers Relating to the Sphere, Condition - and Duties, of Woman. • Margaret Fuller Ossoli

... was within call of two large villages—those of Gimoro and the sheik of the country: during my sojourn of seven months, I never heard a woman scream, neither was there any ...
— Ismailia • Samuel W. Baker

... the wind grew fiercer and fiercer, coming in roaring squalls from the south-west. Most of those on board were alarmed, for the great waves were dreadful to see, and the sound of the wind was a trumpet-call to fear. ...
— The Man • Bram Stoker

... chamber. The family, however, assembled as usual for prayers, and Fidelle among them. She seemed instantly to notice that the lady was not in her accustomed place, and, after an earnest gaze into Minnie's face, started off to call her. ...
— Minnie's Pet Cat • Madeline Leslie

... to be more of a stimulant than an enricher of the soil, if applied in its natural state, and much more durable to be plowed in than to be harrowed in; and as far as I have tried it, I have not found it to be injurious to soils—or as some call it, 'kill the soil.' In the year '49 I applied on the first of April, 176 lbs. per acre on sandy loam grass ground—yield, about half a ton more than the acre adjoining. Same year applied about 150 lbs. to the acre, on four acres of oats, same kind of soil, and the estimated increase was 20 bushels ...
— Guano - A Treatise of Practical Information for Farmers • Solon Robinson

... unfortunate, for it has produced a most unpleasant effect upon the crew. Their looks are more sullen than before, and their discontent more open. The double grievance of being debarred from the herring fishing and of being detained in what they choose to call a haunted vessel, may lead them to do something rash. Even the harpooners, who are the oldest and steadiest among them, are joining in ...
— The Captain of the Pole-Star and Other Tales • Arthur Conan Doyle

... the constable, taking a little staff with a brass crown on the end from his pocket. "No nonsense, or I shall call in help. In the King's name, my lad. ...
— The Adventures of Don Lavington - Nolens Volens • George Manville Fenn

... by his baser propensities personified in Mephistopheles, Faust abandons himself to sensual pleasure,—seduces innocence, burdens his soul with heavy guilt, and seems to be entirely given over to evil. This Part ends with Mephistopheles' imperious call,—"Her zu mir,"—as if secure of his victim. Before the appearance of the Second Part, the reader was at liberty to accept that conclusion. But in the Second Part Faust gradually wakes from the intoxication of passion, outgrows the dominion of appetite, ...
— Beacon Lights of History, Volume XIII • John Lord

... southern Indiana. Now if our vice presidents in Indiana, Illinois, Ohio and Missouri, which is the native home of most every kind of hickory, would get together and go to any one of the central cities of those particular states, call a meeting of their customers in that neighborhood, and spread a knowledge of this association I think that we could build up a local interest that would ...
— Northern Nut Growers Association Report of the Proceedings at the 13th Annual Meeting - Rochester, N.Y. September, 7, 8 and 9, 1922 • Various

... fear of death and hell, will sometimes make us shut our door. A flood of passing feeling will sometimes make us pray for a season in secret. Job had all that before him when he said, 'Will the hypocrite delight himself in the Almighty? will he always call upon God?' No, he will not. And it is just here that the hypocrite and the true Christian best discover themselves both to God and to themselves. The true Christian will, as Job again says, pray in secret till God slays him. He will pray in his dreams; he will pray ...
— Bunyan Characters - First Series • Alexander Whyte

... would be," Helen exclaimed passionately, as soon as she could find her voice; "and I warned you two others, only you would not listen. I knew perfectly well that Hal was not going to let us go in, and I call it downright unfair, and I for one am not going to field for him any more.—And you say," she added, turning indignantly to Hal, "that girls can't play cricket. Well, they can. Father says himself that Drusie plays awfully well for a girl, and I ...
— A Tale of the Summer Holidays • G. Mockler

... duenna; "let us rather attend to his soul, and behave like true charitable Christians; run, Cacho, run, and call Fray Bernardo, or Fray Benito—no matter whom—any friar will do at such ...
— Gomez Arias - The Moors of the Alpujarras, A Spanish Historical Romance. • Joaquin Telesforo de Trueba y Cosio

... their voices seemed to change to hoarse derisive laughter, as if they thought the little misshapen frogs croaking and whistling in the marshes freer far than their proud masters, who coop themselves up in smoky houses the livelong day, and call themselves the free, ...
— Hudson Bay • R.M. Ballantyne

... right," put in Smith, "the single singing—solos, I believe they call them—in the first part will be a hard nut to crack. We can't give a minstrel show without a first part. They'd never believe we were operatic minstrels without it, even if ...
— A Pirate of Parts • Richard Neville

... anyone—my wife least of all. I am not threatening you; I am simply showing you what you must learn to expect from me, from the savage you have married. It is not my intention to frighten you. I am no longer angry with either you or the young fool whom you call your friend. By the way, I have not done him any violence. He has merely gone to find a lodging for himself and for the motor in the village. Yes, I turned him out of his own house, but I might have done worse. I ...
— The Odds - And Other Stories • Ethel M. Dell

