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Bush   Listen
verb
Bush  v. t.  (past & past part. bushed; pres. part. bushing)  
1.
To set bushes for; to support with bushes; as, to bush peas.
2.
To use a bush harrow on (land), for covering seeds sown; to harrow with a bush; as, to bush a piece of land; to bush seeds into the ground.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Bush" Quotes from Famous Books



... brighter, until it hurt one's eyes to look at it, as though it had been the blessed sun itself. Angel Gabriel's hand was as white as silver, and in it he held a green bough with blossoms, like those that grow on the thorn bush. As for his robe, it was all of one piece, and finer than the Father Abbot's linen, and shone beside like the sunlight on pure snow. So I knew from all these things that it ...
— Otto of the Silver Hand • Howard Pyle

... nothing loth, for both were wounded, obeyed the summons, and staggering back from each other stood leaning upon their swords and panting desperately, while Billington dexterously stepping backward behind an elder bush made his way forest-ward with a stealthy footstep, and a shrewd use of cover, suggestive ...
— Standish of Standish - A story of the Pilgrims • Jane G. Austin

... enormously in curing, and many growers consider it more profitable to leave them until they are well matured. It requires about four pounds of fresh leaves to make one pound of dry leaves, and black tea and green tea are grown from the same bush. If the leaf is completely dried immediately after picking it retains its green color, but if it is allowed to stand and sweat for several hours a kind of fermentation takes place ...
— Modern India • William Eleroy Curtis

... high and rocky mountain, called Letternilichk, still a part of Benalder, full of great stones and crevices, and some scattered wood interspersed. The habitation called the Cage, in the face of that mountain, was within a small thick bush of wood. There were first some rows of trees laid down, in order to level a floor for the habitation; and as the place was steep, this raised the lower side to an equal height with the other; and these trees, in the way of joists or planks, were levelled with earth and gravel. ...
— The Jacobite Rebellions (1689-1746) - (Bell's Scottish History Source Books.) • James Pringle Thomson

... the report became general that the Emperor was wounded. It is asserted that several men in ambush had orders to wait their opportunity to fire at the Emperor, when he should approach; and when the Emperor did approach the bush wherein these men lay concealed, they all fired. It appears, however, that only one shot had effect. The Emperor finding himself wounded, instead of being discouraged, was reanimated to the combat, and entered into ...
— An Account of Timbuctoo and Housa Territories in the Interior of Africa • Abd Salam Shabeeny

... even that scale; Quilp they nicknamed him; the cruelest husband; quarter-dollarish in his views and principles, and greedy for bribes even as low as that: yet I have seen that man work with a rose-bush as long and tenderly as a mother with her baby, and his eyes glow and grow wet at the sight of a new and delicate plant. Near him lived a woman,—a relative of his, I believe: one of those women who absorb so much of the world's room and air, and have a right to do it: a nature ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 12, No. 74, December, 1863 • Various

... with signs which (outside Lombard Street) few houses but taverns wear to-day—the sign of the Silkworm or the Sheep, or that fantastic schoolmaster's emblem, the Troubled Pate with a crown upon it. And when they stopped for rest at the sign of a bush upon a pole, how they would fall to upon the Martinmas beef, the neats-tongues, the cheesecakes! It is true they might find prices high and crops poor; but such things must be.... "This is the use, custom, and fruits of war. If the impositions and taxes ...
— The Ten Pleasures of Marriage and The Confession of the New-married Couple (1682) • A. Marsh

... the sheep-cote, back yonder when all the world was twenty or thereabouts, and when every wild-cherry-bush was an olive tree. But one day the tent caterpillar like a wolf swept down on our fold of cherry-bushes and we fled Arden, never to get back. We lived for a time in town and bought olives in bottles, stuffed ones sometimes, then we got a hill in Hingham, ...
— The Hills of Hingham • Dallas Lore Sharp

... landing, ran to them with the glad tidings of their captain's arrival, on which one of them started up in surprise and exclaimed, "What captain? Dam'me! we have no captain." On hearing this the governor had them arrested, and sent to the castle, one man and the woman having to be pursued into the bush before they were taken. They then confessed ...
— Voyage of H.M.S. Pandora - Despatched to Arrest the Mutineers of the 'Bounty' in the - South Seas, 1790-1791 • Edward Edwards

... it was proposed to hang the sail as soon as it was dry and peg out the sides, for which purpose Small and his companion took out their knives, and, attacking a low scrubby bush, soon had a ...
— Mother Carey's Chicken - Her Voyage to the Unknown Isle • George Manville Fenn

... heroes and attendants, Heroes counted by the hundreds. "Should you ask of me the question, How I recognized the bridegroom Mid the hosts of men and heroes, I should answer, I should tell you: 'As the hazel-bush in copses, As the oak-tree in the forest, As the Moon among the planets; Drives the groom a coal-black courser, Running like the famished black-dog, Flying like the hungry raven, Graceful as the lark at morning, ...
— The Kalevala (complete) • John Martin Crawford, trans.

... went every day across a beaten bush track, from their weather-board cottage home, past the big iron gates of Dene Hall, a house built of grey stone in the early days of the colony, where their irascible grandsire dwelt, up a red dusty road to the ...
— An Australian Lassie • Lilian Turner

... garden gate, by Mr. Wythan's orders, informed Carinthia that her mistress had opened her eyes: There was a hope of weathering the ominous third time. But the hope was a bird of short flight from bush to bush until the doctor should speak to confirm it. Even the child was under the shadow of the house. Carinthia had him in her arms, trusting to life as she hugged him, and seeing innumerable darts out of all regions assailing ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... the nerves. Imagination gave birth to sounds, made the quiver of a bush unnatural, planted in a man a growing sense of eyes boring down on his body, nakedly visible to the enemy. Drew's muscles ached. He forced tight rein on his imagination and began the hard task of consciously schooling himself past the danger ...
— Rebel Spurs • Andre Norton

... farmer's son," says Thurlow Weed, "has found the best opportunities for mental improvement in his intervals of leisure while tending 'sap-bush.' Such, at any rate, was my own experience. At night you had only to feed the kettles and keep up the fires, the sap having been gathered and the wood cut before dark. During the day we would always ...
— Pushing to the Front • Orison Swett Marden

... so. I ain't deaf. Samson, sprinkle another spadeful of manure on that bridal-wreath bush over thar by ...
— The Miller Of Old Church • Ellen Glasgow

... ladies comin' heah fo' de picnic? An' who gwine ter eat dem pies Zurie been two days makin'? An' sech a poun' cake! It ought to be a weddin' cake, deed it ought! (Bony comes out of kitchen with a knife in his hand) Heah, niggah, gimme up dat knife an' don' be so slow-back! Dis heah bush done grow an' bloom till ...
— Semiramis and Other Plays - Semiramis, Carlotta And The Poet • Olive Tilford Dargan

... rest; but, united with severe physical exertion, it prepares for it. At least, courteous reader, this is our experience; and certainly this was the experience of our three hunters as they lay on their backs beneath the branches of a willow bush and gazed serenely up at the twinkling stars two days after their ...
— The Dog Crusoe and His Master - A Story of Adventure in the Western Prairies • Robert Michael Ballantyne

... on her back, gasping and rolling up her eyes in great anguish, for she had eaten too much of the fatal salt, and there was no help for her. When all was over they buried the dead chicken under a currant bush, covered the little grave with chickweed, and the bereaved parent wore a black string round ...
— Aunt Jo's Scrap-Bag • Louisa M. Alcott

