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Bide   Listen
verb
Bide  v. i.  (past & past part. bided; pres. part. biding)  
1.
To dwell; to inhabit; to abide; to stay. "All knees to thee shall bow of them that bide In heaven or earth, or under earth, in hell."
2.
To remain; to continue or be permanent in a place or state; to continue to be.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Bide" Quotes from Famous Books



... one a boy in years, Whose daring arm and flashing eye, When death and danger hovered nigh, Belied the trembling fears And shrinking dread that seemed to speak, From quivering lip and pallid cheek At sight of war's array; The first the fearful strife to bide, Forever at his captain's side, Was Lennard in the fray; Yet strange to tell, though oft beside That captain's form he dared to bide The cannon's fiery blast, His hand no human blood had shed, Beneath his steel no ...
— Graham's Magazine Vol XXXII No. 6 June 1848 • Various

... as good a right to die when my time came as he had: but I should bide that time, and not be hurried away ...
— Jane Eyre - an Autobiography • Charlotte Bronte

... birds do harbour in their bowers; The holy storks that are the travellers, Choose for to dwell and build within the firs; The climbing goats hang on steep mountains' side; The digging conies in the rocks do bide. The moon, so constant in inconstancy, Doth rule the monthly seasons orderly; The sun, eye of the world, doth know his race, And when to show, and when to hide his face. Thou makest darkness, that it may be night, Whenas the ...
— England's Antiphon • George MacDonald

... to keep your own bones unbroken, bide where you are, beside the scaffold, and, as the victims ...
— The Wandering Jew, Complete • Eugene Sue

... Mistress Fell?" "One who loved me passing well. Dark his eye, wild his face— Stranger, if in this lonely place Bide such an one, then, prythee, say ...
— Collected Poems 1901-1918 in Two Volumes - Volume I. • Walter de la Mare

... transported to their great hurt & danger, but for sundrie weightie & solid reasons; some of y^e cheefe of which I will hear breefly touch. And first, they saw & found by experience the hardnes of y^e place & countrie to be such, as few in comparison would come to them, and fewer that would bide it out, and continew with them. For many y^t came to them, and many more y^t desired to be with them, could not endure y^t great labor and hard fare, with other inconveniences which they underwent & were contented with. But though they loved their persons, ...
— Bradford's History of 'Plimoth Plantation' • William Bradford

... one salmon—which broke all and ween to sea—why did you not stay at home and take your two-pounders and three-pounders out of the quiet chalk brook which never sank an inch through all that drought, so deep in the caverns of the hills are hidden its mysterious wells? Truly, wise men bide at home, with George Riddler, while 'a fool's eyes are in the ends of ...
— Prose Idylls • Charles Kingsley

... life's first native source, Though from another place I take my name, A house of ancient fame. There, when they came, whereas those bricky towers The which on Thames broad aged back do ride, Where now the studious lawyers have their bowers, There whilome wont the Templar Knights to bide, Till they decayed through pride: Next whereunto there stands a stately place, Where oft I gained gifts and goodly grace[5:2] Of that great Lord, which therein wont to dwell; Whose want too well now feels my friendless case; But ah! here fits not well ...
— Spenser - (English Men of Letters Series) • R. W. Church

... been a year of hard work and hard trial to the country and to us. Our first year was spent in rousing and animating—the second in maintaining, guiding, and restraining. Its motto is, "Bide your time." Never had a People more temptation to be rash; and it is our proudest feeling that in our way we aided the infinitely greater powers of O'Connell till his imprisonment, and of O'Brien thereafter, to keep in the passion, while they kept up ...
— Thomas Davis, Selections from his Prose and Poetry • Thomas Davis

... but him an' the old man couldn't make shift to agree. Ye see this Blackbeard is so used to havin' his own way he wanted to run Stede Bonnet, too. That made Stede boilin', but we was undermanned just then and had to bide our time to ...
— The Black Buccaneer • Stephen W. Meader

... Captain shouted; "all aboord, aboord, my lads! The more 'ee bide ashore, the wuss 'ee be. See to Master Cheeseman's craft! Got a good hour afront of us. Dannel, what be mooning at? Fetch 'un a clout on his head, Harry Shanks; or Tim, you run up and do it. Doubt ...
— Springhaven - A Tale of the Great War • R. D. Blackmore

... the only statesman whom the pursuits of literature had only formed the better for the labours of business. Meanwhile, let me pass for the pedant, and the bookworm: like a sturdier adventurer than myself, 'I bide my time.'—Pelham—this will be a busy session! shall ...
— Pelham, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... better on't, and turn'd back: I heard an ill Report of my Neighbours there; the devouring Sharks, and other Sea-Monsters, whose Company, to tell you the Truth, I did not like; and therefore resolv'd to come home and bide with thee my Girl—Come kiss thy poor Hubby, kiss me I say, for ...
— The City Bride (1696) - Or The Merry Cuckold • Joseph Harris

... away to bed. "May Rab and me bide?" said James. "You may; and Rab, if he will behave himself." "I'se warrant he's do that, doctor;" and in slank the faithful beast. I wish you could have seen him. There are no such dogs now. He ...
— Famous Stories Every Child Should Know • Various

... "You just bide there!" said Jupp, preventing her from moving, and looking like a giant Triton, all dripping with water, as he stepped forward. "You ...
— Teddy - The Story of a Little Pickle • J. C. Hutcheson

... where the 'coons in plenty grow; I, too, am a native of that clime, but harsh, relentless fate Has doomed me to an exile far from that noble state, And I, who used to climb around and swing from tree to tree, Now lead a life of ignominious ease, as you can see. Have pity, O compatriot mine! and bide a season near While I unfurl a dismal tale to catch ...
— John Smith, U.S.A. • Eugene Field

... 'Bide a bit longer, and I'm going too,' continued Fry. 'Well, when I found 'twas Sir Blount my spet dried up within my mouth; for neither hedge nor bush were there for refuge against any foul spring 'a might have made ...
— Two on a Tower • Thomas Hardy