... turning away her head:—and Godolphin was in singular spirits. What a strange thing that we should call such hilarity from our gloom! The stroke induces the flash; excite the nerves by jealousy, by despair, and with the proud you only trace the excitement by the mad mirth and hysterical laughter it creates. Godolphin was charming comme un amour, and the young ...
— Godolphin, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... answer to their prayers, send them help: and if not, ought they not to give up, what was not His work, and not force the matter by calling promiscuously from house to house upon believers and unbelievers. Their reply was: "The gold and silver are the Lord's, and therefore we call upon the unconverted for help for His work." My reply was: "Because the gold and silver are the Lord's, therefore we, His children, need not go to His enemies for the support of His work." Now, at that very moment, while I was ...
— A Narrative of some of the Lord's Dealings with George Mueller - Written by Himself, Third Part • George Mueller

... succeeding to his father's earldom, and a little later Melbourne, the new Premier, was unexpectedly dismissed by the King. At the time Peel, expecting no immediate crisis, was abroad, in Rome; and we have interesting details of his slow journey home to meet the urgent call of Wellington, who was carrying on the administration provisionally. The changes of the last few years were shown by the fact that the Tories felt bound to choose their Premier from the Lower House. It was Wellington who recommended Peel for the place which, under the old conditions, ...
— Victorian Worthies - Sixteen Biographies • George Henry Blore

... became aware that her powers were failing her. Her arm seemed to become cramped, paralyzed, and a mist floated before her eyes. What did it mean? Her lips opened to call aloud—then closed, uttering no sound. Why should he be disturbed because she was suffering a little pain? thought this savage—this daughter of a race ...
— The Sign of the Spider • Bertram Mitford

... "That girl, as you call her, is my wife," said I; and my wife only leaned a little nearer, so that I knew ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 4 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... "House you call it, and I have had the making of it. What was Willebald but a plain merchant-man, one of many scores at the Friday Market? Willebald was clay that I moulded and gilded till God put him to bed under a noble lid in the New Kirk. A worthy man, but loutish and slow like one of his ...
— The Path of the King • John Buchan

... little towns along the Gulf of Bothnia the steamer stopped in answer to a "call," and some passenger clambered on board from a small boat, which mode of proceeding reminded us of the ships that go round Oban and Mull and such Scotch ports, where the same sort of thing goes on, the letters being dropped by ...
— Through Finland in Carts • Ethel Brilliana Alec-Tweedie

... of this class could only be temporary, he fortified it by every means in his power, and then, after a theatrical finale, returned to the gross debaucheries in which he revelled. Anything more selfish or cynical cannot be conceived, and those who call vile acts by their plain names will not feel inclined ...
— The Gracchi Marius and Sulla - Epochs Of Ancient History • A.H. Beesley

... your letter, that you are as giddy and as volatile as ever: just the reverse of Mr. Pope, who has always loved a domestic life from his youth. I was going to wish you had some little place that you could call your own, but, I profess I do not know you well enough to contrive any one system of life that would please you. You pretend to preach up riding and walking to the duchess, yet from my knowledge of you after twenty years, you always joined ...
— Selected English Letters (XV - XIX Centuries) • Various

... in gorgeous uniform, received us with the air of a proprietor; Arab bell boys in bright red silk gowns responded to the call of the manager and conducted us to our rooms; and Arab men in white gowns brought up our luggage. There were French maids on each floor to attend to the calls of the ladies; but Arab men in spotless robes made the beds, cared for ...
— A Trip to the Orient - The Story of a Mediterranean Cruise • Robert Urie Jacob

... she could hear no voice through the howling wind and battering rain. Then Sally's wail sounded, and Grandma's call: "Rose-Ellen! Jimmie! Dick! ...
— Across the Fruited Plain • Florence Crannell Means

... be of any further service to you, my dear niece, pray do not hesitate to call upon me. ...
— Quill's Window • George Barr McCutcheon

... she turned the corner, comforted her, and she stopped a moment to call gently to the dog, afraid to raise her voice too high for fear of the falling roof. Scarcely had she paused, however, when a great crash came, followed by a long mingled sound of many stones and much earth falling. ...
— Chatterbox, 1906 • Various

... various collateral motives, such as interest and vanity, were embarked in its cause; if, notwithstanding all these things, it gradually sickened and died, then the conclusion seems a fair one, that it did not deserve to live. Contrasting its failure with its high pretensions, it is fair to call it an imposition; whether an expressly fraudulent contrivance or not, some might be ready to question. Everything historically shown to have happened concerning the mode of promulgation, the wide diffusion, the apparent success of this delusion, the respectability and enthusiasm of ...
— Medical Essays • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

... and Women's Committees are always alive and ready to act on the question of payment and conditions. Our workers, men and women, are very well paid and despite high prices, were never more comfortable, and never saved more. The call for women to replace men still goes on in Britain. Miners are going to be combed out again. The Trade Unions have been again approached by the Premier and Sir Auckland Geddes on this question of man power. The Battalions must be filled ...
— Women and War Work • Helen Fraser

... at last, when most of them partake The pipe delicious, for its own dear sake. They rest and smoke, and smoke and rest again, Until the "Come, boys!" sounds in loudest strain. Once more to work, with fresh alacrity, They reach the fallow, pleased as men can be. The teamsters call their cattle, not far strayed, But chewing cud beneath some green tree's shade. "Co' Buck! Co' Bright!" throughout the woods resound, And each trained ox moves forward at the sound. Again the work goes forward, as before. Till nearly night-fall, ...
— The Emigrant Mechanic and Other Tales In Verse - Together With Numerous Songs Upon Canadian Subjects • Thomas Cowherd

