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Bush   Listen
verb
Bush  v. t.  To furnish with a bush, or lining; as, to bush a pivot hole.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Bush" Quotes from Famous Books



... forth again towards evening. The road was nothing more than a dray-track, to which the horses were unequal; and after proceeding a few miles, they were detained at the village of Prospect for a week, till one of the partners had returned to Sydney, and brought back a pair of bush-horses and a new cart. As they proceeded the next day, they found the track over which they travelled become more and more populous; till, on crossing the Macquarrie, they encamped in the midst of thirteen teams of cattle ...
— Chambers's Edinburgh Journal, No. 430 - Volume 17, New Series, March 27, 1852 • Various

... or some times the elder ones, who set out on this woodland excursion had no fixed destination, ... when they were tired of going on the ordinary road, they turned into the bush, and wherever they saw an inhabited spot ... they went into it with all the ease of intimacy.... The good people, not in the least surprised at this intrusion, very calmly opened the reserved apartments.... After ...
— Woman's Life in Colonial Days • Carl Holliday

... spectral gloom among the old woods, giving a distorted look to the trunks of the trees, the low bushes, the turned up roots, and the boulders scattered over the ground. See what ogre shapes these things assume as the darkness deepens. Look at that cedar bush, with its dense foliage! It is a crouching lion, and as its branches wave in the gentle breeze, he seems preparing for his leap; and yonder boulder is a huge elephant! The root that comes out from the crevice is his trunk, and the moss and lichens which hang ...
— Wild Northern Scenes - Sporting Adventures with the Rifle and the Rod • S. H. Hammond

... that now On bush and tree, Near leaves so green Looks down to see Flowers looking up— He either sings In ecstasy Or claps ...
— Foliage • William H. Davies

... statesman. He is said to have great powers of sarcasm. From what I have observed there, I should think very little ones would be quite sufficient. Many a sneer withers in those walls, which would scarcely, I think, blight a currant-bush out of them; and I have seen the House convulsed with raillery which, in other society, would infallibly settle the rallier to be a bore beyond all tolerance. Even an idiot can raise a smile. They are so good-natured, or find it so dull. Mr. Canning's badinage was the most successful, ...
— The Young Duke • Benjamin Disraeli

... noon; and at one o'clock, or a little before, Parson Polwhele come striding along home from Little Dinnis. He had tied a handkerchief about his head to keep off the sun; his hands and knees were coated with earth; and he sweated like a furze-bush in a mist, for the footpath led through cornfields and the heat was something terrible. Moreover, he had just called the funeral to mind; and this and the damage he'd left at Little Dinnis fairly hurried him ...
— News from the Duchy • Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... A bush of wild marsh-marigold, That shines in hollows gray, He cut, and smiling to his love, He ...
— Punchinello, Vol. 1, No. 11, June 11, 1870 • Various

... longer checked by a hedgerow, and she had wandered vaguely, unable to distinguish any objects, notwithstanding the wide whiteness around her, and the growing starlight. She sank down against a straggling furze bush, an easy pillow enough; and the bed of snow, too, was soft. She did not feel that the bed was cold, and did not heed whether the child would wake and cry for her. But her arms had not yet relaxed their instinctive clutch; and ...
— Silas Marner - The Weaver of Raveloe • George Eliot

... The rose-bush, planted with such tearful care, Stands in the winter sunshine stiff and bare; Save here and there its lingering berries red Make the cold ...
— Purgatory • Mary Anne Madden Sadlier

... it with thee; it will secure for thee an eternal youth.'Gilgames gathers the branch, and in his joy plans with Arad-Ea future enterprises: 'Arad-Ea, this plant is the plant of renovation, by which a man obtains life; I will bear it with me to Uruk the well-protected, I will cultivate a bush from it, I will cut some of it, and its name shall be, "the old man becomes young by it;" I will eat of it, and I shall repossess the vigour of my youth.'" He reckoned without the gods, whose jealous minds will not allow men to participate in their privileges. The first place on which they set ...
— History Of Egypt, Chaldaea, Syria, Babylonia, and Assyria, Volume 3 (of 12) • G. Maspero

... it I came out through the canes close to her with the letter in my hand. But when she see the letter she dropped the basket with the raspberries in it (they rolled all about on the ground right under the peony bush, for that was a silly, old-fashioned garden, with the flowers and fruit about it anyhow), and I had a nice business picking them up, and she threw her arms round my neck and kissed me, and cried like the silly little thing she was, and thanked me for bringing the ...
— In Homespun • Edith Nesbit

... fluttering thoughts, like a man perfectly confused and out of myself, I came home to my fortification, not feeling, as we say, the ground I went on, but terrified to the last degree, looking behind me at every two or three steps, mistaking every bush and tree, and fancying every stump at a distance to be a man. Nor is it possible to describe how many various shapes my affrighted imagination represented things to me in, how many wild ideas were found every moment in my fancy, and what strange ...
— Library of the World's Best Literature, Ancient and Modern — Volume 11 • Various

... paid no attention to my questions about the river. When the party moved on they followed, and when I halted or rode back they ran off; thus alternately retiring and returning, and calling to the men. At last I galloped my horse at them, whereupon they disappeared altogether in the bush. At 10 1/2 miles we came upon the river, and encamped where it was very deep and broad, the banks and also the flood marks being much lower than further up ...
— Three Expeditions into the Interior of Eastern Australia, Vol 1 (of 2) • Thomas Mitchell

... the orchard's middle avenue between long, sinuous boughs picked out with delicate, rose-hearted bloom. When he reached its southern boundary he flung himself down in a grassy corner of the fence where another lilac bush grew, with ferns and wild blue violets at its roots. From where he now was he got a glimpse of a house about a quarter of a mile away, its gray gable peering out from a dark spruce wood. It seemed a dull, gloomy, remote ...
— Kilmeny of the Orchard • Lucy Maud Montgomery

... by the open window and fanned herself with a feeling of triumphant indignation. If Jean or Helen had been home, she knew perfectly well they would have been soft-hearted and lenient, but every berry on every bush was precious to Kit, and she felt that now was the appointed hour, as ...
— Kit of Greenacre Farm • Izola Forrester

... looked up from his feeding to growl again. The girl desisted. She hoped that he might satisfy his hunger and then depart to lie up, but she could not believe that he would leave her there alive. Doubtless he would drag the remains of his kill into the bush for hiding and, as there could be no doubt that he considered her part of his prey, he would certainly come back for her, or possibly drag her ...
— Tarzan the Untamed • Edgar Rice Burroughs

... love for verse among them than among the English. But they suffer themselves to be led in their choice of poets by English critics of average discernment; this is said of them by their own men of letters. Tennyson is idolized deep down in the bush woods (to their honour be it said), but to understand you sufficiently, they wait for the explanations of the critics. So I wanted them to see what Landor says of you. The comfort in these questions is, that there can be no question, except between the sooner and the ...
— The Letters of Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Barrett, Vol. 1 (of 2) 1845-1846 • Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Barrett

... the reach of his vengeance? The fear fastened itself upon him, urging him to greater effort, and he called upon the last of his strength in a spurt that carried him to where the thick spruce gave place to thin bush, and the bush to the barren and rocky side of a huge ridge, up which the trail climbed strong and well defined. For a few paces he followed it, then slipped and rolled back as the fatal paralysis deadened all power of movement in his limbs. He lay where he ...
— The Honor of the Big Snows • James Oliver Curwood

... See this bit of gorse-bush. The whole year round the thorn has been hardening and sharpening. Spring comes: the thorn does not drop off, and it does not soften; there it is, as uncompromising as ever; but half-way up appear two brown furry balls, mere specks at first, that break at last—straight ...
— Parables of the Cross • I. Lilias Trotter

