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Browse   Listen
verb
Browse  v. t.  (past & past part. browsed; pres. part. browsing)  
1.
To eat or nibble off, as the tender branches of trees, shrubs, etc.; said of cattle, sheep, deer, and some other animals. "Yes, like the stag, when snow the plasture sheets, The barks of trees thou browsedst."
2.
To feed on, as pasture; to pasture on; to graze. "Fields... browsed by deep-uddered kine."
3.
To look casually through (a book, books, or a set of documents), reading those parts which arouse one's interest. Contrasted with scan, in which one typically is searching for something specific.
4.
(Computers) To look at a series of electronic documents on a computer screen by means of a browser 2.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Browse" Quotes from Famous Books



... much a little gray-eyed nurse in El Paso had to do with Pete's determination to browse in those alien pastures is a matter for speculation—but a matter which did not trouble Pete in the least, because it never occurred to him; evident in his confession to Andy White, months later: "I sure went to it with ...
— The Ridin' Kid from Powder River • Henry Herbert Knibbs

... she had been arranging her little set of delicate china, her one rare treasure and inheritance. "Yes, I knew she was reading—whatever she fancied, but I thought I wouldn't interfere—not yet. I have so little time, for one thing, and, anyway, I thought she might browse a bit. She's like a calf in rare pastures, and I don't think she understands enough to do her harm—or much good, either. Those things slide off from her like water off a ...
— The Eye of Dread • Payne Erskine

... ground, and having led my horse a few rods into the prairie—so as to keep him clear of the precipice—I relieved him of his saddle and bridle, and left him to browse to the full length of ...
— The War Trail - The Hunt of the Wild Horse • Mayne Reid

... Islands of Baker, Jarvis, Howland, Malden, Starbuck, Fanning, Enderbury, Lacepede, Browse, ...
— Manures and the principles of manuring • Charles Morton Aikman

... cypresses, through which the sunlight hardly pierced. Up this I passed, and seeking out the deserted stables (which I found all too dilapidated to afford shelter) finally put up my caleche in the ruined sacristy of an old Dominican chapel, and turned my mare loose to browse for the night on a ...
— Prince Zaleski • M.P. Shiel

... elephant-trunk, taking from the stiffness of its outline, and reminding us that our motley crowd of friends inside were uncomfortably cramped for room and only too ready to leap in a cascade on the floor and browse and gallop, flutter and bellow and neigh, and be their natural selves again. I think that none of us ever really thought very much of Ham and Shem and Japhet. They were only there because they were in the story, but nobody really wanted them. The Ark was built for the animals, ...
— Dream Days • Kenneth Grahame

... it did not displease the domestic animals. Agouties, goats, and sheep had soon taken possession of this domain, which offered them roots to nibble at, and grass to browse on far beyond their needs. As for the fowls they were greedily pecking away at the seeds and worms in the banks of the rivulet. Animal life was already manifesting itself in such goings and comings, such flights ...
— Godfrey Morgan - A Californian Mystery • Jules Verne

... fruitful strip of land where the palms stood. The camel immediately refreshed itself with water, while Jalaladdeen's repast consisted of dates from the neighbouring trees. He then allowed the camel to browse upon the brink of the stream, while he resigned himself, without care, to rest beneath the shade. He was soon, however, terrified by the roar of a lion, which sounded close to him; accordingly he sprang ...
— Eastern Tales by Many Story Tellers • Various

... grassy plain-and-hill country. Their tracks and dung covered the ground. They had also evidently descended into the depths of the canon wherever there was the slightest break or even lowering in the upper line of basalt cliffs. Although mountain sheep often browse in winter, I saw but few traces of browsing here; probably on the sheer cliff side they always got some grazing. When I spied the band they were lying not far from the spot in which they had lain the day before, and in the same position on the brink of the canon. They ...
— American Big Game in Its Haunts • Various

... shall the Jungle Peoples come to thee. They shall never cross thy trail, nor sleep near thee, nor follow after thee, nor browse by thy lair. Only Fear shall follow thee, and with a blow that thou canst not see he shall bid thee wait his pleasure. He shall make the ground to open under thy feet, and the creeper to twist about ...
— The Second Jungle Book • Rudyard Kipling

... also that the emigrants already encamped there found pasturage very short. Consequently, our train halted at this more advantageous point, where our cattle could be sent in charge of herders to browse along the Platte River, and where the necessary materials could be obtained to repair the great damage which had been done to our wagon wheels by the intense heat ...
— The Expedition of the Donner Party and its Tragic Fate • Eliza Poor Donner Houghton

... themselves, as Nature meant them to. The Buck had reached his prime, but you are not to suppose that he began to age immediately afterward. It was long before his eye was dimmed or his natural force abated; and as the years went by, with their summers of lily-pads and tender young browse, and their autumns of beechnuts and fighting and love-making, the broad cloven track of his split foot was often to be found in the hard, smooth sand of the beach. Perhaps it is there now. I wish I could go ...
— Forest Neighbors - Life Stories of Wild Animals • William Davenport Hulbert

... forests, marks its outline on the snowy summits beyond. Fruitful clearings appear to the height of five thousand feet on the western slopes; garden terraces mount the eastward face, and the valleys, green with meadows or golden with grain, are dotted with clusters of cottages. Sheep and goats browse in great numbers on the hill-sides; lower down the camel and buffalo feed; herds of horses roam half wild through the glades, and from the higher rocks the chamois looks boldly down on ...
— Historic Tales, Vol. 8 (of 15) - The Romance of Reality • Charles Morris

... people coming a mile off. Only foreigners may go there: the Chinese aren't allowed on it, except the soldiers at the blockhouses by the towers. The most frequent visitor is the baby camel owned by the American marine guards, which comes up to browse on the weeds growing between the stones. We once asked a marine where they found this mascot. "Stole it first," was the reply, ...
— Peking Dust • Ellen N. La Motte