... Third, as you call him, I know nothing beyond the fact that he is a protege of the king of France, and has now fought against his own people—a blunder, as it seems to me, of the worst kind, and one which is certain to alienate many of ...
— In the Irish Brigade - A Tale of War in Flanders and Spain • G. A. Henty

... "You might call them libertarian and totalitarian, though the latter don't necessarily think of themselves as such. The peak of rampant individualism was reached in the nineteenth century, legally speaking. Though in point of fact social pressure and custom were more strait-jacketing than ...
— The Sensitive Man • Poul William Anderson

... stallions, brothers to el-Sooltan, even then in Cairo, and famous throughout Egypt, tore past him like a cyclone and left him indifferent; a chestnut brood mare, whose price was above that of many rubies, trotted up at his call and snuffled a welcome in his sleeve, searched for sugar in his hand and found it, and whinnied gently when he turned away; bays, piebalds, roans, greys, trotted, galloped, jumped, whilst their master smoked endless cigarettes and the ...
— The Hawk of Egypt • Joan Conquest

... so call the priest,' answered he, and when the ceremony was over a cannon was fired and music was played, and within ...
— The Violet Fairy Book • Various

... the phonetic rules. Ihad pointed out this slip before, in the second edition of my "Sanskrit Grammar;" but, as to judge from an article of his on the accent, Professor Whitney has not seen that second edition (1870), which contains the Appendix on the accent in Sanskrit, Ibeg leave to call his attention ...
— Chips from a German Workshop - Volume IV - Essays chiefly on the Science of Language • Max Muller

... the bottles on the shelves. The prefect spoke to Brother Michael and Brother Michael answered and called the prefect sir. He had reddish hair mixed with grey and a queer look. It was queer that he would always be a brother. It was queer too that you could not call him sir because he was a brother and had a different kind of look. Was he not holy enough or why could he not catch up ...
— A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man • James Joyce

... monotonous songs of the conjurers, that Oowikapun was filled with a strange feeling of awe, which was much increased when they all knelt down reverently on the ground and Memotas seemed to talk with the Great Spirit and call him his Father. Then he thanked him for all their blessings, and asked his forgiveness for everything they had done that was wrong, and he asked his blessing upon his family and everybody else, even upon his enemies, if he had any. Then he ...
— Oowikapun - How the Gospel Reached the Nelson River Indians • Egerton Ryerson Young

... 'I was told to call no one and to make no noise for fear of creating a panic. I thought the precaution reasonable. I took one of the lamps that were hung under the awnings and went forward. After opening the forepeak hatch I heard splashing in there. I lowered then ...
— Lord Jim • Joseph Conrad

... shone in both pairs of eyes as a result of this meeting. He stood gloomy and grim, while the two were talking together, and then rather brusquely—and to the disgust of Holmes, who was discoursing eagerly with pretty Mabel Falkner—he reminded his aunt that they were due to call at So-and-So's, and were far behind ...
— The Sign of the Spider • Bertram Mitford

... Gascons, who still clung to him, not because they loved England but because they hated France, spurred him to war; and in 1229 a secret invitation came from the Norman barons. But while Hubert held power no serious effort was made to carry on a foreign strife. The Norman call was rejected through his influence, and when a great armament gathered at Portsmouth for a campaign in Poitou it dispersed for want of transport and supplies. The young king drew his sword and rushed madly on the Justiciar, charging him with treason and corruption by ...
— History of the English People, Volume II (of 8) - The Charter, 1216-1307; The Parliament, 1307-1400 • John Richard Green

... Pursuant to a call for a convention of the people issued by Governor Perry in obedience to the proclamation of President Johnson for the purpose of organizing a State Government, the Convention assembled at Columbia, S.C., ...
— The Journal of Negro History, Volume 5, 1920 • Various

... depth of barely five feet of water across the mouth of the harbour, and several Europeans, impatient of waiting, have been drowned when attempting to land in small boats. "I frequently have to take my passengers back to Baku," said Captain Z—— at the meal he was pleased to call breakfast; "but I think we shall have fine weather ...
— A Ride to India across Persia and Baluchistan • Harry De Windt

... sort of meaning to it, though,' observed Payne. 'For instance, if a bloke backed a winner and made a pile, 'e might call 'is 'ouse, ...
— The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists • Robert Tressell

... mind among them, very distinct from each other? From my testimony then about myself, if you believe it, judge of others also who are Catholics: we do not find the difficulties which you do in the doctrines which we hold; we have no intellectual difficulty in that doctrine in particular, which you call a novelty of this day. We priests need not be hypocrites, though we be called upon to believe in the Immaculate Conception. To that large class of minds, who believe in Christianity after our manner,—in the particular temper, spirit, and light, (whatever word is used,) in which ...
— Apologia Pro Vita Sua • John Henry Cardinal Newman

... ladies ready. The flatboat has probably but ten minutes to live. We must take the women and children ashore. And please, signorina,"—to my sister,—"call M. and Mme. Carpentier." But Joseph had heard all, and showed himself at the door ...
— Strange True Stories of Louisiana • George Washington Cable

... love and appreciation at your command, but let it be intelligent appreciation, not blind admiration or prejudiced disapproval. Do you recollect how you felt and dreamed and gushed when you were a girl, the pages of sentimental twaddle (as you now call it) which you confided to the diary which you burned in disgust at twenty-one? Do you remember how genuine your distresses then seemed? You can smile at the girl you once were, but still you find it in your heart to pity her, poor, silly child, foolishly sobbing late into the ...
— The Secret of a Happy Home (1896) • Marion Harland