... [Mr. Schurz] making these displays about a mere matter of ordinary convenience, it reminds me of the nursery story of the children who thought the sky was going to fall, and it turned out in the end that it was only a rose-leaf that had fallen from a bush to the ground." ...
— Twenty Years of Congress, Volume 2 (of 2) • James Gillespie Blaine

... drew him along from hill to valley, and valley to hill, all the day, every step leading him out of the way from the plain where he had left his camp and the princess Badoura: and instead of perching at night on a bush, where he might probably have taken it, roosted on a high tree, safe from his pursuit. The prince, vexed to the heart at having taken so much pains to no purpose, thought of returning; "But," said he to himself, "which ...
— The Arabian Nights Entertainments Complete • Anonymous

... nearer him. He could see the little figure in a blue jersey marching along the paths with a wheelbarrow, very important because he was helping his father. He had called the big clump of azaleas "the burning bush." ... He had always been a funny ...
— Penny Plain • Anna Buchan (writing as O. Douglas)

... far and wide for the beautiful "holly berries" with which to decorate our homes at Christmas. When we have found a berry-laden bush, we eagerly break off the branches and bear them home in triumph. The bush, once so gay with berries, is a sad-looking thing when we are through with it. The branches are broken so far back that next year it will bear few berries and we shall ...
— Conservation Reader • Harold W. Fairbanks

... Pitt's Deep there was an inn a little back from the road, very large and wide-spread, with a great green bush hung upon a pole from one of the upper windows. At this window he marked, as he rode up, that a man was seated who appeared to be craning his neck in his direction. Alleyne was still looking up at him, when a woman came rushing from the open door of the inn, and made as though she would ...
— The White Company • Arthur Conan Doyle

... remarkable for his revolutionary and anti-British principles. He was brave as a lion, and never quailed before a man; but, though caring so little for a LIVING man, he was extremely afraid of a DEAD one, and would go ten miles out of his road at night to avoid passing a "rath," or "haunted bush." Harry Taylor, on the other hand, was a staunch Protestant; a tall, genteel-looking man, of proud and imperious aspect, and full of reserve and hauteur—the natural consequence of a consciousness of political and religious ascendency ...
— Stories by English Authors: Ireland • Various

... After a time the wolf becomes hungry, and exclaims: "I am hungry." The cock answers: "I have nothing to give you." "Very well; then I will eat you;" and he swallows him whole. And so he devours one after the other, until the bird only remains. The bird flies from tree to tree and bush to bush, and around the wolf's head, until he drives him wild with anger. At last along comes a woman with a basket on her head, carrying food to the reapers. The bird says to the wolf that if he will spare his life he will get him something to eat from the basket. The wolf ...
— Italian Popular Tales • Thomas Frederick Crane

... of the nightingale who was singing to his lady- love in the hawthorn bush, and he lost his place in his song and nearly tumbled over backwards into the garden. Then to her joy she met an elderly, domestic puss taking an evening walk with a view ...
— The Grey Brethren and Other Fragments in Prose and Verse • Michael Fairless

... close application at his desk in the village school was an unheard-of consequence; and, having repeatedly smarted under the schoolmaster's ferule, not to mention his good mother's switches plucked from the big lilac bush by her door, he decided to run away to the great harbor, and ship upon some vessel bound for a ...
— A Woman who went to Alaska • May Kellogg Sullivan

... trenches we had seen that morning. The orderly who had served us, withdrawn a little way, was standing like a statue in the dusk, hands folded in front of him, saying his last prayer of the evening. Beyond, from a bush-covered tent, came the jingle of a telephone and 'the singsong voice of the young Turkish operator relaying messages in German—"Ja!... Ja!... Kaba Tepe... Ousedom Pasha... Morgen ...
— Antwerp to Gallipoli - A Year of the War on Many Fronts—and Behind Them • Arthur Ruhl

... in our town, And he was wondrous wise; He jumped into a bramble bush, And scratch'd out ...
— The Little Mother Goose • Anonymous

... clump of brush, close to the outer fringe, behind a low, broad boulder, a man had lain on his belly no longer ago than yesterday. Broken twigs showed it, a small bush crushed down told of it, the marks of his toes in some of the softer soil proclaimed it eloquently. And, had other signs been required, there they were: two empty brass cartridges where the automatic ejector had thrown them several feet ...
— Judith of Blue Lake Ranch • Jackson Gregory

... at the thought that she was with him and he had eighty pounds a year. Gaily he waved both his hands to her, and she answered with a smile, and then, in his boyishness, he jumped over a gooseberry bush. Immediately afterwards he reddened and tried to look venerable, for while in the air he had caught sight of two women and a man watching him from the dyke. He walked severely to the door, and, again forgetting himself, was bounding ...
— The Little Minister • J.M. Barrie

... every word and note is uplifting, and creates the mood for religious impressions. The writer, Rev. John Bush Atchison, was born at Wilson, N.Y., Feb. 18, 1840, and died ...
— The Story of the Hymns and Tunes • Theron Brown and Hezekiah Butterworth

... a canoe trip on the Moose River, a disconsolate looking little Indian dog came and sat shyly watching us while we broke camp. We learned that the Indian owners had gone to the bush leaving him to fare as he might through the coming winter. When our canoe pushed out into the river there was an extra passenger. We brought him home to Congers, where he immediately carried consternation into the ...
— A Woman's Way Through Unknown Labrador • Mina Benson Hubbard (Mrs. Leonidas Hubbard, Junior)

... into a wood. Of what consequence was it whether his horse was known or not? for how could that help his pursuer to catch him, if, like a maroon negro, having run away safely into the impenetrable thicket, he staid in the bush for the remainder of his days,—or as long as he was not wanted for a breakfast by a hungry wild beast? The author means us to understand, after the fugitive had baffled pursuit by getting into the depth of the forest, that he lay ...
— Tacitus and Bracciolini - The Annals Forged in the XVth Century • John Wilson Ross

... brand; His turban far behind him rolled, And cleft in twain its firmest fold; 660 His flowing robe by falchion torn, And crimson as those clouds of morn That, streaked with dusky red, portend The day shall have a stormy end; A stain on every bush that bore A fragment of his palampore;[100] His breast with wounds unnumbered riven, His back to earth, his face to Heaven, Fall'n Hassan lies—his unclosed eye Yet lowering on his enemy, 670 As if the hour ...
— The Works Of Lord Byron, Vol. 3 (of 7) • Lord Byron

... and frames these enchanting pictures? It is nothing less than the genius which is common to humanity. If we are not able to draw or model, we possess the power to select, group, and clothe with an ideal grace, which is the very soul of art, and every man and woman, every bush, nay, every cabbage, cup, and saucer, provided only it be not actually before us, becomes part of a divine picture. Would that we could do with the present what we do with the past! We CAN do ...
— The Revolution in Tanner's Lane • Mark Rutherford

... "was in sugar making, an occupation to which I became much attached. I now look with great pleasure upon the days and nights passed in the sap-bush. The want of shoes (which, as the snow was deep, was no small privation) was the only drawback upon my happiness. I used, however, to tie pieces of an old rag carpet around my feet, and got along pretty well, chopping wood and gathering ...
— Eclectic School Readings: Stories from Life • Orison Swett Marden

... above, which was to have been his last defence, he never used. The defection of his guards made him abandon that. To build it, they say, cost Hayti thirty thousand lives. He had the true Imperial lavishness. So high it was, so lost in a wilderness of trees and bush, looking out over a land relapsed now altogether to a barbarism of patch and hovel, so solitary and chill under the tropical sky—for even the guards who still watched over its suspected treasures feared to live in its ghostly galleries and had made hovels outside its walls—and at ...
— The Research Magnificent • H. G. Wells

