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Bunt   Listen
noun
Bunt  n.  (Naut.) The middle part, cavity, or belly of a sail; the part of a furled sail which is at the center of the yard.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Bunt" Quotes from Famous Books



... bowline, and when our 'Amigo' had satisfied himself of his superiority by one or two short tacks, he deliberately took a reef in his mainsail, hauled down his flying jib and gaff-topsail, triced up the bunt of his foresail, and fired his long thirty-two at us. The shot came in our third aftermost port on the starboard side, and dismounted the carronade, smashing the slide and wounding three men. The second missed, and ...
— Thrilling Narratives of Mutiny, Murder and Piracy • Anonymous

... as for cup cake, then add gradually one egg at a time, using three altogether, and stirring all the time in one direction. Work in the risen batter two or three spoons at a time between each egg. Grate in the peel of a lemon or an orange. Butter the bunt-form well (do this always before you begin to work). Blanched almonds may be set in the grooves of the cake-form after buttering it. Put in the dough, set it in a warm place and let it rise for an hour and a half or two hours. Bake in a moderate oven ...
— The International Jewish Cook Book • Florence Kreisler Greenbaum

... I had my full share in the performance of this duty. I actually furled the mizen-royal with my own hands—the ship carrying standing royals—and it was said to be very respectably done; a little rag-baggish in the bunt, perhaps, but secured in a way that took the next fellow who touched the gasket five minutes to cast the sail loose. Then it rained, and sails were to be loosened to dry. I let everything fall forward with my own ...
— Afloat And Ashore • James Fenimore Cooper

... put the helm up a bit kinder nearer the wind," drawled out the lookout from his post of observation in the main-top, where he had stopped a moment on catching sight of the object floating in the water ahead of the vessel, as he was coming down from aloft after restowing the bunt of the main-topgallantsail that had blown loose ...
— Picked up at Sea - The Gold Miners of Minturne Creek • J.C. Hutcheson

... the curtain of cloud by strands of rainy cordage, and men aloft are loosing the reefed topsail, bracing the after-yards and setting them for a run in on the larboard tack. They handle gaskets, bunt-lines, leech-lines, fix her best bib and spencer, like a country girl for a run up to town. Men are swarming about the yards and rigging. That is not all: Lascars, stevedores, supercargoes, the hong merchants, agents, are all busy ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Vol. XII, No. 28. July, 1873. • Various

... push; start, give a start to, set going; drive, urge, boom; thrust, prod, foin [Fr.]; cant; elbow, shoulder, jostle, justle^, hustle, hurtle, shove, jog, jolt, encounter; run against, bump against, butt against; knock one's head against, run one's head against; impinge; boost [U.S.]; bunt, carom, clip y; fan, fan out; jab, plug [Slang]. strike, knock, hit, tap, rap, slap, flap, dab, pat, thump, beat, blow, bang, slam, dash; punch, thwack, whack; hit hard, strike hard; swap, batter, dowse^, baste; pelt, patter, buffet, ...
— Roget's Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases: Body • Roget

... batters faced the plate, swung valiantly or wildly at balls and essayed bunts. Few hit the ball out and none made a creditable bunt. After their turn at bat they were ordered to the other end of the cage, where they fell over one another trying to stop the balls that were hit. Every few moments the coach would yell for one of them, any one, to take a turn at pitching. Ken noticed that Arthurs ...
— The Young Pitcher • Zane Grey

... the flood tide the tides will be higher. As exemplifying the effect of violent gales in the Atlantic on the tides of the Bristol Channel, the following extract from "The Surveyor, Engineer, and Architect" of 1840, dealing with observations taken on Mr. Bunt's self-registering tide gauge at Hotwell House, Clifton, ...
— The Sewerage of Sea Coast Towns • Henry C. Adams

... in order to attach him to their interests, is to promise to back him politically in the next campaign for Governor. It's too bad," he continued, dropping his voice, and changing his position. "It really is too bad to see good men trying to bunt a stone wall over with their bare heads. You couldn't have won at any stage of the game. I wish I could have talked to you and your friends before you went into that Sacramento fight. I could have told you then how little chance you had. ...
— The Octopus • Frank Norris

... week the tide of a congregation coming out of the pretty church at Cowes is thoroughly aquatic. Fine stalwart men with handsome faces, girls with chignons as big as a topsail bunt, yacht skippers of bronze hue and anxious eye, well fed sailors with cerulean Jerseys, children with hat ribbons and neckties labelled with yacht names. There were 150 yachts on the water here, and the Rob Roy anchored close to the Hotel, from which the sight was magnificent ...
— The Voyage Alone in the Yawl "Rob Roy" • John MacGregor



Words linked to "Bunt" :   hit, baseball, smut fungus, stinking smut, Tilletia foetida, smut, baseball game, drag a bunt, strike, Tilletia, genus Tilletia



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