Free Translator Free Translator
Translators Dictionaries Courses Other
Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




Bereave   Listen
verb
Bereave  v. t.  (past & past part. bereaved, bereft; pres. part. bereaving)  
1.
To make destitute; to deprive; to strip; with of before the person or thing taken away. "Madam, you have bereft me of all words." "Bereft of him who taught me how to sing."
2.
To take away from. (Obs.) "All your interest in those territories Is utterly bereft you; all is lost."
3.
To take away. (Obs.) "Shall move you to bereave my life." Note: The imp. and past pple. form bereaved is not used in reference to immaterial objects. We say bereaved or bereft by death of a relative, bereft of hope and strength.
Synonyms: To dispossess; to divest.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"Bereave" Quotes from Famous Books



... at last to Cambridge; and now illness fell upon him for the second time in his life. Not a definite illness, but a lingering malaise, which seemed to bereave him of all spring and energy. He was told that he must not work, must spend his time in the open air, must be careful in matters of food and sleep. He lived indeed for some months the life of an invalid. The restrictions ...
— Beside Still Waters • Arthur Christopher Benson

... and they, beholding him, rejoiced with exceeding great joy, and at the return of their son did their spirits revive as the spirits of one awakening from a heavy sleep, and they besought of him, with entreaty of many prayers and the abundance of many tears, that he would not again bereave them of his presence. Therefore, that he might show the honor and the submission due unto his parents, he abided ...
— The Most Ancient Lives of Saint Patrick - Including the Life by Jocelin, Hitherto Unpublished in America, and His Extant Writings • Various

... which (through her husband's instructions) she had armed her mind, had not left it in the power of any outward accident to bereave her of her understanding, or to make her incapable of doing what was proper on all occasions. Therefore, by the advice of all her friends, she undertook what she was so well qualified for; namely, the education of children. ...
— The Governess - The Little Female Academy • Sarah Fielding

... bereave me of all things," says he, "even my friends? I thought—I believed, that ...
— April's Lady - A Novel • Margaret Wolfe Hungerford

... himself under a tree, and tied the cow to one of the branches while he ate some bread, and drank of an infusion of his beloved bang, which he always carried with him. In a short time it began to operate, so as to bereave him of the little sense he possessed, and his head was filled with ridiculous reveries. While he was musing, a magpie beginning to chatter from her nest in the tree, he fancied it was a human voice, and that some woman had asked to purchase his cow: upon which he said, ...
— The Arabian Nights Entertainments vol. 4 • Anon.

... Through which Aurora shows her brightening face; You cannot bar my constant feet to trace The woods and lawns, by living stream at eve: Let health my nerves and finer fibres brace, And I their toys to the great children leave; Of fancy, reason, virtue, nought can me bereave." ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 13, No. 79, May, 1864 • Various

... in her plaint. Forsake me not thus, Adam! witness Heaven What love sincere, and reverence in my heart I bear thee, and unweeting have offended, Unhappily deceived! Thy suppliant I beg, and clasp thy knees; bereave me not, Whereon I live, thy gentle looks, thy aid, Thy counsel, in this uttermost distress, My only strength and stay: Forlorn of thee, Whither shall I betake me, where subsist? While yet we live, scarce one short hour ...
— Paradise Lost • John Milton

... husband and wife fell to talking of their journey and what they had borne therein of toil and travail. At last the Princess said to him, "O my lord, what became of the King who besieged thy sire in his capital and who sought to bereave him of his realm?" and said he, "I myself took him captive and committed him to my father who admitted his excuses and suffered him depart." Quoth she, "And was it thou who capturedst him?" and quoth he, "Yea ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 5 • Richard F. Burton

... Breme. July 18th, Mr. Yong and Mr. Secretary his letter. July 30th, Edmond Hilton cam from Prage to Breme by Stade. Aug. 2nd, veteri stilo, the nyght following, my terrible dream that Mr. Kelly wold by force bereave me of my bokes, toward daybreak. Aug. 5th, novo stylo, Edmond Hilton went toward Stade, to go toward England, with my letters to disclose the treason of Perkins. Ther went in this company two English people, Mr. Rolous Tattin and George Losin. Aug. 7th, the first of the seven half fasts. Aug. 14th, ...
— The Private Diary of Dr. John Dee - And the Catalog of His Library of Manuscripts • John Dee

