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Betide   Listen
verb
Betide  v. i.  To come to pass; to happen; to occur. "A salve for any sore that may betide." Note: Shakespeare has used it with of. "What would betide of me?"






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Betide" Quotes from Famous Books



... the trees, the copses nod, Wings flutter, voices hover clear: "O just and faithful knight of God! Ride on! the prize is near." So pass I hostel, hall, and grange; By bridge and ford, by park and pale, All-arm'd I ride, whate'er betide, Until I find the ...
— Legends That Every Child Should Know • Hamilton Wright Mabie

... per cent margin and render their pupils imitators to the full one hundred per cent limit. We force the children to travel our standard pedagogical tracks and strive to fashion and fix them in our standard pedagogical molds. And woe betide the pupil who jumps the track or shows an inclination to travel a route not of the teacher's choosing! He is haled into court forthwith and enjoined to render a strict accounting for his misdoing; for anything that is either less ...
— The Reconstructed School • Francis B. Pearson

... fumble again at the combination lock which seems to guard the meaning of the second part of "Faust." And we find these occupations so invigorating and joyful that we model and cast an iron resolution to the effect that this winter, whatever betide, we will read a little poetry every day, or every week, as the case may be. On that we plunge back into the beautiful, poetic, inspiring city, and adhere to our poetry-reading program—for exactly a fortnight. Then, unaccountably, our resolve begins to slacken. We ...
— The Joyful Heart • Robert Haven Schauffler

... ruth for me! indeed I never think of aught else save of taking her to Bassorah and of going in unto her." Mubarak rejoined. "O my lord, keep thy faith and be not false to thy pact, lest a sore harm betide thee and the loss of thy life as well as that of the young lady.[FN57] Remember the oath thou swarest nor suffer lust[FN58] to lay thy reason low and despoil thee of all thy gains and thine honour ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 3 • Richard F. Burton

... recurred to his memory, and he thought to himself, "Here am I, grown rich and fat on the money I wantonly stole. Since then, all has gone well with me; yet, had I not been poor, I had never turned assassin nor thief. Woe betide me! what a pity it was!" and as he was revolving the matter in his mind, a feeling of remorse came over him, in spite of all he could do. While his conscience thus smote him, he suddenly, to his utter amazement, beheld the ...
— Stories by English Authors: Orient • Various

... the packet?" asked Ffoulkes gently, "and then just make up our minds to act exactly as Blakeney has enjoined us to do, neither more nor less, but just word for word, deed for deed, and I believe that that will be right—whatever may betide—in the end." ...
— El Dorado • Baroness Orczy

... and inscriptions from the Koran, of a like appearance, wrought in boldest lettering. The freshness of the great gloomy curtain told how quickly the gift of the Sultan had been made available, and that whatever else might betide him, the young Emir was already ...
— The Prince of India - Or - Why Constantinople Fell - Volume 1 • Lew. Wallace

... betide me life," saith the King, "now I see him yonder alone, he shall never escape mine hands, for at a better avail shall I never have him." Then he gat his spear in both his hands, and ran towards Sir Mordred, crying, "Traitor, now is ...
— Stories of King Arthur and His Knights - Retold from Malory's "Morte dArthur" • U. Waldo Cutler

... was not of their faith," said Gloucester. "I now believe that the same revenge that caused the death of Lord Henry of Almayne has now nearly quenched the hope of England, that if you will not be warned, my Lord, worse evil may yet betide." ...
— The Prince and the Page • Charlotte M. Yonge

... may the Spirit of all grace Descend and in our hearts abide, And what of good or ill betide, Find in them ...
— Hymns from the East - Being Centos and Suggestions from the Office Books of the - Holy Eastern Church • John Brownlie

... field thrown out of cultivation, with innumerable mole-hills and badger-holes, and natural cracks about an inch wide, which drain the water off into the marshes. If your carriage is heavily weighted it runs pretty easy; but woe betide you if driving by yourself—you bump up and down like a pea ...
— A Lady's Life on a Farm in Manitoba • Mrs. Cecil Hall

... their preaching, They have soaked you in convention through and through; They have put you in a showcase; you're a credit to their teaching — But can't you hear the Wild? — it's calling you. Let us probe the silent places, let us seek what luck betide us; Let us journey to a lonely land I know. There's a whisper on the night-wind, there's a star agleam to guide us, And the Wild is calling, calling... ...
— The Spell of the Yukon • Robert Service

... faltered in an answer she would have known I was lying and guessed I had broke her orders by leaving my place by the door—and Lord have mercy on a man when she finds he has tricked her. There is a flash in her eye like lightning, and woe betide him it falls on. But truth was that from the moment the door of the Panelled Parlour closed behind him the gentleman's days were ended, for all I saw of him, for ...
— His Grace of Osmonde • Frances Hodgson Burnett

... seem more weird and impassable. Had I had a trumpet and a lance, I should have blown a blast of defiance on the one, and having shaken the other toward the foul corners of the world, would have calmly waited to see what next might betide. Three arrows shot bravely forward would have probably resulted in the discovery of a trap-door with an iron ring; but having neither trumpet, lance, nor arrow, we simply alighted and lunched: yet even then I could not help ...
— Letters From High Latitudes • The Marquess of Dufferin (Lord Dufferin)

... and earthly bark, by reason's guide, Which holds the helm, whilst will doth wield the sail, By my desires, the winds of bad betide, Hath sailed these worldly seas with small avail, Vain objects serve for dreadful rocks to quail My brittle boat from haven of life that flies To haunt the sea of mundane miseries. My soul that draws impressions from above, And views my course, and sees the winds aspire, Bids ...
— Elizabethan Sonnet Cycles - Phillis - Licia • Thomas Lodge and Giles Fletcher

... will I strive to leave grim Death behind me, Since when Death wills methinks he sure will find me; As in the world Death roameth everywhere, Who flees him here perchance shall meet him there. Here, then, I'll bide—let what so will betide me, Thy prayers like holy angels, watch beside me. So all day long and in thy pretty sleeping 'Till next we meet the Saints ...
— The Geste of Duke Jocelyn • Jeffery Farnol

... despaired of him, and began to weep and wail. But Gulnare, seeing him in this state, said to him, "O King of the age, fear not nor grieve for thy son; for I love my child more than thou, and my child is with my brother; therefore fear not his being drowned. If my brother knew that any injury would betide the little one, he had not done what he hath done; and presently he will bring thee thy son safe, if it be the will of God, whose name be exalted!" And but a short time had elapsed when the sea was agitated, and the uncle of the little one came forth from it, having ...
— The Arabian Nights - Their Best-known Tales • Unknown

... be informed, accepted a detail to one of the hospitals at Nashville. Do not write me, except to tell me of a change in your postoffice address. I will not write you, unless I have something of special moment to tell you. Believe me, whatever may betide, at least your ...
— The Red Acorn • John McElroy

