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Bush   Listen
noun
Bush  n.  
1.
(Mech.) A lining for a hole to make it smaller; a thimble or ring of metal or wood inserted in a plate or other part of machinery to receive the wear of a pivot or arbor. Note: In the larger machines, such a piece is called a box, particularly in the United States.
2.
(Gun.) A piece of copper, screwed into a gun, through which the venthole is bored.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Bush" Quotes from Famous Books



... a wife for him," said the gnats; "at a hundred human paces from here there sits a little snail in her house, on a gooseberry bush; she is quite lonely, and old enough to be married. It is only a hundred ...
— A Christmas Greeting • Hans Christian Andersen

... the East. Ball, John, Balliol, Edward, eldest son of King John of Scotland. Balliol, John (d. 1269). Balliol, John, lord of Barnard Castle, and of Galloway, son of the above, See also John, King of Scots. Balsham, Hugh, Bishop of Ely. Barnburgh Castle. Bampton in the Bush. Banaster, Adam. Banbury. Banff. Bankers, foreign; Jewish; Italian. Bannatyne club, publications of the. Bannock, the river. Bannockburn, battle of. Bar, Joan of. See Joan. Bar, Count of. Barbavera. Barbezieux. Barbour, ...
— The History of England - From the Accession of Henry III. to the Death of Edward III. (1216-1377) • T.F. Tout

... along a milky-way of white-weed, past dim-clustering Pleiades and Hyades, of small forget-me-nots; and would have led me further still his astral path, but for golden flights of yellow-birds—pilots, surely, to the golden window, to one side flying before me, from bush to bush, towards deep woods—which woods themselves were luring—and, somehow, lured, too, by their fence, banning a dark road, which, however dark, led up. I pushed through; when Aries, renouncing me now for some lost soul, wheeled, ...
— The Piazza Tales • Herman Melville

... the dead of night the damsel opened his door, and with the keys that she had stolen, she opened twelve other locks that stood between them and the postern door. Then she brought him to his armour, which she had hidden in a bush, and she led forth his horse, and he mounted with much joy, and took the maid with him, and she showed him the way to a convent of white nuns, and there ...
— King Arthur's Knights - The Tales Re-told for Boys & Girls • Henry Gilbert

... and I have one shrub in particular which is bringing in quite a little income. It's a species of broom which I discovered in the most accidental fashion. I was on a hunting expedition one day when I was in Africa, and was hiding behind a clump of broom, when I noticed that one bush was different from the rest. They were plain, but it was mottled in two distinct shades of the same colour. It was evidently a freak, a disease of some sort, as such variations generally are, but it was uncommonly ...
— More About Peggy • Mrs G. de Horne Vaizey

... where a reputation for temperance has been lost by a man telling his experiences of a ghost he happens to have met along some country lane; and the fact that there are cases where an imaginative and nervous person has mistaken for a ghost a white goat or a sheet hanging on a bush only strengthens the sceptic's disbelief and makes him blind to the very large weight of evidence that can be arrayed against him. Some day, no doubt, psychologists and scientists will be able to give us a complete and satisfactory explanation of these abnormal apparitions, ...
— True Irish Ghost Stories • St John D Seymour

... through vicissitudes. When Richard III. died, on Bosworth Field, his crown was secured by a soldier and hidden in a bush. Sir Reginald de Bray discovered it, and restored it to its rightful place. But to balance such cases several of the queens have brought to the national treasury their own crowns. In 1340 Edward III. pawned even the queen's jewels to ...
— Arts and Crafts in the Middle Ages • Julia De Wolf Addison

... gray friar in yonder green bush, Clothed in sackcloth—a little gray friar, Like the druid of old in his temple—but hush! He's at vespers; you must ...
— Humour of the North • Lawrence J. Burpee

... au large." If he took me for a body of bloody-minded republicans, rushing forward to disarm him, I certainly thought he was some wild beast. The man was evidently frightened, and just in a condition to take every bush for an enemy. It is true the other party was rather actively employed in disarming the different guards, but this fellow was within a hundred feet of the Etat Major, and in no sort of danger. Notwithstanding the presented bayonet, ...
— A Residence in France - With An Excursion Up The Rhine, And A Second Visit To Switzerland • J. Fenimore Cooper

... Another mode of transferring warts is to touch each wart with a pebble, and place the pebbles in a bag, which should be lost on the way to church; whoever finds the bag gets the warts." A common Warwickshire custom was to rub the warts with a black snail, stick the snail on a thorn bush, and then, say the folks, as the snail dies so ...
— Three Thousand Years of Mental Healing • George Barton Cutten

... awful sound through the dark undergrowth. A gloomy wood by night has terrors for the bravest, and it was only the certainty that she was leaving girl-life—chaperons, waltz-tunes, and bitter sneering, for ever—that gave courage to proceed. A bit of moss-grown wall, a singularly shaped holly-bush, a white stone, took fantastic and supernatural appearances, and once she stopped, paralyzed with fear, before the grotesque shadow that a dead tree threw over an unexpected glade. A strange bird rose ...
— Muslin • George Moore

... had found the pocket and work over the ground. But the increasing richness of the pans began to worry him. By late afternoon the worth of the pans had grown to three and four dollars. The man scratched his head perplexedly and looked a few feet up the hill at the manzanita bush that marked approximately the apex of the "V." He nodded ...
— Moon-Face and Other Stories • Jack London

... tea of tobacco stems and a soapsuds of whale oil or carbolic soap; mix and apply to the bush with a sprinkler, turning the bush so as to wet the under as well as the upper part of the leaves. Apply, before the sun is ...
— The Ladies Book of Useful Information - Compiled from many sources • Anonymous

... Stedman. "Not so very often; about once a year. The Nelson thought this was Octavia, and put off again as soon as she found out her mistake, but the Bradleys took to the bush, and the boat's crew couldn't find them. When they saw your flag, they thought you might mean to send them back, so they ran off to hide again: they'll be back, though, ...
— Cinderella - And Other Stories • Richard Harding Davis

... the bush of flames red Burning, of which then never a stick brenn'd,* *burned Was sign of thine unwemmed* maidenhead. *unblemished Thou art the bush, on which there gan descend The Holy Ghost, the which that Moses wend* *weened, ...
— The Canterbury Tales and Other Poems • Geoffrey Chaucer

... spoke to Moses out of a burning bush, and told him that he must go and rescue his people from the cruel Egyptians. Moses thought he could not do this; but God promised to help him, and to show him what he would be able to do with that help, God turned the rod which Moses carried into a serpent. Then God told Moses to pick ...
— Wee Ones' Bible Stories • Anonymous

... Regicide, "they can obtain a practicable constitution, even for a limited period of time, they will be in a condition to reestablish the accustomed relations of peace and amity." Pray let us leave this bush-fighting. What is meant by a limited period of time? Does it mean the direct contrary to the terms, an unlimited period? If it is a limited period, what limitation does he fix as a ground for his opinion? Otherwise, his ...
— The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. VI. (of 12) • Edmund Burke

... ranged their dogs and went forth to hunt. Some of the dogs ran before them, and came to a bush which was near at hand; but as soon as they were come to the bush, they hastily drew back, and returned to the men, their hair bristling up greatly. "Let us go," said Pryderi, "and see what is in it." As they came near, behold, a wild boar of a pure white color rose up from the bush. Then the dogs, ...
— The Junior Classics, V4 • Willam Patten (Editor)