... "Bide a wee, Harry, man," he said, "while I'll be tellin' ye of a thing that happened to me on the veldt in ...
— Between You and Me • Sir Harry Lauder

... which contains the eggs, is the eiderdown destined to keep out the cold. The youngsters will bide for some time in this soft shelter, to strengthen their joints and prepare for the final exodus. It does not take long to make. The spinning-mill suddenly alters the raw material: it was turning out white silk; it now furnishes reddish-brown silk, finer ...
— The Life of the Spider • J. Henri Fabre

... no one in my carriage, turned to my husband and said: "There is your wife's coach, and that is the house where Bide lodges. Bide is sick, and I will engage my word she is gone upon a visit to him. Go," said he to Ruff, "and see whether she is not there." In saying this, the King addressed himself to a proper tool for his malicious purpose, for this ...
— Memoirs of Marguerite de Valois, Complete • Marguerite de Valois, Queen of Navarre

... and be ready in a quarter of an hour," he said. "You can meet me by the steps, lady, and you'd best bide in shelter ...
— Troublesome Comforts - A Story for Children • Geraldine Glasgow

... do not belong to myself, I belong to my name and my country. It is because my fortune has twice betrayed me, that my destiny is nearer its accomplishment. I bide my time." ...
— Hortense, Makers of History Series • John S. C. Abbott

... me see," she cried, and would have me put it on, and the sash, and the buff-and-blue sword-knot. After this she put a great hand on each shoulder just as she had done with Jack, and, kissing me, said, "War is a sad thing, but there are worse things. Be true to the old name, my son." Nor could she bide it a moment longer, but hurried out with her lace handkerchief to her eyes, saying as she went, "How shall I bear it! How shall ...
— Hugh Wynne, Free Quaker • S. Weir Mitchell

... good games took place. One or two were a little close for comfort, but the Cardinals managed to pull out in time. Joe did some pitching, though he was not worked as often as he would have liked. But he realized that he was a raw recruit, in the company of many veterans, and he was willing to bide his time. ...
— Baseball Joe in the Big League - or, A Young Pitcher's Hardest Struggles • Lester Chadwick

... women to every company allowed to go with them, and they was drawed by lot. Ah, well I mind the drawing of they lots. It was pity to see the poor wives a-screeching and crying, as one after another was told that she must bide home. Many a one was on her knees to the officer begging mun to take her, and the officer hisself oftentimes was near crying as he was forced to say No. My turn came at last, and I was drawn to go; and then I couldn't help a-crying so loud as any ...
— The Drummer's Coat • J. W. Fortescue

... of this, he conceived a bitter hatred against the white lad. He had especially included him in his muttered threat of vengeance against all those who greeted his final overthrow with shouts of joy; but, like the wily reptile whose name he bore, he was content to bide his time and await his opportunity to strike a deadly blow. After the games were ended he disappeared, and was seen no more ...
— The Flamingo Feather • Kirk Munroe

... in a measure disciplined. That he was energetic, far-seeing, and calculating, he could not doubt. Had he not transported heavy cannon across the country from Lake Champlain to bombard the town? Evidently Mr. Washington was a man who could bide his time. Such men were not likely to leave anything at haphazard. One third of those assaulting Bunker Hill had been cut down by the fire of the rebels. Could he hope for any less a sacrifice of his army in attacking a more formidable position, with the rebels more securely intrenched? It ...
— Daughters of the Revolution and Their Times - 1769 - 1776 A Historical Romance • Charles Carleton Coffin

... long journey, deeply grieved, and said to Freida: 'Everything is lost. We must bide the Senior's writing again; it is no use now.' Freida asked: 'Hersh! where will you hide the writing?' Hersh replied: 'I will hide it where it was before, and you alone, ...
— An Obscure Apostle - A Dramatic Story • Eliza Orzeszko

... says, that the Bishops, in apprehension that James might follow his uncle's example, in casting down the Abbeys, "budded (bribed) the King to bide at home, and gave him three thousand pounds by year to sustain his house, off their benefices." At a later date, the Clergy, we are told, offered to contribute and assign to him of yearly rent of their benefices, the sum of thirty thousand pounds; or to enlarge the sum to L100,000, ...
— The Works of John Knox, Vol. 1 (of 6) • John Knox

... back, turn back, thou pretty bride, Within this house thou must not bide, For here do evil ...
— Household Stories by the Brothers Grimm • Jacob Grimm and Wilhelm Grimm

... Calhoun was certain Conway had tried to kill him. More than one man has been disposed of in time of battle by a personal enemy. Many an obnoxious officer has bitten the dust in this manner. Calhoun could only bide his time and watch. But he now firmly believed his life was in more danger from Conway than it was ...
— Raiding with Morgan • Byron A. Dunn

... "You bide a bit, miss, and you shall hear the whole. Well, by that time 'twas too late for me to slip away, and I was bound to scrooge up into the elbow of this nick here, and try not to breathe, as nigh as might be, and keep my Lammas cough down; for I never ...
— Erema - My Father's Sin • R. D. Blackmore

... ugly look he could now see gathering in her eyes, and it grew deeper every hour he remained in the cottage. His little brother asked him to tell him tales about the sailing ships, and he wanted to go down to the canal with Ulick, but their mother said he was to bide here with her. The day had begun to decline, his brother was crying, and he had to tell him a sea-story to stop his crying. "But mother hates to hear my voice," he said to himself, and he went out into the garden when the ...
— The Untilled Field • George Moore

... that, therefore, instead of struggling against what was unavoidable, their best plan would be to humour the whims of the mutineers, so long, of course, as they were not too outrageous, and to quietly bide their time in the hope that an opportunity might present itself for turning the tables upon the crew. And he emphasised his proposition by so many convincing arguments that, when breakfast was announced by the steward, ...
— The Missing Merchantman • Harry Collingwood

... hands are shaped to the spade and the trowel, not to the bow and the spear, and it will be sweeter to toil to do the will and swell the wealth of Malinche in the sun of the valley or the shadow of the mine, than to bide here free upon your hills where as yet no ...
— Montezuma's Daughter • H. Rider Haggard