... coloured themselves in fearsome style, red being the favourite daub. No matter, the strangers from over sea would have greeted them gladly, being anxious to cultivate friendship. The wild men responded not; but hovered in the distance of the bush, or peered curiously from some ...
— The Romance of a Pro-Consul - Being The Personal Life And Memoirs Of The Right Hon. Sir - George Grey, K.C.B. • James Milne

... me," continued Jasmin. "There is no time for beating round the bush. What about two young persons sent to you by your cousin Michel Greboeuf, of ...
— The King's Warrant - A Story of Old and New France • Alfred H. Engelbach

... horizon slowly dipped until the whole yellow disc beamed above it; ice and water glistened pleasantly; on the hills of all the sister isles there was sunshine and shade; and round about him, in the hilly field, each rock and bush cast a long shadow. Between them the sun struck the grass with such level rays that the very blades and clumps of ...
— The Mermaid - A Love Tale • Lily Dougall

... paced the room in silent indignation, and at length fixing his eye upon an old portrait, whose person was clad in armour, and whose features glared grimly out of a huge bush of hair, part of which descended from his head to his shoulders, and part from his chin and upper-lip to his breast-plate,—'That gentleman, Captain Waverley, my grandsire,' he said, 'with two hundred horse,—whom he levied within his own bounds, discomfited ...
— Waverley, Or 'Tis Sixty Years Hence, Complete • Sir Walter Scott

... would but apprehend some joy, It comprehends some bringer of that joy: Or in the night imagining some fear, How easy is each bush ...
— Lectures on the English Poets - Delivered at the Surrey Institution • William Hazlitt

... engaged, three other men watched their movements with earnest solicitude from a neighbouring bush behind which ...
— Shifting Winds - A Tough Yarn • R.M. Ballantyne

... of the khat bush," was the response. "You must have passed numerous plantations of such bushes up on the hillsides as you flew over into the basin here. The Yemen Arabs like to chew the leaves so well that they have all of the passion for them ...
— Around the World in Ten Days • Chelsea Curtis Fraser

... continuous strain. The sentry peers into the darkness, imagining every bush to be an approaching enemy. Distant trees seem to change their position; bunches of grass, really quite close, seem to be men coming over the sky-line. One man questions another; the section commander is called upon. He in turn ...
— The New York Times Current History: the European War, February, 1915 • Various

... employment," he says, "was in sugar making, an occupation to which I became much attached. I now look with great pleasure upon the days and nights passed in the sap-bush. The want of shoes (which, as the snow was deep, was no small privation) was the only drawback upon my happiness. I used, however, to tie pieces of an old rag carpet around my feet, and got along pretty well, chopping wood and ...
— Eclectic School Readings: Stories from Life • Orison Swett Marden

... twisted hide. Then another man came along, with another brace of donkeys. Finally, a fourth man, wearing skins for covering and with a mat of beard on his cheeks and chin, appeared. His uncovered head, a bush of uncombed flaxen hair, shone whitish as he knelt beside the dead beast, a knife with a dull-gray blade in his hand, and set to work skinning the wolf with appreciable skill. Three more pairs of donkeys, ...
— The Time Traders • Andre Norton

... From the rising ground in the valley, the smoke of the British guns rose up in the still air as, steadily and fast, they replied to the fire of the fort. Both sides of the steep hill slopes were lined with British infantry—the quick flash of the rifles spurting out from every rock and bush; while continuous lines of light smoke rose from the Afghan entrenchments ...
— For Name and Fame - Or Through Afghan Passes • G. A. Henty

... squarely, Sergeant Corney, without beatin' about the bush. Do you think we're too young to enlist as soldiers, if it so be the lads decide that the Minute Boys ought to do all they can ...
— The Minute Boys of the Mohawk Valley • James Otis

... more word. If the rascal takes the cars, send me word. If he beats about the bush until night, be on your guard, especially in lonely places; the desperado is capable of ...
— File No. 113 • Emile Gaboriau

... a topographical suffix denotes a wild uncultivated tract of hilly or common land, more often than not quite bare of trees. The great expanse of Radnor Forest is well known to the writer and not even a thorn bush comes to the mind in picturing its miles of fern-clad ...
— Wanderings in Wessex - An Exploration of the Southern Realm from Itchen to Otter • Edric Holmes

... learned of the company found a way of doing it in five pieces, but not in four. But when they pressed the Haberdasher for the correct answer he was forced to admit, after much beating about the bush, that he knew no way of doing it in any number of pieces. "By Saint Francis," saith he, "any knave can make a riddle methinks, but it is for them that may to rede it aright." For this he narrowly escaped a sound beating. But the curious point of the puzzle is that I have ...
— The Canterbury Puzzles - And Other Curious Problems • Henry Ernest Dudeney

... his own interest in the little Kate to St. Sebastian, 'to have and to hold,' so long as Kate should keep her hold of this present life. Kate had no apparent intention to let slip that hold, for she was blooming as a rose-bush in June, tall and strong as a young cedar. Yet, notwithstanding this robust health and the strength of the convent walls, the time was drawing near when St. Sebastian's lease in Kate must, in legal phrase, 'determine;' and any chateaux ...
— Narrative And Miscellaneous Papers • Thomas De Quincey

... flouris that grew in field, Discerning all their seasons and effeirs, Upon the awful thistle she beheld And saw him keepit with a bush of spears: Consid'ring him so able for the weirs, A radius crown of rubies she him gave, And said, 'In field, go forth and ...
— Dreamthorp - A Book of Essays Written in the Country • Alexander Smith

... acknowledge the all-but omnipotence of early culture and nurture: hereby we have either a doddered dwarf bush, or a high-towering, wide-shadowing tree; either a sick yellow cabbage, or an edible luxuriant green one. Of a truth, it is the duty of all men, especially of all philosophers, to note down with accuracy the characteristic circumstances of their Education, ...
— Sartor Resartus - The Life and Opinions of Herr Teufelsdrockh • Thomas Carlyle

... sword nor any other armour to help him. So the strong- thieves took his raiment from him, all to his shirt, and his spurs and shoon; and then they took a sword-belt, and bound his hands and his feet, and cast him into a bramble-bush much sharp and ...
— Old French Romances • William Morris

... endeavoured to maintain that dignity which she felt to be so beneficial an example to the world. But Juanita emphasised each item of her late education with a jerk which gradually deranged Cousin Peligros' prim mantilla. Then she danced her round an impalpable mulberry bush until the poor ...
— The Velvet Glove • Henry Seton Merriman

... we call hedges in merry Devon, with all the world to myself and the Brethren. A great blackbird flew out with a loud "chook, chook," and the red of the haw on his yellow bill. A robin trilled from a low rose-bush; two wrens searched diligently on a fallen tree for breakfast, quite unconcerned when I rested a moment beside them; and a shrewmouse slipped across the road followed directly by its mate. March violets bloomed under the sheltered ...
— The Roadmender • Michael Fairless

... our bodies cast No shadow on the plain; Now clear and black they stride our track, And we run home again. In morning hush, each rock and bush Stands hard, and high, and raw: Then give the Call: 'Good rest to all That keep the ...
— Songs from Books • Rudyard Kipling

... position, the back of the piston is in contact with the end of the slide valve bush, and, as these two surfaces are ground to an accurate fit, the piston makes a tight "seal" on the end of the bush except at one point, where a feed groove is cut in the piston to allow air to pass around the end of the slide valve bush into chamber "R" ...
— The Traveling Engineers' Association - To Improve The Locomotive Engine Service of American Railroads • Anonymous

... frightened. They started to run away, but the old witch waved her Elder Bush above her head. It cast a spell over the children. They ...
— Story Hour Readers Book Three • Ida Coe and Alice J. Christie

... meaning of the sentence—"He cut away from the crushers as quick as a flash of lightning through a gooseberry-bush." ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 1, August 14, 1841 • Various

