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Ar   Listen
conjunction
Ar  conj.  Ere; before. (Obs.)






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Ar" Quotes from Famous Books



... A General works. Ae General encyclopedias. Ap General periodicals. Ar Reference works. As ...
— A Library Primer • John Cotton Dana

... than two syllables there is often a second accent given, but more slight than the principal one, and this is called the secondary accent; as, car'a-van'', rep''ar-tee', where the principal accent is marked (') and the secondary (''); so, also, this accent is obvious in nav''-i-ga'tion, com''pre-hen'sion, plau''si-bil'i-ty, etc. The whole subject, however, properly belongs ...
— McGuffey's Fifth Eclectic Reader • William Holmes McGuffey

... Miss Mabel comin' in here to sleep. 'Pears like some white folks hain't no idee of what 'longs to good manners. Here, Corind, put the jack in thar, the fish-line thar, the backy thar, and heave that ar other thrash out o'door," pointing to some geological specimens which from time to time John Jr. had gathered, and which his mother had not thought ...
— 'Lena Rivers • Mary J. Holmes

... dee-ar. Well, lots of poor women don't concentrate on the child either. They have far too much to do and worry about. They are 'seeing to' things up ...
— In the Wilderness • Robert Hichens

... ja'nt!" ejaculated old man Broyles, who was engaged in saddling his ancient one-eyed mare. "Ef I couldn't spit as fur as from here to the Edge I'd never chaw tobacker agin! Plain old fashioned laziness is what ails Doss Provine. I'd nacher'ly w'ar him out for this trick, Bonbright, ...
— Judith of the Cumberlands • Alice MacGowan

... that many men play the numbers 4, 11, 44 every day regularly, and this well-known "gig" only comes out about once a year, or say once in every 600 drawings. This is especially the negro's "gig." He watches for its coming day after day with fond anticipation. He would rather "ketch dat 'ar gig" for five dollars than receive a present ...
— Danger! A True History of a Great City's Wiles and Temptations • William Howe

... now almost forgotten, except as they were immortalized by being his enemies. Like Milton and Bacon, who put on record their knowledge that they had written for all time, Gluck had a magnificent consciousness of himself. "I have written," he says, "the music of my 'Ar-mida' in such a manner as to prevent its soon growing old." This is a sublime vanity inseparable from the great aggressive geniuses of the world, the wind of the speed which ...
— The Great German Composers • George T. Ferris

... Souf!" Aunt Chloe bristled, indignant. "Sho! Dat's no more lak de buttermilk we makes dan dat ar' hawse is lak de racers at Belle Mead. Cows got to have white clover, Marse Lanier, an' white clover don't grow in dis ...
— Lanier of the Cavalry - or, A Week's Arrest • Charles King

... times the narrative is silent as to the temper of Charlemagne when he lost his wager game to Guerin de Montglave, but Eastern annals, the historians of Timur, Gibbon and others tell us that the great potentates of the East, Al Walid, Harun Ar Rashid, Al Mamun and Tamerlane shewed no displeasure at being beaten, but rather appreciated and rewarded the skill of their opponents. They manifested, however, great indignation against those who played deceitfully or attempted to flatter by allowing themselves ...
— Chess History and Reminiscences • H. E. Bird

... together to destroy. Without further analysis the reader will be able to detect the relation which the abstractions corresponding to each letter bear to the defined application in the following words. Ak, to be sharp; Ank, to bend; Idh, to kindle; Ar, to move; Al, to burn; Ka, to sharpen; Har, to burn; Ku, to hew; Sa, to produce; Gal, to be yellow or green; Ghar, to be yellow or green; Thak, to thaw; Tar, to go through; Thu, to swell; Dak, to bite; Nak, to perish; Pa, to nourish, to feed; Par, to ...
— AE in the Irish Theosophist • George William Russell

... es Elysion pedion kai peirata gaies athanatoi pempsousin, hothi xanthos Rhadamanthys, teper rheiste biote pelei anthropoisin; ou niphetos, out' ar cheimon polys oute pot' ombros, all' aiei Zephyroio ligy pneiontas aetas Okeanos aniesin anapsychein anthropous.] ...
— The Discovery of America Vol. 1 (of 2) - with some account of Ancient America and the Spanish Conquest • John Fiske

... fired. Soon the growing light disclosed our formidable numbers. Ahead of us there was a camp in the nullah itself. An old man just in the act of gathering fuel walked straight into us. He threw himself on his knees at my feet and lifted his hands with a biblical gesture of supplication crying out, 'Ar-rab, Ar-rab,' an effective, though probably unmerited, shibboleth. As he knelt his women at the other end of the camp were driving off the village flock. Here I remembered that I was alone with the guide of a column ...
— The Story of the Great War, Volume V (of 8) • Francis J. (Francis Joseph) Reynolds, Allen L. (Allen Leon)

... gentleman at the inn, gives the note of these revelations. It must be said that there was little in the appearance either of the town or of its population to suggest the possession of such treasures. Narbonne is a sale petite ville in all the force of the term, and my first impression on ar- riving there was an extreme regret that I had not remained for the night at the lovely Carcassonne. My journey from that delectable spot lasted a couple of hours, and was performed in darkness, - a darkness not so dense, however, ...
— A Little Tour in France • Henry James

... defaced in man, and he and his posteritie of nature become enimies to God, slaves to Sathan, and servandis unto sin.[114] In samekle that deith everlasting hes had and sall have power and dominioun over all that have not been, ar not, or sall not be, regenerate from above: quhilk regeneratioun is wrocht be the power of the Holie Gost, working in the hartes of the elect of God ane assured faith in the promise of God reveiled to us in His Word, be quhilk faith we apprehend Christ Jesus ...
— The Scottish Reformation - Its Epochs, Episodes, Leaders, and Distinctive Characteristics • Alexander F. Mitchell