... long, and it lay through a part of Arcadia where the bush was heavy, and forests were deep, and mountains were high, and while Hercules was pursuing his way and bearing his meek-eyed burden, he one day met the fair goddess to whom the hind was sacred. Her brother, the beautiful god Apollo, ...
— Heroes Every Child Should Know • Hamilton Wright Mabie

... down the god at the feet of the teachers. One of them ran and brought a saw, and first cut off its head and then sawed it into logs. Some of the Rarotongans rushed away in dread. Others—even some of the newly converted Christians—hid in the bush and peered through the leaves to see what would happen. Papeiha lit a fire; the logs were thrown on; the first ...
— The Book of Missionary Heroes • Basil Mathews

... as eager to run back as I had been to run away. Memories, touched by imagination, had come to naught in contact with reality. I learned my first lesson in keeping it and ideals in their proper place. A bird in the bush is worth two in the hand! Utopia is a far country, toward which to travel is better than to arrive. It was some years before I restored the Bellingham of my imagination. If experience be nothing but suffering then I had experienced; over this transaction ...
— Confessions of Boyhood • John Albee

... hearbs, which may be about some 7000 in all. I have also some verses he gave me made on thesse 2 fellows thats keips centry, as it were, just as ye come in at the garden door; their menacing face is of timber; all the rest with their speir is artificially cut out of bush. They have also swans and such lik curiously cut out of the phileria. I saw the sensitive plant; it shrinked at my touching it, tho it was then excessively cold. Saw the tobacco: of the leives dryed they make it as good as that they bring from Spain, Virginia, Martinigo ...
— Publications of the Scottish History Society, Vol. 36 • Sir John Lauder

... I want another thing. I want a little rose bush—and if you can, I want it with a rose open ...
— Melbourne House, Volume 2 • Susan Warner

... of their garden, which James and his daughter most dearly prized, was a dwarf apple-tree little higher than a rose-bush, which grew in a small round bed in the middle of the garden. The old man had planted it on his daughter's birthday, and every year it gave them a harvest of beautiful golden yellow apples spotted with ...
— The Basket of Flowers • Christoph von Schmid

... that I had resolved upon for the shot, I found the herd had moved their position to about 250 paces from me. They were all looking at me, as they had been disturbed by the oxen and the boy Saat in the distance. Dinner depended on the shot. There was a leafless bush singed by the recent fire; upon a branch of this I took a rest, but just as I was going to fire they moved off—a clean miss! —whizz went the bullet over them, but so close to the ears of one that it shook its head ...
— The Albert N'Yanza, Great Basin of the Nile • Sir Samuel White Baker

... himself. He would have been glad to gain Harry's confidence, and to hear from him how matters stood, though he very well knew he should fail if he asked the question point-blank. He therefore beat about the bush for some time, talking of his own love affairs when he was a young man, and of those of several ...
— Won from the Waves • W.H.G. Kingston

... sung all, This hast thou had. Love, be not sad; It shall befall Assuredly, When the bush buddeth And the bank studdeth— Where grass is sweet And damps do fleet, Her delicate beds With daisy heads That the Stars Seven Leaned down from heaven Shall sparkling mark In the warm dark Thy most dear strain Which ringeth aye true— Piercing vale, croft Lifted aloft Dropt even as dew ...
— Poems by Jean Ingelow, In Two Volumes, Volume II. • Jean Ingelow

... could have held her own with any well-dressed city woman. Her plain face was almost beautiful as she stood ready for the great event of Amanda's life. At the last moment she thought of the big bush of shrubs in the yard—"I must get me a shrub to smell in the Commencement," she decided. So she gathered one of the queer-looking, fragrant brown blossoms, tied it in the corner of her handkerchief and bruised it gently so that the ...
— Amanda - A Daughter of the Mennonites • Anna Balmer Myers

... have some other object in view besides his accommodation. He determined, therefore, to proceed upon new principles—sufficiently safe, he thought, to protect him from the consequences of theft. "Good-morrow, Bush," said Art, addressing that on which the third shirt was spread. "Isn't it a burnin' shame an' a sin for you," he continued, "to have sich a line white shirt an you, an' me widout a stitch to my ...
— Phelim O'toole's Courtship and Other Stories • William Carleton

... to admire the wonderful old red-brick house glowing through the tender greens of spring. Her eyes drank in its beauty and then fell on two huge perfect lilac plumes on the bush nearest her. They were larger ...
— Green Valley • Katharine Reynolds

... boys had great faith in dreams, especially in Huck's dreams. They followed him to a place with some shovels and picks, and he showed them just where to dig. Then he sat down under the shade of a pawpaw-bush and ...
— The Boys' Life of Mark Twain • Albert Bigelow Paine

... out the mote that is in thy brother's eye. 43. For a good tree bringeth not forth corrupt fruit; neither doth a corrupt tree bring forth good fruit. 44. For every tree is known by his own fruit: for of thorns men do not gather figs, nor of a bramble-bush gather they grapes. 45. A good man, out of the good treasure of his heart, bringeth forth that which is good; and an evil man, out of the evil treasure of his heart, bringeth forth that which is evil; for of the abundance of the heart his mouth speaketh, 46. And why call ye Me, ...
— Expositions Of Holy Scripture - Volume I: St. Luke, Chaps. I to XII • Alexander Maclaren

... be where I left it—buried under the rose-bush nearest the postern itself. But the first thing is, to get out of ...
— The Bright Face of Danger • Robert Neilson Stephens

... "I too acknowledge the all-but omnipotence of early culture and nurture: hereby we have either a doddered dwarf bush, or a high-towering, wide-shadowing tree; either a sick yellow cabbage, or an edible luxuriant green one. Of a truth, it is the duty of all men, especially of all philosophers, to note down with accuracy the characteristic circumstances of ...
— Sartor Resartus - The Life and Opinions of Herr Teufelsdrockh • Thomas Carlyle

... 2 miles N.E. from Great Berkhampstead, stands in a beautiful district, with Ashridge Park to the N.W. The nearest church is at the pretty village of Nettleden (q.v.) 1/2 mile N.E. High Park Road, Evesden Wood, Marigold Wood, Holly Bush Wood and Frithsden copses are all adjacent and may be visited ...
— Hertfordshire • Herbert W Tompkins

... again and read it through; then started to my feet with fresh energy. I was just leaving the little lawn and returning down my path, when it struck me that the bush on my left hand was of a curious shape. It seemed a mere tangled knot of creepers covered with large white blossom, and rose to about my own height. Carelessly I thrust my stick into the mass, when its ...
— Dead Man's Rock • Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... camps upon the two slopes that lay moon-bathed at midnight. Back where the moon was making the barren mountains a wonderland of deep purple and black and silvery gray and brown, a coyote yapped a falsetto message and was answered by one nearer at hand—his mate, it might be. In a bush under the bank that made of it a black blot in the unearthly whiteness of the sand, a little bird fluttered uneasily and sent a small, inquiring chirp into the stillness. From somewhere farther up the arroyo drifted a faint, aromatic ...
— The Heritage of the Sioux • B.M. Bower

... not changed my place. I open my eyes. Have I been sleeping? I do not know. There is tranquil light now. It is evening or morning. My arms alone can tremble. I am enrooted like a distorted bush. My wound? It is that which glues me ...
— Light • Henri Barbusse

... conclusions (such as they are) merely to make way for his upstart pretensions.'—'Then there is ——-: what of him?' 'He might very well express all he has to say in half the time, and with half the trouble. Why should he beat about the bush as he does? He appears to be getting up a little speech and practising on a smaller scale for a Debating Society—the lowest ambition a man can have. Besides, by his manner of drawling out his words, and interlarding his periods with innuendos ...
— Table-Talk - Essays on Men and Manners • William Hazlitt