... voices outside demanded her. It was the noon halt and Lucy was an important factor in the machinery of the train. Glen's call for her was mingled with the fresh treble of Bob's and Bella's at a farther distance, rose in a plaintive, bovine lowing. She stretched a hand sideways ...
— The Emigrant Trail • Geraldine Bonner

... clothes. One should never take off one's body the garlands of flowers one may wear. Nor should one wear such garlands over one's outer garments. One should never even talk with a woman during the period of her functional change. One should not answer a call of nature on a field (where crops are grown) or at a place too near an inhabited village. One should never answer a call of nature on a water. One should first wash one's mouth thrice with water ...
— The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 4 • Kisari Mohan Ganguli

... out, circling and striking with a speed that was surprising in one of his height and weight. "Foot-work," Flynn called it, and there were times, I think, when the hard-breathing Irishman was glad enough at the call of "time." ...
— Paradise Garden - The Satirical Narrative of a Great Experiment • George Gibbs

... Geoffrey Benteen," exclaimed Madame impulsively, "what have I done except sit quietly in a boat, waiting the passing of the hours? You have been through strain and labor which wears out life. It is you who will lie here upon my wrap, trusting me to call should ...
— Prisoners of Chance - The Story of What Befell Geoffrey Benteen, Borderman, - through His Love for a Lady of France • Randall Parrish

... he intended to have his house to himself, and, more, he purposed to appropriate any other residence he chose to select, whoever might claim it. Hostilities began the moment the door was shut upon them; he drove her away from the food-cup, he fought her over the bathing-dish, he answered her sweet call with a harsh "chack" or an insulting "huff," he twitched her feathers if she came near him, and gave her a peck if she seemed to be having too easy a time. Withal, such was his villainous temper that he desired a victim to abuse, and never let her out of his sight for two minutes, lest she ...
— Upon The Tree-Tops • Olive Thorne Miller

... know," said the Professor, "that what we call music does not appear as such to savages. Noise and sound are not distinguished by them. The beating of their crude tom toms is the only thing that appeals to their ears. That is simply noise. Rhythm and time are recognized, principally ...
— The Wonder Island Boys: The Tribesmen • Roger Finlay

... general human reason to be obliged to assume, as an article of mere belief, the existence of things external to ourselves (from which, yet, we derive the whole material of cognition for the internal sense), and not to be able to oppose a satisfactory proof to any one who may call it in question. As there is some obscurity of expression in the demonstration as it stands in the text, I propose to alter the passage in question as follows: "But this permanent cannot be an intuition in me. For all the determining grounds of my existence which can be found ...
— The Critique of Pure Reason • Immanuel Kant

... difficulty: but on looking at the list they saw names, as they {310} thought, which were so obscure that they had a right to assume Mr. Baily had included persons who had no claim to such a compliment as presentation from the Admiralty. The Secretary requested Mr. Baily to call upon him. "Mr. Baily, my Lords are inclined to think that some of the persons in this list are perhaps not of that note which would justify their Lordships in presenting this work."—"To whom does your observation apply, Mr. Secretary?"—"Well, ...
— A Budget of Paradoxes, Volume I (of II) • Augustus De Morgan

... six weeks and was inconsolable until another friend gave her this one. She thought first of calling him Vesuvio, which was the name of his predecessor, but could not bring herself to do so. Then she had the inspiration to call him Etna, which suited him better, because he was a trifle bigger; it was also a kind of complimentary reference to her first love. While she told us this she was making coffee with a spirit lamp on the chest of drawers. She had a speciality for making ...
— Castellinaria - and Other Sicilian Diversions • Henry Festing Jones

... cupboard of plate, and did call for my silver chafing dishes, but they are sent home, and the man would not be paid for them, saying that he was paid for them already, and with much ado got him to tell me by Mr. Wayth, but I would not accept of that, but will send him his money, not knowing any courtesy I have yet done ...
— Diary of Samuel Pepys, Complete • Samuel Pepys

... by British forms,—God forbid!—for if ever there was a case in which the letter kills and the spirit gives life, it would be an attempt to introduce British forms and the substance of despotic principles together into any country. No! We call for that spirit of equity, that spirit of justice, that spirit of protection, that spirit of lenity, which ought to characterize every British subject in power; and on these, and these principles only, ...
— The Works Of The Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. IX. (of 12) • Edmund Burke

... hindered by the isolation of the islands from foreign markets and a lack of natural resources and good transportation links. A large trade deficit is annually made up for by remittances from emigrants and from foreign aid. Current economic development plans call for exploiting the tourism potential and expanding the fishing industry. National product: GDP - exchange rate conversion - $40 million (1988 est.) National product real growth rate: 5.3% (1986-88 est.) National product per capita: $2,200 (1988 est.) Inflation rate (consumer prices): 8% (1988) ...
— The 1993 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency.