... led them up the slope towards Arwenack through the darkness that had now closed in. To tread his native soil once more went near to drawing tears from him. How familiar was the path he followed with such confidence in the night; how well known each bush and stone by which he went with his silent multitude hard upon his heels. Who could have foretold him such ...
— The Sea-Hawk • Raphael Sabatini

... Ashmoor-street Chapel may neither be luminous nor eloquent, neither pythonic in utterance nor refined in diction, but they are at least worth as much as he gets for them. Any man able to sermonise better, or rhapsodise more cheaply, or beat the bush of divinity more energetically, can occupy the pulpit tomorrow. It is open to all England, and possession of it can be obtained without a ...
— Our Churches and Chapels • Atticus

... usually shrewd observers would locate by the aid of a hazel twig the exact spot where water could be found. In searching for water one sometimes runs across these men even to-day. The superstitious faith in the power of the forked twig or branch from the hazelnut bush to indicate by its twisting or turning the presence of underground water was at one time widespread, but only the very slightest foundation of fact exists for the belief ...
— The Home Medical Library, Volume V (of VI) • Various

... accompany two parties at once. Let us follow just now the one composed of Joe Slag, Terrence O'Connor, and John Mitford. These, with Joe as their leader, proceeded along the shore some miles in a northerly direction; and then, turning into the bush, which was nowhere thick, they pushed into the interior of the island. After advancing about ten miles they came on a wide stretch of sandhills or downs, and found that, having crossed a sort of isthmus, they had come ...
— The Coxswain's Bride - also, Jack Frost and Sons; and, A Double Rescue • R.M. Ballantyne

... I found I had no strength to bear a scene which recalled my memories of past happiness. "Ah!" I thought, "I see it still, that barren moor, dried like a skeleton, lit by a gray sky, in the centre of which grew a single flowering bush, which again and again I looked at with a shudder,—the forecast ...
— The Lily of the Valley • Honore de Balzac

... lonesome was that desolate bar between the "bay" and the ocean. Here and there it swelled up into great drifts and mounds of sand, which were almost large enough to be called hills; but nowhere did it show a tree or a bush, or even a patch of grass. Annie Foster found herself getting melancholy as she gazed upon it and thought of how the winds must sometimes sweep across it, laden with sea-spray and rain and hail, or the bitter sleet and blinding ...
— St. Nicholas Magazine for Boys and Girls, Vol. 5, October 1878, No. 12 • Various

... our villa! stuck like the horn of a bull Just on a mountain-edge as bare as the creature's skull, Save a mere shag of a bush with hardly a leaf to pull! —I scratch my own, sometimes, to see if the ...
— Robert Browning: How To Know Him • William Lyon Phelps

... pure as a spring Is the wine I sing, And to praise it, one needs but name it; For Catawba wine Has need of no sign, No tavern-bush ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. I., No. 3, January 1858 - A Magazine of Literature, Art, and Politics • Various

... brought me nowhere in particular, and stopping for a minute to consider, I picked a few wild fruit, such as my wood-cutter friend had eaten, from an overhanging bush, and in so doing slipped, the soil having now become damp, and in falling broke a branch off. The incident was only important from what follows. Picking myself up, perhaps a little shaken by the jolt, I set off again upon what seemed the plain road, and being by this time displeased ...
— Gulliver of Mars • Edwin L. Arnold

... (named in honor of Mr. T. of Georgia), which lies beyond Mount Vaughan, and three and a half miles from Cape Palmas. There is no road to the interior of the country, except a native path. The agent, with a party of twenty, recently penetrated about seventy miles into the Bush, passing through two tribes, and coming to a third, of large numbers and strength. The king of the latter tribe has a large town, where many manufactures are carried on, such as iron implements and wooden furniture of various kinds. He refused Mr. Russwurm ...
— Journal of an African Cruiser • Horatio Bridge

... my ball, my ball. Be quick and change us both. Me into a wild rose bush, And him into a rose ...
— The Violet Fairy Book • Various

... festoon every hedge. The wild hop, the brione, the clematis or traveller's joy, the large white convolvulus, whose bold yet delicate flowers will display themselves to a very late period of the year—vetches, and white and yellow ladies-bed-straw— invest almost every bush with their varied beauty, and breathe on the passer-by their faint summer sweetness. The campanula rotundifolia, the hare-bell of poets, and the blue-bell of botanists, arrests the eye on every dry bank, rock, and wayside, with its beautiful cerulean bells. There too we behold wild scabiouses, ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 10, Issue 262, July 7, 1827 • Various

... Jim. "What's the use of beating round the bush? We're all crazy for fresh meat. The only thing to do is to draw lots to see who'll sacrifice his feelings and do the shooting. We'll ...
— Jim Spurling, Fisherman - or Making Good • Albert Walter Tolman

... I got into was a lady and her two grown-up daughters, and a son of about five-and-twenty. They lived in a small house at Shepherd's Bush. My wages were very small, and I soon found out that they were a kind of people who keep up a great deal of show on very little means. Of course I had to be let into all the secrets of their miserable shifts for dressing ...
— The Unclassed • George Gissing

... low, and was replenished from the wood pile which stood between the two teepees standing a few yards away in the shadow of the bush which lined the trail. These men, both white and coloured, had the habit of the trail deeply ingrained in them. But then, was it not their life, practically the whole of it? Stephen Allenwood was a police officer who represented the white man's ...
— The Heart of Unaga • Ridgwell Cullum

... the steed's neck, "this will never do. You and I must not give in to our first misfortune. No doubt the want of water for two days is hard to bear, but we are strong and young both of us. Come, let's try at least for a sheltering bush to sleep under, ...
— The Settler and the Savage • R.M. Ballantyne

... monument; she's been coming every cold weather for ten years, poor old Rosy. Don't you think you could do her a bit of an interview for Wednesday's paper? She'll write up very well—get her on variety entertainments in the Australian bush." ...
— Hilda - A Story of Calcutta • Sara Jeannette Duncan

... threw so clear a light on us that I feared the crew on board the sloop might see our forms and suspect their misadventure. But the lantern still hung steadily: so signing to Billy to drag our prisoner behind a tamarisk bush, I open'd the second packet, and poured some of ...
— The Splendid Spur • Arthur T. Quiller Couch

... the sun was drawing out millions of mimic suns from the drops that hung, for a moment ere they fell, from flower and bush and great tree. But Malcolm saw nothing. Perplexed with himself and more perplexed yet with the behaviour of his master, he went back to his grandfather's cottage, and, as soon as he came in, recounted to him the ...
— Malcolm • George MacDonald

... that a servant should throw down a bag with ten pounds in it, into a bush, and that Brittlebank—your brother's man—should see him do it! And lo! when we looked ...
— Come Rack! Come Rope! • Robert Hugh Benson

... breed o' black Campbells from Perth to Galway and Fonda's Bush, which ye dub Broadalbin. I had rather be a Monteith and have the betrayal of Wallace cast in my face than be a Campbell of Argyle wi' the memory o' Glencoe to ...
— The Maid-At-Arms • Robert W. Chambers

... you ever see so many on one bush?" exclaimed Amanda, and the bush was indeed well filled ...
— A Little Maid of Province Town • Alice Turner Curtis

... I ain't deaf. Samson, sprinkle another spadeful of manure on that bridal-wreath bush over thar by ...
— The Miller Of Old Church • Ellen Glasgow

... returned, but was disconcerted on arriving under the olive-tree to find Dona Rosita no longer in the hammock. He turned into a by-path, where an extraordinary circumstance attracted his attention. The air was perfectly still, but the leaves of a manzanita bush near the misshapen cactus were slightly agitated. Presently Ezekiel saw the stealthy figure of a man emerge from behind it and approach the cactus. Reaching his hand cautiously towards the plant, the stranger detached something ...
— The Argonauts of North Liberty • Bret Harte

... cap or sword and, until this moment, he had not wanted to take them down since he was a child; and even now the habit of obedience held him back for a while, as he stood looking up at them. Outside, a light wind rustled the leaves of the rose-bush at his mother's window, swept through the open door, and made the curtain at his elbow swell gently. As the heavy fold fell back to its place and swung out again, it caught the hilt of the sword and made the metal point of the scabbard clank softly against the wall. The boy breathed ...
— Crittenden - A Kentucky Story of Love and War • John Fox, Jr.