... into the dining-room," said Winnie to Gypsy, who was standing out in the yard, remarkably interested in the lilac-bush, and under the very curious impression that people thought she wasn't crying. "I think it's real nice Joy's gone, 'cause she didn't eat up her luncheon. There's a piece of pounded cake with sugar on top. There were tarts with squince-jelly in 'em ...
— Gypsy's Cousin Joy • Elizabeth Stuart Phelps

... you pass through what seems an endless waste of sage-bush and sand. Perhaps this has continued all day long, and you retire at night expecting to look out again in the morning on the same dreary waste. But in the night the scene has changed. When you look out in the ...
— Love's Final Victory • Horatio

... earnest with which child-life is ever seeking to sober itself, and rushing unsummoned into the workaday fields of an aimlessly frantic world. They are houses, and the stone boundaries are walls. This tree stump is an armchair, this board a velvet sofa. Not more truly is "this thorn-bush, my thorn-bush; and ...
— Meadow Grass - Tales of New England Life • Alice Brown

... the air instantly saw what it was, and rejoiced beyond measure. He vanished in a second, flew behind the nearest bush, alighted, and drew off his speckled feather dress, and turned himself into an old woman dressed in tattered clothes. The old dame, well supplied with sighs and groans, tottered across the field to the shepherd-boy, who was still ...
— Folk-Lore and Legends; Scandinavian • Various

... washed their dresses, or dipped a portion of them in running water, as a ritual purification.[1771] The Tshi peoples of West Africa cause women to retire, at the period, to huts prepared for the purpose in the bush, because they are at that time offensive to the deities.[1772] The Ewe-speaking peoples think a mother and baby unclean for forty days after childbirth.[1773] The Bechuanas, when they have touched a corpse, dug a grave, or are near relatives of a deceased ...
— Folkways - A Study of the Sociological Importance of Usages, Manners, Customs, Mores, and Morals • William Graham Sumner

... always the first thing to strike those who saw her, prided herself on being uncompromised as to her moral character. There are some women who, because they stop short of actual vice, consider themselves irreproachable. They are willing, so to speak, to hang out the bush, but keep no tavern. In former times an appearance of evil was avoided in order to cover evil deeds, but at present there are those who, under the cover of being only "fast," risk the appearance ...
— Jacqueline, v2 • Th. Bentzon (Mme. Blanc)

... swiftly. Two years later Richard fell at the battle of Bosworth Field, and the crown won by numberless crimes, rolled under a hawthorn bush. It was picked up and placed ...
— The Evolution of an Empire • Mary Parmele

... came to visit you. I used to sit and sing Upon our purple lilac bush that smells so sweet in Spring; But when you thanked me for my song of course you never knew I soon should be a little girl and ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 156, May 28, 1919. • Various

... study when she had finished reading the letter. Surprise she certainly felt, and a little amusement, too, to think that she—an Australian bush-born girl—could not look after herself and her affairs without an English aunt and an English cousin travelling many thousands of miles across the water to aid her ...
— Fifty-Two Stories For Girls • Various

... was leaving the queen's garden I saw Atossa behind a pomegranate-bush. She beckoned. I went to her; and in that hour we forgot danger and sorrow, but said farewell to each other for ever. Now you know all; and now that I have given her up—now that I know it would be madness even to think of her ...
— Uarda • Georg Ebers

... mountains of naked rock, leaving some space between them and the sea. This space is hilly, reddish, gravelly, and of middling quality, in olives, vines, corn, almonds, figs, and capers. The capers are planted eight feet apart. A bush yields, one year with another, two pounds, worth twelve sous the pound. Every plant, then, yields twenty-four sous, equal to one shilling sterling. An acre, containing six hundred and seventy-six plants, would yield ...
— Memoir, Correspondence, And Miscellanies, From The Papers Of Thomas Jefferson - Volume I • Thomas Jefferson

... promises of several, when they saw that we were ready to depart, they either feigned sickness or stated that they were afraid of the more distant natives. The fact is, that they were too lazy to wander far from their own district, and too fond of Maxwell's beef to leave it for a precarious bush subsistence. Fortunately we found several natives with Mr. Palmer's stockmen, who readily undertook to conduct us by the nearest route to the cataract, which we considered to be midway between Wellington Valley and Mount ...
— Two Expeditions into the Interior of Southern Australia, Complete • Charles Sturt

... laughter, ending in a round of fiendish cursing. 'Hold,' cried I, 'wait until I can loose my sword and lend thee aid.' Saying which, I hastily dismounted, throwing the bridle of my horse over a bush hard by, and hurried in the direction of the tumult. On turning a corner, there came upon my sight a scene which made my blood boil and lent new speed to my legs. Two ruffians had set upon a woman, and while ...
— The Fifth of November - A Romance of the Stuarts • Charles S. Bentley

... time. In a minute more I seed two men comin' ridin'. They wa'ant goin' very vast, so I could hear 'em talkin. When I got to the bottom of the hill I sed to meself, I wan't let those chaps zee me, so I gets under a bush cloase to a pool beside the road. As luck wud 'ave it, they got off their 'osses right against where I was, so as to let um drink, and then I seed that one of them was yer brother, and tother a strange chap, as Maaster Wilfred ...
— Roger Trewinion • Joseph Hocking

... coca) is a bush with leaves that contain the stimulant used to make cocaine. Coca is not to be confused with cocoa, which comes from cacao seeds and is used in making ...
— The 2007 CIA World Factbook • United States

... campaign against the recreant Indians and negroes. The appearance of the men and officers was wretched in the extreme; they had for weeks been beating through swamps and hammocks, thickly matted with palmetto bush, which had torn their undress uniforms in tatters, searching for an invisible enemy, who, thoroughly acquainted with the everglades, defied every attempt at capture. The whole party looked harassed, disappointed, and forlorn. General Taylor ...
— An Englishman's Travels in America - His Observations Of Life And Manners In The Free And Slave States • John Benwell

... times round her, and screeched three times 'tu-whit, tu-whit, tu-whoo.' Joringel could not stir; he stood there like a stone; he could not weep, or speak, or move hand or foot. Now the sun set; the owl flew into a bush, and immediately an old, bent woman came out of it; she was yellow-skinned and thin, and had large red eyes and a hooked nose, which met her chin. She muttered to herself, caught the nightingale, and carried ...
— The Green Fairy Book • Various

... nervously flicking a rose-bush with a twig he had picked up. "You see, it isn't ourselves exactly. Maud and I would rather like to, but our cook, she's Scotch, and a little strict in ...
— Sketches in Lavender, Blue and Green • Jerome K. Jerome

... maid, to call her by her proper title—was a dark-browed slut, wi' eyes like sloes, an' hair dragged over her face till she looked like an owl in an ivy-bush. As for the gown o' her, 'twas no better'n a sack tied round the middle, wi' a brave piece torn away by the shoulder, where one o' the men had ...
— Noughts and Crosses • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... the surface of its placid pools, swollen still from the heavy rains of the "First." In the glittering sunshine the prairie lay a riot of color; the first wild roses now had faded to a pastel pink, but on every bush there were plenty of new ones, deeply crimson and odorous. Across the creek from Thomas Shouldice's little house, Indian pipes and columbine reddened the edge of the poplar grove, from the lowest branches of which morning-glories, white and pink and purple, hung ...
— The Black Creek Stopping-House • Nellie McClung

... have seen many of our shrubs or tall bush-plants in your vacations. Do you remember the sweet creamy white azaleas and the buckeyes that grow along the creeks in the redwoods? And the feathery blue blossoms of the wild lilac crowding in close thickets up the hillsides? One of our shrubs is a holiday ...
— Stories of California • Ella M. Sexton