... dark room lighted with gas. It was a bitterly cold room, with no contrivances for warming it, but in his box there was a fire burning for his own special benefit. He surveyed all his clerks unceasingly, and woe betide the unhappy wretch who was caught idling. He and his slaves reminded me of a thrashing-machine which is worked by horses walking round in a ring, the driver being perched on a high stool in the middle and armed ...
— The Autobiography of Mark Rutherford • Mark Rutherford

... clothes were as good as the blood he boasted, and he wore them with an aplomb suggestive of position and influence, the gentleman was safe; but let his pretensions to gentility lie more in the past than in the suit on his back, and woe betide him! In spite of his protestations the gang took him, and he was lucky indeed if, like the gentleman who narrates his experience in the Review for the both of February 1706, he was able to convince his captors that he was foreign born by "talking ...
— The Press-Gang Afloat and Ashore • John R. Hutchinson

... penance God hath ordained you for that deed, that he that ye shall most trust to of any man alive, he shall leave you there ye shall be slain. Me forthinketh, said King Pellinore, that this shall me betide, but God may fordo ...
— Le Morte D'Arthur, Volume I (of II) - King Arthur and of his Noble Knights of the Round Table • Thomas Malory

... fault—(she would not allow herself to conceive it could be a fault of theirs)—but at all events she loved them dearly as ever; and it was comforting to her poor heart to catch a glimpse of their habitation, and know herself within reach, should sickness or evil betide. ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, No. CCCXXXVI. October, 1843. Vol. LIV. • Various

... me! hide me! Danger and shame and death betide me! For Olaf the King is hunting me down Through field and forest, through thorp and town!" Thus cried Jarl Hakon To Thora, ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

... leads such people as the governors of states, certain favoured courtiers, and people of a trade to behave exactly like these jealous dogs. All of us, as a rule, rob the chance-comer and tear him to pieces. Vain ladies and men of letters are usually so disposed. Woe betide the newly-arrived ...
— The Original Fables of La Fontaine - Rendered into English Prose by Fredk. Colin Tilney • Jean de la Fontaine

... prize, Few joys the Present brings, and those alloy'd; Th' expected fulness leaves an aching void; But HOPE stands by, and lifts her sunny eyes That gild the days to come.—She still relies The Phantom HAPPINESS not thus shall glide Always from life.—Alas!—yet ill betide Austere Experience, when she coldly tries In distant roses to discern the thorn! Ah! is it wise to anticipate our pain? Arriv'd, it then is soon enough to mourn. Nor call the dear Consoler false and vain, When yet again, shining through april-tears, Those fair enlight'ning ...
— Original sonnets on various subjects; and odes paraphrased from Horace • Anna Seward

... Thou, who in wisdom placed me here, Who, when thou wilt, can take me hence, Ah! whilst I tread this earthly sphere, Extend to me thy wide defence. To Thee, my God, to Thee I call! Whatever weal or woe betide, By thy command I rise or fall, In thy protection I confide. If, when this dust to dust restored, My soul shall float on airy wing, How shall thy glorious name adored, Inspire her feeble voice to sing! But, if this fleeting spirit ...
— Life of Lord Byron, Vol. I. (of VI.) - With his Letters and Journals. • Thomas Moore

... whatever his fears might have been for the success of the expedition, he felt none for the safety of his sons, well knowing and relying on their dauntless pluck, energy, and fitness for the work. His parting injunction to them had been, that whatever might betide, 'they should keep together'. He knew that he would not be disobeyed, and felt firm in the faith that, should the party by misfortune be reduced to their own two selves, with only their tomahawks in their ...
— The Overland Expedition of The Messrs. Jardine • Frank Jardine and Alexander Jardine

... sonne you are to blame, The gentlemen are honest, vertuous, And will protect Pertillo happily. These thoughts proceed out of aboundant love, Because you grieve to leave his company. If ought betide him otherwise then well, Let God require due vengaunce on my head, And cut ...
— A Collection Of Old English Plays, Vol. IV. • Editor: A.H. Bullen

... girl. "He lives in a spur of the mountains north of us, and comes down from his lair at night to rob my father's DOUAR. With a single blow of his mighty paw he crushes the skull of a bull, and woe betide the belated wayfarer who meets ...
— The Return of Tarzan • Edgar Rice Burroughs

... virtue of the same principle that Frederic II punished heretics as criminals according to the common law; ut crimina publica. He speaks of the "Ecclesiastical peace" as of old the emperors spoke of the "Roman peace." As Emperor, he considered it his duty "to preserve and to maintain it," and woe betide the one who dared disturb it. Feeling himself invested with both human and divine authority, he enacted the severest laws possible against heresy. What therefore might have remained merely a threatening theory became a terrible reality. The laws of 1224, 1231, 1238, ...
— The Inquisition - A Critical and Historical Study of the Coercive Power of the Church • E. Vacandard

... names in the kinges eares, and the other princes, that your renowne shall hereafter shine vnquenchable through our Realme of France. (M398) He had scarcely ended his Oration, but the greatest part of our souldiers replyed: that a greater pleasure could neuer betide them, perceiuing well the acceptable seruice which by this meanes they shoulde doe vnto their Prince: besides that this thing should be for the increase of their honours: therefore they besought the Captaine, before he departed out of the place, to begin to build ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of - the English Nation. Vol. XIII. America. Part II. • Richard Hakluyt

... wings and red satin breeches to the good old hostel too, and destroying a gallery with a very rich ceiling; and nothing will remain of ancient but the front, and an hundred mouldy portraits, among apostles, sibyls, and Kings of England. On Sunday I shall settle at Strawberry; and then woe betide you on post-days! I cannot make news without straw. The Johnstones are going to Bath, for the healths of both; so Richmond will be my only staple. ...
— Letters of Horace Walpole - Volume II • Horace Walpole

... might,"— The faithful warrior sought a sign That God would on his labors shine. The man who, at thy dread command, Lifted the shield and deadly brand. To do thy strange and fearful work— Thy work of blood and vengeance, Lord!— Might need assurance doubly tried, To prove Thou wouldst his steps betide. But when the message which we bring Is one to make the dumb man sing; To bid the blind man wash and see, The lame to leap with ecstasy; To raise the soul that's bowed down, To wipe away the tears and frown ...
— The Biography of Robert Murray M'Cheyne • Andrew A. Bonar

... respects for enduring hardship and privation, or the more dangerous reverse of self-indulgence, and willing to follow the fortunes of the Royalist and her commander through all the various shades of good or evil fortune which may betide. A fine, though slow passage took us to Rio Janeiro, which presents features of natural beauty rarely equaled. The weather during our stay was hot in the extreme, and very wet, which marred, in some degree, the satisfaction I should otherwise have enjoyed in ...
— The Expedition to Borneo of H.M.S. Dido - For the Suppression of Piracy • Henry Keppel