... excuse-making reasoning. Nobler thoughts showed him the fallacy of this beating around the bush. Explanations and demonstrations are unnecessary to the understanding of patriotic and religious ideals; true patriotism does not need them. One's country . . . is one's country. And the laboring man, skeptical and jesting, the self-centred farmer, the solitary ...
— The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse • Vicente Blasco Ibanez

... the stab of a poignard. There, behind that bush, some people were kissing. He ran thither; and found an amorous couple whose faces were entwined, united in an ...
— The Works of Guy de Maupassant, Volume IV (of 8) • Guy de Maupassant

... to the mouth of the Wady Tiryam, where we arrived before our luggage and provisions, lacking even "Adam's ale." The Shaykhs took all the water which could be found in the palm-boothies near the shore, and drank coffee behind a bush. This sufficed to give me the ...
— The Land of Midian, Vol. 1 • Richard Burton

... up beating about the bush, Pa?" she demanded, with contemptuous pity. "You might as well own up what's taking you to Carmody. I can see through your design. You want to get away to the Garland auction. That is what is troubling ...
— Chronicles of Avonlea • Lucy Maud Montgomery

... milked a brindled Cow Out in a pasture green, The Birdies sang from bush and bough— All Nature ...
— The Slant Book • Peter Newell

... were standing beneath the old thorn-bush at the far end of the orchard; indeed, they had been standing there for some time, with their heads held close, just as though they were talking together. In fact, that is just what they were doing. They were talking about ...
— Plantation Sketches • Margaret Devereux

... passed along swiftly over the smooth gravel road. Great, beautiful trees overshadowed the ground on either side with their long arms; and underneath, the turf was mown short, fresh and green. Sometimes a flowering bush of some sort broke the general green with a huge spot of white or red flowers; gradually those became fewer, and were lost sight of; but the beautiful grass and the trees seemed to be unending. Then a gray rock here and there began to show itself. Pony got through his gallop, and subsided again ...
— Melbourne House • Elizabeth Wetherell

... that beast of the ancients which came to the poor man's door. In the darkness its eyes, glowing like coals, are ever watching me, and even in the bright daylight its shadowy form is ever near me, stealing from bush to bush, or from room to room, always dogging my footsteps. Will it ever vanish, like a mere phantom—a wolf of the brain—or will it come nearer and more near, to spring upon and rend me at the last? If they could only clothe my mind as they have my body, to make me like themselves ...
— A Crystal Age • W. H. Hudson

... hand, and one word in her ear, When they reached the hall door, and the charger stood near; So light to the croupe the fair lady he swung, So light to the saddle before her he sprung! "She is won! we are gone, over bank, bush, and scaur; They'll have fleet steeds that follow," ...
— Poems Every Child Should Know - The What-Every-Child-Should-Know-Library • Various

... tailoring began; and he saw it, and told you. It is a sign for him to be up and flying. He thought it would be his excuse for declining your invitation, instead of which you all went thrusting your heads into a bramble-bush. O my!" ...
— Our Young Folks, Vol 1, No. 1 - An Illustrated Magazine • Various

... doorway, under a bush of green ilex, we sat down in company to eat bread and peaches sopped in the wine of the country, and talked very briskly of all the things we had seen and heard. And soon into the current of our discourse was drawn a dark-faced youth, who had been ...
— Earthwork Out Of Tuscany • Maurice Hewlett

... of the present age, the introduction of the coming age, and the glorification of Zion, with the heavy judgments of God that shall accompany these events. Many of these revelations are made through the medium of symbols. In the seventh and last revelation, a voice addresses Ezra out of a bush, as it did Moses of old. Upon his complaining that the law has been burnt, he is directed to take five ready scribes, with a promise that the holy writings which are lost shall be restored to his people. The next day the voice calls ...
— Companion to the Bible • E. P. Barrows

... a very bad hand at talking, and therefore I won't beat about the bush in what I've got to say at present. Of course we've all heard of that scoundrel Crosbie, and the way he has ...
— The Small House at Allington • Anthony Trollope

... Doubtless Webster, if at home, would loose his dog did such a one appear. A wayfarer, also, in former times was but a goer of ways, a man afoot, whether on pilgrimage or itinerant with his wares and cart and bell. Does the word not recall the poetry of the older road, the jogging horse, the bush of the tavern, the crowd about the peddler's pack, the musician piping to the open window, or the shrine in the hollow? Or maybe it summons to you a decked and painted Cambyses bellowing his wrath ...
— Journeys to Bagdad • Charles S. Brooks

... Osborne sneered. He hesitated, glowering in the difficulty of thinking. "See here, Monsieur Duchemin—since you prefer that style—I'm not going to beat about the bush with you. I'm a plain man, plain-spoken. They tell me you reformed. I don't know anything about that. It's my conviction, once a thief, always a thief. I may ...
— The False Faces • Vance, Louis Joseph

... later than them!" he answered, still beating about the bush; "she comed here later than them," he ...
— She and I, Volume 1 • John Conroy Hutcheson

... reached, and the two were just congratulating themselves upon having passed the dangerous spot in safety, when a large bird, flying from a near-by bush, frightened Billy and caused him to ...
— Young Auctioneers - The Polishing of a Rolling Stone • Edward Stratemeyer

... highly favoured in various ways. The second is Moses, who drove away the rival shepherds and helped the daughters of the Priest of Midian to water their flock, and who, while he was keeping the flock of Jethro, his father-in-law, saw the Angel of the Lord in a flame of fire in a bush. And the third is David, the man after God's own heart. He was "the man who was raised up on high, the anointed of the God of Jacob, and the sweet Psalmist of Israel[27];" but he was found among the sheep. "He ...
— Parochial and Plain Sermons, Vol. VIII (of 8) • John Henry Newman

... say, in this world; so are the men of this world: they must have all their good things now, they cannot stay till next year, that is, until the next world, for their portion of good. That proverb, "A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush," is of more authority with them than are all the Divine testimonies of the good of the world to come. But as thou sawest that he had quickly lavished all away, and had presently left him nothing but rags; so will it be ...
— The Works of John Bunyan • John Bunyan

... "If thou break off a twig from one of these plants, the thoughts thou hast will all be cut short." Then I stretched my hand a little forward and plucked a branchlet from a great thorn-bush, and its trunk cried out, "Why dost thou rend me?" When it had become dark with blood it began again to cry, "Why dost thou tear me? hast thou not any spirit of pity? Men we were, and now we are become stocks; truly thy hand ought to be more pitiful had we been ...
— The Divine Comedy, Volume 1, Hell [The Inferno] • Dante Alighieri

... prospecting; I've had a turn in the great grazing grounds, though I didn't care to sink the little money I had in a fancy flock in the hope of turning it into a herd, or to spend my life on horseback galloping after half-wild cattle on the plains. I wasn't long "beating about the bush," though I've once or twice been out with the natives and have had a brush with the rangers, one of whom—Black Jack—carried a bullet of mine about in his shoulder for some time before he fell ...
— Miss Grantley's Girls - And the Stories She Told Them • Thomas Archer