... old, old story, yet I kneel To tell it at thy call; And cares grow lighter as I feel That Jesus knows ...
— Poems with Power to Strengthen the Soul • Various

... of March 28, 182-, was precisely one of the nights that were wont to call forth these expressions of commiseration. The level rain-storm smote walls, slopes, and hedges like the cloth-yard shafts of Senlac and Crecy. Such sheep and outdoor animals as had no shelter stood with ...
— Stories by English Authors: England • Various

... them. In the morning they go towards the place whence came the odour, and search there for the rhubarb until they find it. Rhubarb is the putrefied wood of a great tree, and acquires its odour even from its putrefaction, the best part of the tree is the root, nevertheless the trunk, which they call calama, ...
— Celebrated Travels and Travellers - Part I. The Exploration of the World • Jules Verne

... and thou shall dye. Therefore betake you to what fence you will; Amongst this bundle chuse one weapon forth And like a worthy Duke prepare thy selfe In knightly manner to defend thy life; For I will fight with thee and kill thee, too, Or thou shalt give an end unto my life. But if thou call unto thy slaves for helpe, Burbon, my sword shall nayle thee to the wall. And thinke Prince Philip is a Prince indeed To give thee this advantage ...
— A Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. III • Various

... Imitating other men's natures, thou layest aside thy own Immoderate either seeking or evading glory or reputation Impose them upon me as infallible Impostures: very strangeness lends them credit Improperly we call this voluntary dissolution, despair Impunity pass with us for justice In everything else a man may keep some decorum In ordinary friendships I am somewhat cold and shy In solitude, be company for thyself—Tibullus In sorrow ...
— Quotes and Images From The Works of Michel De Montaigne • Michel De Montaigne

... a trolling line as we passed up the lake; but we caught no trout. Along the shore, however, we caught small ones in plenty with the fly. These shore trout, as I call them, seem to be a distinct species, differing in many respects from the other trout of the lakes or streams. They are uniform in size, rarely exceeding a quarter of a pound in weight. They are of a whitish color, longer in proportion than the lake, ...
— Wild Northern Scenes - Sporting Adventures with the Rifle and the Rod • S. H. Hammond

... on whom we could Depend—that is, by the strict application of the law of Fear, not Kindness, and who stood in such Terror of us, and of our ever-ready Thongs, Halters, Pistols, and Cutlasses, as scarcely to dare call their souls their own—followed us with Sumpter mules well laden with provisions, kegs of drink, both of water and ardent, and additional ammunition. I was full of glee at the prospects of this Foray, vowed that it was a hundred times pleasanter than making out Maum Buckey's washing-books, ...
— The Strange Adventures of Captain Dangerous, Vol. 2 of 3 • George Augustus Sala

... but he let the subject drop, and once more, on reaching camp, we went to sleep, trusting to Boxer to call us if necessary, and as we could not take the wolf-skin, he benefited most ...
— With Axe and Rifle • W.H.G. Kingston

... eyes which held new depths of affection. The last moment of the interview yesterday had brought an undreamed development, strangely endearing: her father, in the nicest way, had invited Dr. Vivian to call on him at the Works this afternoon and see the plant for himself. Part of this perfect consummation had been due, without doubt, to Vivian himself, a little, perhaps, to the direction she had artfully given the conversation; but she well knew that most of it had sprung spontaneously from ...
— V. V.'s Eyes • Henry Sydnor Harrison

... Whether the call came to them from a promising or unpromising field, on them rested the duty of responding. In the great Sermon on the Mount, our Lord, after finishing with his gentle and sweet benedictions, abruptly turned and, with changed tone and ...
— The American Missionary, Vol. 43, No. 7, July, 1889 • Various

... KING. Ungentle queen, to call him gentle Suffolk! No more, I say; if thou dost plead for him, Thou wilt but add increase unto my wrath. Had I but said, I would have kept my word, But when I swear, it is irrevocable.— If, after three days' space, thou here be'st found On any ground ...
— King Henry VI, Second Part • William Shakespeare [Rolfe edition]

... reflected a short time, and not knowing there was such a ship on the Navy List, turned to the first lieutenant and asked him if he had heard of such a man-of-war. "No," said he, smiling, "the captain chooses to call her so; he means the flag-ship." On repairing on board her, my commander said to me, "You help me to look at those fellows' phizes," pointing to a number of men who were toeing the seam on her quarter-deck. "I am to take thirty of them; they are queer-looking chaps, and I do ...
— A Sailor of King George • Frederick Hoffman

... to make use of their senses and their brains, but we have refused to recognize the very force that guides all these instincts, the vital power of sex. Yet, in the face of this stupidity, acknowledging the call of the age, girls are sent out into the industrial world, where they fight shoulder to shoulder with men. Here they find potential worth of their individualities; here they meet with the same—no greater—temptation than their brothers, but ...
— Sex-education - A series of lectures concerning knowledge of sex in its - relation to human life • Maurice Alpheus Bigelow

... discovery, and particularly in the capture of the cacique Caonabo. Knowing the daring and adventurous spirit of this man, Columbus felt much disturbed at his visiting the island in this clandestine manner, on what appeared to be little better than a freebooting expedition. To call him to account, and oppose his aggressions, required an agent of spirit and address. No one seemed better fitted for the purpose than Roldan. He was as daring as Ojeda, and of a more crafty character. An expedition of the ...
— The Life and Voyages of Christopher Columbus (Vol. II) • Washington Irving

... together I was speechless, and could remember nothing,—not even my own name. And, when that stage had passed, and I began to move more freely among my fellows, for years I was but a wreck of my former self. I was visited, at all hours of the day and night, by frightful—I know not whether to call them visions, they were real enough to me, but since they were visible to no one but myself, perhaps that is the word which best describes them. Their presence invariably plunged me into a state of abject terror, against which I was unable ...
— The Beetle - A Mystery • Richard Marsh