... no use in beating about the bush. I feel sorry for the nervous woman at all times and every day in the week, but there's no chance of a doubt that the nervous woman is mentally unbalanced for want of courage and lack of will power. ...
— The Woman Beautiful - or, The Art of Beauty Culture • Helen Follett Stevans

... the Dragon took in a fresh supply of coal, which would carry her, if properly husbanded, across the Pacific. Steaming northward, she entered the bay of Valparaiso, which Tom, as he looked at the barren, red, and bare hills surrounding it, with scarce a bush except the cactus to be seen, pronounced a very odd sort of Paradise. The town stands partly on the shores of the bay, and chiefly on a number of hills separated by valleys, with the mighty Cordilleras rising ...
— The Three Commanders • W.H.G. Kingston

... was nothing to be seen except that in the Martin orchard "Ol' Martin" was working with his team under the trees which came in rows down to the road. Finding nothing to interest him there, he turned toward the village and his eyes searched the street. Opposite the Gwynnes' gate, Dr. Bush's house stood back among the trees, but there was no sign of life about it. Further down on the same side of the street, the Widow Martin's cottage, with porch vine covered and windows bright with flowers, hid itself under a great spreading ...
— The Major • Ralph Connor

... the worms from my bag, which he crammed—all slimy and crawling as they were—into the pocket of a nearly new satin waistcoat. At another time, just as he was about to put on a fresh bait, his line became entangled in a bush, so as to require both hands to disengage it. Without the slightest hesitation he put the worm into his mouth to hold it while his hands were engaged with the line, and he seemed greatly to enjoy the laughter which his queer proceeding forced from ...
— Personal Recollections of Birmingham and Birmingham Men • E. Edwards

... by limiting the size and scope of government. Under the leadership of Vice President Bush, we have reduced the growth of Federal regulations by more than 25 percent and cut well over 300 million hours of government-required paperwork each year. This will save the public more than $150 billion over the next ...
— Complete State of the Union Addresses from 1790 to the Present • Various

... The horses were turned out to graze ostentatiously unprotected, so that the people in the thicket should have every chance to notice how secure the white men felt. The mules pastured comfortably over the shallow snow that crushed as they wandered among the sage-bush, and the square bell hung once more from the neck of the leader and tankled upon the hill. The shelter-tents littered the flat above the wash-out, and besides the cook-fire others were built irregularly ...
— Red Men and White • Owen Wister

... center of the court stood a large shrub about eight feet tall. It was beautifully trimmed and perfectly conical in form. The thick foliage was a dark, bright green, and the whole bush was covered with pure yellow flowers. They looked very much like velvety yellow pansies. I walked over and touched one. It was stiff and hard and shone with a metallic luster. It had evidently been on the ...
— The Enchanted Island • Fannie Louise Apjohn

... threaten the tranquillity of your native country. But whatever happen, do you faithfully honor and obey your prince, and adhere to the crown. I charge you never to forsake the crown, though it should hang upon a bush." "These last words," added Windham, "made such impressions on all our breasts, that the many afflictions of these sad times could never efface their indelible characters." From innumerable instances, it appears how ...
— The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.I., Part E. - From Charles I. to Cromwell • David Hume

... road was nothing more than a dray-track, to which the horses were unequal; and after proceeding a few miles, they were detained at the village of Prospect for a week, till one of the partners had returned to Sydney, and brought back a pair of bush-horses and a new cart. As they proceeded the next day, they found the track over which they travelled become more and more populous; till, on crossing the Macquarrie, they encamped in the midst of thirteen teams of cattle and their thirteen ...
— Chambers's Edinburgh Journal, No. 430 - Volume 17, New Series, March 27, 1852 • Various

... thou knowest that hidden by yonder bush is a well of crystal water. No more than nine paces must thou go to reach it. Let me, I pray thee, drink from ...
— Celtic Tales - Told to the Children • Louey Chisholm

... surrender of the prisoner. The demand was conceded with scarcely a word of protest, and five minutes later the miserable Alvaros, in a speechless frenzy of fear, was being hurried along a lonely bush path, known only to the negroes, to a spot some three miles distant. What happened to him when he arrived there must be left untold; suffice it to say that Major Alvaros was never more seen of men, and the mystery of his disappearance remains unsolved to this day, although Carlos Montijo and ...
— The Cruise of the Thetis - A Tale of the Cuban Insurrection • Harry Collingwood

... of greenbacks, but the people of the south who did not have rations furnished them, and who had to skirmish around and buy something to live upon, early learned that a greenback was worth "two in the bush," as it were. No community in the south was more loyal to the confederacy than the people of Montgomery, Alabama. They tried to use confederate currency as long as there was any hope, and they tried hard to despise the greenbacks; but when it got ...
— How Private George W. Peck Put Down The Rebellion - or, The Funny Experiences of a Raw Recruit - 1887 • George W. Peck

... grizzly man several years older than the Californian, with a short, stiff, throat-latch beard and a great bush of dense, short curls, stood by the forward guards, a picture of rude force and high efficiency. At every moment, from some direction among the deck's loungers a light scrutiny ventured to rest on him, to which he seemed habituated, and the lightest was enough to reveal ...
— Gideon's Band - A Tale of the Mississippi • George W. Cable

... there on being unhooked. Come, I doubt if any Indian would read marks more clearly than I have done, though probably he would explain matters in a far more pompous style. The fact is, my experience of bush-life and Indian life has been very considerable, as you will understand if you like some day to listen to some of my adventures. But there is nothing to keep ...
— The Log House by the Lake - A Tale of Canada • William H. G. Kingston

... night she went, And, stooping, crept by hedge and tree; Her rose-bush flung a snare of scent, And caught ...
— Modern British Poetry • Various

... rabbit-track, yet presently we met some wayfarer who had crossed the Cape by it. A piny dell gave some vista of the broad sea we were leaving, and an opening in the woods displayed another blue sea-line before; the encountering breezes interchanged odor of berry-bush and scent of brine; penetrating farther among oaks and chestnuts, we came upon some little cottage, quaint and sheltered as any Spenser drew; it was built on no high-road, and turned its vine-clad gable away from even ...
— Oldport Days • Thomas Wentworth Higginson

... Quaker, who kindly inquired what he was waiting there so long for? After some hesitation, he told his dreams. The Quaker laughed at his simplicity, and told him that he had had last night a very curious dream himself, which was, that if he went and dug under a certain bush in Upsall Castle, in Yorkshire, he would find a pot of gold; but he did not know where Upsall was, and inquired of the countryman if he knew, who, seeing some advantage in secrecy, pleaded ignorance of the locality, and then, thinking his business in London was completed, returned immediately ...
— Folklore as an Historical Science • George Laurence Gomme

... was going to bring up when I started. I went afoot the rest of the day, and let my wings hang. Early next morning I went to a private place to have some practice. I got up on a pretty high rock, and got a good start, and went swooping down, aiming for a bush a little over three hundred yards off; but I couldn't seem to calculate for the wind, which was about two points abaft my beam. I could see I was going considerable to looard of the bush, so I worked ...
— Captain Stormfield's Visit to Heaven • Mark Twain

... the dead of night the damsel opened his door, and with the keys that she had stolen, she opened twelve other locks that stood between them and the postern door. Then she brought him to his armour, which she had hidden in a bush, and she led forth his horse, and he mounted with much joy, and took the maid with him, and she showed him the way to a convent of white nuns, and there they ...
— King Arthur's Knights - The Tales Re-told for Boys & Girls • Henry Gilbert

... no mistaking the aim of all this, and Mr. Wade was too British in his habits to beat about the bush much longer. ...
— Roden's Corner • Henry Seton Merriman