... chief to pay a fine, and in a manner with shaking him with overmastering fear. Yet he said he advised them thus, not because he was really terrified, but because he was moved with compassion for their youth. Ket replied that it was idle to waste time in beating so much about the bush and trying to sap their righteous longing for revenge by an offer of pelf. So he bade him come forward and make trial with him in single combat of whatever strength he had. He himself would do without the aid of his brother, and would fight with ...
— The Danish History, Books I-IX • Saxo Grammaticus ("Saxo the Learned")

... forced to mind his steering while the glare of the headlamps flickered across deep holes and ruts. Few of the dirt roads leading to the new Canadian cities are good, but the one they followed, though roughly graded, was worse than usual and broke down into a wagon trail when it ran into thick bush. For a time, the car lurched and labored like a ship at sea up and down hillocks and through soft patches, and Foster durst not lift his eyes until a cluster of lights twinkled among the trees. Then with a sigh of relief he ran into ...
— Carmen's Messenger • Harold Bindloss

... watched the calves in the fields beyond the river. It grew dark, and I fell asleep. It was towards the end of October, and it proved a stormy night. I felt the cold in my sleep, and dreamed that I was pulling the blanket over me, and actually pulled over me a dry thorn-bush which lay on the ground near me. In my sleep I had rolled from the top of the hill till within three yards of the river, which flowed by the unfenced edge of the bottom. I awoke several times, and, finding myself wet and cold and stiff, closed my eyes again ...
— The Posthumous Works of Thomas De Quincey, Vol. II (2 vols) • Thomas De Quincey

... average home there comes the feeling that the kitchen—the room itself—is just as much an expression of the family life and aims and ideals as the living room or any other room, we shall be only beating about the bush in our endeavor to find a remedy for some of ...
— American Cookery - November, 1921 • Various

... a short time upon a Bush farm, my experiences were of such a practical nature as to entitle me to speak with confidence on many rural matters. The religious opinions so frequently and strongly expressed are the result of a careful study of God's Word, and I feel that for ...
— The Emigrant Mechanic and Other Tales In Verse - Together With Numerous Songs Upon Canadian Subjects • Thomas Cowherd

... pattern), a little way off, and rather in the shade; and be sure you get all the grace and look of the pattern without going a step nearer to see what it is. Then try to draw a bank of grass, with all its blades; or a bush, with all its leaves; and you will soon begin to understand under what a universal law of obscurity we live, and perceive that all distinct drawing must be bad drawing, and that nothing can be right, till it ...
— Modern Painters, Volume IV (of V) • John Ruskin

... came in perfectly furious, carrying a paper. She had found it under the laurel bush, at the foot ...
— International Short Stories: French • Various

... found them both under a narrow ledge that thrust out a dozen feet below the edge of the trail. A stunted bush, rooted deep in some hidden crevice, grew up before it, and, staring upward at it, the girl guessed that to this little bush alone Buck owed his life. He had been able to give her no further details of his descent, but she saw that it would be possible for a man to crawl along ...
— Shoe-Bar Stratton • Joseph Bushnell Ames

... behind the bush, and Levin saw nothing but the bright flash of a match, followed by the red glow and blue smoke of ...
— Anna Karenina • Leo Tolstoy

... a poor, little house even when the wistaria vine covered it, wall and roof, and the bees hummed among its clusters of violet blossoms; but now the wistaria bush was only a tangle of twisted wires hung upon it, and the little weather-stained cabin looked bare and poor enough. As the young fellow stood in the door looking out with the evening light upon him, his ...
— The Burial of the Guns • Thomas Nelson Page

... morning. The sun arose and lit up into flashing splendor the icy glories of the landscape. From every roof and eave, from every bough and bush, dropped millions of blazing jewels. Earth wore a gorgeous bridal dress, bedecked with diamonds. Within the doctor's house everything was comfortable as you could wish. A rousing fire of hickory wood roared upon the hearth, an abundant breakfast of coffee, ...
— The Rector of St. Mark's • Mary J. Holmes

... in some cases this may preserve them, it cannot be depended on as a rule. To keep up a steady bloom, pinch off all flowers as soon as they begin to fade. It is best to not let the buds open fully while on the bush, but they should be cut in the bud, and placed in a vase of water, where they will expand and keep for a long while. All dead leaves and flower stems should be carefully removed, and the surface of the soil in the pots should be stirred up occasionally with a stick, ...
— Your Plants - Plain and Practical Directions for the Treatment of Tender - and Hardy Plants in the House and in the Garden • James Sheehan

... expert inquiry at holes which might prove to be rabbit warrens; glaring in truculent threat up some tree which might or might not harbor an impudent squirrel; affecting to see objects of mysterious import in bush clumps; crouching in dramatic threat at a fat stag-beetle which scuttled across ...
— Further Adventures of Lad • Albert Payson Terhune

... mortar and bricks for the construction of his strong cities. It was then that one of them, Moses, received from God the mission to deliver them. One day while he was keeping his herds on the mountain, an angel appeared to him in the midst of a burning bush, and he heard these words: "I am the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, the God of Jacob. I have seen the affliction of my people which is in Egypt, I have heard their cry against their oppressors, I know their sorrows. And I am come down to deliver ...
— History Of Ancient Civilization • Charles Seignobos

... bordered with inveterate black, like broad beans ripe for planting, shone through a hubbub of snowy froth; while sluicing and wringing and rinsing went on over the bubbled and lathery turf; and every handy bush or stub, and every tump of wiry grass, was sheeted with white, like a ship in full sail, and shining in ...
— Mary Anerley • R. D. Blackmore

... alacrity. "Where shall we go?" she asked in a whisper. "To the forest? There were eyes in the forest last night, not the great, still, solemn eyes that stare at Margery every night, but eyes that glowed like coals, and moved from bush to bush. Margery was afraid, and she left the forest, and sat by the water side all night, listening to what it had to say. A star shot, and Margery knew that a soul was on its way to Paradise, where she would fain go if only she could find the way.... There are ...
— Prisoners of Hope - A Tale of Colonial Virginia • Mary Johnston

... Isaac. We found him of the chimney-corner, whence he seldom stirreth, being now infirm. Old Mary had but then made an end of her washing, and she was a-folding the clean raiment to put by. I ran into the garden and gathered sprigs of rosemary, whereof they have a fine thriving bush. ...
— Joyce Morrell's Harvest - The Annals of Selwick Hall • Emily Sarah Holt

... Anderson, the surgeon, spent his leisure wandering on the beach of Adventure Bay; angling in a lake, or ascending the neighbouring hills.[6] Captain Cook left swine on the shore, which were driven into the bush when the natives were not present; in the hope they might escape them, and thus add to the resources of the country. He departed on the 30th for New Zealand. The account left by Cook is chiefly interesting for its description of the natives, and will be noticed in the ...
— The History of Tasmania, Volume I (of 2) • John West

... a relief, at Winterbourne Bishop, to be in a country which had nothing to draw a man out of a town. A wide, empty land, with nothing on it to look at but a furze-bush; or when I had gained the summit of the down, and to get a little higher still stood on the top of one of its many barrows, a sight of the distant village, its low, grey or reddish-brown cottages half hidden among its ...
— A Shepherd's Life • W. H. Hudson

... called on Dr. Talbot in his office. Half an hour later, looking flushed and angry, he strolled frowning down Bush street, then turned abruptly and walked in the direction of South Park. He did not know Mrs. McLane but he believed she ...
— Sleeping Fires • Gertrude Atherton