... were unharnessed, and left to browse under the care of the coachman who had driven us. The provisions were unpacked, and John Hart and Nab Walker spread out a meal on the grass at the foot of a superb cypress which recalled to me the forest odors of Morganton and Pleasant Garden. We were hungry ...
— The Master of the World • Jules Verne

... silver waters of the Wolf. And through this dawn the men are moving, feeding stock, harnessing their teams, and many of them sing as they ride to their work in the fields, for they are content. The tinkling of the bells on the cows grow fainter as the cows browse along the paths that lead to their mountain pastures. Up and down the road in companionable groups the pigs are moving, audibly condoling with each other over the lack of business methods that caused the ...
— Sergeant York And His People • Sam Cowan

... provisions. Afghan donkeys will march with troops and carry loads of grain or flour, averaging ninety pounds, without difficulty. They keep pace with mules or ponies in a baggage column, as they avoid the frequent checks which retard the larger animals; they browse on the line of march, and find their own forage easily in the neighborhood of camp; they are easily controlled and cared for, and are on all accounts the most inexpensive transport in Eastern countries. [Footnote: Lieut.-Col. E. F. Chapman, ...
— Afghanistan and the Anglo-Russian Dispute • Theo. F. Rodenbough

... the four steps into the basement bookshop. It was a fine place to browse, when one had an hour to spare. But the chums from Roselawn were not in browsing ...
— The Campfire Girls of Roselawn - A Strange Message from the Air • Margaret Penrose

... tones our youthful sages, Patient, severe, laborious, slow, exact, As o'er creation's protoplasmic pages They browse and munch the ...
— The Poetical Works of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Complete • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

... a small boy, I was permitted to browse, where I read those wonderful Black Forest Stories and my first serious novel, On the Heights, contained a bust of Goethe, and on the shelves were Fichte, Freytag, Spielhagen, Strauss, and a miscellaneous collection of German authors grave and gay, or perhaps melancholy ...
— Germany and the Germans - From an American Point of View (1913) • Price Collier

... winters that sometimes were fruitful of blinding blizzards, sweeping from the north in an intensity of fury that was almost inconceivable, the buffalo too congregated there for shelter, and to browse on the ...
— The Old Santa Fe Trail - The Story of a Great Highway • Henry Inman

... Poachers of a poorer and more primitive stamp are said to have resorted to the expedient of dropping a heavy iron bar from where they had secreted themselves, on the projecting branch of an oak, so that it might fall across the neck of the deer which had come to browse beneath. Or they baited a large hook with an apple, and suspended it at a proper height by a stout cord over a path which the deer were observed to frequent. They also were known to set a number of nooses of iron wire in a ...
— The Forest of Dean - An Historical and Descriptive Account • H. G. Nicholls

... of expansion. But the embrace of earth and the things of earth is like the embrace, with a pathos in its ardour, which precedes a farewell. From the first he had recognised the danger on the one hand of settling down to browse contentedly in the paddock of our earthly life, and on the other hand the danger of ignoring our limitations, the danger of attempting to "thrust in earth eternity's concerns." In his earlier years he had chiefly ...
— Robert Browning • Edward Dowden

... exceedingly convenient in situations almost, or altogether, inaccessible to wheel-carriages. The long crooks are used for the carriage of corn in sheaf from the harvest-field to the mowstead or barn, for the removal of furze, browse, faggot-wood, and other light materials. The writer of one of the happiest effusions of the local muse,*[10] with fidelity to nature equal to Cowper or Crabbe, has introduced the figure of a Devonshire pack-horse bending under the 'swagging load' of the high-piled crooks as an emblem of care ...
— The Life of Thomas Telford by Smiles • Samuel Smiles

... harbour gained, lo! herds of oxen bright And goats untended browse the pastures fair. We, sword in hand, make onset, and invite The gods and Jove himself the spoil to share, And piling couches, banquet on the fare. When straight, down-swooping from the hills meanwhile ...
— The Aeneid of Virgil - Translated into English Verse by E. Fairfax Taylor • Virgil

... class of scientific laborers to whom all facts are alike nourishing mental food, and who seem to exercise no choice whatever, provided only they can get hold of these same indiscriminate facts in quantity sufficient. They browse on them, as the animal to which they would not like to be compared browses on his thistles. But the Master knows the movement of the age he belongs to; and if he seems to be busy with what looks ...
— The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (The Physician and Poet not the Jurist)

... while there was a vain pursuit. At last the lumbermen gave it up. "Let him be!" said his owner, "an' I rayther guess he'll turn up agin when he gits peckish. He kaint browse on ...
— Earth's Enigmas - A Volume of Stories • Charles G. D. Roberts

... himself. You do not need to show him his pasturage. If there is anything to eat anywhere in the district he will find it. Little tufts of bunch-grass growing concealed under the edges of the brush, he will search out. If he cannot get grass, he knows how to rustle for the browse of small bushes. Bullet would devour sage-brush, when he could get nothing else; and I have even known him philosophically to fill up on dry pine-needles. There is no nutrition in dry pine-needles, but Bullet ...
— The Mountains • Stewart Edward White

... trying to do. You're trying to blow us up!" howled Stacy. "Why don't you use dynamite in the biscuit while you are about it? I think I'll go out and browse with the ponies. It's much safer and I'll bet will ...
— The Pony Rider Boys with the Texas Rangers • Frank Gee Patchin



Words linked to "Browse" :   mercantilism, browser, browsing, antique, commerce, shop, range, flora, vegetation, graze, reading, crop, feed, botany, commercialism



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