... explanation, and still eyed the helpless sitter with suspicion. He had found a shed in which he had put up his horses, but he came back dripping and skeptical. "Thar ain't nobody but him within ten mile of the shanty, and that ar d—d ...
— The Luck of Roaring Camp and Other Tales • Bret Harte

... "Sure! The Japs. Ar' ye that blind? Don't ye know all the time the three rascals we well-nigh killed was Japs? Can't ye see 'ow they don't want the h'Americans or th' Roosians to git t' the treasure of this peninsula? Can't ye see 'ow bloomin' easy h'it'd be for 'em ...
— Lost In The Air • Roy J. Snell

... parts ar'n't to be compared with them at London—eh, sir?" quoth Titmouse, approaching closer to Mr. Aubrey and his groom, to see what the latter was doing—who, on hearing Titmouse's last sally, gave him ...
— Ten Thousand a-Year. Volume 1. • Samuel Warren

... objections to diacritical marks, but my serious objection to them is that they ar ...
— The Unpopular Review, Volume II Number 3 • Various

... "Them fits fine," said she, showing her legs amply. I was not excited about it, and was going. "Ain't you never going to ha me agin?" said she. "I've no money." "We are old friends, never mind money, if I hadn't got you Martha we moight ha been good friends still,—ar wish a hadn't." "You did it to save us," said I. "Ah, but yer shouldn't leave old friends, and I ha watched and made yer both comfortable." Well, thought I, this is an invitation to fucking,—she had a wonderful slip in her ...
— My Secret Life, Volumes I. to III. - 1888 Edition • Anonymous

... the tinker, with a prolonged rattle in that said Ar-r, which was not without great significance. "But you sees the real gentleman, who han't got his bread to get, can hafford to 'spise his c'racter in the world. A poor tinker must be timbersome and nice in his 'sociations. But sit ...
— My Novel, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... a new voice to us, loud and clear, and the song, consisting of three clauses, sounded like "Whit-e-ar! Whit-e-ar! Whit-e-ar!" then a pause, and the same repeated, and so on indefinitely. It came nearer and still nearer, and in a moment we saw the bird, a tiny creature, red-brown on the back, light below—the image of the little ...
— A Bird-Lover in the West • Olive Thorne Miller

... Anthropologist BAE: Bureau of American Ethnology SI-MC: Smithsonian Institution, Miscellaneous Collections UC: University of California Publications UC-AR: Anthropological Records UC-PAAE: American ...
— Washo Religion • James F. Downs

... indistinct. For a day or two before, shocks were felt here and there in Andalusia, but so weak were they that they passed almost unperceived. During the night of December 24-25, one slight shock was noticed at Colmear (Fig. 19) and another at Zafarraya. On the 25th, a faint movement of the ground was noticed at Malaga, and a few weak tremors at Periana; and shortly after came the great shock at about 8.50 P.M. mean time of Malaga, or about 9.8 P.M. ...
— A Study of Recent Earthquakes • Charles Davison

... ar bricks. I heated 'em for you, and forgot 'em till you was gone; take 'em honey; you's got more than a mile to go, and I knows ...
— A Child's Anti-Slavery Book - Containing a Few Words About American Slave Children and Stories - of Slave-Life. • Various

... Aunt Hominy, "didn't Miss Vessy hole dat ar' hat one time, an' pin a white rose in it? Didn't he, dat drefful Meshach Milbun, offer Miss Vessy a gole dollar, an' she wouldn' have none of his gole? Dat she did! Virgie, you go git dat hat, chile! Poke it off de rack wid my pot-hook heah. 'Twon't hurt you, gal! I'll sprinkle ye fust wid camomile ...
— The Entailed Hat - Or, Patty Cannon's Times • George Alfred Townsend

... chair war ter be steadied by a guy-rope from—say—from that thar old pine tree over thar," Kennedy insisted, indicating the long bole of a partially uprooted and inverted tree on the steeps. "The chair would swing cl'ar of ...
— The Christmas Miracle - 1911 • Charles Egbert Craddock (AKA Mary Noailles Murfree)

... [cnoen] Canon; regla, ley, estatuto; lo que se paga en reconocimiento del dominio directo de algun terreno. Kanon aklat ng kapakanan ng mga Banal na Kasulatan; tuntunin, kautusan; ang pinaka bayad sa pagkilala ng talagang pagka may-ar ng ...
— Dictionary English-Spanish-Tagalog • Sofronio G. Calderon

... Semites gave the first place to the Sun, and not, like the Shumiro-Accads, to the Moon, possibly from a feeling akin to terror, experiencing as they did his destructive power, in the frequent droughts and consuming heat of the desert.[AR] ...
— Chaldea - From the Earliest Times to the Rise of Assyria • Znade A. Ragozin

... p'int o' rememberin' what it was I was fergittin'. I don't make no doubt, ef Kit an' me er Bill an' me could only meet an' drink along day er so hit'd all come plain to me. But all by myself, an' sober, an' not sociable with Dang Yore Eyes jest now, I sw'ar, I kain't think o' nothin'. What's a girl's mind fer ef hit hain't to ...
— The Covered Wagon • Emerson Hough

... "Then you ar the last person who should show yourself there, since there are sure to be strict charges against admitting you, and you would only put the garrison on the alert. You had better let the reconnoitring party consist ...
— Love and Life • Charlotte M. Yonge