... obliged to hold his peace on account of the extreme difficulty of his position. He felt that to watch her again, or to put her under any kind of restraint, might now lead to far more serious results than before, and he determined to bide his time. An incident occurred very soon, however, which helped him to make ...
— Paul Patoff • F. Marion Crawford

... Brussels not a day has passed in which mingled love and respect have not grown within my bosom. I have sat by and watched while my excellent young friend Mr. Anderson has endeavored to express his feelings. I have said to myself that I would bide my time. If you could give yourself to him, why then the aspiration should be quenched within my own breast. But you have not done so, though, as I am aware, he has been assisted by my friend Sir Magnus. I have seen, and have heard, and ...
— Mr. Scarborough's Family • Anthony Trollope

... my years," said Meg. "If folk have ony thing to write to me about, they may gie the letter to John Hislop, the carrier, that has used the road these forty years. As for the letters at the post-mistress's, as they ca' her, down by yonder, they may bide in her shop-window, wi' the snaps and bawbee rows, till Beltane, or I loose them. I'll never file my fingers with them. Post-mistress, indeed!—Upsetting cutty! I mind her fu' weel when she dree'd penance ...
— St. Ronan's Well • Sir Walter Scott

... term 'second-hand,' which other crafts have 'soiled to all ignoble use.' But why it has been able to do this is obvious. All the best books are necessarily second-hand. The writers of to-day need not grumble. Let them 'bide a wee.' If their books are worth anything, they, too, one day will be second-hand. If their books are not worth anything there are ancient trades still in full operation amongst us—the pastrycooks and the trunkmakers—who ...
— Obiter Dicta - Second Series • Augustine Birrell

... creek, it was useless to try and follow the footprints, though there were points here and there where the sense of touch might have helped him. He decided to creep stealthily up stream until he found the camp, and then bide his time. ...
— The Hunters of the Ozark • Edward S. Ellis

... has a parallel in the history of Rome. Whoever read the history of Julius Caesar knows that this smart politician while elected dictator managed to become so popular with the people that they offered him the kingly crown, but J. Caesar knew that he had to bide his time, that the rest of Senators know of his ambition, and after refusing three times he knew they would offer it to him a fourth time, and when then he accepted it he was ...
— The Attempted Assassination of ex-President Theodore Roosevelt • Oliver Remey

... are bolts and bars Are to me the hands that guide To the freedom of the stars Where my golden kinsmen bide. ...
— AE in the Irish Theosophist • George William Russell

... twinge of longing now and then Will vex, no doubt, the happiest men. In summer I could wish outside Upon the dove-cote roof to bide, With just beneath the garden bright And stretch of greensward too in sight. Or else again in winter time, When, as today, the weather's prime:— Now I've begun, I'll say it out We've got a sleigh here, staunch and stout, All ...
— The German Classics of The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Vol. VII. • Various

... draught yourself out of my head-piece; not this silver bauble, but my steel-cap, which is twice as ample. By the same token, that whereas before you were giving orders to fall back, you were a changed man when you had cleared your throat of the dust, and cried, 'Bide the other brunt, my brave and stout boys ...
— Waverley Volume XII • Sir Walter Scott

... like a man, and he'll be keen for the trip," said Thomas. "And last night I were thinkin' after I goes to bed how fine 'tis that you're to be doctor to the coast. Indian Jake's to be my trappin' pardner th' winter, and the lads'll 'bide home. You'll be needin' dogs and komatik (sledge) to take you about. There'll be little enough for the dogs to do, and you'll be welcome to un. The lads can do the drivin' for you and whatever you wants un to ...
— Troop One of the Labrador • Dillon Wallace

... persons—one of whom would soon be gone. He was not aware that Ferguson also knew of his attempted crime, or the danger would have seemed greater. However much he thirsted for vengeance, it would not do to gratify it now. He must bide his time. ...
— The Young Miner - or Tom Nelson in California • Horatio Alger, Jr.

... and many a goodly gentleman and tall fellow beside! If they died, they died with curses on their lips, and if they live, they bide with the Holy Office or in the ...
— Sir Mortimer • Mary Johnston

... locks are sprent With unreturning autumn's rime, Whose heads, like wind-worn trees, are bent Beneath the savage storms of time— Pray Christ, the Child, to be your guide Past the dim shoal, where shadows bide. ...
— Christmas Sunshine • Various

... said the chief, "though the hearts of their red brothers will be heavy at parting. Their hearts were filled with gladness with the hope that the palefaces would bide with them and take unto them ...
— The Boy Chums in the Forest - or Hunting for Plume Birds in the Florida Everglades • Wilmer M. Ely

... thirty years, a living seed, A lonely germ, dropt on our waste world's side, Thy death and rising thou didst calmly bide; Sore companied by many a clinging weed Sprung from the fallow soil of evil and need; Hither and thither tossed, by friends denied; Pitied of goodness dull, and scorned of pride; Until at length was done the awful deed, And thou didst lie outworn in stony bower Three days asleep—oh, ...
— The Poetical Works of George MacDonald in Two Volumes, Volume I • George MacDonald

... precision, dexterity, and tenacity. Finally, he avoided help. Not pride, self-preservation; the compulsively helpful have rarely the wit to ask before rushing in to knock you on your face, so he learned to bide his time till the horizon was clear of beaming simpletons. Also, he found an interest in how ...
— A Matter of Proportion • Anne Walker

... hope That dying gave thee birth, Sweet Melancholy! For memory of the dead, In her dear stead, 'Bide thou with me, Sweet Melancholy! As purple shadows to the tree, When the last sun-rays sadly slope Athwart the bare and darkening earth, Art thou ...
— Rose and Roof-Tree - Poems • George Parsons Lathrop

... cattle away into the town of Antwerp. The villagers gave him the employment a little out of charity,—more because it suited them well to send their milk into the town by so honest a carrier, and bide at home themselves to look after their gardens, their cows, their poultry, or their little fields. But it was becoming hard work for the old man. He was eighty-three, and Antwerp was a good league ...
— Stories of Childhood • Various