... yourselves in flight Fall vanquish'd at your billow-cleaving barks. 80 With you is all the flower of Greece.[2] Let him Whose heart shall move him to encounter sole Illustrious Hector, from among you all Stand forth, and Jove be witness to us both. If he, with his long-pointed lance, of life 85 Shall me bereave, my armor is his prize, Which he shall hence into your fleet convey; Not so my body; that he shall resign For burial to the men and wives of Troy. But if Apollo make the glory mine, 90 And he fall ...
— The Iliad of Homer - Translated into English Blank Verse • Homer

... her plaint: 'Forsake me not thus, Adam! Witness, Heaven, What love sincere, and reverence in my heart I bear thee, and unweeting have offended, Unhappily deceived! Thy suppliant I beg, and clasp thy knees. Bereave me not, Whereon I live, thy gentle looks, thy aid, Thy counsel in this uttermost distress, My only strength and stay. Forlorn of thee, Whither shall I betake me? where subsist? While yet we live, scarce one short hour perhaps, Between us two let there be peace.' . . . . . . . She ended ...
— English Literature For Boys And Girls • H.E. Marshall

... the wyld cat to the brownish beaver, Running for life, with hounds pursued sore, When huntsmen of her pretious stones bereave her, Which with her teeth sh' had bitten off before; Restoratives and costly curious felts Are made of them, ...
— The Affectionate Shepherd • Richard Barnfield

... one about it, should perhaps make few believe, But I think it over now that life looms dull and years bereave, How blank we stood at our bright wits' end, two frail barks in distress, How self-regard in her was slain ...
— Satires of Circumstance, Lyrics and Reveries, with - Miscellaneous Pieces • Thomas Hardy

... matter nothing, whose deaths none need deplore. How great my bewilderment to find that my efforts at concealment—to make myself even more remote than my Island—had had by impish perversity a contrary effect! On no consideration shall I part with all my secrets. Bereave me of my illusions and I am bereft, for they are "the stardust ...
— My Tropic Isle • E J Banfield

... yet, when a man is called virtuous, or is denominated a man of virtue, we chiefly regard his social qualities, which are, indeed, the most valuable. It is, at the same time, certain, that any remarkable defect in courage, temperance, economy, industry, understanding, dignity of mind, would bereave even a very good-natured, honest man of this honourable appellation. Who did ever say, except by way of irony, that such a one was a man of great virtue, but ...
— An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals • David Hume

... palace and looking up, saw the ebony horse flying away with the prince and princess. At this the King was sore troubled and cried out, saying, 'O King's son, I conjure thee, by Allah, have compassion on me and my wife and bereave us not of our daughter!' The prince made him no reply, but, thinking that the princess repented of leaving her father and mother, said to her, 'O ravishment of the age, wilt thou that I restore thee to thy father ...
— The Book Of The Thousand Nights And One Night, Volume IV • Anonymous

... dying song, Yet take, ere grief bereave The breath which I enjoy too long, Tell thou that fair one this: my soul prefers Her love above my life; and that I died her's: And let him be, for evermore, to her remembrance dear, Who loved the very thought of her whilst he remained here. And ...
— Pastoral Poems by Nicholas Breton, - Selected Poetry by George Wither, and - Pastoral Poetry by William Browne (of Tavistock) • Nicholas Breton, George Wither, William Browne (of Tavistock)

... could no love have shown: Each vulgar virtue would as much have done. My love was such, it needed no return; But could, though he supplied no fuel, burn. Rich in itself, like elemental fire, Whose pureness does no aliment require. In vain you would bereave me of my lord; For I will die:—Die is too base a word, I'll seek his breast, and, kindling by his side, Adorned with flames, I'll mount ...
— The Works of John Dryden, Volume 5 (of 18) - Amboyna; The state of Innocence; Aureng-Zebe; All for Love • John Dryden