... "Where the shining glass, Lets in the light amid your temple's side, By broken by-ways did I inward pass, And in that window made a postern wide, Nor shall therefore this ill-advised lass Usurp the glory should this fact betide, Mine be these bonds, mine be these flames so pure, O glorious ...
— Jerusalem Delivered • Torquato Tasso

... astrologers and those who smote the sand [24] and said to them, "It is my will that ye enquire concerning the child that shall be born to me this month, whether it will be male or female, and tell me what will betide it of chances and what will proceed from it." [25] So the geomancers smote their [tables of] sand and the astrologers took their altitudes [26] and observed the star of the babe [un]born and said to the Sultan, "O ...
— Alaeddin and the Enchanted Lamp • John Payne

... but yet no entrance, till we bless First you, then you, and both for white success. Profane no porch, young man and maid, for fear Ye wrong the Threshold-god that keeps peace here: Please him, and then all good-luck will betide You, the brisk bridegroom, you, the dainty bride. Do all things sweetly, and in comely wise; Put on your garlands first, then sacrifice: That done, when both of you have seemly fed, We'll call on Night, to bring ye both to bed: Where, ...
— The Hesperides & Noble Numbers: Vol. 1 and 2 • Robert Herrick

... pain—how tender we ought to be of them, and how observant of these movements, considering their dumbness. The human baby guides and governs us by its cries. In fact, it will nearly rule a household by these cries, and woe would betide it, if it had not this power of making its afflictions known. It is a sad thing to reflect upon, that the animal which has the most to endure from man is the one which has the least powers of protesting by noise against any of ...
— Voices for the Speechless • Abraham Firth

... outstretched fingers, Every soul to action high; Woe betide the soul that lingers— Onward! onward! is ...
— Reading Made Easy for Foreigners - Third Reader • John L. Huelshof

... same way the Artillery had all manner of codes for every conceivable occasion. Various messages were devised and entered in the Defence Scheme for retaliation, S.O.S., raid purposes, etc., and woe betide the luckless F.O.O. or Infantryman who sent the wrong message. There were "concentrates" and "Test concentrates," and "attacks" and "Test attacks," and "S.O.S." and many others. If anything serious really happened, the lines were always broken at once, and there ...
— The Fifth Leicestershire - A Record Of The 1/5th Battalion The Leicestershire Regiment, - T.F., During The War, 1914-1919. • J.D. Hills

... unlike those of Singapore, are formed by fresh water, and are no better than stagnant puddles. In passing over these, the wind becomes of course charged with malaria, which it distributes in every house between it and the sea; and woe betide the European who fails to keep out of its way! Most places that I have visited, have a healthy, as well as an unhealthy season. Bencoolen is an exception to this rule, being unhealthy all the year through. Even ...
— Trade and Travel in the Far East - or Recollections of twenty-one years passed in Java, - Singapore, Australia and China. • G. F. Davidson

... for the sake of their happiness than my own, have mingled in the masque, the song or the dance, with the youth of my household? Well, I repent not of it—though Knox termed it sin, and Morton degradation—I was happy because I saw happiness around me: and woe betide the wretched jealousy that can extract guilt out of the overflowings of an unguarded gaiety!—Fleming, if we are restored to our throne, shall we not have one blithesome day at a blithesome bridal, of which we must now name neither the bride nor the bridegroom? But that bridegroom shall ...
— Sir Walter Scott - (English Men of Letters Series) • Richard H. Hutton

... and marched into the river. Not a word was spoken till they reached the other side, when Robin leaped, lightly down, and was going on his way. Then the friar stopped him. "Not so fast, my fine fellow," said he. "It is my turn now, and you shall take me across the river, or woe will betide you." ...
— The Elson Readers, Book 5 • William H. Elson and Christine M. Keck

... fear of pursuit Must needs prolong his nuptial rights: But if you give your full consent, That Sophos may enjoy his long-wish'd love, And have fair Lelia to his lovely bride, I'll follow Churms whate'er betide; I'll be as swift as is the light-foot roe, And overtake him ere his journey's end, And bring fair Lelia ...
— A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. IX • Various

... enjoined complete silence on Gower. In truth, Grenville's expressions, quoted above, were merely the outcome of the good will which he and Pitt felt towards France. But these words from the two powerful Ministers meant safety for France on her coasts, whatever might betide her on ...
— William Pitt and the Great War • John Holland Rose

... the end of my days. You are the only one who can save me from becoming a criminal, a vagabond, for with you only have I known happiness. Why should I live or care to live? If this farmer clod keeps you from me, woe betide him! My one object in living will be his destruction. I shall hate him only as a man robbed as I ...
— He Fell in Love with His Wife • Edward P. Roe

... of Orange, had for years been doing a more soldierly part than his, in hunting to the death Covenanting peasants. His Highlanders below, hungering for the joy of battle and the gathering of spoil, were brave and faithful, but they were little more than savages, and woe betide the land that lay beneath their sword; while the troops on the other side represented the forces of order and civilization, and though they might be routed that evening, they held the promise of final victory. Was it worth the doing, and something of which afterwards ...
— Graham of Claverhouse • Ian Maclaren

... bliss to thee betide," Her face with beauty beaming clear, "Welcome thou art here to abide, For now thy speech is to me dear. Masterful mood and haughty pride, I warn thee win but hatred here; For my Lord loveth not to chide And meek are all that to Him come near. When in His place thou shalt appear, To ...
— The Pearl • Sophie Jewett

... fell in the dusk of the night When unco things betide, The skilly captain, the Cameron, Went down to that waterside. Canny and soft the captain went; And a man of the woody land, With the shaven head and the painted face, Went down at his right hand. It fell ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 14 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... another person places hot cinders on the ground. The cake is put on the cinders and gravel, and an earthenware pot is spread over all, to retain the heat. Hence the bread comes out with fragments of gravel and cinder in it. Woe betide the hasty eater! Compare Lamentations iii. 16, "He hath broken my teeth with gravel stones." This, then, may be the meaning of the proverb cited at the head of this note. Bread hastily snatched, advantages thoughtlessly or fraudulently grasped, may appear sweet in anticipation, ...
— The Book of Delight and Other Papers • Israel Abrahams

... fortunate to have him on their side. He is not in the least afraid, and he won't shelter any unjust steward. On the other hand, whatever complaints there are against the natives will be just as honestly examined, and woe betide the kraals that are in the wrong! He is no Exeter Hall sentimentalist, and they must know it pretty well ...
— The Rhodesian • Gertrude Page

... thought, he gave him a rap upon the ribs in return. At this Robin laughed aloud, and the Tinker grew more angry than ever, and smote again with all his might and main. Again Robin warded two of the strokes, but at the third, his staff broke beneath the mighty blows of the Tinker. "Now, ill betide thee, traitor staff," cried Robin, as it fell from his hands; "a foul stick art thou to serve me thus in ...
— The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood • Howard Pyle