... it," replied Spurge. "I know a man just aback of here that'll run up to the town with a message—chap that can be trusted, sure and faithful. 'Bide here five minutes, sir—I'll send a message to Mr. Vickers—this chap'll know him and'll find him. He can come down with the rest—and the police, too, if he likes. ...
— Scarhaven Keep • J. S. Fletcher

... threats laid to both sides. "As soon as the leaves put out good, I aim to get Floyd," Martin is reported to have said. Similar mutterings were reported to have been uttered by Tolliver. "I'll bide my time till the brush gets green; then I aim to have a reckoning. That Logan outfit, well-wishers of the Martins, are ...
— Blue Ridge Country • Jean Thomas

... care, you're improving, my "Pet," a bit. Promising Novice, of that there's no doubt. But up to Champion form? No, not yet a bit. Just try that on, and you'll soon get knocked out. Can't say exactly how long we must bide with you, Help you develope grit, muscle, and pipe; But we must own you to-day—(though we side ...
— Punch, Or the London Charivari, Volume 101, November 21, 1891 • Various

... blind and scorned, In pain their time they bide To seize the roots of London Town And tumble ...
— A Cluster of Grapes - A Book of Twentieth Century Poetry • Various

... bide our time," said Burgsdorf placidly. "For the present it only concerns us to obtain your honored companionship. Since, however, you declare that you can not go afoot, I ...
— The Youth of the Great Elector • L. Muhlbach

... said Giles Gosling, "to decoct, an that be the word, his pound into a penny and his webs into a thread.—Take a fool's advice, neighbour Goldthred. Tempt not the sea, for she is a devourer. Let cards and cockatrices do their worst, thy father's bales may bide a banging for a year or two ere thou comest to the Spital; but the sea hath a bottomless appetite,—she would swallow the wealth of Lombard Street in a morning, as easily as I would a poached egg and a cup ...
— Kenilworth • Sir Walter Scott

... court as perfect as thou thinkest to make the isle; but Bessee shall not bide there. She is the blind beggar's child, and such shall she remain. Send me to a dungeon, as I said, and thou canst pen her in a convent, or make her a menial to thy princesses, as thou wilt; but while my life and my freedom are my ...
— The Prince and the Page • Charlotte M. Yonge

... that leads from Oaxaca to Vera Cruz," said Pharaoh, looking out upon it from a sheltering tree; "and lo! yonder is a post-house. We must bide awhile where we are or we shall ...
— In the Days of Drake • J. S. Fletcher

... the Pope has bid thee wear hair next thy bare skin, my son, why, clap a wig over thy shaven scalp." So the monks in proper pity and kindness, when they had shut the great gates as night came down, made their pilgrim guests welcome to bide at Oyster-le-Main as long as they pleased. The solemn bell for retiring rolled forth in the darkness with a single deep clang, and the sound went far and wide over the neighbouring district. Those peasants who were still awake in their ...
— The Dragon of Wantley - His Tale • Owen Wister

... stricken father was there, dragged from his dead by the petty concerns of this world which cannot bide for grief. He was as a sleep-walker. He had come into another universe. The hacienda sala, where his child lay mid tapers, where mumbled prayers arose, or this adobe, where uniformed men fouled the air with cigarettes and looked after ...
— The Missourian • Eugene P. (Eugene Percy) Lyle

... a satisfaction, though," says Alan. "But bide a bit, bide a bit; I'm thinking—and thanks to this bonny westland wind, I believe I've still a chance of it. It's this way, Davie. I'm no' trysted with this man Scougal till the gloaming comes. 'But,' says he, ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 11 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... niece," whom Ethel knew to be Cherry's intended supplanter. She looked piteously at Flora, who only smiled and made a sign with her hand to her to be patient. Ethel fretted inwardly at that serene sense of power; but she could not but admire how well Flora knew how to bide her time, when, having waited till Mrs. Ledwich had nearly wound up her discourse on Mrs. Elwood's impudence, and Mrs. Perkinson's niece, she leaned towards Miss Boulder, who sat between, and whispered to her, "Ask Mrs. Ledwich ...
— The Daisy Chain, or Aspirations • Charlotte Yonge

... just come from upstairs, Mother. Let her bide quiet a while with young Andrew here; whilst do you come along with me and get me out my Sunday coat. 'Tis time I was dressed for church ...
— Six Plays • Florence Henrietta Darwin

... is my name, My heart with love of God doth flame, Here and above I'll bide the same; O Lord! I ...
— Targum • George Borrow

... not, in the village; I can't say. My men are abed and asleep, long ago. You'll have to bide till morning." ...
— Round the World in Seven Days • Herbert Strang

... bide by the waters tonight, wizard; for here is a picture of the sea. It is the sea, and it is talking, as it always does. There are some who think the sea speaks only of sorrow, but this is not wholly true. If you will listen thoughtfully enough, you will find that it is not all of troubles ...
— The Singing Mouse Stories • Emerson Hough

... Theer's lots o' things gells can do in Manchester—tailorin, or machinin, or dress-makin, or soomthin like that. But yo must get a bit older, an I must find a place for us to live in, so theer's naw use fratchin, like a spiteful hen. Yo must bide and I must bide. But I'll coom back for yo, I swear I will, an we'll get shut on Aunt Hannah, an live in a little place by ...
— The History of David Grieve • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... said Triggs, "and how much you makes it warth his while. I'm blamed if I'd go bail for un myself, but that won't be no odds agen' Adam's goin': 'tis just the place for he. 'T 'ud niver do to car'y a pitch-pot down and set un in the midst o' they who couldn't bide his stink." ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Vol. XXVI., December, 1880. • Various

... sigh escaped Theodore; he must bide his time, but a great point had been gained. There came a tapping at the chamber door. Theodore went forward and opened it, and Pliny, listening, heard a ...
— Three People • Pansy

... the shadow of a Moorish arch way, drinking lemonade, in default, as he said, of better tipple, Ted resolved to bide his time, but his time seemed rather long of coming. He therefore boldly entered the magnificent skiffa ...
— The Pirate City - An Algerine Tale • R.M. Ballantyne