... silent for a little while. Then he gathered his courage for a great effort, for he felt that it was of no use to beat about the bush any longer. ...
— Black, White and Gray - A Story of Three Homes • Amy Walton

... it with a bramble bush, Sing ivy, sing ivy; And reaped it with my little penknife, Sing holly, go ...
— A Nonsense Anthology • Collected by Carolyn Wells

... his children's sake, be advisable to emigrate. He had long looked forward to this, but had abstained from taking any step until his sons were of an age to be able to make themselves useful in a life in the bush or ...
— Out on the Pampas - The Young Settlers • G. A. Henty

... presume, as a business man, you would count a bird in the hand worth several in the bush—in other words, you would sooner have what he has stowed away—somewhere, than what he ...
— Pearl of Pearl Island • John Oxenham

... to fear from lurking foes, for an act of Edward the First was still in force, by which every highway leading from one market-town to another was always to be kept clear, for two hundred feet on each side, of every ditch, tree, or bush in which a man might lurk to do harm; while, as any ill that happened to travellers was made payable by the township in which it occurred, there was a strong personal interest on the part of the inhabitants to suppress plundering bands in ...
— A March on London • G. A. Henty

... half a cask of water aboard, and that a hog wouldn't 'a' drank, only for the name on't. So we pulled ashore after some, and findin' a spring near by, was takin' it out, hand over hand, as fast as we could bale it up, when all of a sudden the mate see a bunch of feathers over a little bush near by, and yelled out to run for our ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 1, No. 5, March, 1858 • Various

... want is, you want much of meat: Why should you want? Behold, the Earth hath Rootes: Within this Mile breake forth a hundred Springs: The Oakes beare Mast, the Briars Scarlet Heps, The bounteous Huswife Nature, on each bush, Layes her full Messe before you. Want? why Want? 1 We cannot liue on Grasse, on Berries, Water, As Beasts, ...
— The First Folio [35 Plays] • William Shakespeare

... suddenly you would be fighting for breath and sight in a maelstrom of dirt, indescribably filthy dirt, whilst your papers flew up twenty feet and your rifle hit you cruelly over the head. As a Marian martyr observed to an enthusiast who thrust a blazing furze-bush into his face, 'Friend, have I not harm enough? What need of that?' One storm at Harbe blew all night, having made day intolerable and meals out of the question. As Fowke curled himself miserably under his blanket for the night, I heard him deliver himself of the opinion quoted ...
— The Leicestershires beyond Baghdad • Edward John Thompson

... year has lived, events so crowd on each other. When I reflect back a little, a grey old age I could fancy On my head to be lying, and yet my strength is still active. Yes, we people in truth may liken ourselves to those others Unto whom in a fiery bush appear'd, in a solemn Moment, the Lord our God; in fire and clouds ...
— The Poems of Goethe • Goethe

... a.m., and passed through nothing but sandhill and flooded flat country till 3 p.m., and arrived at Tac Wilten Creek, containing little water but drinkable. For the first few miles the sandhills were further apart with, in the interval, salt-bush and grassy flats. Watered the horses and camels; crossed the creek, passed up the south side; crossed a sandhill; crossed the creek, went a short distance to north side of creek; recrossed it and went up south side ...
— McKinlay's Journal of Exploration in the Interior of Australia • John McKinlay

... away into still deeper and irretrievable traces of sterility, like the shadows of a picture passing through their several transitions of color to the depth of the back-ground. The larches and cedars diminished gradually in size and numbers, until the straggling and stinted tree became a bush, and the latter finally disappeared in the shape of a tuft of pale green, that adhered to some crevice in the rocks like so much moss. Even the mountain grasses, for which Switzerland is so justly celebrated, grew thin and wiry; and by the time the travellers reached the ...
— The Headsman - The Abbaye des Vignerons • James Fenimore Cooper

... they wouldn't find the plugs, so he put them into an oil can that he had found under the hood of the machine and tied a piece of wire to the can. He tied the other end of the wire to the root of a bush on the shore. And all that he did while the fellows were in the car. What do you ...
— Roy Blakeley's Camp on Wheels • Percy Keese Fitzhugh

... on their search, they came to the dwelling of Pugut-Negru, whom they forced to accompany them. Pugut-Negru pretended to be lame, and so he could not keep up with them. As he was so slow, they mercilessly threw him into a bush of thorns and left him there. But he said to his magical whip, "Build me at once, along the road in which the two princes will pass, a splendid palace; and let lions, leopards, and other animals be about it." No sooner was the ...
— Filipino Popular Tales • Dean S. Fansler

... somewhat sadly, but when he saw his mother at the window of her bed-room, his heart leapt at the thought that she was with him and he had eighty pounds a year. Gaily he waved both his hands to her, and she answered with a smile, and then, in his boyishness, he jumped over a gooseberry bush. Immediately afterwards he reddened and tried to look venerable, for while in the air he had caught sight of two women and a man watching him from the dyke. He walked severely to the door, and, again forgetting himself, was bounding upstairs ...
— The Little Minister • J.M. Barrie

... moving about through the Camp. She had a fire with a kettle hanging over it. There were two or three other people about, and some starved-looking horses. The dog was lying beside the fire, and there was a baby rolling about on the ground. A little pig was tied by one hind leg to a thorn-bush. ...
— The Irish Twins • Lucy Fitch Perkins

... though he was trembling with fright, and saw in the fast gathering shadows his own china dog, standing beside Granny Pyetangle's favourite lavender bush—though how it managed to get there so quickly he could not imagine! He stretched out his hand to stroke it, and started up, as instead of the cold china, he felt the soft curls of a ...
— Soap-Bubble Stories - For Children • Fanny Barry

... us, and look upon us as socialists?" Father Paissy asked directly, without beating about the bush. ...
— The Brothers Karamazov • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

... and talks, and mathematical calculations carried out as pleasing puzzles. In mathematics the boy made rapid progress, but the faculty of observation was the dominant one. Every phase of cloud and sky, of water and earth, rock and mountain, bird and bush, plant and tree, was curious to him. He kept a journal of his observations, which had the double advantage of deepening his impressions by recounting them, and second, it taught him ...
— Little Journeys to the Homes of the Great Philosophers, Volume 8 • Elbert Hubbard

... beat about the bush. Didn't he tell you it was I who published Mrs. Aubyn's letters? ...
— The Touchstone • Edith Wharton

... sandwiches,—regretting that the basket of provisions had not been bigger,—and had drunk their sherry and water out of the little horn mug which Mrs. Crocket had lent them, Nora started off across the moorland alone. The horse had been left to be fed in Princetown, and they had walked back to a bush under which they had rashly left their basket of provender concealed. It happened, however, that on that day there was no escaped felon about to watch what they had done, and the food and the drink had been found secure. Nora had gone off, and as ...
— He Knew He Was Right • Anthony Trollope

... under obligation to him her services would be very valuable. He was glad to find Mrs. Cresswell there. It showed that the Cresswells were still intimate, and the Cresswells were bound to him and his interests by strong ties. He bowed as Mrs. Cresswell left, and then did not beat around the bush because, in this case, ...
— The Quest of the Silver Fleece - A Novel • W. E. B. Du Bois

... morning a party of horsemen rode through the forest, looking behind each bush and tree as if they sought ...
— Mother Stories • Maud Lindsay