... looking back, crying Orza, Orza, beckoning the people to follow, which they did for a mile or two along-shore, out of sight of the vessel: Then the Indians fled to the woods, still wanting our people to follow them; but being disarm'd, they were apprehensive the Indians would bush- fight them, so they thought proper to give over the pursuit, and to return ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume 17 • Robert Kerr

... emigrating to New Zealand was this: My uncle's second son, Lewis, had abandoned the profession of the law and gone to Australia by himself, where he was now a shepherd in the bush. He would rejoin his father, and they would be a re-united family. All of them would be together in New Zealand except one, my cousin Edward, who lay in the family vault in Burnley Church. I had feelings of the strongest ...
— Philip Gilbert Hamerton • Philip Gilbert Hamerton et al

... junction of the Tsavo, palms of various sorts replace to a large extent the forest trees. Naturally also the stream widens and flows more slowly. Outside the palms grow tall elephant-grass and bush. Our marching had generally to be done in the narrow, neutral space between these two growths. It was pleasant enough, with the river snatching at the trailing branches, and the birds and animals rustling away. Beyond the elephant-grass flats low ridges ran down to the river, varying in width, ...
— African Camp Fires • Stewart Edward White

... which are here, like the legends of Popery, first coined and stamped in the church. All inventions are emptied here, and not a few pockets. The best sign of the Temple in it is that it is the thieves' sanctuary, who rob more safely in a crowd than a wilderness, while every pillar is a bush to hide them. It is the other expense of the day, after plays and taverns; and men have still some oaths to swear here. The visitants are all men without exceptions; but the principal inhabitants are stale knights ...
— Old Saint Paul's - A Tale of the Plague and the Fire • William Harrison Ainsworth

... foeman at Trafalgar and the Nile, But I had a nation's wealth and numbers at my back the while. His was one long fight with scarcely seven score to do his will, With a host of open foes and secret foes, more deadly still; Foes in every bush and hollow, foes behind his monarch's throne, Stabbing with one hand extended seemingly to clasp his own. Yet he triumphed, and behold you! now a country growing fast, With a glorious future breaking through the darkness of the past, With a host of stout ...
— Fleurs de lys and other poems • Arthur Weir

... English king has fought after that fashion. Having slain many, he was himself slain and his diminished force destroyed. So ended the war of the usurpers; and the last and most doubtful of all the usurpers, a wanderer from the Welsh marches, a knight from nowhere, found the crown of England under a bush of thorn. ...
— A Short History of England • G. K. Chesterton

... enjoying the moonlight; while down in the chickens' house, in the corner of the yard, Houpet and his friends were calmly roosting; fat little Nibble soundly sleeping in his cage, cuddled up in the hay; poor, placid Grignan reposing in his usual corner under the laurel bush. All these things Hugh would have seen, and would no doubt have wondered much at them. But though neither tired nor cold, he was still sleepy, very sleepy, so, after another stare all round, he decided that he would defer further ...
— The Tapestry Room - A Child's Romance • Mrs. Molesworth

... her head held high and her eyes cold and determined. "What do you want me to do? Please don't beat about the bush any longer." ...
— One Man in His Time • Ellen Glasgow

... Marguerite Oger well to the fore, and the little Countess Foder, and beautiful Mrs. Henry of the American Embassy. There were the ladies belonging to the Academic confraternity, Madame Ancein in mauve on the arm of Raverand, the leader of the bar; Madame Eviza, a bush of little roses surrounded by a busy humming swarm of would-be barristers. Behind the President's bench was Danjou, standing with folded arms, and showing above the audience and the judges the hard angles of his regular stage-weathered countenance, everywhere to be seen during the last forty ...
— The Immortal - Or, One Of The "Forty." (L'immortel) - 1877 • Alphonse Daudet

... sported a long, twirling mustache, that almost enveloped his mouth. The sailors said he looked like a rat with his teeth through a bunch of oakum, or a St. Jago monkey peeping through a prickly-pear bush. ...
— White Jacket - or, the World on a Man-of-War • Herman Melville

... Through bush, and brake, and forest, Ran the cunning Pau-Puk-Keewis; Like an antelope he bounded, Till he came unto a streamlet In the middle of the forest, To a streamlet still and tranquil, That had overflowed ...
— The Song Of Hiawatha • Henry W. Longfellow

... whirlwind, and it was only owing to his horse's instinct that he did not ride wide of the hut altogether; for during the last half-mile he never saw the hut, until its outline loomed suddenly over his horse's ears; and by then the sun was invisible.— "A Bride from the Bush." ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... and the like,—the equipment, in short, of a decent frontier yeoman of the time.[273] But being, like the tough veteran, his father, of a bold and adventurous disposition, he seems to have been less given to farming than to hunting and bush-fighting. ...
— A Half Century of Conflict - Volume I - France and England in North America • Francis Parkman

... leader, who might have restored their courage, lay senseless in the bush, and as the second in command, the big warrior, seized him to drag him away from the fire, the wall of flame emitted something even more terrifying than the magnificent figure of the mad panther. Out of the red glare shot a huge gaunt figure with long white teeth and slavering jaws, the king wolf, ...
— The Eyes of the Woods - A story of the Ancient Wilderness • Joseph A. Altsheler

... is ready to lay her egg, she often has great trouble in discovering a nest at just the right stage. She leaves the flock and perches upon some tree or bush, where she can have a good view of all that is going on. When she discovers a nest by watching the actions of its owners, she waits for an opportunity when both the owners are away, when she approaches it very stealthily, but quickly, keeping a very sharp watch, ...
— St. Nicholas Magazine for Boys and Girls, Vol. 5, July 1878, No. 9 • Various

... Lacerated and torn by prickles, and covered all over with blood, he began to wander in that forest destitute of men but abounding with animals of diverse species. Sometime after, in consequence of the friction of some mighty trees caused by a powerful wind, a widespread bush fire arose. The raging element, displaying a splendour like to what it assumes at the end of the Yuga, began to consume that large forest teeming with tall trees and thick bushes and creepers. Indeed, with flames fanned by the wind and myriads of sparks flying about in ...
— The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 3 - Books 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 • Unknown

... know, there was a nest, Held there by the sideward thrust Of those twigs that touch his breast; Though 'tis gone now. Some rude gust Caught it, over-full of snow,— Bent the bush,—and ...
— Rose and Roof-Tree - Poems • George Parsons Lathrop

... intentions best, no doubt, and perhaps has told them to you. But Ive my daughter to look after; and it's my duty as a parent to have a clear understanding about her. No good is ever done by beating about the bush. I ask Lieutenant—well, I dont speak French; and I ...
— Fanny's First Play • George Bernard Shaw

... skippin' past a winder W'ere a bang-up lady sot, All amongst a lot of bushes— Each one climbin' from a pot; Every bush had flowers on it— Pretty? Mebbe not! Oh, no! Wish you could 'a seen 'em growin', It ...
— Poems Teachers Ask For, Book Two • Various

... savages on the West Coast of Africa during the Ashanti War of 1874. This man knew the natives well, as he had been the Governor's servant there for several years before the niggers swarmed out of the bush to kill off the whites. Every one seemed to be safe in the boats, when Captain Wonham suddenly spied Jack running for his life on top of a long spit of high rocks that jutted out like a wharf. The ...
— Flag and Fleet - How the British Navy Won the Freedom of the Seas • William Wood

... hunted him in, and I hunted him out, Three times through the bog, and about and about; Till out of a bush I spied his head, So I levelled my gun and ...
— The Land-War In Ireland (1870) - A History For The Times • James Godkin