... executed, for making such a comparison to me. As it is, I will banish thee." "I am glad," said Luned, "that thou hast no other cause to do so than that I would have been of service to thee, where thou didst not know what was to thine advantage. Henceforth, evil betide whichever of us shall make the first advance towards reconciliation to the other, whether I should seek an invitation from thee, or thou of thine own ...
— The Junior Classics, V4 • Willam Patten (Editor)

... on the poor mistresses. You can't make girls work if they don't want, you can't cram their brains when they've no brains to cram; but those wretched examiners send a record of all the marks, so you can see exactly where they fall short. Woe betide the mistress who is responsible for that branch! I wouldn't mind prophesying that if the German doesn't come out better than last year, Fraulein will be packed off. I wouldn't be too sure of myself. I've done ...
— The Independence of Claire • Mrs. George de Horne Vaizey

... enjoyed a dignity so high, As long as God shall please, then I must die. ST. What! must you die? fond youth! and at the best But wish, and hope, and maybe all the rest! Take my advice—whatever may betide, For that which must be, first of all provide; Then think of that which may be, and indeed, When well prepared, who knows what may succeed? But you may be, as you are pleased to hope, Priest, ...
— The Canadian Elocutionist • Anna Kelsey Howard

... companies at the first alarm, in scarlet shirts, turned out on shortest notice, at a dead run on "shanks' mare." Woe betide the member who was late, for he was fined right heavily. Pumping by hand to put out a fire was a laborious affair and slackers were not tolerated. Even with the best of will and the most earnest of pumpers, the fires got out of hand and took a terrible toll ...
— Seaport in Virginia - George Washington's Alexandria • Gay Montague Moore

... enjoins impossibilities and commends absurdities. Arthur's reflections told him that in treasuring the remembrance of Isabel, even in his heart-of-heart, he invaded no one's right, and broke no divine precept. He measured the feelings of his mistress by his own. "Whatever," said he, "may betide me in life, of good or ill fortune, the idea of this virtuous, this heroical maid, shall restrain the arrogance of prosperity, or prevent my sinking under the weight of calamity. I will bring her to my mind's eye, restraining her tears for her ...
— The Loyalists, Vol. 1-3 - An Historical Novel • Jane West

... as if to me; but she glanced at Dick, who—though he had still to pose as the owner of the car—was growing fond of the tonneau, while Ropes drove. Woe betide Don Cipriano if he had ...
— The Car of Destiny • C. N. Williamson and A. M. Williamson

... men, Scorned all the tin-gods of our petty world, And plunged headlong into imprudences, And smashed conventions with a reckless zeal, Holding his luck and not himself to blame For aught that might betide when reckoning came. But he was true as steel and staunch as oak. And if he pledged his word he bore it out Unswerving to the finish, and he gave Whate'er he had of strength to ...
— The Vagabond and Other Poems from Punch • R. C. Lehmann

... betide me death," said the king; "now I see him yonder alone, he shall never escape my hands, for at a better vantage ...
— The Legends Of King Arthur And His Knights • James Knowles

... they are waiting till the Cherokees have drawn the fire of the Borderers, and then they will bring hell to the Tidewater. You and I know that there's some sort of madman in command, a man that quotes the Bible and speaks English; but madman or not, he's a great general, and woe betide Virginia if he gets among the manors. I was sent to the hills to get news, and I've got it. Would it not be the part of a coward to bide here and make no effort ...
— Salute to Adventurers • John Buchan

... what means this singing? Notes so sad, some ill betide;" "In the village, crowds are bringing From the chapel, home ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction - Volume 19, No. 543, Saturday, April 21, 1832. • Various

... causes sufficiently numerous and potent to create and sustain apprehension, and embarrass the usual proceedings of trade. Still money flowed into England from continental Europe, as the place of security which, whatever might betide the world, was supposed to be beyond the range of political convulsion. Thus capital was plentiful, and money was easily obtained by all creditable establishments. The peace, good order, and constitutional liberty by which these blessings were ...
— The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.III. - From George III. to Victoria • E. Farr and E. H. Nolan

... immeasurably better food, they were smarter to look at and smarter to go, their rigging was tauter, their sails better cut and ever so much flatter on a wind, their cargo more quickly and scientifically stowed, and, most important point of all, their discipline quite excellent. Woe betide the cook or steward whose galley or saloon had a speck of dirt that would make a smudge on the skipper's cleanest cambric handkerchief! It was the same all through, from stem to stern and keel to truck, from foremast hand to skipper. Aboard the best clippers the system was ...
— All Afloat - A Chronicle of Craft and Waterways • William Wood

... his pate. Woe to those, however, who dared to come by twos or by threes, with inquisitive and curious eye, within the bounds of their domain; for if caught, or only the eye of a fairy fell upon them, ill was sure to betide them through life. Still more awful, however, was the result if any were so rash as to address them, either in plain prose or rustic rhyme. The last instance of their being spoken to, is thus still handed down by tradition:—''Twas on a beautifully clear evening in the month of August, when ...
— Notes and Queries, Issue No. 61, December 28, 1850 • Various

... well, if he hears beside him The snarl of thy wrath at noon, What evil may soon betide him, Or late, if thou smite not ...
— Poems and Ballads (Third Series) - Taken from The Collected Poetical Works of Algernon Charles - Swinburne—Vol. III • Algernon Charles Swinburne

... Earldom of Envy, the Kingdom of Covetousness, the Isle of Usury were granted as marriage gifts to the pair. But Theology was angry. He would not permit the wedding to take place. "Ere this wedding be wrought, woe betide thee," he cried. "Meed is wealthy; I know it. God grant us to give her unto whom Truth wills. But thou hast bound her fast to Falseness. Meed is gently born. Lead her therefore to London, and there see if the ...
— English Literature For Boys And Girls • H.E. Marshall

... pipyng, Sterueth in Winter wyth hungrie gripyng, Therefore an other sayd sawe doth men aduise, That they be together both mery and wise. Thys Lesson must I practise, or else ere long, Wyth mee Mathew Merygreeke it will be wrong. In deede men so call me, for by him that vs bought, What euer chaunce betide, I can take no thought, Yet wisedome woulde that I did my selfe bethinke Where to be prouided this day of meate and drinke: For know ye, that for all this merie note of mine, He might appose me now that should aske where I dine. My lyuing lieth heere and there, of ...
— Roister Doister - Written, probably also represented, before 1553. Carefully - edited from the unique copy, now at Eton College • Nicholas Udall

... other the customary salutation is "How are you, sir?" or "How are you, gentlemen?" First-year men are expected to wear hats, and not to speak to upper classmen until they have been spoken to; and, though there is no hazing at the university, woe betide them if they do not heed ...
— American Adventures - A Second Trip 'Abroad at home' • Julian Street

... child, and turning to sport every word that was uttered. Perhaps he did this because he saw a cloud upon Perdita's brow. She tried to rouse herself, but her eyes every now and then filled with tears, and she looked wistfully on Raymond and her girl, as if fearful that some evil would betide them. And so she felt. A presentiment of ill hung over her. She leaned from the window looking on the forest, and the turrets of the Castle, and as these became hid by intervening objects, she passionately exclaimed—"Scenes of happiness! scenes sacred ...
— The Last Man • Mary Shelley