... leave thee, And I would snatch an interval of rest: Sleep these last moments ere the laws bereave thee, For never more thou'lt press ...
— The Poetical Works of Henry Kirke White - With a Memoir by Sir Harris Nicolas • Henry Kirke White

... is a bargain. We will agree that I bereave some person of either stolen or unearned property, say, to the value of L10,000——" And with his usual carefulness in such matters, Mr. Sheridan entered the wager ...
— The Certain Hour • James Branch Cabell

... of happiness from himself. Love and friendship he considered as groundless and chimerical, and believed that those delusions would, in people of sense, be rectified by experience; but he knew the obstinacy of his sister's attachment to these phantoms, and that to bereave her of the good they promised was the most effectual means of rendering her miserable. For this end he set himself to thwart her wishes. In the imbecility and false indulgence of his parents he found the most powerful auxiliaries. ...
— Edgar Huntley • Charles Brockden Brown

... (count)[223] the murder of our late King (which 1000 tymes hath bein casten up to me) as a iust iudgement of God on them for their pride. I cannot forget whow satyrically they have told this, saying that the peaple of great Britain keip their Kings at their beck, at their pleasure not only to bereave them of their croune but also of their life. I endewored to show them that they understood not things aright, that the same had bein practicat in France on Henry the 4t: the cases are not indeed alike, since our ...
— Publications of the Scottish History Society, Vol. 36 • Sir John Lauder

... have limits, just because it is human. It is subject to loss, and is often to some extent the sport of occasion. It lacks permanence: misunderstandings can estrange us: slander can embitter us: death can bereave us. We are left very much the victims of circumstances; for like everything earthly it is open to change and decay. No matter how close and spiritual the intercourse, it is not permanent, and never certain. If nothing else, the shadow of death is always on it. Tennyson ...
— Friendship • Hugh Black

... love assures the charmer that no woman shall ever succeed her in his regards; but this is probably a veritable amorous swan-song. He was older than are most men at fifty-two. Years as they pass, he sadly says, bereave us one by one of all our precious things; of mirth, of loves, of banquets; at last the Muse herself spreads wings to follow them. "You have sported long enough," she says, "with Amaryllis in the shade, you have eaten and drunk your fill, it is time for you to quit the ...
— Horace • William Tuckwell

... my child! Enough, thou hast my heart; For those I love with life I'd freely part; I would not harm a soul, nor of its faith bereave it. ...
— Faust • Goethe

... and gave it to the old woman, who took it and repaired to Taj al-Muluk. And when he saw her, he rose to his feet and exclaimed, "May Allah never bereave me of the blessing of thy coming!" Quoth she, "Take the answer to thy letter." He took it and reading it, wept with sore weeping and said, "I long for some one to slay me at this moment and send me to my rest, for indeed death were easier to me than this my state!" Then he took ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 3 • Richard F. Burton

... like a servant, and the money now spent in buying armour, and horses, and waging of war, shall be bestowed in building of towns and houses. By ending these incessant wars ere they be aware, you shall bereave them both of force and beggary, and make them weak and wealthy. Then you can convert the military service due from the lords into money; then you can take up the fisheries now left to the French and the Spaniards; ...
— The Land-War In Ireland (1870) - A History For The Times • James Godkin

... always the truest. That which seems faintly possible—it is so refined, is often faint and dim because it is deepest seated in the mind among the eternal verities. Empirical science is apt to cloud the sight, and, by the very knowledge of functions and processes, to bereave the student of the manly contemplation of the whole. The savant becomes unpoetic. But the best read naturalist who lends an entire and devout attention to truth, will see that there remains much to learn of his relation to ...
— Nature • Ralph Waldo Emerson

... Wherefore, heart of my body, go not about at once to dishonour yourself and to cast your husband and myself into strife and peril. You are not the first woman, nor will you be the last, who hath been deceived, nor have I in this practised upon you to bereave you of your own, but for the exceeding love that I bear you and am minded ever to bear you and to be your most humble servant. And although it is long since I and all that I possess or can or am worth have been yours and at your service, henceforward I purpose that they shall be more than ...
— The Decameron of Giovanni Boccaccio • Giovanni Boccaccio