... "I was willing to bide my time, and so I hauled sheets, and luffed, and tacked, and all that sort of thing, till we got to Christiania. When I was pulling the main boom, or something of that kind,—I don't just know what it was now,—one of the fellows in gold ...
— Up The Baltic - Young America in Norway, Sweden, and Denmark • Oliver Optic

... ours, and Schott's, Franklin's, and Spalding's, and staff-officers halted for the day, that I had quite despaired of a word with her for the present; and had somewhat sulkily seated myself on the stairs to bide my time. What between love, jealousy, and hurt pride that she had not instantly left her irksome poppinjays at the mere sight of me, and flown to me under the noses of them all, I was in two minds whether I would remain in the house or no—so absurd and horridly unbalanced is a young man's ...
— The Hidden Children • Robert W. Chambers

... your eminence; still, as I have proved victor in the first battle in the campaign I will bide ...
— Won by the Sword - A Story of the Thirty Years' War • G.A. Henty

... His own temple cast, Appall'd the town, Appall'd the lands, lest Pyrrha's time Return, with all its monstrous sights, When Proteus led his flocks to climb The flatten'd heights, When fish were in the elm-tops caught, Where once the stock-dove wont to bide, And does were floating, all distraught, Adown the tide. Old Tiber, hurl'd in tumult back From mingling with the Etruscan main, Has threaten'd Numa's court with wrack And Vesta's fane. Roused by his Ilia's plaintive woes, He vows revenge for guiltless blood, And, spite of Jove, his banks o'erflows, ...
— Odes and Carmen Saeculare of Horace • Horace

... could not fawn it. But both these conflicting expedients were vetoed. Jonathan Floyd, who took in Acton's meek message of "humbly craved leave to speak with Master Jennings," came back with the inexplicable mandate, "Warn Roger Acton from the premises." So, he must needs bide till to-morrow morning, when, come what might, he resolved to see his honour, and set some truths ...
— The Complete Prose Works of Martin Farquhar Tupper • Martin Farquhar Tupper

... great Slav Empire would only have been put off to a later day, instead of being finally shelved. How could the Tsar or the Russian people have forgiven the Kaiser for humbling them once more? If they had pocketed the affront in silence, it would only have been in order to bide their time for revenge, and they would have chosen the moment when Russia, in possession of all her resources, could have entered upon the struggle with ...
— World's War Events, Vol. I • Various

... lasting success in a real hotel than he will achieve in the spurious affair that was staged. A number of others, in an extremely uninteresting cast, labored ineffectively. Mr. Chalmers completely routed the good impression he had made in "Abigail," and I should recommend him to "bide a wee" before hurling further manuscripts at susceptible managers—not for their sake, but ...
— Ainslee's, Vol. 15, No. 6, July 1905 • Various

... her as best he could. Together they then buried the whitening bones, and Sigmund registered a solemn oath to avenge his family's wrongs. This vow was fully approved by Signy, who, however, bade her brother bide a favourable time, promising to send him aid. Then the brother and sister sadly parted, she to return to her distasteful palace home, and he to a remote part of the forest, where he built a tiny hut and plied the ...
— Myths of the Norsemen - From the Eddas and Sagas • H. A. Guerber

... headlong thus to ruin stride? If aught of soundness in you bide, Behold in Him the Lord divine Of ...
— The Hymns of Prudentius • Aurelius Clemens Prudentius

... grace converteth straight to ire: And coward Love then to the heart apace Taketh his flight, whereas he lurks and plains His purpose lost, and dare not show his face. For my lord's guilt, thus faultless, bide I pains: Yet from my lord shall not my foot remove; Sweet is his death that takes his end ...
— Tudor and Stuart Love Songs • Various

... be sure. Something's afoot, as you truly say. And, being troubled from my youth up with an inquiring nose, I'll e'en step forward and smell out the occasion. Do you bide here, my Jehu, till ...
— In Clive's Command - A Story of the Fight for India • Herbert Strang

... with reproach her folk She told them 'twas a sorry joke. "Hard-hearted wretches," so she cried, "To jeer while here upstairs I bide!" ...
— Monitress Merle • Angela Brazil

... enough, provided it can be done at a profit. Will Government guarantee that? . . . No, brother Pamphlett: what you say about your callin', I says about mine. 'Business as usual'— that's my word: an' let Obed here be a good son to his mother an' bide at home, defyin' all the Germans ...
— Nicky-Nan, Reservist • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch (Q)

... here frae the bit callant ye sent to meet your carriage," said the beggar, as he trudged stoutly on a step or two behind Miss Wardour; "and I couldna bide to think o' the dainty young leddy's peril, that has aye been kind to ilka forlorn heart that cam near her. Sae I lookit at the lift and the rin o' the tide, till I settled it that if I could get down time eneugh to gie you warning, we wad do weel yet. But I doubt, I doubt, I have ...
— The Antiquary, Complete • Sir Walter Scott

... says, in thae gran' Roman ballants o' his. But for ye, Alton, laddie, ye're owre young to start off in the People's Church Meelitant, sae just bide wi' me, and the barrel o' meal in the corner there winna waste, nae mair than it did wi' the widow o' Zareptha; a tale which coincides sae weel wi' the everlasting righteousness, that I'm at times no inclined to consider ...
— Alton Locke, Tailor And Poet • Rev. Charles Kingsley et al

... was in an agony lest he should be left behind. But his father decreed that he should go. "These are times when manhood must come fast," he said. "He can bide within the Shield-ring when blows are going. He will be safe enough if it holds. If it breaks, he will sup like the rest of us ...
— The Path of the King • John Buchan

... the lad bide?" he said; "ye'll not rest till ye make him a greater ninny nor he is by natur. He might as well ha' bin a gell, an better, for all the good ...
— Our Frank - and other stories • Amy Walton