... lost! she's lost! For see the rocks beside her; Each effort's vain; she's cleft in twain, And now, O woe betide her! The old man spoke, as through her broke The cruel rocks around her. "Advice was vain; you took the chain, And ...
— Canada and Other Poems • T.F. Young

... prefigure the unending blackness of that eternal night you have chosen as your future portion. As you have willfully, voluntarily, and most wickedly called it down upon your own head, may the 'curse of God rest upon you in this world and the world to come!' May evils betide you in this life, every cherished hope be blasted; every plot of villainy thwarted, and you become a reproach among men, an outcast and a vagabond on the face of the earth! And when, at last, your sinful race is run, and your guilty soul has been ushered into that dreaded ...
— Ellen Walton - The Villain and His Victims • Alvin Addison

... or seek we, whate'er betide, Though the seaboard shift its mark from afar descried, But aims whence ever anew shall arise the soul? Love, thought, song, life, but show for a glimpse and hide The goal that is not, and ...
— A Midsummer Holiday and Other Poems • Algernon Charles Swinburne

... destroying a work of art. Had they left the beautiful statue there on its pedestal, Bologna would now on that account alone be a place of pilgrimage. The cannon they made is lost and forgotten—buried deep in the sand by its own weight—for Mein Herr Krupp can make cannon; but, woe betide us! who can make a statue ...
— Little Journeys to the Homes of the Great, Volume 4 (of 14) - Little Journeys to the Homes of Eminent Painters • Elbert Hubbard

... Andrew Johnstone must soon come to open war with the new party in the church. In his well-meant and vigorous efforts to make everyone tread the old paths the ruling elder produced a great amount of friction; for, though he feared God, he did not regard man, and woe betide the reckless youth who made himself too ...
— Duncan Polite - The Watchman of Glenoro • Marian Keith

... 'Now, betide me death, betide me life,' said the king, 'now that I see him yonder I will slay the serpent, lest he live to work more havoc on ...
— King Arthur's Knights - The Tales Re-told for Boys & Girls • Henry Gilbert

... fortune guide you, The boy with the bow beside you Run aye in the way, till the dawn of day And a luckier lot betide you. ...
— Mae Madden • Mary Murdoch Mason

... Woe betide them if they fall into my hands. I would give them as short a shrift as ever a Highland cateran got from a Glasgow judge. These continued alarms may mean nothing or they may be an indication that the Hillmen are assembling and ...
— The Mystery of Cloomber • Arthur Conan Doyle

... troubles assail, and dangers affright; Though friends should all fail, and foes all unite; Yet one thing secures us, whatever betide, The Scriptures assure ...
— New Tabernacle Sermons • Thomas De Witt Talmage

... perilous in the hand of an ambitious head. Where might is mixed with wit, there is too good an accord in a government. Essays be oft dangerous, specially when the cup-bearer hath received such a preservative as, what might so ever betide the drinker's draught, the ...
— Memoirs of the Court of Queen Elizabeth • Lucy Aikin

... wish to serve this man Who had ventured through hell my doom to revoke, As only the truest of comrades can. I begged him to tell me how best I might aid him, And urgently prayed him Never to leave me, whatever betide; When I saw he was hurt— Shot through the hands that were clasped in prayer! Then, as the dark drops gathered there And fell in the dirt, The wounds of my friend Seemed to me such as no man might bear. Those bullet-holes in the patient hands Seemed to transcend All horrors ...
— A Treasury of War Poetry - British and American Poems of the World War 1914-1917 • Edited, with Introduction and Notes, by George Herbert Clarke

... more have done 100 Than thee, Mazeppa! On the earth So fit a pair had never birth, Since Alexander's days till now, As thy Bucephalus and thou: All Scythia's fame to thine should yield For pricking on o'er flood and field." Mazeppa answered—"Ill betide The school wherein I learned to ride!" Quoth Charles—"Old Hetman, wherefore so, Since thou hast learned the art so well?" 110 Mazeppa said—"'Twere long to tell; And we have many a league to go, With every now and then a blow, And ten to one at least the foe, Before our steeds may graze ...
— The Works of Lord Byron, Volume 4 • Lord Byron

... the city, there to barter his fashion against the solid gold of some merchant, rolling in his majesty's coin, who might be silly enough to give his daughter, for a bow, to a courtier without a shilling. On one point, however, Sir James was decided—betide him weal, betide him woe—that his next mistress should neither be a wit, nor a beauty, nor ...
— Tales and Novels, Vol. VII - Patronage • Maria Edgeworth

... and bade give him an hundred gold pieces, saying, "Thou hast cheered us with thy company this day."[FN19] The Porter thanked him and, taking the gift, went his way, pondering that which he had heard and marvelling mightily at what things betide mankind. He passed the night in his own place and with early morning repaired to the abode of Sindbad the Seaman, who received him with honour and seated him by his side. As soon as the rest of the company was assembled, he set meat and drink before ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 6 • Richard F. Burton

... betide! My oldest, dearest friend hath died,— Died in my hand quite unaware, Oh, ...
— Pipe and Pouch - The Smoker's Own Book of Poetry • Various

... table by his bed stood the field-glasses with which he watched his gardeners, and woe betide man who permitted a single leaf to lie on the perfect lawns, which stretched away on the plateau before ...
— The Scarlet Feather • Houghton Townley

... to the shore opposite the Island of the Mystic Lake. You must cross to the island on his back, and make your way through the water-steeds that swim around the island night and day to guard it; but woe betide you if you attempt to cross without paying the price, for if you do the angry water-steeds will rend you and your horse to pieces. And when you come to the Mystic Lake you must wait until the waters are as red as wine, ...
— Irish Fairy Tales • Edmund Leamy

... we know God's loving providence carefully watches over us at all times, and constantly preserves us from countless dangers; that nothing can betide us without His permission, and that He blesses the work of every day if we ask Him. Far from being influenced by the common superstition with regard to Friday, it would seem as if we should piously prefer ...
— Apples, Ripe and Rosy, Sir • Mary Catherine Crowley

... showed them to be people of some consequence: for in those days the texture of a woman's hood, the number of her pearls, and the breadth of her lace and fur were carefully regulated by sumptuary laws, and woe betide the esquire's daughter, or the knight's wife, who presumed to poach on the ...
— All's Well - Alice's Victory • Emily Sarah Holt

... perform this foolish gear, To this intent, and think themselves in safety all the year. To Christ dare none commit himself. And in these days beside They judge what weather all the year shall happen and betide: Ascribing to each day a month, and at this present time The youth in every place do flock, and all apparelled fine, With pipers through the streets they run, and sing at every door In commendation of the man, rewarded well therefore, Which on themselves they do bestow, or ...
— In The Yule-Log Glow—Book 3 - Christmas Poems from 'round the World • Various