... dived from the skiff my head encountered a solid something which made me see a thousand flashes av lightning in one second. I was so stunned that I had only instinct—I belave ye call it that—to throw my ar-rum around the murthering object and hold like death. Ye know, judge, how drownin' men will hold to straws. That straw, yer Honor, was the spar of a vessel movin' through the water. It was, I found out afterward, one of the pieces which had wedged ...
— Bohemian Days - Three American Tales • Geo. Alfred Townsend

... of there, you young cubs!" suddenly roared a voice, whose owner they could not see. "I'll l'arn ye to interfere with other folks' business. I'll give yer five minutes to shake ther dust of this hy'ar mounting off yer feet. If any of ye is here then, it'll be the worse for ye. This claim belongs to Ab Durkin. ...
— The Pony Rider Boys in the Rockies • Frank Gee Patchin

... The Brihad Ar. Up. knows of samsara and karma but as matters of deep philosophy and not for the vulgar: but in the Buddhist Pitakas they are assumed as universally accepted. The doctrine must therefore have ...
— Hinduism and Buddhism, Vol I. (of 3) - An Historical Sketch • Charles Eliot

... also at this time a young woman who luvs him dearer than life, and who is, of course, related to the gov'ment; and just as the gov'ment goes agin him she goes for him. This is nat'ral, but not grateful. She sez, "And can it be so? Ar, tell me it is not so thusly as this thusness wouldst seem!" or words ...
— The Complete Works of Artemus Ward, Part 7 • Charles Farrar Browne

... to be hung!" came from Columbus Washington. "Da aint no sodgers, no matter if da do w'ar a uniform." ...
— Young Captain Jack - The Son of a Soldier • Horatio Alger and Arthur M. Winfield

... desolate scene it looked as I surveyed it from a projecting spur upon whose summit I rested my blown horse. I was now far in advance of the party who occupied a parallel ridge behind me. By signs they intimated that our course now lay to the north; in fact, Daniel had steered very much too ar south, and we had struck the Saskatchewan river a long, distance below the intended place of crossing. Away we went again to the north, soon losing sight of the party; but as I kept the river on my left far below in the valley I knew they ...
— The Great Lone Land - A Narrative of Travel and Adventure in the North-West of America • W. F. Butler

... me," said Sut, making a rather sudden turn in the conversation. "Me and him have had some tough scrimmages years ago, as I was tellin' that ar Barnwell, or Big Fowl, rather, that has had the charge of starting the place called New Boston. I've got 'nough scars to remember him by, and he carries a few that he got from me. I have a style of sliding his warriors under, when I run a-foul of 'em, ...
— The Cave in the Mountain • Lieut. R. H. Jayne

... own oracle. Apollyon, his tragedies popular. Appian, an Alexandrian, not equal to Shakespeare as an orator. Applause, popular, the summum bonum. Ararat, ignorance of foreign tongues is an. Arcadian background. Ar c'houskezik, an evil spirit. Ardennes, Wild Boar of, an ancestor of Rev. Mr. Wilbur. Aristocracy, British, their natural sympathies. Aristophanes. Arms, profession of, once esteemed, especially that of gentlemen. Arnold. Ashland. Astor, Jacob, a rich man. ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of James Russell Lowell • James Lowell

... "That ar awkward," said the pork-dealer. "Ain't we nohow able to get up a set? Come, Mr Chorley—I believe that's your name, sir?" (This was addressed to the gentleman who had risen.) "You ain't a-goin' to desart us that away? We can't make up a ...
— The Quadroon - Adventures in the Far West • Mayne Reid

... Kentuck, I'll say it, and stand to it, thar's not a better lad to be found than Tom Bruce, if you hunt the district all over. You'd scarce believe it, mom," he continued, addressing Edith herself, "but the young brute did actually take the scalp of a full-grown Shawnee before he war fourteen y'ar old, and that in fa'r fight, whar thar war none to help him. The way of it war this: Tom war out in the range, looking for a neighbour's horse; when what should he see but two great big Shawnees astride of the identicular beast he war hunting! Away went Tom, and away went ...
— Nick of the Woods • Robert M. Bird

... never press thee hard, Ne'er may disease thy steps attend: Listen, ye gents; rude Boreas hold your tongue! The pomp advances, and my lyre is strung. First comes Marshal Thackeray, Dress'd out in crack array; Ar'nt he a whacker, eh? His way he picks, Follow'd by six, Like a ...
— The English Spy • Bernard Blackmantle

... between this and Daverill's removal, words came from him which may bring the story home or explain it if events have not done so already. "The old * * * has got his allowance. He won't ask for no more. Who was he, to be meddling? You was old enough in all conscience, July-ar!" His pronunciation of her name has a hint of a sneer in it—a sneer at the woman he victimised, some time in the interval between his desertion of his wife and his final error of judgment—dabbling in burglary. She might have been spared insult; for whatever her other faults were, want of ...
— When Ghost Meets Ghost • William Frend De Morgan

... have high-stukes till I produce a grand pianny. Mary's after a dimint neclas, and my beluvid spous Eliza (that's the carut-heded one lives down by the rivver) will put sumthin' in my food if she don't git a gol watch and chane. Tomlinson's fust three ar rasin' Ned fur new housis, hors and kerige, and the like. The new ones is more amable, but yellin' fur close and truck. Uncle Peter Haskins' latest is on the warpath fur a seleskin sak, and so on and so forth. You know ...
— Mr. Scraggs • Henry Wallace Phillips

... the while, swinging his unfinished basket to and fro for a cradle. He was too stiff in the joints for dancing nowadays, but he still sang the "bloomin' gy-ar-ding" when ever they asked him, particularly if some apple-cheeked little maid would say, "Please, Tom!" He always laughed then, and, patting the child's hand, said, "Pooty gal,—got eyes!" The youngsters dance with glee at this meaningless phrase, ...
— The Village Watch-Tower • (AKA Kate Douglas Riggs) Kate Douglas Wiggin