... want to see us, really and truly, I want to know it," answered Tom bluntly. "I don't believe in this dodging around the bush. There is no sense in it." It had angered him to think Nellie had been seen in the company of Flockley and his cronies, and he was for ...
— The Rover Boys at College • Edward Stratemeyer

... of our fellows," observed Carmen, after scanning him closely. "All the same, he may not be. Let us slip behind this acacia-bush and watch his movements." ...
— Mr. Fortescue • William Westall

... half an acre was bounded on one side by a growth of wild mustard, whose slender stalks rose to more than the height of a man's head. On the other side was a grove of live-oak; and in front, the ground fell away in a rugged, bush-grown declivity. ...
— The Golden Fleece • Julian Hawthorne

... said, "we need not beat about the bush. You ask us a plain question and you want a plain answer. Then I must tell you this. The matter is not one concerning which I can give you any definite information. I appreciate the position of your friend Mr. Jones, and I should like to have met him in the same ...
— The Illustrious Prince • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... heroine of her own and Cattle Downs stations. Many were the tales told by the station hands of her feats of horsemanship and of the incorrigible buck-jumpers she had tamed. Moreover, she could box any man on the station. There was a certain amount of bush-romance attaching to her name, enough to have made her a legendary figure had she lived in mediaeval times. And yet, withal, she was a thorough girl of her century, educated and refined, but endowed with a masculine strength and a rigid uprightness of ...
— Australia Revenged • Boomerang

... can interview your mother-yes," put in Mumps, who had just appeared. "Baxter, there's no use in beating around the bush. Crabtree is bound to marry Mrs. Stanhope, and Dora may as well ...
— The Rover Boys on the Ocean • Arthur M. Winfield

... they hooked their little tails round that of their mother. Professor Henslow kept in confinement some harvest mice (Mus messorius) which do not possess a structurally prehensive tail; but he frequently observed that they curled their tails round the branches of a bush placed in the cage, and thus aided themselves in climbing. I have received an analogous account from Dr. Gunther, who has seen a mouse thus suspend itself. If the harvest mouse had been more strictly arboreal, ...
— On the Origin of Species - 6th Edition • Charles Darwin

... practice was like his counsel. He saw our plain New England life with as honest New England eyes as ever looked at a huckleberry-bush or into a milking-pail. ...
— Ralph Waldo Emerson • Oliver Wendell Holmes

... others of the species. Their feeding requires as much care as that of cavalry or artillery horses; they are fond of green food, and certain trees and shrubs. In grazing, camels brought from India sometimes are poisoned by eating the oleander bush and other plants which the native camel avoids. Elphinstone's ill-fated expedition in 1841 lost 800 out of 2,500 camels from this cause alone. On the march, or where grazing does not abound, they are fed with grain and bhoosa [Footnote: Chopped ...
— Afghanistan and the Anglo-Russian Dispute • Theo. F. Rodenbough

... little, frown a little, and get up meekly, and slink into the street. Human magnetism is such a subtle force. And Madame Chanve didn't mind in the least; she preferred a bird in the hand to a brace in the bush. From half a dozen to a score of us dined at her long table every evening; as many more drank her appetisers in the afternoon, and came again at night for grog or coffee. You see, it was a sort of club, a club of which Childe was at once the chairman ...
— Grey Roses • Henry Harland

... and it was, I think, about three in the afternoon when I reached the spot. The beaters were all ready and impatient, no doubt, owing to being kept waiting so long, and as I did not wish to delay them, and had no ladder, and there was no suitable tree, I took a seat on the ground behind a bush which lay on one side of, and about twenty yards from, a depression in the land through the bottom of which, by all the laws of tigers, the tiger ought to have passed to the main forest beyond. I had no sooner seated myself than I saw, from ...
— Gold, Sport, And Coffee Planting In Mysore • Robert H. Elliot

... darling lamb!" Elizabeth tugged at the poor little thing, caught by its woolly fleece in the long sharp thorns of a bush. ...
— Some Three Hundred Years Ago • Edith Gilman Brewster

... art to deceive me with respect to his design. His hypocritical manoeuvres only confirmed my suspicions, and, in order in my turn to deceive him, I pretended not to attend to him, and turned my back to the bush where the hen was cackling, upon which he immediately sprang to the place. I ran after him, and came up to him at the moment when he had broken the egg, and was swallowing it. Having caught the thief in the fact, I ...
— Stories about the Instinct of Animals, Their Characters, and Habits • Thomas Bingley

... rose, or look at the pure white petals of the lily, or the sweet-smelling blossoms of the orange or the jasmine, you are simply seeing or smelling leaves. The fruit itself, whether in the form of an apple, or a berry or a nut, is simply a form of leaf, a perfected form of the plant, or bush, or tree. Originally all these fruits, flowers and nuts were but leaves ...
— The Wonder Island Boys: Exploring the Island • Roger Thompson Finlay

... in the grass or from rose bush to rose bush. No word of ours escaped him. If our conversation on the enthralling subjects of fertilizers and aphides seemed in its earnest absorption to verge upon the emotional and tender he interfered at once. He commanded ...
— My Robin • Frances Hodgson Burnett

... have crossed the Baidar Valley the balmy air becomes raw and chill, the bald mountains tame and common-place, and the long descent is through an ashy-gray country, swept over by an icy blast, saddened by a lowering sky, unrelieved by a flower, a bush, or a cottage. So marvellous is the power of mere position, so great the difference between the two sides of the same mountain-wall! You pass at once from ...
— Russia - As Seen and Described by Famous Writers • Various

... from which bullets might come at any time, the two lieutenants conferred for a few moments, and had decided to put back, when a rattling chorus of pistol reports sounded from the depths of the woods. It died away; then was heard a crashing of bush and branch, and out upon the sands sprang a figure—a long, weird figure in black frock of clerical cut. Into their midst it sped with mighty bounds, and sinking down, lifted a glad face to the heavens with the groaning utterance: "O God, I thank thee. ...
— "Where Angels Fear to Tread" and Other Stories of the Sea • Morgan Robertson

... the sun sunk below the horizon, and the light slowly died out. Rico arose, and passed along the road towards the red flowers. A narrow lane branched off from the main road at this place. There they stood, one bush after another: it looked like a great garden. There was, truly, only an open fence about the whole; and within the flowers, the trees, and the grape-vines were all ...
— Rico And Wiseli - Rico And Stineli, And How Wiseli Was Provided For • Johanna Spyri

... and the Spanish "bandoleros" (banished men) and "salteadores" (raiders). The forests of England gave cover to the outlaws whose very much flattered portrait is to be found in the ballads of Robin Hood. The "maquis," i.e. the bush of Corsica, and its hills, have helped the Corsican brigand, as the bush of Australia covered the bushranger. But neither forest thicket nor mountain is a lasting protection against a good police, used with intelligence by the government, and supported by ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 4, Part 3 - "Brescia" to "Bulgaria" • Various

... away with me; I became almost rude. "Madam," I exclaimed, "why beat about the bush? I do not care to deceive you, and you must not deceive me. Why should we not be friends in every way, ...
— 54-40 or Fight • Emerson Hough

... keep it a moment longer, Sister Nightmare," answered Scarecrow. "I thought I had a glimpse of something behind that thick bush." ...
— Famous Tales of Fact and Fancy - Myths and Legends of the Nations of the World Retold for Boys and Girls • Various

... right, half to the left of the highway. Shoot straight and strong, and waste no breath with noise; let the loose of the bowstring cry for you! and look you! think it no loss of manhood to cover your bodies with tree and bush; for one of us who know is worth a hundred of those proud fools. To it, lads, and let them see what the grey goose bears between his wings! Abide us here, brother John Ball, and pray for us if thou wilt; but for me, if God will not do ...
— A Dream of John Ball, A King's Lesson • William Morris