... and small cruisers sailed, the white ensign proudly flying, into the harbour to anchor and to watch the interned shipping. It must have been a humiliating spectacle to the Hun; but he was helpless. Woe betide him, if he placed a mine or trained a gun upon this ship of ours. The town would have suffered, and ...
— Sketches of the East Africa Campaign • Robert Valentine Dolbey

... evening we ventured out for a walk in spite of growlings and spittings up above among the crass-looking clouds. Natal is not a nice country, for women at all events, to walk in. You have to keep religiously to the road or track, for woe betide the rash person who ventures on the grass, though from repeated burnings all about these hills it is quite short. There is a risk of your treading on a snake, and a certainty of your treading on a frog. You will soon ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, April, 1876. • Various

... themselves. We reached at length what is called a cedar swamp in the States. The cedar trees form a dense, tangled thicket, perfectly impervious to the wind, and in winter, when the moist ground is frozen hard below, such a locality is perfectly healthy. Woe betide the unfortunate wretch who has to take up his quarters within one in the summer time, when mosquitoes and rattlesnakes abound. He will wish himself well out of ...
— Dick Onslow - Among the Redskins • W.H.G. Kingston

... see that birds' nest in the top of that tree? In it are six eggs; you must climb up there and get all those eggs for me before nightfall, and if one is broken woe betide you!" ...
— Europa's Fairy Book • Joseph Jacobs

... if in the mean time her husband died, But Heaven forbid that such a thought should cross Her brain, though in a dream! (and then she sigh'd) Never could she survive that common loss; But just suppose that moment should betide, I only say suppose it—inter nos. (This should be entre nous, for Julia thought In French, but then the rhyme ...
— Don Juan • Lord Byron

... Zumurrud was minded to have him brought before her, but then she bethought her that belike he was an hungered and said to herself, "It were properer to let him eat his fill." So he went on eating, whilst the folk looked at him in astonishment, waiting to see what would betide him; and, when he had satisfied himself, Zumurrud said to certain of her eunuchry, "Go to yonder youth who eateth of the rice and bring him to me in courteous guise, saying: 'Answer the summons of the ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 4 • Richard F. Burton

... was for dividing all the lands and all the capital belonging to other people among the working class, calmly and quietly, without any violence, and deprecating violence: but saying, perhaps very truly, that the people to be robbed might not like it, and might offer violence; in which case woe betide them; it was they who would be guilty of violence; and they must take the consequences if they resisted the reasonable, propositions of himself and his friends! That, I suppose, is among the new ideas with which Kenelm is more familiar than I am. Do you entertain ...
— Kenelm Chillingly, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... hope indeed; but hope itself is fear Viewed on the sunny side; I hope, and disregard the world that's here, The prizes drawn, the sweet things that betide; I ...
— Poems • Christina G. Rossetti

... custom to spend her afternoon, when the day was fine, in visiting some shrine or abbey. When the day was not fine, she passed the time in embroidering among her maidens, and woe betide the unlucky damsel who selected a wrong shade, or set in a false stitch. The natural result of this was that the pine-cone, kept by Olympias as a private barometer, was anxiously consulted on the least appearance of clouds. Diana asserted that she offered a wax candle to Saint Wulstan every month ...
— A Forgotten Hero - Not for Him • Emily Sarah Holt

... Cornelia.—Woe betide the woman who bids you to forget that woman who has loved you: she sins against her sex. Leonora was unblameable. Never think ill of her for what ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, No. 327 - Vol. 53, January, 1843 • Various

... sable and mard array Stepped forward stately knights eleven: "We'll with Sir Axel swear to-day, Betide whatever pleases heaven." ...
— Axel Thordson and Fair Valborg - a ballad • Thomas J. Wise

... festooned with garlands of young coco-nut leaves. Another girl keeps her company and sleeps with her, but she may not touch any other person, tree or plant. Further, she may not see the sky, and woe betide her if she catches sight of a crow or a cat! Her diet must be strictly vegetarian, without salt, tamarinds, or chillies. She is armed against evil spirits by a knife, which is placed on the mat or carried on her person.[159] Among the Kappiliyans of Madura and Tinnevelly a girl at her ...
— Balder The Beautiful, Vol. I. • Sir James George Frazer

... find ye?' demanded Yusuf. 'Abou Ben Zegri will never keep you here after having evened his gude-daughter to ye. He'll sell you to some corsair captain, and then the best that could betide ye wad be that a shot frae the Knights of Malta should make quick work wi' ye. Or look at the dumbie there, Fareek. A Christian, he ca's himsel', too, though 'tis of a by ordinar' fashion, such as Deacon Shortcoats would scarce own. I coft him dog cheap ...
— A Modern Telemachus • Charlotte M. Yonge

... does In the park, in the lane, And just outside The shuttered pane, Have also been heard - Quick feet as light As the feet of a sprite - And the wise mind knows What things may betide When such ...
— Moments of Vision • Thomas Hardy

... certain nameless individual. I am glad I did not live in those days! If a poor old woman was ugly, and cross, and mumbled to herself, as we old women will do sometimes, and above all, if she kept a large black cat, woe betide her! ...
— Holidays at the Grange or A Week's Delight - Games and Stories for Parlor and Fireside • Emily Mayer Higgins

... pilot need or helm, as ships are wont, But know, themselves, our purpose; know beside All cities, and all fruitful regions well Of all the earth, and with dark clouds involv'd Plough rapid the rough Deep, fearless of harm, (Whate'er betide) and of disast'rous wreck. Yet thus, long since, my father I have heard 690 Nausithoues speaking; Neptune, he would say, Is angry with us, for that safe we bear Strangers of ev'ry nation to their home; And he foretold a time when he would smite In vengeance some Phaeacian ...
— The Odyssey of Homer • Homer

... fa'," well betide; good luck to. This is the Scotch version of the common saying, "When the wine is in, the wit is out;" or, "What is in the heart of the sober man is on the tongue of the ...
— The Proverbs of Scotland • Alexander Hislop

... with roaring Asonante) Who forsooth because our betters Would begin to kick and fling You forthwith your noble mind Must prove, and kick me off behind, Tow'rd the very centre whither Gravity was most inclined. There where you have made your bed In it lie; for, wet or dry, Let what will for me betide you, Burning, blowing, freezing, hailing; Famine waste you: devil ride you: Tempest baste you black and blue: (To Rosaura.) There! I think in downright railing I can hold ...
— Life Is A Dream • Pedro Calderon de la Barca

... Whoever had succeeded in training himself to imagine vigorously might at once have, do, or be whatever it pleased him to imagine, becoming ipso facto, as the Stoics used to say an acquirer of virtue does, 'rich, beautiful, a king.' Woe betide any one, however, who, as long as the cosmical constitution remains what it is, shall attempt to put the theory into practice, and desisting from all those animal functions, involving intercourse with a real or imaginary external world, which are vulgarly supposed essential to animal existence, ...
— Old-Fashioned Ethics and Common-Sense Metaphysics - With Some of Their Applications • William Thomas Thornton