... affairs; but they were neither authorized to advance nor to retard any measure taken by the Directors in consequence of that state: they were not provided even with sufficient means of knowing what any of these measures were. And this imperfect information, together with the want of a direct call to any specific duty, might have, in some degree, occasioned that remissness which rendered even the imperfect powers originally given by the act of 1773 the less efficient. This defect was in a great measure remedied by a subsequent ...
— The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. VIII. (of 12) • Edmund Burke

... Advantage they set upon him with their Emissaries to discover to them his Adherents, as they call'd them, and promis'd him great Things on one Hand, threatning him with his utter Ruin on the other; and the Great Scribe of the Country, with another of their great Courtiers, took such a low Step as to go to him to the Dungeon where they ...
— The Consolidator • Daniel Defoe

... course he did not know it just then, Bob was very much mistaken when he made this prophecy. It happened that events were shaping themselves at that very hour in a way calculated to call upon the saddle boys to make another venture into the realms of chance, and mounted upon their prized horses too. What these events were, and how well Frank and Bob acquitted themselves when brought ...
— The Saddle Boys in the Grand Canyon - or The Hermit of the Cave • James Carson

... regret that she had remained so long from home, made me strive to soothe her fears. When she was about to hurry away, I begged her to tell me her name, that I might know what to call ...
— A Yacht Voyage to Norway, Denmark, and Sweden - 2nd edition • W. A. Ross

... {194} They so call certain women, who without being in the cloisters use the habit of nuns, and live in common ...
— Roman Catholicism in Spain • Anonymous

... eyes, and these openly admitted deep anger. He recollected Herr Rosen well enough. The encounter over at Cadenabbia was not the first by many. Herr Rosen! His presence in this room under that name was an insult, and he intended to call the interloper to account the very ...
— The Place of Honeymoons • Harold MacGrath

... of fact," he continued presently, and with a highly self-satisfied note in his voice, "apart from the executive work it's what the Americans call a lead-pipe cinch. We can't lose. I've been fishing for this quite a while, and I put it over by getting in touch with the right people. It's wonderful what you can do in the proper quarter. The Vancouver Construction Company consists of Joe Hedley and myself. Joe is ...
— Burned Bridges • Bertrand W. Sinclair

... encouraging denial, I must own: as was the rest of her plea; to wit, 'A disinclination to change her state. Exceedingly happy as she was: she never could be happier!' And such-like consenting negatives, as I may call them, and yet not intend a reflection upon my sister: for what can any young creature in the like circumstances say, when she is not sure but a too-ready consent may subject her to the slights of a sex that generally values a blessing ...
— Clarissa, Volume 1 (of 9) • Samuel Richardson

... provinces was always flowing into Rome itself; particularly in the Flavian time; and supplied or fed a new centripetalism there which righted things in the next half-cycle. It was Rome, not the provinces, that Nero and Caligula represented in their day; the time was transitional; you may call Otho and Vitellius the first bungling shots of the provinces at having a hand in things at the center; wholesome Vespasian was their first representative emperor: Nerva and those that followed him represented equally the provinces ...
— The Crest-Wave of Evolution • Kenneth Morris

... There growing longest by the meadow's edge, And into many a listless annulet, Now over, now beneath her marriage ring, Wove and unwove it, till the boy returned And told them of a chamber, and they went; Where, after saying to her, 'If ye will, Call for the woman of the house,' to which She answered, 'Thanks, my lord;' the two remained Apart by all the chamber's width, and mute As two creatures voiceless through the fault of birth, Or two wild men supporters of a shield, Painted, who stare at open space, nor glance The one ...
— Idylls of the King • Alfred, Lord Tennyson

... was assured of more than competence, he never expressed them. His one regret was the effect of his enlistment on those most closely bound to him by affections which had been deepened and made more tender by the sense of common exile. At last the hour came when he was free to follow the imperative call of patriotic duty. He went to Ottawa, saw Sir Sam Hughes, and was offered a commission in the Canadian Field Artillery on the completion of his training at the Royal Military College, at Kingston, Ontario. The last weeks of his training were passed ...
— Carry On • Coningsby Dawson

... remarkable for some of those qualities which bring them either blame or praise; and thus it is that one is reputed liberal, another miserly, using a Tuscan term (because an avaricious person in our language is still he who desires to possess by robbery, whilst we call one miserly who deprives himself too much of the use of his own); one is reputed generous, one rapacious; one cruel, one compassionate; one faithless, another faithful; one effeminate and cowardly, another bold and brave; one affable, another haughty; one lascivious, another chaste; ...
— The Prince • Niccolo Machiavelli

... von with a capital V when at the beginning of a period, while neither von nor the corresponding French de as predicate of nobility should ever be spelled with a capital) at that time suffered from intermittent fever, but was cured by the use of calisaya bark. I mention this to call attention to the fact that quinine was not known in the year 1812. When the corps marched into Poland the abundance of provisions which the soldiers had ...
— Napoleon's Campaign in Russia Anno 1812 • Achilles Rose

... Longsword, giving way to his indignation, 'if this is the only answer you can give to my complaint, I advise you to call yourself no longer a king; since you have no longer the privilege of being obeyed, or of administering justice, or punishing offenders.' And rising with a dignity which awed most of those present, he left ...
— The Boy Crusaders - A Story of the Days of Louis IX. • John G. Edgar