... provided with scaling-ladders, and advanced with a number of crossbow-men in front, who speedily opened a hot fire on the walls. Walter ordered his archers to bide their time, and not to fire a shot till certain that every shaft would tell. They accordingly waited until the French arrived within fifty yards of the wall, when the arrows began to rain among them with deadly effect, scarce one but struck its mark—the face ...
— Saint George for England • G. A. Henty

... sure as we can of having the best opinion, even if we know that this opinion has an infinitely small chance of being speedily or ever accepted by the majority, or by anybody but ourselves. Truth and wisdom have to bide their time, and then take their chance after all. The most that the individual can do is to seek them for himself, even if he seek alone. And if it is the most, it is also the least. Yet in our present mood we seem not to feel this. We misunderstand the considerations ...
— On Compromise • John Morley

... turnin' it over," he said, "and there's no road will help you across the Moor for days to come. You must bide here till the hue-an'-cry has blown over, and meantime the missus must fit up some disguise for you; but you must bide in bed, for a man can't step out o' this house, front or back, without bein' visible from all the tors around. So ...
— Corporal Sam and Other Stories • A. T. Quiller-Couch

... the thing but ill, my sovereign. I should have calmly yielded to the Prince Who is most wonderfully versed in war. The Swedes' left wing was wavering; on their right Came reinforcements; had he been content To bide your order, they'd have made a stand With new intrenchments in the gullies there, And never had you ...
— The German Classics of The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Vol. IV • Editor-in-Chief: Kuno Francke

... was a strong point," said Herbert, "and I should think you would be puzzled to imagine a stronger; as to the rest, you must bide your guardian's time, and he must bide his client's time. You'll be one-and-twenty before you know where you are, and then perhaps you'll get some further enlightenment. At all events, you'll be nearer getting it, for it must come ...
— Great Expectations • Charles Dickens

... bide our chance, Unhappy, and make terms with Fate A little more to let us wait; He leads for aye the advance, Hope's forlorn-hopes that plant the desperate good For nobler Earths and days of manlier mood; Our wall of ...
— Hero Tales From American History • Henry Cabot Lodge, and Theodore Roosevelt

... got a share of the sunshine, but when their love-making cooled her displeasure was visited on poor Ronnie. Any advances on my own part were countered with sales of soap, customers apparently being rarer than lovers. So I had to bide my time. ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 156, May 28, 1919. • Various

... make friends with one of the chiefs of the red-skins, who, bribed by the promise of a case of whisky and some fire-arms, undertook to attack Captain Loraine's farm as soon as a good chance of success should offer. The chief, you'll understand, was to bide his time and to bring Silas word directly ...
— With Axe and Rifle • W.H.G. Kingston

... his property as a protective dyke between himself and a ruthless biological struggle for existence; his property means liberty and opportunity to escape dictation by another man, an employer or "boss," or at least a chance to bide his time until a satisfactory alternative has presented itself for his choice. The French peasants in 1871 who flocked to the army of the government of Versailles to suppress the Commune of Paris (the first attempt in history of ...
— A History of Trade Unionism in the United States • Selig Perlman

... families—" she made a brief philosophical gesture, and Madra Clifford studied her with a narrowed gaze. "It would be the same," she continued, "if Chinamen came to America." Mrs. Wibird shuddered. "A yellow skin," she cried impetuously; "I can't bide ...
— Java Head • Joseph Hergesheimer

... doth craw, the day doth daw, The channerin' worm doth chide; Gin we be missed out o' our place A sair pain we must bide." ...
— The Balladists - Famous Scots Series • John Geddie

... Comte de Tournay. Ranulph made his decision. Shamed and dishonoured in Jersey, in that holy war of the Vendee he would find something to kill memory, to take him out of life without disgrace. His father must go with him to France, and bide his fate ...
— The Judgment House • Gilbert Parker

... have a talk, lad," said his host, as they rose from the table; "but thee'd better bide with us for the summer and not fret about the future: thee dost ...
— A Beautiful Possibility • Edith Ferguson Black

... westward; and look there! One of those sea-gulls! ay, there goes a pair; And such a sudden thaw! If rain comes on As threats, the water will be out anon. That path by the ford is a nasty bit of way, Best let the young ones bide from school to-day. ...
— The Canadian Elocutionist • Anna Kelsey Howard

... himself!" saith Dame Elizabeth, a-pulling off her hood. "Now, here's a string come off! Alway my luck! If a body might but bide in peace—" ...
— In Convent Walls - The Story of the Despensers • Emily Sarah Holt

... the mother of Beatrice, Mrs. Lansell would probably have gone back to her room, and continued to bide her time; but the mother of Beatrice had learned a few things about the ways of a wilful girl. She went in, and closed the door carefully behind her. She did not wish to keep the whole house awake. Then she went straight to the bed, laid hand upon a white shoulder that gleamed in the moonlight, ...
— Her Prairie Knight • B.M. Sinclair, AKA B. M. Bower

... Netting the fields in bond as thine; I see thy tendrils drink by sips From grass and clover's smiling lips; I hear thy roots dig down for wells, Tapping the meadow's hidden cells; Whole generations of green things, Descended from long lines of springs, I see make room for thee to bide, A quite comrade by their side; I see the creeping peoples go Mysterious journeys to and fro; Treading to right and left of thee, Doing thee homage wonderingly. I see the wild bees as they fare Thy cups of honey drink, but spare; I mark thee bathe, and bathe again, In sweet, uncalendared spring ...
— Success With Small Fruits • E. P. Roe

... my youngest brother, Why didn't ye bide at home? Had you a hundred thousand lives Ye couldn't spare ...
— English Fairy Tales • Joseph Jacobs (coll. & ed.)

... till I scarce know'd which was mangle and which was Our Johnny. Nor Our Johnny, he scarce know'd either, for sometimes when the mangle lumbers he says, "Me choking, Granny!" and Mrs Higden holds him up in her lap and says to me "Bide a bit, Sloppy," and we all stops together. And when Our Johnny gets his breathing again, I turns again, and ...
— Our Mutual Friend • Charles Dickens

... the sea, and a terrible cry, which filled them with fear. The sea then opened, and there arose something like a great black column, which reached almost to the clouds. This redoubled their terror, made them rise with haste, and climb up into a tree m bide themselves. They had scarcely got up, when looking to the place from whence the noise proceeded, and where the sea had opened, they observed that the black column advanced, winding about towards the: shore, cleaving the water before it. They could not at first think what this could mean, but ...
— The Arabian Nights Entertainments vol. 1 • Anon.