... to be forgot; I've read thy heart in every line, And know that there one sacred spot, Whate'er betide, will still be mine, For death but lays its mystic spell Upon affection's earthliness,— I know that, though thou lov'st me well, Thou lov'st thy ...
— Lives of the Three Mrs. Judsons • Arabella W. Stuart

... shalt to-day provide, Let me as a child receive; What to-morrow may betide, Calmly to Thy wisdom leave. 'Tis enough that Thou wilt care; Why should ...
— Daily Strength for Daily Needs • Mary W. Tileston

... comfortably no doubt. In the meantime I am in a twitter of ecstatic happiness. You, who have gone through it all, will quite understand what I mean. It seems that as a lover he is the most exigeant of gentlemen. He requires constant writing to, and woe betide me if I do not obey his behests. However, I do not complain, and must confess that I am at the present moment the most ...
— Kept in the Dark • Anthony Trollope

... it, and with a strange kind of cackle, meant to be a chirrup, cried: "Good wine, good wine; is it not the peculiar bond of good feeling?" Then brimming both glasses, pushed one over, saying, with what seemed intended for an air of fine disdain: "Ill betide those gloomy skeptics who maintain that now-a-days pure wine is unpurchasable; that almost every variety on sale is less the vintage of vineyards than laboratories; that most bar-keepers are but a set of male Brinvilliarses, with complaisant arts practicing against the lives of their ...
— The Confidence-Man • Herman Melville

... brave, and bravely let him dare Whate'er betide, and feel no coward fright. Who shares the worst, the best deserves to share; Who follows Love shall stand ...
— Three Women • Ella Wheeler Wilcox

... one true God, Maker of the earth and heaven, The Father who to us the power To become his sons hath given. He will us at all times nourish, Soul and body, guard us, guide us, 'Mid all harms will keep and cherish, That no ill shall ever betide us. He watches o'er us day and night; All things are governed ...
— The Hymns of Martin Luther • Martin Luther

... Woe betide the needy invalid sent thither in search of sunshine! Sunshine is indeed a far more expensive luxury on the Riviera than we imagine, seeing that only rooms with a north aspect are cheap, and a sunless room is much more comfortless and unwholesome than a well-warmed one, ...
— In the Heart of the Vosges - And Other Sketches by a "Devious Traveller" • Matilda Betham-Edwards

... proudest destrier sometimes in the dust, And then 'tis weary work; he strives beside Seem better than he is, so that his trust Is always on what chances may betide; ...
— The Defence of Guenevere and Other Poems • William Morris

... be done out of the house. Fruiterers, market-men, as butchers and poulterers. The Agent's maitre-d'hotel will give a receipt to each individual for the articles he produces; and let all remember that The Agent is a VERY KEEN JUDGE, and woe betide those who serve ...
— The Fitz-Boodle Papers • William Makepeace Thackeray

... When they but look thee in the face:— Shalt not in a golden chain array thee, Nor at the altar take thy place! Shalt not, in lace and ribbons flowing, Make merry when the dance is going! But in some corner, woe betide thee! Among the beggars and cripples hide thee; And so, though even God forgive, On ...
— Faust • Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe

... Or if that needes they must be washt in blood, Imbrue them heere, heere in Cornelias brest. 770 Ay mee as I stood looking from the Ship (Accursed shippe that did not sinke and drowne: And so haue sau'd me from so loath'd a sight) Thee to behold what did betide my Lord, My Pompey deere (nor Pompey now nor Lord) I sawe those villaines that but now were heere: Bucher my loue and then with violence, To drawe his deare beloued Body hence; What dost thou stand to play the Oratrix, And tell ...
— The Tragedy Of Caesar's Revenge • Anonymous

... it, as he would the wind whistle: while in the shape of a threat, he treats it with contempt; if put into execution his scorn would subside into indifference. You know he has but one object—doing what is right; the rest may betide as it will. One or two of the ministers,(366) who are honest men, would, I have reason to believe, be heartily concerned to have such measures adopted; but they are not directors. The little favour they possess, and the desperateness of their situation oblige them to swallow ...
— The Letters of Horace Walpole Volume 3 • Horace Walpole

... betide the mill, As day by day the miller's wheel Do dreve his clacks, an' heist his zacks, An' vill his bins wi' show'ren meal: Mid's water never overflow His dousty mill, nor zink too low, Vrom now till wheat ageaen do grow, An' we've another ...
— Poems of Rural Life in the Dorset Dialect • William Barnes

... feel inside me Knocking hard against my bones? How should such a thing betide me! They were kids, and ...
— Household Stories by the Brothers Grimm • Jacob Grimm and Wilhelm Grimm

... the captain, "For nought can man avail: Oh, woe betide the ship that lacks Her rudder and ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 15, No. 88, February, 1865 • Various

... men and women on the road, their dresses, appearance, countenances, and words; every kind of bird in the air, and insect and chrysalis in the hedges; the crops in the fields, the flowers and herbs on the banks. If I walked in the town, I must not be eyes and no eyes; woe betide me if I could only report the dresses! Really, I have known me, when I was but eight, come home to my mother laden with details, when perhaps an untrained girl of eighteen could only have specified that she had gone up and ...
— The Woman-Hater • Charles Reade

... year it did betide, When they were multiplied, An army took the field Of rats, with spear and shield, Whose crowded ranks led on A king named Ratapon. The weasels, too, their banner Unfurl'd in warlike manner. As Fame her trumpet sounds, The victory balanced well; Enrich'd were ...
— A Hundred Fables of La Fontaine • Jean de La Fontaine

... spoke,— A mastering wish to serve this man Who had ventured through hell my doom to revoke, As only the truest of comrades can. I begged him to tell me how best I might aid him, And urgently prayed him Never to leave me, whatever betide;— When I saw he was hurt— Shot through the hands that were clasped in prayer! Then as the dark drops gathered there And fell in the dirt, The wounds of my friend Seemed to me such as no man might bear. Those bullet-holes in the patient ...
— The Haunted Hour - An Anthology • Various

... way through the people, saying, "O folk, are ye not ashamed to mob this stranger and make mock of him and scoff at him?" And he went on to rate them, till he drave them away from Ma'aruf, and none could make him any answer. Then he said to the stranger, "Come, O my brother, no harm shall betide thee from these folk. Verily they have no shame."[FN18] So he took him and carrying him to a spacious and richly-adorned house, seated him in a speak-room fit for a King, whilst he gave an order to his slaves, who ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 10 • Richard F. Burton