... Robert a question leading in the direction of the grief which he saw the healthy and earnest nature of the youth gradually assimilating into his life. He had too much respect for sorrow to approach it with curiosity. He had learned to put off his shoes when he drew nigh the burning bush of ...
— Robert Falconer • George MacDonald

... of Berkley (appointed one of the Lords Justices in Ireland) to attend him as his chaplain, and private secretary.—Lord Berkley landed near Waterford, and Mr. Swift acted as secretary during the whole journey to Dublin. But another of lord Berkley's attendants, whose name was Bush, had by this time insinuated himself into the earl's favour, and had whispered to his lordship, that the post of secretary was not proper for a clergyman, to whom only church preferments could be suitable or advantageous. Lord Berkley ...
— The Lives of the Poets of Great Britain and Ireland (1753),Vol. V. • Theophilus Cibber

... Edith's pillow was wet with tears. When she arose the next morning she felt as we are all apt to feel after the excitement of new and sudden resolves, rather flat; and the sight of Muff sitting near a laurel bush in the garden, enjoying the morning sun, quite unnerved her. "Part with Muff! No, I cannot; and I don't believe any one would do such a thing for such a boy as Fred. I cannot part with Muff, that's certain. Fred had better give up his birds, and ...
— Emilie the Peacemaker • Mrs. Thomas Geldart

... an unusually vivid perception of the outer world; a perception mingled with a still stranger double vision, a sense that seemed to be born in the dark of the brain and to be moving there to a foregone conclusion. And all the time her eyes were busy, now with a bush of May in crimson blossom, now with the many-pointed leaves of a sycamore pricked against the blue; now with the straight rectangular paths that made the park an immense mathematical diagram. From where she sat ...
— Superseded • May Sinclair

... gold fishes were disporting—now circling about in rapid evolutions, and anon leaping above the surface, and displaying their brilliant sides in the rays of the setting sun. When we had watched for some moments their happy gambols, Mr. C. turned around and broke a twig from a bush that stood behind us; "there is a bush," said he, "which has committed many a murder." On requesting him to explain, he said, that the root of it was a most deadly poison, and that the slave women used to make a decoction of it and give to their infants to destroy them; ...
— The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Omnibus • American Anti-Slavery Society

... rising fast, for between the Atlanteans and the savage Drilgoes there was as much difference as between a modern American and a blackfellow from the Australian bush. These men were civilized to a degree that even modern ...
— Astounding Stories of Super-Science, May, 1930 • Various

... there an unconscionable time. Was he arguing, preaching, remonstrating? Had he discovered in himself a capacity and a taste for that sort of thing? Or was he perhaps, in an intense dislike for the job, beating about the bush and only puzzling Captain Anthony, the providential man, who, if he expected the girl to appear at any moment, must have been on tenterhooks all the time, and beside himself with impatience to see the back of his brother-in-law. How was it that he had not got rid of Fyne ...
— Chance - A Tale in Two Parts • Joseph Conrad

... the one on duty on the night of the 26th. The order runs: "Eight hundred [men] properly officered to relieve the troops on Bedford Road to-morrow morning, six field officers to attend with this party. The same number to relieve those on Bush [Flatbush] Road, and an equal number those stationed towards the Narrows. A picket of three hundred men under the command of a Field Officer, six Captains, twelve subalterns to be posted at the wood on the west side of the creek ...
— The Campaign of 1776 around New York and Brooklyn • Henry P. Johnston

... more artificial than other plantations of fruits, since the vine requires greater discipline under cultivation than tree or bush. Yet greater art is required only when the attempt is made to grow the grape to perfection, for the vine bears fruit if left to indulge in riotous growth wheresoever it can strike root. Vineyard management, therefore, may represent the consummate art of three thousand or more years of cultural ...
— Manual of American Grape-Growing • U. P. Hedrick

... scorpions is not here meant that small animal so called, which was never used in corrections, but either a shrub, furze bush, or else some terrible sort of whip of the like nature see ...
— The Antiquities of the Jews • Flavius Josephus

... find my garden-tools upon the granary floor: Let her take 'em: they are hers: I shall never garden more: But tell her, when I'm gone, to train the rose-bush that I set About the parlour-window ...
— Knickerbocker, or New-York Monthly Magazine, March 1844 - Volume 23, Number 3 • Various

... cried, giving my dress a smack with her open hand. 'What a plague do you want of all that bustle; you'll leave it behind, lass, the first bush you ...
— Uncle Silas - A Tale of Bartram-Haugh • J.S. Le Fanu

... right, Gabe," said Old Man Curry, who was counting money in his tackle-room. "It was sort o' risky. When a man can't tell his own hoss when he sees him, anything is liable to happen to him on a bush track. I've just cut this bank roll in two, Gabe, and here's your bit. Shanghai's a good ...
— Old Man Curry - Race Track Stories • Charles E. (Charles Emmett) Van Loan

... them with dog and bush," said Tibble, "and they dropped as from the moon to save my poor master from the robbers on Bagshot heath! Come now, mine honest fellow, aid me to rake, as thou sayest, this same household. They are come up from the Forest, to ...
— The Armourer's Prentices • Charlotte M. Yonge

... bark cloth. When all signs [of menstruation] have passed, a public announcement of a dance is given to the women in the village. At this dance no men are allowed to be present, and it was only with a great deal of trouble that I managed to witness it. The girl to be 'danced' is led back from the bush to her mother's hut where she is kept in solitude to the morning of the dance. On that morning she is placed on the ground in a sitting position, while the dancers form a ring around her. Several songs are then sung with reference ...
— Studies in the Psychology of Sex, Volume 6 (of 6) • Havelock Ellis

... as to the need of beating out the fire and trampling down a place to isolate it, as in the bush-fires of her experience; and Rosamond related the achievements of the regiment in quenching many a conflagration ...
— The Three Brides • Charlotte M. Yonge

... about ten o'clock; but as there were many sunken rocks at about two leagues distance from it, upon which the sea broke very high, and the wind seemed to be gradually dying away, I tacked again and stood off. The land appeared to be barren and rocky, without either tree or bush: When I was nearest to it I sounded, and had forty-five fathom, with black muddy ground. To my great misfortune, my three lieutenants and the master were at this time so ill as to be incapable of duty, though the rest of the ship's company were in ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. 12 • Robert Kerr

... went Hy Smith, also. He flagged a train about a mile out of town and hopped aboard. I come out of the bush and took the last car, telling the brakie a much-needed man had got on forward. Also, I took the Con. into my confidence. So just when we pulled into the next town I steps behind Mr. Troy, puts a gun against the back of his neck, and read the ...
— Red Saunders' Pets and Other Critters • Henry Wallace Phillips

... bush-hidden parapet of earth, heaps of ammunition lay—cannister and common shell. She recognized these, and, with a shudder, a long row of smaller projectiles on which soldiers were screwing copper caps—French ...
— Special Messenger • Robert W. Chambers

... years old daughter of an English settler who lived some twelve miles from the point opposite to which the Georgette had gone ashore, was riding through the bush, accompanied by a native stockman, and coming out towards the edge of the cliff saw the steamer in distress, and witnessed the overturning of the small boat. Horrified at the position of the poor people on ...
— Noble Deeds of the World's Heroines • Henry Charles Moore

... entered the thick bush. The giant cotton trees had now shed their light feathery foliage, resembling that of an acacia, and the straight, round, even trunks looked like the skeletons of some giant or primeval vegetation rising ...
— By Sheer Pluck - A Tale of the Ashanti War • G. A. Henty

... me that you are beating around the bush. I'll come straight to the point. How long have you known that I am ...
— Beverly of Graustark • George Barr McCutcheon