... good of beating about the bush?" he demanded, in a fierce undertone. "You know d—n' well what I mean: you're butting in on the Lawton affair. You've bitten off more than you can chew, and you'd better wise yourself up to that, ...
— The Crevice • William John Burns and Isabel Ostrander

... redoubled his exertions, when, within thirty yards of the shore, an eddy assisted him, and he made sure of success; but when within ten yards, a counter current again caught him, and swept him down. He was now abreast of the very extreme point of the islet; a bush that hung over the water was his only hope; with three or four desperate strokes he exhausted his remaining strength, at the same time that he seized hold of a small bough. It was decayed—snapped asunder, ...
— Newton Forster • Frederick Marryat

... student will do well to banish for the present all thought of ornament or elegance, and to aim only at expressing himself plainly and clearly. The best ornament is always that which comes unsought. Let him not beat about the bush, but go straight to the point. Let him remember that what is written is meant to be read; that time is short; and that—other things being equal—the fewer words the better.... Repetition is a far less serious fault than obscurity. Young ...
— The Verbalist • Thomas Embly Osmun, (AKA Alfred Ayres)

... would they seek it in this low desert, without a tree, without a bush? The bowels of the earth even would not give it. Two feet below the surface ...
— Dick Sand - A Captain at Fifteen • Jules Verne

... town... The sick girl was not getting better... Day after day, and day after day ... but ... here..." (The doctor made a brief pause.) "I declare I don't know how to tell you."... (He again took snuff, coughed, and swallowed a little tea.) "I will tell you without beating about the bush. My patient ... how should I say?... Well she had fallen in love with me ... or, no, it was not that she was in love ... however ... really, how should one say?" (The doctor looked down and grew red.) "No," he went on quickly, ...
— Best Russian Short Stories • Various

... mouse," said he, continuing, "did not beat long about the bush, and from the first moment that she trotted before the shrew-mouse, she had enslaved him for ever by her coquetries, affectations, friskings, provocations, little refusals, piercing glances, and wiles of a maiden who desires yet dares not, amorous ...
— Droll Stories, Complete - Collected From The Abbeys Of Touraine • Honore de Balzac

... haven't heard," he answered indifferently, though his pulses throbbed at the words. Rising from the table an instant later, he went out into the yard, where the sunshine filtered softly through June foliage. By the porch a damask rose-bush was in bloom, and the fragrance followed him along the path between the borders of portulaca. At the gate he found a young robin too weak to fly, and lifting it carefully, he returned it to the nest in a pear-tree. Like all young and helpless ...
— The Miller Of Old Church • Ellen Glasgow

... indicated and peered through the parted curtain. For a few seconds he could see nothing; then, as his eyes grew accustomed to the gloom, he discerned two motionless figures standing on the left-hand side of the drive, partly concealed by a tall laurel bush. ...
— The Lighted Way • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... thick and spreading hawthorn bush That overhung a molehill, large and round, I heard from morn to morn a merry thrush Sing hymns of rapture while I drank the sound With joy—and oft an unintruding guest, I watched her secret toils from day to day; How true she warped the moss ...
— Birds Illustrated by Color Photograph [March 1897] - A Monthly Serial designed to Promote Knowledge of Bird-Life • Various

... the surface; so his enemies went away believing that they had seen the last of him. But, in reality, he was carried down, half drowned, below the next bend in the river, where he fortunately came across a 'snag' floating in the water (a snag is, you know, a part of a tree or bush which floats very nearly under the surface of the water); and he held on to this snag, and by great good luck eventually came ashore some two or three miles down the river. At the place where he landed he came across a fine fat cow buffalo, and immediately ...
— The Orange Fairy Book • Andrew Lang

... from dear old Lady Charlotte Lindsay, who was exceedingly kind and cordial indeed to me. We said many good words about you. After she was gone, the old Berry sisters (who still hang on the bush) tottered in, and I felt touched to the heart by the affectionate sympathy and kind goodwill exhibited towards me by these three ...
— Records of Later Life • Frances Anne Kemble

... of every bush and tree, and keeping its piece always pointed towards the fire. They observed that it was black and ...
— Lost in the Forest - Wandering Will's Adventures in South America • R.M. Ballantyne

... Asquith, to have noticed that! The brilliant phrase, like good wine, needs no bush. But just as the orator marks his good things by a dramatic pause, or by raising or lowering his voice, or by gesture, so the writer marks his epigrams with italics, setting the little gem, so to speak, like a jeweller—an ...
— Oscar Wilde, Volume 1 (of 2) - His Life and Confessions • Frank Harris

... deeper and more wonderful to stir and direct the young discoverer. He sees the apple tree let fall its blossoms, and, lo! the fruit grows day by day to a mellow and enticing ripeness under his eyes. Suddenly he detects a hidden sequence between flower and fruit! The rose bush is covered with buds, small, green, unsightly; a night passes, and, behold! great clusters of blossoming flowers that call him by their fragrance, and when he has come reward him with a miracle of colour. Here is another mystery; and day by day they multiply ...
— Under the Trees and Elsewhere • Hamilton Wright Mabie

... With his merry eyes and his brisk bearing, he looked like a man who was on good terms with Fortune. Indeed, he had good cause to be so, for she had used him well. Three years ago he had been an unknown subaltern bush-fighting with Algonquins and Iroquois in the wilds of Canada. An exchange had brought him back to France and into the regiment of Picardy, but the lucky chance of having seized the bridle of the king's horse ...
— The Refugees • Arthur Conan Doyle

... the bush] It's all very well for the boss to talk. The boss keeps on saying, "You don't bring enough peasants to Hell! See what a lot of tradesmen, gentlefolk, and all sorts of people flock in every day, and how few peasants!" Now, how's one to get ...
— The First Distiller • Leo Tolstoy

... Water Street, between Market and Race Streets, became a desert. The poor were the first victims of the fever. From the sudden interruption of business, they suffered for a while from poverty as well as disease. A large and airy house at Bush-hill, about a mile from the city, was opened for their reception. This house, after it became the charge of a committee appointed by the citizens on the 14th of September, was regulated and governed with the order and cleanliness of ...
— Great Fortunes, and How They Were Made • James D. McCabe, Jr.

... 26th of June, to a female busily engaged in bringing pieces of leaf to her cells, which she was building under a board, on the roof of the piazza, directly under my window. Nearly the whole morning was occupied by the bee in bringing pieces of leaf from a rose bush growing about ten yards from her cells, returning at intervals of a half minute to a minute with the pieces, which she carried in such a manner as not to impede her steps when she alighted near her hole." ...
— Our Common Insects - A Popular Account of the Insects of Our Fields, Forests, - Gardens and Houses • Alpheus Spring Packard

... stubbed out, though it was then important enough, and played a great part in the result of this day's work. Radowesnitz, a pronounceable little Village, half a mile farther or southward of the Oak-bush, is beyond the extremity of Daun's position; low down on a marshy little Brook, which oozes through lakes and swamps towards Kolin, in ...
— History of Friedrich II. of Prussia, Vol. XVIII. (of XXI.) - Frederick The Great—Seven-Years War Rises to a Height.—1757-1759. • Thomas Carlyle

... saw a small black animal walk slowly out from under a big bush. The animal was something like a little tiger, except that she was plain black instead of being striped yellow and black. At first Nero was ...
— Nero, the Circus Lion - His Many Adventures • Richard Barnum

... angel he came (For Victor had been his good guide), And the bush in which Victor appeared Burned bright, and a voice from ...
— The Most Ancient Lives of Saint Patrick - Including the Life by Jocelin, Hitherto Unpublished in America, and His Extant Writings • Various