... at dusk, Faring down some woody trail Leading homeward through the musk Of may-apple and pawpaw, Hazel-bush, and spice and haw,— So comes Autumn, swart and hale, Drooped of frame and slow of stride. But withal an air of pride Looming up in stature far Higher than his shoulders are; Weary both in arm and limb, Yet the wholesome heart of him Sheer at ...
— Green Fields and Running Brooks, and Other Poems • James Whitcomb Riley

... following out his little scheme for vanishing. He struck the edge of the bush patch, and was on the extreme end of the line, so that he believed he could drop out of the race, and no one be the wiser. By the time the runners reached the road over which they were to go for two and a half miles, they would be so far away from the crowd that no one ...
— Fred Fenton on the Track - or, The Athletes of Riverport School • Allen Chapman

... began to hope that they might have escaped; secondly, to see which would be the best course to take if I ran for my life. For I could run, and pretty swiftly, then. The hardy life I had led out in the bush, with Jimmy for my companion, had made me light of foot and ...
— Bunyip Land - A Story of Adventure in New Guinea • George Manville Fenn

... figured in the bas-reliefs. These must have been taken off, as they are to-day, before entering a temple, a palace, or a harem. Moses was required to take off his shoes before approaching the burning bush, because the place on which he stood was holy ground. In the houses of their gods, in those of their kings and rich men, the floor would be covered with those rich carpets and mats that from one end of the East to the other conceal from sight the floors of white wood or ...
— A History of Art in Chaldaea & Assyria, v. 1 • Georges Perrot

... by stress of circumstances, as good Irishmen as I ever met. Coming home from work one evening, I met on the road to the Curragh a party of them, carrying, for want of a better banner, a big green bush, and singing "The Green Flag." Then, as they came in sight of the famous plain ...
— The Life Story of an Old Rebel • John Denvir

... on, and, in a little while, they saw what had happened. Nicknack was caught in a thick bush by the rope around his horns. He had pulled the rope loose from his leafy bower, and it had dragged along after him as he wandered away. Then the end of the rope had become tangled in a thick bush and the goat could not pull it loose. He was held as ...
— The Curlytops on Star Island - or Camping out with Grandpa • Howard R. Garis

... if you will take my advice, you will look to some other way of settling this business. You know what a law-suit means in this country, and you'll find yourself in the midst of a strange bush ...
— The Impostures of Scapin • Moliere

... head and shoulders taller in cheerful and sterling courage. She could walk head in air along the most precarious rafter; her hand feared neither the grossness nor the harshness of life's web, but was thrust cheerfully, if need were, into the briar bush, and could take hold of any crawling horror. Ruin was mining the walls of her cottage, as already it had mined and subverted Mr. Archer's palace. Well, she faced it with a bright countenance and a busy hand. She had got some washing, some rough seamstress work from the 'Green Dragon,' and from ...
— Lay Morals • Robert Louis Stevenson

... finally court theatricals in his Highness's own playhouse. The beautiful castle gardens were illuminated with a myriad coloured lamps in the trees; the rose-garden had become an enchanted bower, with little lanterns twinkling in each rose-bush, and the fountain in the centre was so lit up with varied lights that the spray assumed a thousand hues. Hidden bands of musicians played in the garden, and, in fact, it was said that Stuttgart would never ...
— A German Pompadour - Being the Extraordinary History of Wilhelmine van Graevenitz, - Landhofmeisterin of Wirtemberg • Marie Hay

... a circle round the fire and performed a war dance, with the unlucky trappers for rueful spectators. This done, emboldened by what they considered cowardice on the part of the white men, they neglected their usual mode of bush-fighting, and advanced openly within twenty paces of the willows. A sharp volley from the trappers brought them to a sudden halt, and laid three of them breathless. The chief, who had stationed himself on an eminence to direct all the movements of his people, seeing three of his ...
— The Adventures of Captain Bonneville - Digested From His Journal • Washington Irving

... many, he was himself slain and his diminished force destroyed. So ended the war of the usurpers; and the last and most doubtful of all the usurpers, a wanderer from the Welsh marches, a knight from nowhere, found the crown of England under a bush ...
— A Short History of England • G. K. Chesterton

... invariably; as sometimes a man, by being forewarned of danger, is unnerved with terror, and undone. So the two maxims, "Never abandon a certainty for an uncertainty," "Nothing venture, nothing have," destroy each other. Whether you shall give up the one bird in the hand and try for the two in the bush depends on the relative worth of the one and the two, and the probabilities of success in the trial. No abstract maxim can help solve that problem: it requires living intelligence. To follow a foreign rule empirically will often be to fare as the monkey ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. XI., February, 1863, No. LXIV. • Various

... the way you beat around the bush. You tell me some meager scrap of filmy news and then ask me a dozen questions. As I told you before, I don't like it—and I 'm just about at the point where I don't care what ...
— The Cross-Cut • Courtney Ryley Cooper

... 7. 15 for breakfast. We started again at 9.50 A.M., continuing our westerly course along the path: we crossed to the south of the watercourse above the water, and proceeded over the most splendid salt-bush country that one could wish to see, bounded on the left by sandhills, whilst to the right the peculiar-looking flat-topped sandstone ranges form an extensive amphitheatre, through the far side of the arena of which may be traced the ...
— Successful Exploration Through the Interior of Australia • William John Wills

... off went his arrow, and down fell the thrush into a bush that grew at the foot of the tree. The Jew, when he saw that he could have the bird, thought he would cheat the man, so he put his money into his pocket again, and crept into the bush to find the prize. As soon as he had got into the middle, ...
— Folk-lore and Legends: German • Anonymous

... beautiful flowers, roses especially. There is something extremely oriental in its appearance, and the fountains are ornamented with China vases and Chinese figures of great value. Walking along under arches formed by rose-bushes, a small column of water spouted forth from each bush, sprinkling us all over with its showers. But the prettiest thing in the garden is a great tank of clear water, enclosed on three sides by a Chinese building, round which runs a piazza with stone pillars, shaded by a drapery of white curtains. Comfortable well-cushioned sofas are arranged ...
— Life in Mexico • Frances Calderon De La Barca

... no molestation; but others might not have escaped unpleasantness. The agent of a Hatton Garden jeweller might have had to pay toll, if the story were true that a few of the dispersed "Black Legion" had got off with their rifles and started a joint-stock company in the bush-whacking line, and were doing ...
— Romantic Spain - A Record of Personal Experiences (Vol. II) • John Augustus O'Shea

... with his small number of men, moved first to the left, and then to the right, at both which places he endeavoured to force a passage, but was repulsed, being unsupported by the irregulars. Instead of retreating, as he ought in prudence to have done, he still continued his platoon and bush firing till four o'clock in the afternoon, during which time his regular troops suffered greatly by the fire from the camp, and were at last thrown into confusion; which was no sooner perceived by general Johnson's men, than they, without waiting for orders, leaped over their breastwork, ...
— The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.II. - From William and Mary to George II. • Tobias Smollett

... Ma dye with some bush they call 'indigo,' and black walnut bark. Big old pen for ...
— Slave Narratives Vol. XIV. South Carolina, Part 1 • Various

... to the point quickly," Lady Charlotte remarked. "I don't commonly beat the bush long myself. Love him! You might as well ask me my age. The indiscretion would be equal, and the result the same. Love! I have a proper fear of the word. When two play at love they spoil the game. It's enough that ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... camps upon the two slopes that lay moon-bathed at midnight. Back where the moon was making the barren mountains a wonderland of deep purple and black and silvery gray and brown, a coyote yapped a falsetto message and was answered by one nearer at hand—his mate, it might be. In a bush under the bank that made of it a black blot in the unearthly whiteness of the sand, a little bird fluttered uneasily and sent a small, inquiring chirp into the stillness. From somewhere farther up the arroyo drifted a faint, aromatic ...
— The Heritage of the Sioux • B.M. Bower