... has strong affections, and brought up as she has been, may, at her age, be easily influenced and persuaded. If I take her in hand, I will be bound by a very little coaxing and threatening to bend her to my will. Not to beat about the bush (for the advantages of the scheme would take a week to tell) what's to prevent ...
— The Old Curiosity Shop • Charles Dickens

... Habitations. Underweigh. Wind and weather. Tidal Phenomenon. Natural History. Singular Kangaroo. Bustard. Cinnamon Kangaroo. Quails. Goanas and Lizards. Ant Hills. Fishing over the side. A day in the Bush. A flood of fire. Soil and Productions. White Ibis. Curious Tree. Rain water. Geology of the Cliffs. Weigh, and graze a Rock, or Touch and go. The Twins. Sunday Strait. Roe's Group. Miago and his friends. A black dog. A day ...
— Discoveries in Australia, Volume 1. • J Lort Stokes

... out into the verandah, and Farmer Hosking pocketed the pruning-knife which he had been using on a bush ...
— Old Fires and Profitable Ghosts • A. T. Quiller-Couch

... and Jacob were little, their characters could not be judged properly. They were like the myrtle and the thorn-bush, which look alike in the early stages of their growth. After they have attained full size, the myrtle is known by its fragrance, and the thorn-bush ...
— The Legends of the Jews Volume 1 • Louis Ginzberg

... us swing from the road. Come, the hedges of Nature are not as impassable as the hedges of man. Through these scrub oaks and wild pears, between this tangle of thickets, over the clematis and blackberry bush,—and here we are under the pines, the lofty and majestic pines. How different are these natural hedges, growing in wild disorder, from the ugly cactus fences with which my neighbours choose to shut in their homes, and even their souls. But my ...
— The Book of Khalid • Ameen Rihani

... day, And counting up your gains; A fellow jumps from out a bush, And takes your horse's reins, Another hints some words about A bullet in ...
— The Poetical Works of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Complete • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

... broad sunlight warned him to a safer path across the fields. He had been too much of a rambler during those long Saturday afternoons at Ashfield, to have any dread of a tramp through swamp-land or briers. "Who cared for wet feet or a scratch? Who cared for a rough scramble through the bush, or a wade (if it came to that) through ever so big a brook? Who cared for old Brummem and his white-faced nag?" In fact, he had the pleasure of seeing the parson's venerable chaise lumbering along ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 16, No. 93, July, 1865 • Various

... the two lads instantly moved to the side of Zeph, who beckoned to him to follow him. He led the boy ten feet away behind a thick large bush, his back ...
— Ralph on the Overland Express - The Trials and Triumphs of a Young Engineer • Allen Chapman

... be a stout bush or tree growing on the face of the cliff, not ten feet below the spot where the snow-wreath had broken off. Roy caught at this convulsively, and held on. Fortunately the line on his shoulder broke, and the sledge fell into the abyss below. Had this ...
— Silver Lake • R.M. Ballantyne

... variation in his own song. The catbird is as shy as the robin is vulgarly familiar. Only when his nest or his fledglings are approached does he become noisy and almost aggressive. I have known him to station his young in a thick cornel-bush on the edge of the raspberry-bed, after the fruit began to ripen, and feed them there for a week or more. In such cases he shows none of that conscious guilt which makes the robin contemptible. On the contrary, he will maintain his post in the thicket, and sharply scold ...
— My Garden Acquaintance • James Russell Lowell

... Timofyevna, playing cards with her old friend in the corner, muttered something to herself. Panshin walked up and down the room, and spoke eloquently, but with secret exasperation. It seemed as if he were abusing not a whole generation but a few people known to him. In a great lilac bush in the Kalitins' garden a nightingale had built its nest; its first evening notes filled the pauses of the eloquent speech; the first stars were beginning to shine in the rosy sky over the motionless ...
— A House of Gentlefolk • Ivan Turgenev

... raw. The Gorkah is a small red berry, very sweet and pleasant, slightly acid, not unlike a red currant in fact, and with two small pips or stones. The Nepaulese call it Bunchooree. It grows on a small stunted-looking bush, with few branches, and a pointed leaf, in form resembling the acacia leaf, but ...
— Sport and Work on the Nepaul Frontier - Twelve Years Sporting Reminiscences of an Indigo Planter • James Inglis

... derisively. "Wanted to see how big a fool you was," he jeered. "Thought you were going to eat all there were on the bush." ...
— Tabitha's Vacation • Ruth Alberta Brown

... in the sun the same now as in summer; it lifts and swings the arching trail of bramble; it dries and crumbles the earth in its fingers; the hedge-sparrow's feathers are fluttered as he sings on the bush. ...
— Field and Hedgerow • Richard Jefferies

... in rainbow arches against Awguan's brown face—he shut his eyes against it; they turned up the hill beyond. A little space ahead showed free of bush or boulder. Awguan took the hillside below the trail, lowered his head, laid his ears back, and bunched his mighty muscles. He drew alongside; leaning far over, heel to cantle, Stan threw his arm about ...
— Copper Streak Trail • Eugene Manlove Rhodes

... Following this reflection, I took a common stereoscopic view and subjected it to my lenses. It was an ordinary view of a Swiss hamlet, the chief object of which was an inn with a sign over the door surmounted by a bush. The only objects upon the sign discernible with a common convex eye-glass were a mug of beer on one side and a wine-bottle on the other. Their position indicated that something else was on the ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 10, No. 58, August, 1862 • Various

... being, the Contessa was older and wiser. She had gone through a great many experiences. She knew that rich young English peers, marquises, uncontrolled by any parent or guardians, were fruit that did not grow on every bush, and that if this tide of fortune was not taken at its flood there was no telling when another might come. Now, though Bice was so dear, the Contessa had still a great many resources of her own, and was neither old nor tired of life. She would make herself a new career even without ...
— Sir Tom • Mrs. Oliphant

... despair he had already dashed the Lancastrian standard to the ground and hewed his way into the presence of his rival when he fell overpowered with numbers, and the crown which he had worn and which was found as the struggle ended lying near a hawthorn bush was placed on the head ...
— History of the English People, Volume III (of 8) - The Parliament, 1399-1461; The Monarchy 1461-1540 • John Richard Green

... forest but amid their own enduring foliage. The skunk cabbage raises his hooded head first in sheltered hollows. The marsh marigold lies in the protection of bog tussocks and stream banks. The first bloodroot is always found at the foot of some natural windbreak, while the shad-bush, that ventures farther afield and higher in air than any, is usually set in a protecting hedge, like his golden ...
— The Garden, You, and I • Mabel Osgood Wright

... in the song as the canoes swept away around a little promontory, crowned with three pine-trees, which stood up in the blaze of the setting sun like the three children in the fiery furnace, or the sacred bush that burned and was ...
— The Golden Dog - Le Chien d'Or • William Kirby

... paths higher up. A veranda of Turkish bayonets with Turkish rifles roofed crossways on them, failed to improve the situation greatly, so he gave it up as a bad job, and moved to the shade of a fine arbutus bush on the less steep enemy side of the Top. He preferred shade, comfort, and clean arms and ammunition, with the risk of Turkish shrapnel, of which he had no great fear, to the drawbacks of the ...
— The Tale of a Trooper • Clutha N. Mackenzie