... but, before her companion could answer, a tattered form moved from behind a bush a little in advance and started ahead in the path, walking and beckoning. Presently they turned into a clear, open forest and followed the long, rapid, swinging stride of the negro for nearly an hour. Then they halted on the ...
— Dr. Sevier • George W. Cable

... Below it, on the window sill, near the wall, with head erect, and its little basilisk eyes upturned towards the lovely fly, crouched a camelion lizard; its beautiful body, when I first looked at it, was a bright sea—green. It moved into the sunshine, a little away from the shade of the laurel bush, which grew on the side it first appeared on, and suddenly the back became transparent amber, the legs and belly continuing green. From its breast under the chin, it every now and then shot out a semicircular ...
— Tom Cringle's Log • Michael Scott



Words linked to "Bush" :   greasewood, bitter pea, silver-bush, low-bush blueberry, Erythroxylon truxiuense, render, chaparral broom, abelia, jasmine, Clethra alnifolia, joewood, cajan pea, Hakea laurina, geebung, Canella winterana, Japanese allspice, Halimodendron argenteum, Halimodendron halodendron, devil's walking stick, coville, maleberry, President Bush, Labrador tea, cotoneaster, Codariocalyx motorius, Indian rhododendron, Ledum groenlandicum, Lindera benzoin, currant bush, fringe bush, Japanese andromeda, Combretum bracteosum, flannelbush, Griselinia littoralis, catclaw, Leycesteria formosa, bean caper, alpine totara, Jew-bush, bristly locust, scrub, crampbark, Lysiloma sabicu, gooseberry, Ardisia escallonoides, squaw-bush, strawberry bush, leadwort, Jacquinia keyensis, Mahonia aquifolium, joint fir, Indian currant, flowering quince, flame bush, Chilean firebush, rabbit bush, carissa, woody plant, Embothrium coccineum, mountain fetterbush, lotus tree, Cordyline terminalis, dusty miller, bush willow, juniper bush, President George W. Bush, cassava, kei apple, cranberry, Erythroxylon coca, Lyonia ligustrina, Ledum palustre, bush league, Croton tiglium, bird's-eye bush, Benzoin odoriferum, Fabiana imbricata, flannel bush, crepe flower, George Walker Bush, stingaree-bush, Bauhinia monandra, elder, currant, lavender cotton, Comptonia peregrina, blackberry bush, glasswort, Dubyuh, hemp, kali, lily-of-the-valley tree, Aristotelia racemosa, elderberry bush, Chilean hazelnut, Dalmatian laburnum, Chinese angelica, Dalea spinosa, consumption weed, artemisia, glory pea, bearberry, shrub, Chimonanthus praecox, false tamarisk, crape myrtle, furnish, Acocanthera spectabilis, Georgia bark, broom, crepe jasmine, barberry, cat's-claw, Chrysolepis sempervirens, beauty bush, allspice, Lepidothamnus laxifolius, George W. Bush, marmalade bush, Baccharis pilularis, Aristotelia serrata, coralberry, Chile hazel, lilac, batoko palm, Vannevar Bush, fetter bush, scarlet bush, Gaultheria shallon, kapuka, Himalaya honeysuckle, Colutea arborescens, dewberry bush, forsythia, rosebush, eggplant bush, jujube, Comptonia asplenifolia, day jessamine, Diervilla lonicera, climbing hydrangea, silverbush, blueberry, smoke bush, buckthorn, minnie bush, Dirca palustris, candlewood, crotch hair, East Indian rosebay, hamelia, stagger bush, bush-league, Caesalpinia decapetala, Lavatera arborea, black-fronted bush shrike, fire thorn, bush nasturtium, Brugmansia suaveolens, crowberry, daisy-bush, boxwood, chaparral pea, huckleberry oak, Cestrum nocturnum, Anadenanthera colubrina, gooseberry bush, angel's trumpet, Dovyalis caffra, belvedere, Datura sanguinea, fuchsia, Cyrilla racemiflora, desert willow, Cajanus cajan, Chinese angelica tree, indigo, buddleia, leucothoe, gastrolobium, American spicebush, Chilean rimu, crepe gardenia, boysenberry bush, German tamarisk, frangipani, beach plum bush, cotton plant, Leucothoe editorum, Ardisia crenata, Griselinia lucida, Hakea leucoptera, honeyflower, Cestrum diurnum, bush violet, Datura arborea, Madagascar plum, cushion flower, Cineraria maritima, leatherwood, bush honeysuckle, Anagyris foetida, glandular Labrador tea, Benjamin bush, African hemp, raspberry bush, kalmia, castor-oil plant, juneberry, cranberry tree, chaparral, crystal tea, Leucothoe racemosa, dombeya, juniper, casava, Leiophyllum buxifolium, Aralia stipulata, bush clover, haw, corkwood tree, bladder senna, buckler mustard, Hercules'-club, Adenium obesum, Astroloma humifusum, forestiera, Heteromeles arbutifolia, Chiococca alba, governor plum, American angelica tree, fothergilla, bean trefoil, gorse, Geoffroea decorticans, George Herbert Walker Bush, Aspalathus linearis, European cranberry bush, George Bush, common flat pea, flowering hazel, hovea, guava bush, Chilopsis linearis, coffee rose, Kiggelaria africana, Lyonia mariana, Flacourtia indica, bitter-bark, bramble bush, five-finger, Christ's-thorn, spice bush, bush jacket, Ardisia paniculata, daisy bush, cinquefoil, impala lily, Biscutalla laevigata, mimosa bush, camelia, needle-bush, Japanese angelica tree, kidney wort, bushing, Datura suaveolens, Irish gorse, Caesalpinia sepiaria, arrow wood, bush out, gardenia, hollygrape, spicebush, Jew bush, arbutus, corkwood, ground-berry, grevillea, camellia, Lyonia lucida, furze, lady-of-the-night, kudu lily, cherry laurel, huckleberry, cyrilla, daisybush, Cytesis proliferus, groundsel tree, Caulophyllum thalictrioides, Chile nut, Baccharis halimifolia, bush leaguer, ephedra, Larrea tridentata, provide, minniebush, dahl, alpine azalea, holly-leaves barberry, he-huckleberry, laurel cherry, lavender, creosote bush, Hibiscus farragei, black bead, Brunfelsia americana, Acocanthera oppositifolia, Grewia asiatica, banksia, bushman's poison, Acocanthera venenata, Christmas berry, Brugmansia arborea, lomatia, burning bush, honeybells, heath, bridal wreath, bridal-wreath, Brazilian potato tree, Aralia spinosa, crape jasmine, Brugmansia sanguinea, Conradina glabra, Aspalathus cedcarbergensis, Lepidothamnus fonkii, kei apple bush, crepe myrtle, honey bell, Australian heath, Hakea lissosperma, Jupiter's beard, oriental bush cherry, staggerbush, calliandra, false azalea, andromeda, capsicum, groundberry, Guevina heterophylla, sugar-bush, California redbud, pubic hair, hiccup nut, flowering shrub, chanal, Chamaedaphne calyculata, Bassia scoparia, American cranberry bush, dhal, black greasewood, Chilean flameflower, bush bean, cranberry bush, Genista raetam, George H.W. Bush, jujube bush, high-bush blueberry, blue cohosh, bush baby, Desmodium motorium, bush vetch, box, bush hibiscus, guelder rose, butterfly flower, goldenbush, Canella-alba, castor bean plant, bryanthus, bush lawyer, firethorn, Leucothoe fontanesiana, amorpha, dwarf golden chinkapin, blueberry root, bush shrike, groundsel bush, fetterbush, blolly, dog hobble, needlebush, croton, coca, coyote bush, European cranberrybush, Eryngium maritimum, Batis maritima



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