... know whar to go an' what ter do, an' den come Dr. Peters and Mr. Allen frum Arkansas to git han's to go out dar an' work fer dem. My Pa took his family and we stayed two years. It took us might nigh ar whole week to git dar, we went part way on de train and den rid de steam boat up de Mississippi River ter de landin'. We worked in the cotton field out dar and done all kinds er work on de farm, but us didn't like an' Dr. Peters ...
— Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves: Volume IV, Georgia Narratives, Part 1 • Works Projects Administration

... "That ar' young lady's not to have no care, nohow, took of her, a'n't she? She's to be lef' there a-sufferin' all alone that-a-way, is she? I guess so too! Hnh! Now I'se gwine to nuss her, and I don't keer if you don't know nothin' about culining, you must get yer own dinnas and breakwusses and suppas. ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 1, No. 5, March, 1858 • Various

... angyr, na the wretchyt dome That is couplyt to foule thyrldome. Bot gyff he had assayit it, Than all perquer he suld it wyt; And suld think fredome mar to prise Than all the gold in warld that is. Thus contrar thingis evirmar Discoweryngis off the tothir ar. ...
— Book of English Verse • Bulchevy

... wouldn't frow herseff away in dat ar way," said Sally. "She's good lookin' 'nough to git a house-servant, and not hab to ...
— Clotelle - The Colored Heroine • William Wells Brown

... almyght.' With that thay kryde alle 'nowelle!' Os[AP] heighe as thay myght yelle. He rode vpon a browne stede, Of blak damaske was his wede. A peytrelle[AQ] of golde fulle bryght Aboute his necke hynge[AR] doun right, And a pendaunte behynd him dide[AS] honge Vnto the erthe, it was so longe, And thay that neuer before hym dide[AT] see, Thay knew by chere[u] wiche was he. To the mynster dide he fare, And of his horse he lighte there. His chapelle[AU] mette ...
— A Bibliographical, Antiquarian and Picturesque Tour in France and Germany, Volume One • Thomas Frognall Dibdin

... Common Council determined (4 Nov.) to put a stop to these extortionate demands, and resolved that, "As touchyng the Requeste made by my lorde cardynalles grace for appreste or aloone of more money to the kynges grace, they can in no wise agre thereto, but they ar and wilbe well contendid to be examyned uppon their othes yf it shall please his grace so to do."(1113) The stand thus made by the citizens against illegal exactions gave courage to others. The king's commissioners were forcibly driven out of Kent, and ...
— London and the Kingdom - Volume I • Reginald R. Sharpe

... And the R, by carrying the tip of the tongue to the top of the palate, so that being grazed by the air that comes out with force, it yields to it and comes back always to the same place, making a kind of trill: R. AR. ...
— The Middle Class Gentleman - (Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme) • Moliere

... her drink wine or strong drink, nor eat any unclean thing." The sin offering, which consisted of a kid, called in Hebrew, Sa'ir, corresponded to the admonition given to Samson's mother, not to shave his hair, in Hebrew Se'ar. The two oxen corresponded to the two pillars of which Samson took hold to demolish the house of the Philistines; whereas the three kinds of small cattle that were presented as offerings symbolized the three battles that Samson undertook against ...
— THE LEGENDS OF THE JEWS VOLUME III BIBLE TIMES AND CHARACTERS - FROM THE EXODUS TO THE DEATH OF MOSES • BY LOUIS GINZBERG

... Wishes me to inform you she will be glad if you will let hir know if you think of coming To hir House thiss month or Next as she cannot have you in September on a kount of the Hoping If you ar coming she thinkes she had batter Go to London on the Day you com to hir House she says you shall have everry Thing raddy for you at hir House and Mrs. Newton to meet you and stay with you ...
— The Humour of Homer and Other Essays • Samuel Butler

... creepin' to th' winder to harken, when a chap 'at knew him happened to pass. He knew how jaylus Jim war, soa he thowt he'd have a lark. "Halla, Jim!" he said, "coom here; aw've summat to tell thee. Tha munnot goa in yor haase just nah, for tha ar'nt wanted." ...
— Yorkshire Ditties, Second Series - To which is added The Cream of Wit and Humour - from his Popular Writings • John Hartley

... Paterson (as proved to be his name) was at once our friend. We often found him waiting for us at the Story-seat, and the great stout fellow laughed and wept over our tales like a three-year-old. Often he said with extraordinary pride, "You are telling the story to me quite as much as to David, ar'n't you?" He was of an innocence such as you shall seldom encounter, and believed stories at which even David blinked. Often he looked at me in quick alarm if David said that of course these things did not really happen, and unable to resist that appeal ...
— The Little White Bird - or Adventures In Kensington Gardens • J. M. Barrie

... arch in manner. Hagaln, who is a talented narrator, frequently succeeds in catching the living speech and characteristic mode of expression of his characters. The Fox Skin (Tfuskinni) first appeared in 1923, in one of his collections of short stories (Strandbar).—He has also been successful as a recorder and editor of the biographies of greatly different people, based on first-hand accounts of their own lives. He is at present continuing with the writing of his ...
— Seven Icelandic Short Stories • Various

... he's dead—died aboard ship; but that may not be true. Them sort of ruffians generally live to a great age. Someone may have put him out, or rather done him in. There were two or three chaps what I've heard talkin' terrible bitter agin him; and one fine young man, Ar Bo, who is back from the Andamans—where he got sent to for three year, on account of this cocaine business—told me that he met a lot of clever fellows from all parts of the world; up to every dodge they were, ...
— The Road to Mandalay - A Tale of Burma • B. M. Croker