... and beauty, stole over her, melting her mood to tenderness, and filling her mind with sadly sweet memories of the days of delight which preceded "all this." She thought of the yellow gorse on the common, recalling its peculiar fragrance; of the misty cobwebs stretched from bush to bush, and decked with dazzling drops of dew; of the healthy happy heath creatures peeping out at her shyly, here a rabbit and there a hare; of a lark that sprang up singing and was lost to sight in a moment, of a thrush ...
— The Heavenly Twins • Madame Sarah Grand

... Could this be the lost Mr. Quack? He had forgotten that probably Mr. Quack dressed differently from Mrs. Quack, and so of course he had been looking for some one all in brown. There was the bang of a gun somewhere over on the Big River, and the green head was hastily withdrawn under the bush, but not before Sammy had seen a look of terrible fear in his eyes. "I believe it IS Mr. Quack!" thought Sammy. "If it is, I'll have the best news ever to tell Mrs. Quack. Just trust Sammy Jay to find anything he goes ...
— The Adventures of Poor Mrs. Quack • Thornton W. Burgess

... night, after the men were rolled in their cloaks, that Dobri Petroff found himself lying close to Andre under the same bush. ...
— In the Track of the Troops • R.M. Ballantyne

... marked influence on Tactics owing to the restrictions it imposes on view and on movement. Forest, jungle, and bush, mountains and ravines, rivers and streams are natural obstacles, while cultivation adds woods and plantations, fences and hedges, high growing crops, farm houses, villages and towns, with sunken roads below the ...
— Lectures on Land Warfare; A tactical Manual for the Use of Infantry Officers • Anonymous

... what seems an endless waste of sage-bush and sand. Perhaps this has continued all day long, and you retire at night expecting to look out again in the morning on the same dreary waste. But in the night the scene has changed. When you look out in the morning the first thing you see is the broad Columbia River, with its banks ...
— Love's Final Victory • Horatio

... troops arrived, continuing a campaign against the recreant Indians and negroes. The appearance of the men and officers was wretched in the extreme; they had for weeks been beating through swamps and hammocks, thickly matted with palmetto bush, which had torn their undress uniforms in tatters, searching for an invisible enemy, who, thoroughly acquainted with the everglades, defied every attempt at capture. The whole party looked harassed, disappointed, and ...
— An Englishman's Travels in America - His Observations Of Life And Manners In The Free And Slave States • John Benwell

... said Miss Clegg. "But he tore a lot of things an' smashed a rose bush, but I did n't care about that. I just told him to leave 'em on a chair this mornin' an' I'd sew 'em all up again, an' I done it, an' as to the rose bush, I'll have him get another an' give ...
— Susan Clegg and a Man in the House • Anne Warner

... the birds on bush or tree, Commend me to the owl, Since he may best ensample be To those the cup that trowl. For when the sun hath left the west, He chooses the tree that he loves the best, And he whoops out his song, and he laughs at his jest; Then, though hours be late and ...
— Kenilworth • Sir Walter Scott

... wanted to bait his hook afresh, he took half the worms from my bag, which he crammed—all slimy and crawling as they were—into the pocket of a nearly new satin waistcoat. At another time, just as he was about to put on a fresh bait, his line became entangled in a bush, so as to require both hands to disengage it. Without the slightest hesitation he put the worm into his mouth to hold it while his hands were engaged with the line, and he seemed greatly to enjoy the laughter which his queer proceeding forced ...
— Personal Recollections of Birmingham and Birmingham Men • E. Edwards

... they descended into the valley,—creeping cautiously down the slope of the sand-wreath, and with equal caution advancing from boulder to bush, and ...
— The Boy Slaves • Mayne Reid

... the understanding, there were glimpses, glimmering notions of the patriarchal wanderings, with palm-trees hovering in the horizon, and processions of camels at the distance of three thousand years; there was Moses with the Burning Bush, the number of the Twelve Tribes, types, shadows, glosses on the law and the prophets; there were discussions (dull enough) on the age of Methuselah, a mighty speculation! there were outlines, rude guesses at the shape ...
— English Critical Essays - Nineteenth Century • Various

... Agamemnon's dirge To chant within the halls. Good-bye to life. Strangers, alas! Not like a foolish bird scared at the bush Am I. Bear witness, when I am no more, When for my woman's blood a woman dies, And for a man ill-wed a man is slain; With my last breath I crave of ye ...
— Specimens of Greek Tragedy - Aeschylus and Sophocles • Goldwin Smith

... prickles, and covered all over with blood, he began to wander in that forest destitute of men but abounding with animals of diverse species. Sometime after, in consequence of the friction of some mighty trees caused by a powerful wind, a widespread bush fire arose. The raging element, displaying a splendour like to what it assumes at the end of the Yuga, began to consume that large forest teeming with tall trees and thick bushes and creepers. ...
— The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 3 - Books 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 • Unknown

... come, we make known our requests to Him, for our outgoings have now been for several years at the rate of more than One Hundred Pounds each day; but though the expenses have been so great, He has never failed us. We have indeed, as to the outward appearance, like the 'Burning Bush in the Wilderness;' yet we have not been consumed. Moreover, we are full of trust in the Lord, and therefore of good courage, though we have before us the prospect, that, year by year, our expenses will increase more and more. Did all my beloved fellow disciples, who seek ...
— Answers to Prayer - From George Mueller's Narratives • George Mueller

... a beautiful fist—so small, too, if he chose. Why, once, in his spare hours, he wrote out all the Psalms, with the headings, on one side of a folio sheet, and had it framed and hung up in his parlour, out at Shepherd's Bush. He died in the night—oh yes, quite easily. He was down at the office all yesterday, and spoke to me as brisk as a bird. They found him dead ...
— Stories By English Authors: London • Various

... her guide. 'But we keep the fruit packed up till it is wanted. It keeps it fresher. See now!' As he spoke he touched a bush. ...
— Hoodie • Mary Louisa Stewart Molesworth

... first he threatened to take her by force; then he agreed to give her another day in which to make up her mind to go with him peaceably, and again he concluded that a bird in the hand was worth two in the bush. ...
— Brewster's Millions • George Barr McCutcheon

... trees, infinite in variety, and great in size, showing that Nature had worked here with the hand of a master. Little streams flashing in silver or gold in the sunlight, flowed down to the greater rivers, and on a bush a scarlet tanager fluttered like a ...
— The Keepers of the Trail - A Story of the Great Woods • Joseph A. Altsheler

... on our small plot has reached the last limit of endurance and greenness, and is sprouting weeds at a great rate; also our one bush, though still full of chirpiness, is beginning ...
— The Sunny Side of Diplomatic Life, 1875-1912 • Lillie DeHegermann-Lindencrone

... and me t You've succeeded; be satisfied. If you've anything to say to me on any other subject, say it. If not, please let's have done for the present. I don't feel in a mood for beating about the bush any longer.' ...
— The Nether World • George Gissing

... reached that city the same authority does not state." Dante calls him Cain; Chaucer has him put up there as a punishment for theft, and gives him a thorn-bush to carry; Shakespeare also loads him with the thorns, but by way of compensation gives him a dog for a companion. Ordinarily, however, his offence is stated to have been, not stealing, but Sabbath-breaking,—an idea derived from ...
— Myths and Myth-Makers - Old Tales and Superstitions Interpreted by Comparative Mythology • John Fiske

... best, no doubt, and perhaps has told them to you. But Ive my daughter to look after; and it's my duty as a parent to have a clear understanding about her. No good is ever done by beating about the bush. I ask Lieutenant—well, I dont speak French; and ...
— Fanny's First Play • George Bernard Shaw