... Faustus, leave this damned art, This magic, that will charm thy soul to hell, And quite bereave thee of salvation! Though thou hast now offended like a man, Do not persever in it like a devil: Yet, yet thou hast an amiable soul, If sin by custom grow not into nature; Then, Faustus, will repentance come too late; Then thou art banish'd from the sight of heaven: No mortal ...
— Dr. Faustus • Christopher Marlowe

... wounds my soul upon this sorry time! Pale is my face, and in my pale confesses The pain I suffer, since I needs must leave thee. Red are mine eyes through tears that them oppresses, Dulled are my sp'rits since fates do now bereave thee. And now, ah now, my plaints are quite prevented! The winds are fair the sails are hoised high, The anchors weighed, and now quite discontented, Grief so subdues my heart as it should die. A faint farewell ...
— Elizabethan Sonnet Cycles - Phillis - Licia • Thomas Lodge and Giles Fletcher

... leave her, Hastily thrusting books aside; Still the hurrying weeks bereave her, Filling her heart with joy and pride; Only the thought of you can grieve her, You who have ...
— A Treasury of War Poetry - British and American Poems of the World War 1914-1917 • Edited, with Introduction and Notes, by George Herbert Clarke

... a heart of gold, And a deeper wealth of perfume, Than the tiny cup could hold; So the great wind roaring above Sent a tiny zephyr down, To drift aside the sheltering bloom, And bereave ...
— Landscape and Song • Various

... the wild request, when there appeared Her priest, who counsel gave in words like these: "It is not meet, O royal lady, that Thou shouldst this attitude defiant assume, When Bukka in a moment may bereave Us all of our dear, noble Timmaraj, And drive thee, too, to fling thy life away; And, if 'tis writ thou shouldst so die with him, Our sad entreaties and our tears will nought Avail, nor alter laws thus preordained. But haply, ...
— Tales of Ind - And Other Poems • T. Ramakrishna

... butchers, too, that bereave sheep of their little ones, that engage to sell you lambs fit for slaughter, and then give you lamb as old as two lambs, and pass off a tough old ram as a prime wether—if I spy that ram on a city thoroughfare, I'll make ram and owner ...
— Amphitryo, Asinaria, Aulularia, Bacchides, Captivi • Plautus Titus Maccius

... was changed. It was not his secret poniard that I dreaded. It was only the success of his efforts to make you a confederate in your own destruction, to make your will the instrument by which he might bereave you of liberty ...
— Wieland; or The Transformation - An American Tale • Charles Brockden Brown

... plead the great influence of these two fathers in the church, and the irreparable injury which would be sustained by their leaving it; and would have said, If we must part with some of our teachers, take Simeon, and Lucius, and Manaen, but bereave us not of our spiritual fathers. The question however was not left to their decision. The demand is stern and solemn from the Holy Spirit, with whom there is no selfish bias, "Separate me BARNABAS ...
— Thoughts on Missions • Sheldon Dibble

... instruments, [558] smote his [tablet of] sand, so he might learn where the lamp was, and found that it was in the palace and not with Alaeddin; [559] whereat he rejoiced with an exceeding joy and said, "Now it will be an easy matter for me to bereave this accursed of his life and I have a way to come at the lamp." Accordingly he went to a coppersmith and said to him, "Make me so many [560] lamps [561] and take of me their worth in full; [562] but I will have thee despatch them ...
— Alaeddin and the Enchanted Lamp • John Payne

... the world, for unto his courage it is too little: wherefore I advise you to keep well your marches and straits in the mountains; for certainly he is a lord to be doubted. Well, said Lucius, before Easter I suppose to pass the mountains, and so forth into France, and there bereave him his lands with Genoese and other mighty warriors of Tuscany and Lombardy. And I shall send for them all that be subjects and allied to the empire of Rome to come to mine aid. And forthwith sent old wise knights unto these countries following: first to Ambage and Arrage, to Alexandria, to India, ...
— Le Morte D'Arthur, Volume I (of II) - King Arthur and of his Noble Knights of the Round Table • Thomas Malory