... creeps upon the helpful wall. Of all beasts, the soft and patient lamb. Of all fowls, the mild and gall-less dove. Christ is the rose of the field, and the lily of the valley. When God appeared to Moses, it was not in the lofty cedar, nor the sturdy oak, nor the spreading plane; but in a bush, an humble, slender, abject shrub: as if he would, by these elections, check the conceited arrogance of man. Nothing procureth love like humility; nothing hate, like pride. The proud man walks among daggers pointed against him; whereas the humble ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 20, - Issue 572, October 20, 1832 • Various

... men whom White took from Red Oak led the posse to the camp on Pryor Creek. It was on a ledge on a hillside. The fires had been built under a jutting rock. Only a bush wren could have hidden its nest more completely—Bruce had been lucky in spying it out. He told White that there was but one unprotected approach—a long unused trail that led down from the cliff-top and ended in a briar tangle fifty feet above ...
— McClure's Magazine, Vol 31, No 2, June 1908 • Various

... far up on the mountain side. At the end of this pipe, where the water was now going to waste, the Littlest Girl from Kansas had taken in charge the precious flow, and proposed a tiny garden of her own. Here there were divers shrubs, among these a single rose bush, now blossomless. Dan Anderson broke off a leafy twig or so, and handed them to Constance, who ...
— Heart's Desire • Emerson Hough

... trousers, and, except a sunburnt complexion, had not the slightest appearance of a sailor; yet he had been forty years in the whale-trade, and, as he said himself, had owned ships, built ships, and sailed ships. His boat's crew were a pretty raw set, just out of the bush, and, as the sailor's phrase is, "hadn't got the hayseed out of their hair.'' Captain Terry convinced our captain that our reckoning was a little out, and, having spent the day on board, put off in his boat at sunset for his ship, which was now six or eight miles astern. ...
— Two Years Before the Mast • Richard Henry Dana

... Well—A single rose upon the bush. Bound to be plucked, you know. Couldn't be left to fade in the ...
— Six Plays • Florence Henrietta Darwin

... will not beat about the bush with you. My judgment is still against this marriage; you need not look so alarmed; it does not follow I shall forbid it. I feel I have hardly a right to, for my Rosa might be in her grave now but for you; and, another thing, when I interfered between you ...
— A Simpleton • Charles Reade

... for a true samurai to hasten death or to court it, was alike cowardice. A typical fighter, when he lost battle after battle and was pursued from plain to hill and from bush to cavern, found himself hungry and alone in the dark hollow of a tree, his sword blunt with use, his bow broken and arrows exhausted—did not the noblest of the Romans fall upon his own sword in Phillippi under like circumstances?—deemed ...
— Bushido, the Soul of Japan • Inazo Nitobe

... world-wide is the fame of Ste. Anne d'Auray that a traveller mentions having seen at her shrine an embroidered altar-cloth of Irish damask, with "Irlande: Reconnaissance a Sainte Anne, 1850," woven into the pattern. The convent, with its enclosure, the Scala Sancta, fountain, and miraculous bush, all date from the seventeenth century. There is a railway station for Ste. Anne, within two miles of ...
— Brittany & Its Byways • Fanny Bury Palliser

... were torn to shreds, her feet were bleeding; she felt nothing. Not once did she look up or back or round. Had she done so, she might have noticed that her footprints in the sand were describing a circle, as our footprints do when we are lost in the bush or the desert. ...
— The Hawk of Egypt • Joan Conquest

... Mr. Matson, and so are you. So I won't beat around the bush, but come straight to the point. You're the greatest pitcher in the country, and we want to secure your services for the new league. We've got oceans of money behind us, and we're prepared to let you name your own terms. We'll ...
— Baseball Joe Around the World - Pitching on a Grand Tour • Lester Chadwick

... so. I was going to have radishes and a rose-bush," replied Mary tearfully. "There's a robin just building in the elm-tree now. There won't be any trees in ...
— Nine Little Goslings • Susan Coolidge

... jar on the ears of the traders in their lonely dwelling; warning them that competition was at hand, and that, if they desired to carry on the trade in peace, they must push still further into the bush, or be hopelessly swallowed up ...
— Wrecked but not Ruined • R.M. Ballantyne

... dead limbs of the willow were rounded and adorned by the climbing milkania, Milkania scandens, which filled every crevice in the leafy bank, contrasting agreeably with the gray bark of its supporter and the balls of the button-bush." ...
— History of American Literature • Reuben Post Halleck

... "thorough" are originally the same word, and in Shakespeare's time both forms were used for the preposition. Cf. Puck's song in "Midsummer Night's Dream," "Thorough bush, thorough briar." ...
— Coleridge's Ancient Mariner and Select Poems • Samuel Taylor Coleridge

... like the idea of facing Aunt Kate again, so he slipped in through the back gate, and walked quietly around the house. As he approached the house, he heard a voice, and paused a moment, hidden by a lilac bush. Poor, lonely Bobby was sitting on the steps, one hand on Tiger's neck, while the other stroked Topsy. He was pouring out to his two friends all ...
— Stories Worth Rereading • Various

... sound of the train died away in the distance, and then, such was their utter stillness, from the thorn-bush close to them a thrush suddenly thrilled into song. The soft notes fell balmlike into that awful silence and ...
— Greatheart • Ethel M. Dell

... utter privacy of a small seat-enclosing, bush-hidden half-cave, Damocles de Warrenne crushed Lucille to his breast as she again flung her arms around ...
— Snake and Sword - A Novel • Percival Christopher Wren

... can experience no greater sensation of joy than that which she feels when she first realizes that she is the mistress of a lilac bush. Neither her debut dance nor her first proposal of sentiment equals it. It is the same way about the first egg she gathers with her own ...
— The Golden Bird • Maria Thompson Daviess

... guinea a lesson, sir.' (A loud laugh.) Sir James (rather ruffled)—'Never mind your terms here. I ask you what is musical accent. Can you see it?' Cooke—'No.' Sir James—'Can you feel it?' Cooke—'A musician can.' (Great laughter.) Sir James (very angry)—'Now, pray sir, don't beat about the bush, but explain to his lordship and the jury, who are supposed to know nothing about music, the meaning of what you call accent.' Cooke—'Accent in music, is a certain stress laid upon a particular note, ...
— The International Monthly Magazine - Volume V - No II • Various

... that day. A confounded berthing master came on board on some pretence or other, but in reality, Bunter thought, simply impelled by an inconvenient curiosity—inconvenient to Bunter, that is. After some beating about the bush, that man ...
— Tales Of Hearsay • Joseph Conrad

... cleared his eye or opened an inner one, will go back for the explanation to an old and unforgotten promise, and will exclaim when he sees the Church struggling, but triumphant, like the fire-girdled bush at Horeb, "God is in the midst of her, she shall not be moved; God shall help her, and that right early." And not only in the preservation from her enemies but in her unfailing progress among men in every age, has God shown that his purpose is to build ...
— The Wesleyan Methodist Pulpit in Malvern • Knowles King

... desert in patent-leather boots, does the stage hero. He takes a supply with him when he is wrecked on an uninhabited island. He arrives from long and trying journeys; his clothes are ragged and torn, but his boots are new and shiny. He puts on patent-leather boots to tramp through the Australian bush, to fight in Egypt, to ...
— Stage-Land • Jerome K. Jerome