... and came from a lady worker, afterwards the dearest and most valued of the many friends I made in France. I shall not soon forget the day I first entered her canteen. She and her fellow-worker, also a valued friend now, did not call me a "—— parson"; but they left me under the impression that I was not wanted there. Her snub, delivered as a lady delivers such things, was ...
— A Padre in France • George A. Birmingham

... offspring - a wise precaution against degeneracy, in view of the quantities of self-fertilized seed that will be set late in summer by the tiny apetalous flowers that never open (see white wood sorrel). Surely two kinds of blossoms should be enough for any species; but why call this the frost-flower when its bloom is ended by autumn? Only the witch-hazel may be said to flower for the first time after frost. When the stubble in the dry fields is white some cold November morning, comparatively ...
— Wild Flowers, An Aid to Knowledge of Our Wild Flowers and - Their Insect Visitors - - Title: Nature's Garden • Neltje Blanchan

... are stationed so as to be everywhere within call. There is no longer any body of rioters, and the individuals are hunted to their holes, and led to prison. Lord George was last night sent to the ...
— The Diary and Letters of Madame D'Arblay Volume 1 • Madame D'Arblay

... zealous friends of the gospel applied to Charles, king of Bohemia, to call an economical council, for an inquiry into the abuses that had crept into the church, and to make a full and thorough reformation. The king, not knowing how to proceed, sent to the pope for directions how to act; but the pontiff was so incensed at this affair, that his only reply ...
— Fox's Book of Martyrs - Or A History of the Lives, Sufferings, and Triumphant - Deaths of the Primitive Protestant Martyrs • John Fox

... seems to be that the two speeches proceed upon the supposition that love is and ought to be interested, and that no such thing as a real or disinterested passion, which would be at the same time lasting, could be conceived. 'But did I call this "love"? O God, forgive my blasphemy. This is not love. Rather it is the love of the world. But there is another kingdom of love, a kingdom not of this world, divine, eternal. And this other love I will now show you in ...
— Phaedrus • Plato

... it scented its prey, stand motionless like a statue, and then slowly crawl forward with a peculiar gait; and another kind of wolf rushing round, instead of at, a herd of deer, and driving them to a distant point, we should assuredly call these actions instinctive. Domestic instincts, as they may be called, are certainly far less fixed than natural instincts; but they have been acted on by far less rigorous selection, and have been transmitted for ...
— On the Origin of Species - 6th Edition • Charles Darwin

... accordingly made for the appointment and supervision of teachers and evangelists at Use, Ikpe, and Odoro Ikpe, and for the care of the children. It was also decided to realise her settlement scheme and call it "The Mary Slessor Home for Women and Girls," with a memorial missionary in charge, and later an appeal for a capital sum of L5000 for the purpose was issued. It would have pleased Mary to know that the lady chosen for the position of memorial missionary was her old colleague ...
— Mary Slessor of Calabar: Pioneer Missionary • W. P. Livingstone

... 1983 Turkish Cypriot President Rauf DENKTASH declared independence and the formation of a "Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus" (TRNC), which has been recognized only by Turkey; both sides publicly call for the resolution of intercommunal differences and creation of a new federal ...
— The 1995 CIA World Factbook • United States Central Intelligence Agency

... and if thou hadst thought, how at your quivering your image quivers within the mirror, that which seems hard would seem easy to thee. But that thou mayst to thy pleasure be inwardly at ease, lo, here is Statius, and I call on him and pray that he be now the healer of thy wounds." "If I explain to him the eternal view," replied Statius, "where thou art present, let it excuse me that to thee I cannot ...
— The Divine Comedy, Volume 2, Purgatory [Purgatorio] • Dante Alighieri

... little warlike world within! The well-reeved guns, the netted canopy, The hoarse command, the busy humming din. When at a word, the tops are manned on high: Hark to the boatswain's call, the cheering cry! While through the seaman's hand the tackle glides, Or school-boy midshipman, that, standing by, Strains his shrill pipe, as good or ill betides, And well the docile crew ...
— The Two Admirals • J. Fenimore Cooper

... the north of the Hector Bank that voyage. I said, 'All right, sir,' wondering what he was fussing about, since I had to call him before altering the course anyhow. Just then eight bells were struck: we came out on the bridge, and the second mate before going off mentions in the usual way—'Seventy-one on the log.' Captain Brierly looks at the compass and then all round. It was dark ...
— Lord Jim • Joseph Conrad

... the Fourth Avenue Church called a meeting of ministers and church officials to discuss the probable loss of the amendment that was to have been the cure for liquor evils. The call to the meeting was ...
— David Lannarck, Midget - An Adventure Story • George S. Harney

... the battalion my heart-felt thanks, and assure each and all that if in after-years they call on me or mine, and mention that they were of the Thirteenth Regulars when Willie was a sergeant, they will have a key to the affections of my family that will open all it has; that we will share with them our last blanket, our last ...
— Memoirs of Three Civil War Generals, Complete • U. S. Grant, W. T. Sherman, P. H. Sheridan

... back to help thresh, and Wednesday he had been obliged to go to town to see about board for the coming term; but he felt sure of her. It had all been arranged the Sunday before; she'd expect him, and he was to call at eight o'clock. ...
— Main-Travelled Roads • Hamlin Garland