... the Earl's thane were the only hearers he was conscious of, but his tone left the words open to all ears. There was a sudden indrawing of many breaths, followed by a frightened silence. The only sound that disturbed it was a growing rustle in the bush around them, which was explained when the old cniht Morcard and some two-score armed henchmen and yeoman-soldiers, singly and in groups, filtered quietly through the shadows and placed themselves at their ...
— The Ward of King Canute • Ottilie A. Liljencrantz

... my road to Cambridge, travelling in a stagecoach, whilst we were slowly going up a steep hill, I looked out of the window, and saw a man sitting under a hawthorn-bush, reading very intently. There was a pedlar's box beside him; I thought I knew the box. I called out as we were passing, and asked the man, "What's the mile-stone?" He looked up. It was poor Jacob. The beams of the morning sun dazzled him; but he recognized me immediately, ...
— Tales & Novels, Vol. IX - [Contents: Harrington; Thoughts on Bores; Ormond] • Maria Edgeworth

... pointed to a huge aloe bush down one of the trails to their left, they started to run. Then Kirby knew that he was not seeing things. What his first inspection of the trails had failed to show, he saw ...
— Astounding Stories of Super-Science, December 1930 • Various

... bending his gaze in the direction of the march, he saw afar, fluttering like a signal of distress in the engulfing sea about, a little whipping flag of white, which was upheld by the gaunt hand of a ragged sage bush. This, as he drew near, he discovered to be a portion of an old flour sack, washed clean and left bleaching in the sun and wind until it had assumed a colour a shade more pure ...
— The Girl at the Halfway House • Emerson Hough

... geese are always swans Bathers, who exhibited themselves in all degrees of ugliness Fred's verses were not good, but they were full of dejection Hang out the bush, but keep no tavern A familiarity which, had he known it, was not flattering His sleeplessness was not the insomnia of genius Importance in this world are as easily swept away as the sand Natural ...
— Serge Panine • Georges Ohnet

... and much vociferation. He caressed him with his bill, and appeared to make a close examination of his person. These birds have always passed the night close together, the bantam roosting among the branches of a low bush, while his faithful companion squatted on the ...
— The Dawn of Reason - or, Mental Traits in the Lower Animals • James Weir

... his bow and a quiver of arrows, and while Pocahontas and Cleopatra were sporting at the waterfall he had sought a pond whose surface was all but covered with fragrant water lilies, and he had hidden behind a sumac, bush, waiting patiently till a buck came down alone to drink. Only one arrow did he spend, which found its place between the wide branched antlers; then the hunter had waded into the pond, pushing aside the lily pads, and with one cut of his knife he had put an end to the struggling deer. Now he ...
— The Princess Pocahontas • Virginia Watson

... the picture Wild Bill discovered. The little yellow-headed man was standing in the midst of a small clearing in the bushes, a clearing long since made for the purposes of his wife's weekly wash. His back was turned, and his small figure was bowed over the tub in front of him. Every bush around him was decorated with clothes laid out on their leafy surfaces, where the sun could best operate its hygienic drying process. He saw the bobbing heads of the mudlarking children a few yards away where the low cut-bank ...
— The Twins of Suffering Creek • Ridgwell Cullum

... had, we find, Less dread than what prevails with human kind; He bore them in his arms:—they marked his birth; From noble Cadmus sprung, who, when on earth, At last, to serpent was in age transformed; The adder's bush the clown no longer stormed; No more the spotted reptile sought to stay, But seized the time, ...
— The Tales and Novels, Complete • Jean de La Fontaine

... lie low an' keep still," said Junkie; and, without further explanation of his intentions, he went softly down the bank and crept towards the sleeper, taking advantage of every stone and root and bush as he went along. Really, for a first attempt, it was worthy of the child of ...
— The Eagle Cliff • R.M. Ballantyne

... this, the gipsy turned back and looked carefully round; but Cuthbert was already crouching behind a bush, and escaped observation. As soon as Robin had fairly disappeared, the youth rose and ran quickly after him, and soon caught glimpses of the tall, stooping figure wending its way amongst the ruddy ...
— The Lost Treasure of Trevlyn - A Story of the Days of the Gunpowder Plot • Evelyn Everett-Green

... tiny child I was filled with dreams of the great things I was to do when grown up. My ambition was as boundless as the mighty bush in which I have always lived. As I grew it dawned upon me that I was a girl—the makings of a woman! Only a girl—merely this and nothing more. It came home to me as a great blow that it was only men who could take the ...
— My Brilliant Career • Miles Franklin

... whistles! Just now he passed by here. The rain dripped down from his sodden crown, But his whistle sounded clear; And it made my task seem easier, And my heart grew brave and strong, Hurrah for the boy that whistles! He helps the world along. —Written for Dew Drops by Bertha E. Bush. ...
— Dew Drops, Vol. 37, No. 10, March 8, 1914 • Various

... sharp bones given them by the devill to pricke them, have no pappes or dugges whereon theire devil may sucke; but theire devill receiveth bloud from the place, pricked with the bone; and they are more grand witches than any y^t have marks.'[604] In Suffolk in 1645 'one Bush of Barton widdow confessed that the Deuill appeared to her in the shape of a young black man ... and asked her for bloud, which he drew out of her mouth, and it dropped on a paper'.[605] At Auldearne, in 1662, the blood was drawn for baptizing the witch; Isobel Gowdie ...
— The Witch-cult in Western Europe - A Study in Anthropology • Margaret Alice Murray

... to pay a few days' visit to Laramie, ninety-five miles north-east of our post. Leaving at noon in procession, with three ambulances and as many army wagons, scaling the bluffs, bare of everything like trees or shrubs, and only covered with grass and wild flowers, and now and then sage-bush and prickly-pear cactus, which are very troublesome to the horses' feet. The roads were, as usual, very hard and fine, so that up hill and down dale we made six miles to the hour all the way. Our first station was Horse Creek, twenty-five miles, where we camped on a fine stream ...
— Three Years on the Plains - Observations of Indians, 1867-1870 • Edmund B. Tuttle

... she was bonnie, in her green and white paint, lying like a great water-beetle ready to scamper over the smooth surface. Alec sprang on board, nearly upsetting the tiny craft. Then he held it by a bush on the bank while Curly handed in Annie, who sat down in the stern. Curly then got in himself, and Alec and him ...
— Alec Forbes of Howglen • George MacDonald

... childhood's cheek that flows, Is like the dewdrop on the rose; When next the summer breeze comes by, And waves the bush, the flower is dry. ...
— Many Thoughts of Many Minds - A Treasury of Quotations from the Literature of Every Land and Every Age • Various

... there is no use dallying or beating about the bush; I want this partnership terminated at once. There's no use in an honest man and a thief trying to do business together, and this interview to-night is to find the shortest way of ...
— At the Time Appointed • A. Maynard Barbour

... adult) take two tablespoonfuls of the clarified remainder, twice or thrice within the day. This has never failed to effect a cure, and in many cases it has been almost instantaneous. 3. In diseases of this kind the Indians use the roots and leaves of the blackberry bush—- a decoction of which, in hot water, well boiled down, is taken in doses of a gill before each meal, and before retiring to bed. It is an almost infallible cure. 4. Beat one egg in a teacup; add one tablespoonful of loaf sugar and half a teaspoonful ...
— Burroughs' Encyclopaedia of Astounding Facts and Useful Information, 1889 • Barkham Burroughs

... not as good as when Barringford and I marched under General Braddock," answered Dave. "Then the pioneer corps cut down every tree and bush that ...
— On the Trail of Pontiac • Edward Stratemeyer