... their power is then no greater than before that ever they meddled with their master. For where God begins justly to strike by his lawful lieutenants, it is not in the devil's power to defraud or bereave him of the office or effect of his powerful and revenging sceptre.' Thus I am safe; and I shall take care to go armed with a proper warrant, which I shall obtain from a magistrate, my honoured friend and singular good client, Master Roger Newell. This will obtain me such ...
— The Lancashire Witches - A Romance of Pendle Forest • William Harrison Ainsworth

... is not sown that shall make my collar. When the hangsman comes, 'tis time enough to wake; so, I pray thee, bereave not a poor man of the only solace the rich cannot purchase ...
— Traditions of Lancashire, Volume 1 (of 2) • John Roby

... treasures. Never shall I love that place or like that soil which shall cause the lack of it. Most gracious Lady, consider my long, true, and faithful heart toward you. Let not this unfortunate place here bereave me of that which, above all the world, I esteem there, which is your favodr and your presence. I see my service is not acceptable, but rather more and more disliketh you. Here I can do your Majesty no service; there I can do you some, at the least rub your horse's heels—a ...
— The Rise of the Dutch Republic, 1555-1566 • John Lothrop Motley

... mothers—ah! the mothers! They did not say, "Come home!" to their brave boys in the army; they were too proud for that—too faithful to the end. They did not summon them to come home; they only knelt down and prayed: "God, end this cruel war! Only give me back my boy! Do not bereave me of my child! The cause is lost—his blood not needed! God, pity me and ...
— Mohun, or, The Last Days of Lee • John Esten Cooke

... good spinster answered,—"You have never neglected him, Sara; to that I am ready to bear witness. If God has seemed to bereave you, it is because he sees it is best; meanwhile, take comfort in this: you have been tenderer than many mothers, and more patient than many sisters, to this dear little brother who loved you so well, so do not let self-reproach add ...
— Sara, a Princess • Fannie E. Newberry

... long arm, stretch forth one's hand. take from, take away from; disseize^; deduct &c 38; retrench &c (curtail) 201; dispossess, ease one of, snatch from one's grasp; tear from, tear away from, wrench from, wrest from, wring from; extort; deprive of, bereave; disinherit, cut off with a shilling. oust &c (eject) 297; divest; levy, distrain, confiscate; sequester, sequestrate; accroach^; usurp; despoil, strip, fleece, shear, displume^, impoverish, eat out of house and home; drain, drain to the dregs; ...
— Roget's Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases: Body • Roget

... are not aware, girl, that this scrupulousness of yours is likely to thwart the purposes of justice, and bereave your mistress of property to the amount of a thousand ...
— The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner • James Hogg

... the altars of prayer, take away our Bibles and our days of worship, shut up the doors against all our Sunday-schools and turn more than a million of children into the streets, away from sweet song and moralizing influences, and the pure morals of the gospel of Christ. This would bereave the living of his rule of life, and rob the dying of the ...
— The Christian Foundation, May, 1880

... treasons lurk. Solicit Henry with her wondrous praise: Bethink thee on her virtues that surmount, And natural graces that extinguish art; Repeat their semblance often on the seas, That, when thou comest to kneel at Henry's feet, Thou mayst bereave him of his ...
— King Henry VI, First Part • William Shakespeare [Aldus edition]

... again. These four knights had set their hearts upon me, and despite their great treasure, esteemed my love as richer than all their wealth. Alas, for the fair and valiant knight! Alas, for the loyal and generous man! By gifts such as these they sought to gain my favour, but how might lady bereave three of life, so as to cherish one. Even now I cannot tell for whom I have most pity, or who was closest to my mind. But three are dead, and one is sore stricken; neither is there anything in the world which can bring me comfort. ...
— French Mediaeval Romances from the Lays of Marie de France • Marie de France



Words linked to "Bereave" :   deprive, bereavement



Copyright © 2020 Free-Translator.com