... under Laudonniere (lo-do-ne-ar'), landed at the St. Johns River in Florida, and built a fort called Fort Caroline in honor of Charles IX. of France. But the King of Spain, hearing that the French were trespassing, sent an expedition under Menendez (ma-nen'-deth), who founded ...
— A School History of the United States • John Bach McMaster

... Areola (ar-e'o-lah). The colored circle round the nipple or round a pustule. A minute space or interstice in ...
— Mother's Remedies - Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remedies from Mothers - of the United States and Canada • T. J. Ritter

... qu'ar. The Duke promised he would write me two waaks ago from his castle and return the five pounds I loaned him. Ye can't ...
— The Launch Boys' Adventures in Northern Waters • Edward S. Ellis

... conquest; such an account as we possess of the siege of Rhodes by Soliman II., (Memoires de l'Academie des Inscriptions, tom. xxvi. p. 723—769.) I must therefore depend on the Greeks, whose prejudices, in some degree, are subdued by their distress. Our standard texts ar those of Ducas, (c. 34—42,) Phranza, (l. iii. c. 7—20,) Chalcondyles, (l. viii. p. 201—214,) and Leonardus Chiensis, (Historia C. P. a Turco expugnatae. Norimberghae, 1544, in 4to., 20 leaves.) The last of these narratives is the earliest in date, since it was composed ...
— The History of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire - Volume 6 • Edward Gibbon

... soliloquized Mike—"The divil burn ye, for a guessing yankee as ye ar'—how am I to follow with such legs as the likes of these? If it wasn't for the masther and the missus, ra'al jontlemen and ladies they be, I'd turn my back on ye, in the desert, and let ye find that Beaver estate, in yer own ...
— Wyandotte • James Fenimore Cooper

... it? Well tha con goa an fotch Slinger aght o' th' pigcoit (for aw reckon he's thear yet), but ha mich better ar ta, at sits thear suppin' it? But whether aw'm as gooid as aw should be or net, aw'm sure tha'rt a gooid-for-nowt, an th' sooiner tha taks thi hook aght o' this haase an' th' better, for aw've studden thy nonsense woll aw'm ...
— Yorksher Puddin' - A Collection of the Most Popular Dialect Stories from the - Pen of John Hartley • John Hartley

... remarked Mr. Gidge, as he disengaged himself from Cabot's impulsive embrace and stepped back for a more comprehensive view. "Your voice sounds familiar, Mister, but I can't say as I ever seen you before. I took ye fust off fer a b'ar, and then fer a Huskie. When I seen you was white, I 'lowed ye might be one of the 'Marmaid's' crew, seeing as she was heading fer the pack 'bout the time we struck it. Now, though, as I say, I'm jiggered ef I know ...
— Under the Great Bear • Kirk Munroe

... made in safety. The party ar rived at the base at last, the boys shouting joyously as they saw Tad waving a torch at them. At least they ...
— The Pony Rider Boys in the Grand Canyon - The Mystery of Bright Angel Gulch • Frank Gee Patchin

... Daedale, dixit, Materiam, qua sis ingeniosus, habes. Possidet en terras, et possidet aequara, Minos: Nec tellus nostrae, nec patet undo fugae. Restat iter coelo: tentabimus ire. Da veniam caepto, Jupiter alte, meo. OVID. Ar. Am. Lib. ii. 33. ...
— The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL.D, In Nine Volumes - Volume the Third: The Rambler, Vol. II • Samuel Johnson

... (baladiyat, singular—baladiyah); Al Hadd, Al Manamah, Al Mintaqah al Gharbiyah, Al Mintaqah al Wusta, Al Mintaqah ash Shamaliyah, Al Muharraq, Ar Rifa wa al Mintaqah al Janubiyah, Jidd Hafs, Madinat Hamad, Madinat Isa, ...
— The 1991 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency.

... exclaimed. "I take off my hat to Theodore Watling, always did." He became contemplative. "It can be done, Mr. Paret, but it's going to take some careful driving, sir, some reaching out and flicking 'em when they r'ar and buck. Paul Varney's never been stumped yet. Just as soon as this is introduced we'll have Gates and Armstrong down here—they're the Ribblevale attorneys, aren't they? I thought so,—and the best legal talent they can hire. And they'll round up all the disgruntled fellows, you know,—that ...
— The Crossing • Winston Churchill

... "We don't know her very well, and she dresses so fine and is kind of citified, you know. Ar'n't you ...
— Miss Elliot's Girls • Mrs Mary Spring Corning

... forward on his deck chair, and gazing earnestly into my eyes, 'there's wan question I'd like to ask ye. The ambition of me life is to get into Parlimint. And I want to know from ye, as a frind—if I accomplish me heart's wish—is there annything, in me apparence, ar in me voice, ar in me accent, ar in me manner, that would lade annybody to ...
— Miss Cayley's Adventures • Grant Allen

... King Childebert (580); it started in the region of Auvergne, which was inundated by a great flood; he also describes a similar epidemic in Touraine in 582. Rhazes, or as the Arabs call him, Abu Beer Mohammed Ibn Zacariya Ar-Razi, in the latter part of the ninth century wrote a most celebrated work on small-pox and measles, which is the earliest accurate description of these diseases, although Rhazes himself mentions several writers who had previously described them, and who had formulated rules for their ...
— Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine • George M. Gould