... The stars shot down wi' sklentin' light, Wi' you, mysel, I gat a fright Ayont the lough; Ye, like a rash-bush, stood ...
— The Humourous Poetry of the English Language • James Parton

... efforts, while they failed to secure the concealment they sought. Though women of undoubted sense and excellent education, yet they acted as foolishly as the ostrich, which, when hunted to cover, thrusts his head into a bush, and is weak enough to think that his whole body is concealed, when it stands out not only a target, but a fixed one, for the hunter's rifle. So these women took it for granted, that, if they ran to the cover of a chamber from which all visitors should be excluded, their acquaintances ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 15, No. 89, March, 1865 • Various

... me, indeed, you don't understand me," said Mr. Beaumont, beating with his whip the leaves of a bush which was near him. "Either you don't understand me, or I don't understand you. I am much more able to bear contradiction than you think I am, provided it be direct. But I do not love—what I am doing at this instant," added he, ...
— Tales and Novels, Vol. V - Tales of a Fashionable Life • Maria Edgeworth



Words linked to "Bush" :   governor plum, grevillea, daphne, bitter-bark, juniper bush, Leiophyllum buxifolium, Camellia sinensis, coca plant, Georgia bark, leadwort, Dubya, President George W. Bush, chalice vine, flat pea, crepe gardenia, amorpha, bird's-eye bush, coville, kalmia, abelia, lotus tree, Lagerstroemia indica, Datura arborea, Embothrium coccineum, Australian heath, American angelica tree, Lycium carolinianum, Cytisus ramentaceus, sugar-bush, elder, horsebean, Aspalathus cedcarbergensis, Jew-bush, lavender cotton, saltbush, kei apple bush, cupflower, jujube, guinea flower, dahl, bush poppy, fuchsia, beauty bush, California redbud, Christmas bush, rosebush, catjang pea, raspberry bush, laurel cherry, Epigaea repens, cherry laurel, George H.W. Bush, frangipanni, needlebush, chanal, hollygrape, arbutus, cotton, frangipani, ringworm bush, glandular Labrador tea, Flacourtia indica, Christ's-thorn, butterfly flower, Dacridium laxifolius, Erythroxylon truxiuense, Jacquinia armillaris, Lyonia mariana, silverbush, barbasco, columnea, makomako, lady-of-the-night, Lavatera arborea, belvedere, crepe flower, Brunfelsia americana, Kiggelaria africana, elderberry bush, Leucothoe fontanesiana, daisy bush, fire-bush, ligneous plant, George Herbert Walker Bush, crowberry, capsicum, buddleia, American spicebush, gardenia, hawthorn, German tamarisk, sweet pepperbush, Adenium multiflorum, Aralia spinosa, groundsel tree, governor's plum, alpine totara, Loiseleuria procumbens, Desmodium motorium, kudu lily, blueberry bush, flowering shrub, pepper bush, Hibiscus farragei, flame bush, buckthorn, cranberry tree, Vannevar Bush, bushy, coralberry, Indian currant, Adam's apple, cranberry, flame pea, Chamaedaphne calyculata, Leucothoe editorum, bush shrike, Chile hazel, Indian rhododendron, Grewia asiatica, leatherleaf, lavender, kelpwort, shadbush, minniebush, Chamaecytisus palmensis, render, false tamarisk, lilac, chaparral, crystal tea, Fabiana imbricata, guava bush, bush lawyer, boysenberry bush, Colutea arborescens, five-finger, cotton plant, Ardisia paniculata, chaparral broom, Brugmansia arborea, consumption weed, creosote bush, kidney wort, hiccough nut, Anadenanthera colubrina, Dalea spinosa, Astroloma humifusum, Leitneria floridana, forsythia, cat's-claw, Leucothoe racemosa, Japan allspice, Caesalpinia sepiaria, angel's trumpet, haw, cannabis, Lepidothamnus laxifolius, forestiera, Caesalpinia decapetala, currant, maleberry, Ardisia crenata, goldenbush, Brugmansia suaveolens, Batis maritima, clianthus, Guevina heterophylla, Bush administration, Geoffroea decorticans, maikoa, Irish gorse, crampbark, Anagyris foetida, firethorn, Dalmatian laburnum, crotch hair, East Indian rosebay, Cestrum nocturnum, smoke bush, Acalypha virginica, Chinese holly, Chinese angelica, Canella winterana, Griselinia littoralis, honey-flower, Caulophyllum thalictroides, pubic hair, joint fir, camellia, castor bean plant, hamelia, desert willow, ephedra, day jessamine, desert rose, bushman's poison, Caulophyllum thalictrioides, blue cohosh, bracelet wood, black haw, Gaultheria shallon, butterfly bush, Cajanus cajan, Cineraria maritima, eggplant bush, minnie bush, daisy-bush, Benjamin bush, Ilex cornuta, hediondilla, Euonymus atropurpureus, leucothoe, lentisk, Chilopsis linearis, bush pea, Canella-alba, Hakea laurina, fothergilla, chanar, hemp, bridal wreath, dewberry bush, crepe myrtle, flannelbush, gastrolobium, caragana, bush vetch, rabbit bush, silver-bush, Hermannia verticillata, Mahernia verticillata, Ledum palustre, candlewood, provide, quince bush, Anthyllis barba-jovis, stagger bush, Cycloloma atriplicifolium, Ledum groenlandicum, Indigofera tinctoria, lomatia, brittle bush, strawberry bush, devil's walking stick, Aralia stipulata, calliandra, Lysiloma sabicu, hoary golden bush, Euonymus americanus, gorse, Apalachicola rosemary, furnish, Kochia scoparia, Cordyline terminalis, Chilean flameflower, Hercules'-club, feijoa bush, Leycesteria formosa, Chinese angelica tree, cyrilla, Brugmansia sanguinea, scrub, cinquefoil, kapuka, needle-bush, fire bush, squaw-bush, ground-berry, cranberry heath, highbush cranberry, Datura suaveolens, Graptophyllum pictum, cotton-seed tree, blackthorn, bladder senna, bush tit, oriental bush cherry, woody plant, kali, Dirca palustris, chaparral pea, fringe bush, Guevina avellana, bearberry, Aristotelia racemosa, leatherwood, coronilla, catclaw, calico bush, Brazilian potato tree, Acocanthera oppositifolia, glory pea, groundsel bush, gooseberry, flannel bush, Eriodictyon californicum, Christmasberry, blueberry, coyote brush, Jupiter's beard, groundberry, climbing hydrangea, supply, Aspalathus linearis, juniper, Codariocalyx motorius, mimosa bush, black bead, heath, Comptonia asplenifolia, dog hobble, staggerbush, castor-oil plant, caper, hovea, spicebush, andromeda, blueberry root, Acocanthera spectabilis, glasswort, bridal-wreath, honeybells, bush jacket, President Bush, cotoneaster, quail bush, buckler mustard, low-bush blueberry, Aralia elata, Jerusalem thorn, African hemp, corkwood tree, Croton tiglium, dombeya, Diervilla sessilifolia, corkwood, bush leaguer, dog laurel, Jacquinia keyensis, male berry, Clethra alnifolia, Dubyuh, Christmas berry, Cytesis proliferus, dusty miller, bush honeysuckle, huckleberry oak, Brassaia actinophylla, bush willow, bush out, helianthemum, lily-of-the-valley tree, hiccup nut, cushion flower, barberry, bush clover, fool's huckleberry, mallow, black greasewood, Combretum bracteosum, cranberry bush, coyote bush, hydrangea, jujube bush, Desmodium gyrans, bush-league



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