... construction, which for ordinary, commonplace gardening will answer admirably. Or, its foundation is merely the plain earth. Such a building does admirably in the summer time, and even in the late spring and early autumn; but woe betide the enthusiastic amateur in winter, who, being possessed of one of these light greenhouse structures, has indulged in a few costly, exotic plants. They will be frozen, to a certainty! It is economy to pay a fair price in the beginning to secure a properly built ...
— Three Acres and Liberty • Bolton Hall

... in the memory of Sir Oliver's sworn promise that her brother's life should be inviolate to him, betide what might. She trusted him; she depended upon his word and that rare strength of his which rendered possible to him a course that no weaker man would dare pursue. And in this reflection her pride in him increased, and she thanked God for a lover who in ...
— The Sea-Hawk • Raphael Sabatini

... Allah, the Glorious, the Great! O Sa'adan, what case is this?" "O my lord," replied Sa'adan, "it is Allah (extolled and exalted be He!) who ordaineth joy and annoy and there is no help but this and that betide." And Gharib rejoined, "Thou speakest sooth, O Sa'adan!" But Ajib passed the night in joy and he said to his men, "Mount ye on the morrow and fall upon the Moslems so shall not one of them be left alive." ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 7 • Richard F. Burton

... the name of a man on his tombstone, or in the announcement of his death or marriage; and as for the militia ensigns and lieutenants, there is no end to them. Deacon is an important title, which is rarely omitted; and wo betide the man who should forget to call a magistrate "esquire." No such usages prevail among us; or, if they do, it is among that portion of the people of this colony which is derived from New England, and still retains some of its customs. Then, in no part of the colonies is English ...
— Satanstoe • James Fenimore Cooper

... left the car with the chauffeurs, and having been armed we started with two guides for the trenches. Every gun emplacement was inspected to see if orders had been faithfully carried out—and woe betide the man who failed. The Major's intimate and technical knowledge of every detail in machine-gun fighting, won ...
— The Fight for the Argonne - Personal Experiences of a 'Y' Man • William Benjamin West

... Town had separated into two or three portions, which had betaken themselves to the most probable fighting points, and had gone where glory waited them, thirsting for the blood, or, at any rate, for the bloody noses of the gowned aristocrats. Woe betide the luckless gownsman, who, on such an occasion, ventures abroad without an escort, or trusts to his own unassisted powers to defend himself! He is forthwith pounced upon by some score of valiant Townsmen, who are on the watch for these favourable opportunities for ...
— The Adventures of Mr. Verdant Green • Cuthbert Bede

... with the low standard thus set up and made adaptable to everything, takes refuge among the graces and refinements it can bring to bear on private life, and leaves the public weal to such fortune as may betide it in the press and uproar of a general scramble—then again ...
— Life And Adventures Of Martin Chuzzlewit • Charles Dickens

... and mistress bride, Many fair lovely bairns to you betide! Let Venus to you mutual love procure, Let Saturn give you riches to endure. Long may you sleep in one another's arms, Inspiring sweet desire, and ...
— The Anatomy of Melancholy • Democritus Junior

... to the breeze his beard As hawthorn blossom white; betide what may, Escape he will not seek, puts to his lips A trumpet clear, whose blast the Pagans hark, And fast their cohorts rally on the field. They bray and neigh, the men of Occiant, While those of Arguile yelp as curs, and ...
— La Chanson de Roland • Lon Gautier

... Perhaps she had observed my agitated face, in which many emotions contended, probably (as in my heart), but I only said, "Let me pass now, darling!—One thing will," I thought, "be secure, under the contemplated circumstances—your welfare and education, whatever else betide—beautiful, and good as an angel, you shall be wise ...
— Miriam Monfort - A Novel • Catherine A. Warfield

... grudge the tranquil age, When nought can now betide ill, To glance, from a distant hermitage, At ...
— Fringilla: Some Tales In Verse • Richard Doddridge Blackmore

... back to her temple under the protection of her priests and the threat of Tarzan of the Apes that whoever harms her shall die. Tarzan will go again to Opar before the next rains and if harm has befallen La, woe betide Cadj, the High Priest." ...
— Tarzan and the Jewels of Opar • Edgar Rice Burroughs

... so reprehensible in a nurse to talk gossip, do not disdain to serve up their neighbors occasionally to the nurse, with some very highly seasoned scandal sauce, and here the honor of the nurse must come into play; let her forget it if possible, as woe will betide the poor girl if in her next place she unwittingly lets out any of the secrets she has heard in these long talks. Try then to steer clear of the neighbors. If your patient be a cultivated person, and you yourself know anything about books, you have a never-failing topic. All the latest ...
— Making Good On Private Duty • Harriet Camp Lounsbery

... the woman; "then Dr. Battius has more sense in him than I believed! She is right, Ishmael; and what she says, shall be done. I will shoulder a rifle myself; and woe betide the red-skin that crosses my path! I have pulled a trigger before to-day; ay, and heard an Indian yell, too, ...
— The Prairie • J. Fenimore Cooper

... was the surly command, and Ramiro turned again to me. "You have gone a little pale, good Messer Boccadoro," he sneered. "We shall soon learn whether you have sought to fool me. Woe betide you, should it be so. We bear a name ...
— The Shame of Motley • Raphael Sabatini

... the kevil fell To stay the fearsome noise, "Gae in," they cried, "whate'er betide, Thou ...
— Phantasmagoria and Other Poems • Lewis Carroll

... or hear, by conjuring up the most ridiculous phantoms; and the more ridiculous they are, the more firmly do they at last believe in them themselves. The worse their grounds are, the more jealously do they guard against anybody's seeing them; and woe betide any one who should frequent any particular spot too often: he is at once set down as designing a plot against it, to fortify the place and take it from them; this idea is their greatest bugbear. Among that tribe blood shed by any means—by ...
— What Led To The Discovery of the Source Of The Nile • John Hanning Speke

... Pawkie, and shaking her awake, told her what was going on, and a terrified woman she was. I then dressed myself with all possible expedition, and went to the town-clerk's, and we sent for the town-officers, and then adjourned to the council-chamber to wait the issue of what might betide. ...
— The Provost • John Galt

... they by poverty controlled— Good fortune shall betide them As scenes of beauty they behold, And seem to revel in the gold Which Plutus has denied them; For, ah! the poor from want's despair Oft covet wealth ...
— Poems - Vol. IV • Hattie Howard

... scattered into other lands afar across the sea. Amazed he stood, nor stricken was Achates less than he By joy, by fear: they hungered sore hand unto hand to set; But doubt of dealings that might be stirred in their hearts as yet; So lurking, cloaked in hollow cloud they note what things betide Their fellows there, and on what shore the ships they manned may bide, And whence they come; for chosen out of all the ships they bear Bidding of peace, and, crying ...
— The AEneids of Virgil - Done into English Verse • Virgil

... JULIAN.] Adieu then; and whate'er betide the country, Sustain at least the honours ...
— Count Julian • Walter Savage Landor



Words linked to "Betide" :   happen, take place, pass off, befall, fall out, occur, go on, bechance, pass, come about



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