... it oughter," said Candace, bridling herself with proud consciousness; "ef it don't, 'ta'n't 'cause ole Candace ha'n't put enough into it. I tell ye, I didn't do nothin' all day yisterday but jes' make dat ar cake. Cato, when he got up, he begun to talk someh'n' 'bout his shirt-buttons, an' I jes' shet him right up. Says I, 'Cato, when I's r'ally got cake to make for a great 'casion, I wants my mind jest as quiet ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 4, No. 25, November, 1859 • Various

... the guard, 'while ar coot treaces. Hang on tiv'em sumhoo. Well deane, my lod. That's it. Let'em goa noo. Dang 'em, they'll ...
— The Life And Adventures Of Nicholas Nickleby • Charles Dickens

... a weak, plaintive voice, although husky from the phlegm which was fast coagulating in her throat—"Mother, I already have ceased to be of this world; I am dying, dearest mother, fast dying; and oh, thou All—good and AR—merciful Being, against whom I have fearfully sinned, would that the last struggle were now o'er, and that my weary spirit were released, and my shame hidden in the silent tomb, and my sufferings and very name forgotten!" She paused and gasped for breath; I thought it was all over with her; ...
— Tom Cringle's Log • Michael Scott

... you see a gate hin the fence as you're a-kerryin' hon yer right shoulder. Gate's sebm mile f'm 'ere. Nalrookar track goes through that gate; b't neb' you mind; you keep straight ahead pas' the gate, hon a pad you'll 'ar'ly see; han jist hat the fur hend o' the pine-ridge you'll strike hanuther gate; an' you mus' be very p'tic'lar shettin' 'er. Then take a hangle o' fo'ty-five, with the pine-ridge hon yer back; an' hin fo' mile you'll strike yer las' gate—'ere, hin the co'ner. Take ...
— Such is Life • Joseph Furphy

... either nothing shall seme strange at all, or if anie thing do seme, yet it shall not seme so strange, but that either the self same, or the verie like vnto it, or the more strange then it is, shal appear to be in, those things, which ar more familiar vnto vs for extraordinarie learning, then required of vs for our ordinarie vse. And forasmuch as the eie will help manie to write right by a sene president, which either cannot vnderstand, or cannot entend to vnderstand the reason of a rule, therefor in the end of this treatis ...
— Early English Meals and Manners • Various

... thy bidding bowed, 50 From my mansion in the cloud, Which the breath of Twilight builds, And the Summer's sunset gilds With the azure and vermilion, Which is mixed for my pavilion;[ar] Though thy quest may be forbidden, On a star-beam I have ridden, To thine adjuration bowed: Mortal—be thy ...
— The Works of Lord Byron, Volume 4 • Lord Byron

... which we found verry good, our Bacon which was given us by we examined and found Sound and good Some of that purchased in the Illinois Spoiled, a relish of this old bacon this morning was verry agreeable, Deer to be Seen in every direction and their tracks ar as plenty as Hogs about a farm, our hunts. Killed 9 Deer to day the land below the last river is good, that above, between the two rivers which is near together is Slaik'y and bad on the N. Side, the other Side is good land, ...
— The Journals of Lewis and Clark • Meriwether Lewis et al

... Deacon Tubman. "Oh, yes, and they are all well enough for the old folks, but they ar'n't the kind of biscuit the young folks like—too heavy in the centre, and over-hard in the crust for young ...
— The Busted Ex-Texan and Other Stories • W. H. H. Murray

... form of the name is As-Ar, ; the first sign, , is a throne, and the second, , is an eye, but the exact meaning represented by the two signs is not known. In late times a sceptre, took the place of the throne, but ...
— Legends Of The Gods - The Egyptian Texts, edited with Translations • E. A. Wallis Budge

... minister. 'I be goin' to rassle with Satan for the soul o' that 'ar man, an' if you keep watch I reckon you'll see 'at the ground'll be scratched up some ...
— A Man for the Ages - A Story of the Builders of Democracy • Irving Bacheller

... ar road goes to Newmarket, where these Yanks are ordered, but we've lost it and we shall come out in about an hour and a half at the junction, whar th' train ...
— The Iron Game - A Tale of the War • Henry Francis Keenan

... exclaimed, as they took their places, "dar, cap'en, jes tas dem ar trout, to begin on, an see if you ever saw anythin to beat 'em in all your born days. Den try de stew, den de meat pie, den de calf's head; but dat ar pie down dar mustn't be touched, nor eben so much as looked at, till de ...
— Lost in the Fog • James De Mille

... "If that ar ain't Cap. Bowen's knife over to Bruceville, he hes the mate to it! His'n is the only knife I ever see with ...
— Far Past the Frontier • James A. Braden

... peices uv clorf to make doll cloes, and a bu-te-ful gold ring, and a lockit with her pas hare in it, and a big box full uv all kinds uv candy and nuts and razens and ornges and things, and a little git-ar to play chunes on, and two little tubs and some little iuns to wash her doll cloes with; then she bort a little wheelbarrer, and put all the things in it, and started fur home. When she was going a long, presently she herd sumbody cryin and jes a sobbin himself ...
— Diddie, Dumps, and Tot • Louise-Clarke Pyrnelle

... the woman, "what a pup that ar is! Yer, you young uns! Put back into the house, and hide under the bed, or he'll eat ye up like ye was so ...
— The Young Surveyor; - or Jack on the Prairies • J. T. Trowbridge

... the name of God" is part of the formula employed by pious Muslims in their acts of worship, and on entering upon any enterprise of danger or uncertainty—bi'smi'llahi ar-rahman ar-rahimi, "In the name of God, the Merciful, the Compassionate!" These words are usually placed at the beginning of Muhammedan books, secular as well as religions; and they form part of the Muslim Confession of Faith, ...
— Flowers from a Persian Garden and Other Papers • W. A. Clouston