... and Parnes.[1] Consequently, while still the Greeks of Homer's age were Achaians, while Argos was the titular seat of Hellenic empire, and the mythic deeds of the heroes were being enacted in Thebes or Mycenae, Athens did but bide her time, waiting to manifest herself as the true godchild of Pallas, who sprang perfect from the brain of Zeus, Pallas, who is the light of cloudless heaven emerging after storms. And Pallas, when she planted her chosen people ...
— Sketches and Studies in Italy and Greece, Complete - Series I, II, and III • John Symonds

... lowly serf And the high-born lady still May bide in their proud dependency, Free subjects of your will! Teach the base North how ill, At the fiery cannon's mouth, He fares who touches your household gods, Gentlemen ...
— War Poetry of the South • Various

... but never will be famous, I fear. He is too fierce an iconoclast to suit the old party, too individual a reformer to join the new, and being born a century too soon must bide his time, or play out his part before stage and audience are ...
— Moods • Louisa May Alcott

... that graceless scamp, I never could stomach him. I wondered then, as I have since, how he was the brother of such a sister. He could scarce bide his time until Mr. Swain should have a coach and a seat in the country with the gentry. "A barrister," quoth he, "is as good as any one else. And if my father came out a redemptioner, and worked his way, so had old Mr. Dulany. Our family ...
— The Crossing • Winston Churchill

... could do far better than you can do now. You wouldn't need to bide here longer. You could go to Glen Elder to Aunt Janet, you and my mother. But I'll never see Glen Elder, nor Aunt Janet, nor anything but these dark walls and yon bit of ...
— The Orphans of Glen Elder • Margaret Murray Robertson

... people on the River Drive who showed no more desire to make her acquaintance than when she had been Mrs. Lewis Babcock. What did this mean? It meant simply—she began to argue—that she must hold fast to her faith and bide her time. That if she and her friends kept a bold front and resisted the encroachments of this pernicious spirit, Providence would interfere presently and confound these enemies of social truth no less obviously than it had already overwhelmed Mrs. Gregory Williams. As the wife of the ...
— Unleavened Bread • Robert Grant

... he said, "that we two should come together. I, too, will soon be back in the Western Seas, and belike we'll meet. I'm something of a rover, and I never bide long in the same place, but I whiles pay a visit to James Town, and they ken me well on the Eastern Shore and the ...
— Salute to Adventurers • John Buchan

... Maiden thou that art, Come, visit this my heart; And bring me chief my Good, God's Son in Flesh and Blood; Bless body, soul; and bide For ever ...
— Our Lady Saint Mary • J. G. H. Barry

... the anguish that I feel Through my inmost entrails steal, That I bide in doubt lest death ...
— Wine, Women, and Song - Mediaeval Latin Students' songs; Now first translated into English verse • Various

... to the ear-tips. The coldness of the questioning voice gives him a nervous shudder. He says with an effort, looking at the thick white, black-fringed lids that bide ...
— The Dop Doctor • Clotilde Inez Mary Graves

... Chris,' she said, as soon as Mr. Penrose had taken his seat by her side. 'Well, he were awlus one for sleepin'. Th' owd felley would a slept on a clooas-line if he could a' fun nowhere else to lay hissel. But he'll sleep saander or ever naa. They'll bide some wakkenin' as sleep raand here, Mr. Penrose. Did he come in a ...
— Lancashire Idylls (1898) • Marshall Mather

... nobles, inasmuch as they offered my brother refuge and concealment in their castles, albeit they accused him between themselves of some secret art; but he who was so soon to die counselled him to bide a while with Uncle Conrad at the forest lodge, and see what he himself and other of his friends might do ...
— Uarda • Georg Ebers

... revulsion in the last two acts! The great scene of the third act leaves an impression that the world's affairs are not in such bad hands after all. Posa does not convince the king's mind, but he finds his heart and wins his confidence. One has the feeling that, if he bide his time and use some tact, he can accomplish all that he desires. But to our amazement he gives up the king and enters upon a desperate game of double-dealing in which he deceives everybody. He forms the plan ...
— The Life and Works of Friedrich Schiller • Calvin Thomas

... and Judith had settled on taking the trip to Mountain City together. Douglas made no comment. Not that he had any intention of allowing Judith to make the trip under such circumstances, but he knew that for the present he could only bide his time. ...
— Judith of the Godless Valley • Honore Willsie

... thinkers, we are ambitious spirits! As I stand over the insect crawling amid the pine needles on the forest floor, and endeavoring to conceal itself from my sight, and ask myself why it will cherish those humble thoughts, and bide its head from me who might, perhaps, be its benefactor, and impart to its race some cheering information, I am reminded of the greater Benefactor and Intelligence that stands ...
— Walden, and On The Duty Of Civil Disobedience • Henry David Thoreau

... "there are some expenses which a man's social position and the character which he has had the ill-luck to receive from heaven force upon him. I don't believe these dogs ruin me. Let them bide! But, in the interests of their own good luck, see they are not ...
— Essays in Little • Andrew Lang

... was he goin'. He was thinking to get a lift as far as Oriana, if the stages was runnin' on that road. 'Then ye 'll have to bide here till morning,' I says, 'for ye must have met the stage goin' the other way.' 'I met nothing,' says he; 'I come be way of the bluffs,'—which is a strange way for one man ...
— The Desert and The Sown • Mary Hallock Foote

... Lane. "I am very glad that you did not take office under Mr. Gresham," she said to him when they first met each other again in London. "Of course when I was advising you I could not be sure that this would happen. Now you can bide your time, and if the opportunity offers you can go to work ...
— Phineas Redux • Anthony Trollope