Words linked to "Bush" :   maikoa, Irish gorse, false tamarisk, rosebush, beach plum bush, Hermannia verticillata, impala lily, ephedra, makomako, Ardisia paniculata, caricature plant, Chinese holly, laurel sumac, cannabis, flowering hazel, Dubya, quail bush, carissa, groundsel bush, frangipanni, leatherwood, Cytesis proliferus, scrub, cotton plant, Cordyline terminalis, coral bush, Bassia scoparia, caragana, Comptonia asplenifolia, dombeya, Chilean nut, Bauhinia monandra, bush honeysuckle, cushion flower, hediondilla, five-finger, frangipani, candlewood, amorpha, kidney wort, Malosma laurina, camellia, Datura sanguinea, black bead, Erythroxylon coca, minniebush, catclaw, Madagascar plum, andromeda, bracelet wood, cat's-claw, President George W. Bush, greasewood, allspice, derris, shrub, buckthorn, Vannevar Bush, currant bush, fringe bush, American cranberry bush, Conradina glabra, Dacridium laxifolius, Chilean hazelnut, hiccup nut, Datura suaveolens, black greasewood, Chimonanthus praecox, Euonymus americanus, Leucothoe editorum, Aristotelia racemosa, Desmodium motorium, Camellia sinensis, fire bush, Lepidothamnus fonkii, Brugmansia suaveolens, cranberry, Christ's-thorn, sugar-bush, bush shrike, Jew-bush, Jerusalem thorn, Halimodendron argenteum, butterfly bush, hoary golden bush, burning bush, Himalaya honeysuckle, coca plant, bush baby, Chrysolepis sempervirens, Adam's apple, Epigaea repens, Lepechinia calycina, coyote bush, Indian currant, guinea flower, Griselinia littoralis, Lepidothamnus laxifolius, kapuka, Dubyuh, Jacquinia armillaris, crape myrtle, fool's huckleberry, blolly, Cineraria maritima, groundsel tree, President Bush, provide, feijoa, strawberry bush, hawthorn, cinquefoil, bitter-bark, Leucothoe racemosa, male berry, gardenia, Leycesteria formosa, honey bell, belvedere, kei apple bush, Baccharis halimifolia, staggerbush, calliandra, bushman's poison, false azalea, Cytisus ramentaceus, Fabiana imbricata, Dalea spinosa, guelder rose, Hibiscus farragei, Aspalathus linearis, Adenium multiflorum, angel's trumpet, Adenium obesum, Acocanthera spectabilis, jasmine, capsicum pepper plant, Chiococca alba, joint fir, Acalypha virginica, chaparral pea, climbing hydrangea, George W. Bush, saltbush, chanar, Jew bush, desert rose, crampbark, Christmas bush, fuchsia, Combretum bracteosum, ligneous plant, Chinese angelica tree, Lambertia formosa, barberry, Batis maritima, Acocanthera oblongifolia, groundberry, forsythia, common flat pea, eggplant bush, batoko palm, barilla, daisybush, Datura arborea, daphne, fothergilla, Japanese angelica tree, dahl, Anagyris foetida, flannelbush, Dirca palustris, quince bush, crepe myrtle, Ledum palustre, chanal, flame bush, mimosa bush, glandular Labrador tea, heath, juniper bush, Cajanus cajan, Chamaecytisus palmensis, lily-of-the-valley tree, bladder senna, dewberry bush, hovea, bristly locust, bush poppy, Clethra alnifolia, consumption weed, bush bean, indigo plant, gooseberry, Larrea tridentata, Cyrilla racemiflora, Catha edulis, coralberry, bird's-eye bush, cajan pea, Chile hazel, Kochia scoparia, brittle bush, marmalade bush, coffee rose, Kolkwitzia amabilis, coronilla, Mahonia aquifolium, Australian heath, low-bush blueberry, Acocanthera venenata, bush league, Loiseleuria procumbens, fire-bush, Anadenanthera colubrina, desert willow, Geoffroea decorticans, bridal-wreath, hamelia, Leitneria floridana, flame pea, kelpwort, lawyer bush, smoke bush, Labrador tea, lady-of-the-night, huckleberry oak, Caesalpinia sepiaria, Anthyllis barba-jovis, coyote brush, huckleberry, cupflower, California beauty, dwarf golden chinkapin, Flacourtia indica, calico bush, Jupiter's beard, Canella winterana, mallow, Hercules'-club, Lycium carolinianum, Christmas berry, cranberry heath, alpine totara, cotoneaster, gorse, Ledum groenlandicum, leatherleaf, Diervilla lonicera, high-bush blueberry, hiccough nut, elderberry bush, castor bean plant, Desmodium gyrans, chaparral broom, Chilean firebush, crowberry, needlebush, kalmia, coca, cherry laurel, alpine azalea, jujube bush, needle bush, jujube, bush hibiscus, Lyonia ligustrina, helianthemum, cranberry bush, buddleia, Caesalpinia decapetala, butcher's broom, supply, guinea gold vine, bush tit, maleberry, Christmasberry, gooseberry bush, Codariocalyx motorius, Cestrum diurnum, kei apple, buckler mustard, Baccharis viminea, glory pea, Guevina heterophylla, geebung, lilac, arrow wood, woody plant, fetter bush, abelia, lentisk, Leucothoe fontanesiana, dog laurel, black-fronted bush shrike, cyrilla, Colutea arborescens, Brugmansia sanguinea, artemisia, raspberry bush, Aralia stipulata, bush leaguer, chalice vine, Brunfelsia americana, beat around the bush, Argyroxiphium sandwicense, Dovyalis caffra, bitter pea, honey-flower, East Indian rosebay, guava bush, box, governor plum, Georgia bark, American angelica tree, corkwood tree, Chile nut, catjang pea, day jessamine, leadwort, bearberry, Erythroxylon truxiuense, Chamaedaphne calyculata, Aralia elata, bushy, boysenberry bush, glasswort, banksia, hemp, rabbit bush, Japanese andromeda, Ardisia escallonoides, Lyonia mariana, Brugmansia arborea, Caulophyllum thalictrioides, Dalmatian laburnum, Leiophyllum buxifolium, honeyflower, stagger bush, Griselinia lucida, chaparral, Jacquinia keyensis, coville, Chilean rimu, Euonymus atropurpureus, sweet pepperbush, Hakea lissosperma, cotton-seed tree, forestiera, boxthorn, croton, grevillea, boxwood, furze, elder, Chinese angelica, Japanese allspice, broom, firethorn, Lavatera arborea, Biscutalla laevigata, Aristotelia serrata, flat pea, governor's plum, shadbush, California redbud, blackthorn, lomatia, Hazardia cana, pubic hair, bush out, creosote bush, camelia, Diervilla sessilifolia, cassava, minnie bush, flannel bush, African hemp, crepe flower, Ilex cornuta, bush pea, bush vetch, casava, black haw, Baccharis pilularis, goldenbush, Halimodendron halodendron, squaw-bush, mountain fetterbush, Acocanthera oppositifolia, Codiaeum variegatum, butterfly flower, stingaree-bush, Embothrium coccineum, bramble bush, holly-leaves barberry, Cercis occidentalis, Genista raetam, American spicebush, clianthus, bush clover, blueberry bush, silverbush, Brassaia actinophylla, scarlet bush, Eryngium maritimum, oriental bush cherry, kudu lily, Lindera benzoin, Hakea laurina, render, Eriodictyon californicum, bush-league, crotch hair, Lupinus arboreus, Lyonia lucida, bushing, lavender, honeybells, Benzoin odoriferum, flowering quince, bush willow, daisy-bush, Lagerstroemia indica, Cestrum nocturnum, cranberry tree



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