... slinking around this spot. He went as near as he dared trying to overhear words. Perhaps the general, unable to comprehend chaos, might call upon him for information. And he could tell him. He knew all concerning it. Of a surety the force was in a fix, and any fool could see that if they did not retreat while they ...
— The Red Badge of Courage - An Episode of the American Civil War • Stephen Crane

... "I thank you much for the love you have shown me; but I cannot listen. You will call me mad, foolish—the world would do so; but I know what I need and the kind of path I must walk in. I cannot marry you. I will always love you for the sake of what lay by me those three hours; but there it ends. I must know and see, I cannot be bound to one whom I love as I ...
— The Story of an African Farm • (AKA Ralph Iron) Olive Schreiner

... laid upon the desk, and presently he that sat at it lifted his eyes and glanced at the superscription. He scarcely spoke above a whisper; but his words, nevertheless, were clearly distinguishable. I did not call to mind the sound of his voice, but his words called ...
— Arthur Mervyn - Or, Memoirs of the Year 1793 • Charles Brockden Brown

... eloquence of St. Aldegonde produced a profound impression. The men who had obstinately refused the demands of Alva, now unanimously resolved to pour forth their gold and their blood at the call of Orange. "Truly," wrote the Duke, a little later, "it almost drives me mad to see the difficulty with which your Majesty's supplies are furnished, and the liberality with which the people place their lives and fortunes at the disposal of this rebel." It seemed ...
— The Rise of the Dutch Republic, 1555-1566 • John Lothrop Motley

... Dihkan Danishwar (A.D. 651). The work of this Danishwar, the "Chodainameh" (Book of Kings), deserves to be specially singled out. It was written, not in neo-Persian and Arabic script, but in what scholars call middle-Persian and in what is known as the Pahlavi writing. It was from this "Chodainameh" that Abu Mansur, lord of Tus, had a "Shah Nameh" of his own prepared in the neo-Persian. And then, to complete the tale, in 980 a certain ...
— Persian Literature, Volume 1,Comprising The Shah Nameh, The - Rubaiyat, The Divan, and The Gulistan • Anonymous

... direct road. And yet Swithin did not turn; he felt an indescribable reluctance to see Viviette. He could not exactly say why. True, before he knew how the land lay it might be awkward to attempt to call: and this was a ...
— Two on a Tower • Thomas Hardy

... (explained that) he could not be so presumptuous; but as Pao-y would not listen to any such thing, but went on to address him as brother and to call him by his style Ch'ing Ch'ing, he had likewise himself no help, but to begin calling him, at random, anything ...
— Hung Lou Meng, Book I • Cao Xueqin

... age for compulsory military service after January 1st of the year of 18th birthday; 17 years of age for voluntary military service; in 2005 Poland plans to shorten the length of conscript service obligation from 12 to 9 months; by 2008, plans call for at least 60% of military personnel to be volunteers; only soldiers who have completed their conscript service are allowed to volunteer for professional service; as of April 2004 women are only allowed to serve as officers ...
— The 2005 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency

... battle," she had said, and seized his hands and kissed them as if in passionate gratitude. "And 'tis a debt—a debt I swore to pay—if that we call God would let me. Perhaps He will not, but were He you—who know ...
— His Grace of Osmonde • Frances Hodgson Burnett



Words linked to "Call" :   howl, span, tell, put off, phone, sick call, yowl, call down, prophesy, call waiting, tempt, order, nickname, holloa, yaup, hail, mobilise, let loose, pipe, send for, ring, telecommunicate, get together, calling, cards, bellow, call it quits, straddle, Bronx cheer, battle cry, call one's bluff, service call, table, ululate, outbid, skreigh, set back, bid, call off, visit, muster call, enjoin, venture, call up, instruction, boo, callable, awaken, telephone call, screak, clamor, shriek, name, system call, halloo, bell-like call, holler, collect call, label, entitle, summons, claim, squawk, decision, second-guess, distress call, function call, stop, razzing, margin call, demand, cite, come by, shout out, hue and cry, mail call, term, mobilize, vociferation, play, wake up, blue murder, summon, foregather, vocalization, post, telecom, birdcall, war cry, yell, brand, call attention, drop in, muster, call centre, two-note call, refer, call forwarding, bird, remit, call number, call on, assemble, call for, cell phone, roar, trunk call, asking, wake, wail, prorogue, baptise, war whoop, gather, determination, call the tune, call fire, misname, recall, baptize, foretell, regard, vaticinate, tag, shout, razz, port of call, style, long distance, hold over, adjudge, gainsay, call-out, yawl, shrieking, siren call, outcry, call it a day, caller, shelve, challenge, dub, program line, call option, drop by, screech, square dance, call-in, exclaim, emit, stop over, disposition, miscall, whoop, consider, yodel, defer, forgather, call in, double, yelling, raspberry, pretend, athletics, birdsong, shouting, curtain call, conference call, turn to, call back, lift, request, underbid, wake-up call, hold, close call, clamoring, put over, clamouring, bellowing, hosanna, postpone, skreak, rename, Salafast Group for Call and Combat, round, call center, telecommunication, bespeak, put option, anticipate, cry, telephone, meet, read, hoot, phone call, rouse, animal communication, shrill, inclination, call to order, roaring, screeching, declare, hurrah, call loan, guess, call at, address, expect



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