... lady, who was accompanied by an old companion or nurse. Marguerite was travelling with her uncle because, unknown to him, she had a lover who had sailed with him on this expedition and whom she hoped to marry. As they crossed the Atlantic these facts leaked out, and Roberval resolved to bide his time and punish his niece for her deception. As they passed the coast of Southern Labrador Marguerite and her old nurse were seized and put into a boat, Roberval ordering his sailors to row them ashore to an island, and leave them to their ...
— Pioneers in Canada • Sir Harry Johnston

... voice of prayer goes heaven-ward, where the people have that most priceless gift—faith in God. With this as the basis, and leavened as it will be with brotherly love, there will be no danger in grappling with any evils which exist in our midst; we shall feel that we may work and bide our time, and die knowing that God will ...
— The American Union Speaker • John D. Philbrick

... no flame be kindled!" burst out in wrath the superstitious father. "Bide thou till morning! Then shalt thou see the ...
— Out of the Triangle • Mary E. Bamford

... "Let me bide, laddie," he said. "You've doon your best to save me, but you canna do't mair; gang awa' and save ...
— On Board the Esmeralda - Martin Leigh's Log - A Sea Story • John Conroy Hutcheson

... a good rick ablaze, here's John Purdy the beadle wi' his head broke, and here's me in a sweat, alack—and all to no purpose, since needs must you in your bilboes bide." ...
— Black Bartlemy's Treasure • Jeffrey Farnol

... April sunbeams fall On its blossomed boughs in the morning, and tell of the days to be; Then back unto the high-seat he wended soberly; For this was the thought within him; Belike the day shall come When I shall bide here lonely amid the Volsung home, Its glory and sole avenger, its after-summer seed. Yea, I am the hired of Odin, his workday will to speed, And the harvest-tide shall be heavy.—What then, were it come and past And ...
— The Story of Sigurd the Volsung • William Morris

... would, he could not bring the matter to a head. The girl had evidently had a more severe shock than they had realized at first, and she became listless and difficult to interest in passing events. He saw there was nothing for it but to wait, and he set himself to bide his time with the best ...
— The Pit Prop Syndicate • Freeman Wills Crofts

... that hast not tried, What hell it is in sueing long to bide; To lose good days, that might be better spent, To waste long nights in pensive discontent, To speed to-day, to be put back to-morrow, To feed on hope, to pine with fear and sorrow, To fret thy soul with crosses and with cares, To eat thy heart through comfortless despairs, ...
— Tales and Novels, Vol. IV • Maria Edgeworth

... king's intimate friend and the companion of many of his frequent journeys he could not always bide with her nor be with her for any great length of time. For Edgar had a restless spirit and was exceedingly vigilant, and liked to keep a watchful eye on the different lately hostile nations of ...
— Dead Man's Plack and an Old Thorn • William Henry Hudson

... "Then shall one of two things be, either he shall not hold himself back for long, or the hauntings will abate for more than one night; I will bide here another night and ...
— The Story of Grettir The Strong • Translated by Eirikr Magnusson and William Morris

... you are jealous. The old story. Don't tell me. Now do you bide here. I'll send Fitzpiers to you. I saw him smoking in front of his house but a ...
— The Woodlanders • Thomas Hardy

... Frau Regine shrugged her shoulders over the inexperience of this girl whose eyes she might not open; but she was diplomatic enough to let the subject drop for the present and bide her time. Willibald, accustomed to confide in his mother, had told her of his meeting with Fraeulein Volkmar, and how he had enacted the part of porter at her suggestion. Frau von Eschenhagen was, naturally enough, incensed ...
— The Northern Light • E. Werner

... anybody ever does really see a mountain, who goes for the set and sole purpose of seeing it. Nature will not let herself be seen in such cases. You must patiently bide her time; and by and by, at some unforeseen moment, she will quietly and suddenly unveil herself and for a brief space allow you to look right into the heart of her mystery. But if you call out to her peremptorily, 'Nature! unveil yourself this very moment!' she only draws her veil the ...
— A Study Of Hawthorne • George Parsons Lathrop

... of roads and codes, when he needs must worship, loved a deity practical as himself; and in his parcelling of the known world into plots, saying unto this man, Bide here, and to that, Sit you down there, he could scarce fail to evolve the god Terminus: visible witness of possession and dominion, type of solid facts not to be quibbled away. We Romans of this latter day — so hailed by others, ...
— Pagan Papers • Kenneth Grahame

... condition of things is not favorable to the rigid virtues. But inferences from this must not be pressed too far. When I was a private soldier in Virginia, as one of a three-months' regiment, we used to bide from each other our little comforts and delicacies, even our dishes and clothing, or they were sure to disappear. But we should have ridiculed an adventurous thinker upon the characteristics of races and classes, who should have leaped therefrom to the conclusion that all ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. XII. September, 1863, No. LXXI. - A Magazine Of Literature, Art, And Politics • Various

... all about them from Happy Jack. Had their pedigree down fine—several things he'd told me that not even their own tribe knew. But I held my hush, and went on courting Tilly, they a-casting sharp remarks and everybody roaring. 'Bide a wee, Tommy,' I says ...
— The God of His Fathers • Jack London

... Certitude, Yon puzzled crowd, whose tired intent Hunts like a pack without a scent. And now come home, Where none of our mild days Can fail, though simple, to confess The magic of mysteriousness; For there 'bide charming Wonders three, Besides, Sweet, thee, To comprehend whose commonest ways, Ev'n could that be, Were coward's 'vantage ...
— The Unknown Eros • Coventry Patmore

... her, the gipsy!" said Yesterday. "Bide here by the fire with me, my babe, and I will tell you a story shall do you good ...
— The Silver Crown - Another Book of Fables • Laura E. Richards

... down, "I wish you had taken him away yestreen. But come, let us catch the brute and away with him, for he shall not bide in this ...
— The Pilots of Pomona • Robert Leighton



Words linked to "Bide" :   visit, continue, stay, abide, archaism, overstay, stay on, remain, outstay



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