... a pow'ful monstrous tree trunk right across de road at a place whar yo' cain't see it till yo' gits right on top ob it. Ef yo' done hit dat ar tree on yo' lickity-split machine, yo' suah would land in kingdom come. Doan't go ...
— Tom Swift and his Motor-boat - or, The Rivals of Lake Carlopa • Victor Appleton

... great house is; which side they leans to, Union or Confederate. And if you don't come down to my house this very night after dark with some news of some kind, I'll take these yer diamonds straight to the Missus and tell her where I got 'em. You know what I mean, so cl'ar yourself." ...
— Marcy The Blockade Runner • Harry Castlemon

... and Iuliet, written first in Italian by Bandell, and nowe in Englishe by Ar. Br. In dibus Richardi Tottelli. Cum Priuilegio. [Colophon] Imprinted at London in Flete strete within Temble [sic] barre, at the signe of the hand and starre, by Richard Tottill the .xix. day of Nouember. ...
— Catalogue of the Books Presented by Edward Capell to the Library of Trinity College in Cambridge • W. W. Greg

... elegies, which are characterised by an Anacreontic spirit, a cheerful, joyous tone, and even by a certain degree of inspiration. He wrote also Skolia, Hymns, and Epigrams, and was a pretty voluminous writer in prose (Pauly). Compare the Scholiast on Ar. ...
— On the Sublime • Longinus

... volcano of revenge seething within his soul. Some were stretched out drowsily upon the filthy floor, their natures apparently stupefied to the level of brutes. When Loo Loo was brought in, most of them were roused to look at her; and she heard them saying to each other, "By gum, dat ar an't no nigger!" "What fur dey fotch her here?" "She be white lady ob ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. II, No. 8, June 1858 • Various

... ride home for me. There was the skin of a monstrous Wolf, but no other hint of triumph. We buried the fearless one on a butte back of the Ranch-house. Penroof, as he stood by, was heard to grumble: "By jingo, that was grit—cl'ar grit! Ye can't raise ...
— Animal Heroes • Ernest Thompson Seton

... a few very common vowel changes. The sound er usually became ar, as in Barclay (Berkeley), Clark, Darby, Garrard (Gerard), Jarrold (Gerald), Harbord (Herbert), Jarvis (Gervase), Marchant, Sargent, etc., while Larned, our great-grandfathers' pronunciation of "learned," corresponds to Fr. Littri. Thus Parkins is the same name ...
— The Romance of Names • Ernest Weekley

... has most likely begun to marvel where them labor struggles comes buttin' in. We're within ropin' distance now. It's not made cl'ar, but, as I remarks prior, I allers felt like Huggins is the bug onder the chip when them printers gets hostile that time an' leaves the agency. Huggins ain't feeble enough mental to believe for a moment Boggs writes that piece. The fact that Boggs can't even ...
— Wolfville Days • Alfred Henry Lewis

... if it hadn't been for her he wouldn't be here. He'd have been teachin' singin' school yet—if he wasn't in jail. You can call him Po-or de-ar Mr. Phillips,' if you want to; I call him 'Old Eg.' And he is a bad egg, too, 'cordin' to my notion. Prob'ly that's why his wife and Judge Knowles hove him out ...
— Fair Harbor • Joseph Crosby Lincoln

... them ar suck-holes of waves deserves," was the grim answer. "When the high tide sweeps in thar, it kerries everything with it, and them caves guzzle it all down, nobody ...
— Killykinick • Mary T. Waggaman

... "Hee-ar! Help!" cried Dinny. And running in the direction of the sound, they came upon Dinny's boot-soles, and were just in time to save him from gliding into the little river, head first, the tuft of grass to which he was clinging having ...
— Off to the Wilds - Being the Adventures of Two Brothers • George Manville Fenn

... Jimmy mus' cl'ar up yo' litter here. Don't leave it on mammy's nice flo'. Hit's mighty nigh supper-time. Cl'ar ...
— Southern Lights and Shadows • Edited by William Dean Howells & Henry Mills Alden

... and Helen.]—The meeting of Menelaus and Helen after the taking of Troy was naturally one of the great moments in the heroic legend. The versions, roughly speaking, divide themselves into two. In one (Little Iliad, Ar. Lysistr. 155, Eur. Andromache 628) Menelaus is about to kill her, but as she bares her bosom to the sword, the sword falls from his hand. In the other (Stesichorus, Sack of Ilion (?)) Menelaus or some one else takes ...
— The Trojan women of Euripides • Euripides

... there ar'n't any whales," said Tom. "How long might they be, say the biggest you ...
— The Golden Magnet • George Manville Fenn

... where he was joined by a reinforcement from Bengal, the whole number not exceeding three hundred Europeans, and assembled a body of the natives, that he might have at least the appearance of an army. With these he proceeded to Koveripauk, about fifteen miles from Ar-cot, where he found the French and Indians, consisting of fifteen hundred sepoys, seventeen hundred horse, a body of natives, and one hundred and fifty Europeans, with eight pieces of cannon. Though ...
— The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.II. - From William and Mary to George II. • Tobias Smollett

... again to Chang-how and fixed her great black eyes on him in silence. Then she sounded a note of solemn warning: "Lord! Lord! Shang-hai!" said she, "ef ebber I does cotch you out an' out, ef ebber I does git a good square holt on you, I'll t'ar you all to pieces! Yo' mammy won't want what'll be left uv you, 'cos' 'twon't ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Volume 22. July, 1878. • Various

... grinned in the dim light, "Yis, sor, they're in their bunks wishin' to die. They've niver been in a blow before. It's say-sick they ar-re." ...
— The Cruise of the Dry Dock • T. S. Stribling

... him well enough; but I reckon our Marian do a leetle better. He tried to spark the gurl, an' made fine speeches to her; but she couldn't bar the sight o' him for all that. Ha! ha! ha. Don't ye recollex the trick that ar minx played on him? She unbuckled the girt o' his saddle, jest as he wur a-goin' to mount, and down he kim—saddle, bags, and all—cawollup to the airth! ha! ha! Arter he wur gone, I larfed till I wur like ...
— The Wild Huntress - Love in the Wilderness • Mayne Reid

... another look, but I can't make much out of her, except she's some kind of a nigger, anyhow. She's sittin' on the bench far away from the light, and she's dressed in a second-hand horse blanket, a feed sack, and a bran' new pair of ar'tics. And she don't say ...
— The Best Short Stories of 1921 and the Yearbook of the American Short Story • Various

... hall room, fourth floor back, who sat on the lowest step, trying to read a paper by the street lamp, turned over a page to follow up the article about the carpenters' strike. Mrs. Murphy shrieked to the moon: "Oh, ar-r-Mike, f'r Gawd's sake, where is me little bit ...
— The Four Million • O. Henry

... Visions is: 'The learned poete M. Francisce Petrarche, gentleman of Florence, did invent and write in Tuscan the six firste . . . . which because they serve wel to our purpose, I have out of the Brabants speache turned them into the English tongue;' and 'The other ten visions next ensuing ar described of one Ioachim du Bellay, gentleman of France, the whiche also, because they serve to our purpose I have translated them out of Dutch into English.' The fact of the Visions being subsequently ascribed to Spenser would not by itself carry much weight. ...
— A Biography of Edmund Spenser • John W. Hales

... "De-ar me!" her soft falsetto rose. "But that will be a very o-ald tune, Mr. Oleron! I will not have heard it this ...
— Widdershins • Oliver Onions

... [FN172] Arab. "Wa'ar" rocky, hilly, tree-less ground unfit for riding. I have noted that the three Heb. words "Year" (e.g. Kiryath-YearinCity of forest), "Choresh" (now Hirsh, a scrub), and "Pardes" ({Greek letters} a chase, a hunting-park opposed to , an orchard) are preserved in Arabic and are intelligible in Palestine. ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 6 • Richard F. Burton

... same class, were dealt with equally as severely under Mary Queen of Scots as they were under Henry VIII. and Elizabeth in England. In an act passed in 1579 I find the following relating to Gipsies and vagabonds:—"That sik as make themselves fules and ar bairdes, or uther sik like runners about, being apprehended, sall be put into the Kinge's Waird, or irones, sa lang as they have ony gudes of their owin to live on, and fra they have not quhair upon to live of thir owin that their eares be nayled to the trone or to an uther ...
— Gipsy Life - being an account of our Gipsies and their children • George Smith

... taken prisoner over there," the little soldier pursued, "but if I do, Uncle Ar—the corporal says that's the fortunes of war, and I must take it ...
— A Court of Inquiry • Grace S. Richmond

... received all the things, to the great content of the owners, who returne you many thankes. Thay ar indeed very well chose things of all sorts: and I give you many thanks for the troble you have had with them: I sent you Tomey's scurt and long slevs of his ould cott; I hope you have them. On Mr. Felden it seemes took it last Wadinsday, and sayd hee would deliver it him selfe. Wee dayly wish ...
— Selected English Letters (XV - XIX Centuries) • Various

... ar," an idiomatic phrase; "they overcame," an idiomatic phrase. Compare Annals of Ulster under years 1175, ...
— Heroic Romances of Ireland Volumes 1 and 2 Combined • A. H. Leahy

... AR'TE-RY. [Gr. aer, aer, air, and tereo, tereo, to keep; because the ancients thought that the arteries contained only air.] A tube through which blood ...
— A Treatise on Anatomy, Physiology, and Hygiene (Revised Edition) • Calvin Cutter

... munere felix. Pro nihilo ducens conjunx hc verbula prudens, His verbis plane quod ait vir monstrat inane: Rebus inops quidam . . . (bone vir, tibi dicam) Vas oleo plenum, longum quod retro per vum Legerat orando, loca per diversa vagando, Fune ligans ar(c)to, tecto[que] suspendit ab alto. Sic prstolatur tempus quo pluris ematur[atur] Qua locupletari se sperat et arte beari. Talia dum captat, hc stultus inania jactat: Ecce potens factus, fuero cum talia nactus, Vinciar ...
— Chips from a German Workshop - Volume IV - Essays chiefly on the Science of Language • Max Muller

... serious. "Now, Arthur, for heaven's sake," she said, "don't act like the aunts. That's what I've listened to all my life. Calm yourself, my de-ar. That's what I've run away from. I might as well have stayed with them if you're going to do it. It's wicked of you, Arthur, it really is, to scold me, when I came so far just to see you, and when you know ...
— The Second Chance • Nellie L. McClung

... Dew tell!" she exclaims. "I thought yew were in Pa-ar—is! Ma, would yew have concluded to find Lord Algy here? This is too lovely! If I'd known yew were coming I'd have stopped at home—yes, ...
— Thelma • Marie Corelli

... bhi seoladh stigh ri bhun, Chaidh slabhraidh a chuir a nuas; S roimh an t slabhraidh cha do ghabh-ar crith Ach chaidhearurra na m'ruith suas. S ...
— Memories of Canada and Scotland - Speeches and Verses • John Douglas Sutherland Campbell

... want to git up another b'ar fight," said he. "If I thought there was a ghost of a show to git them robbers for you boys, I'd stay and help you scout for them; but there ain't a show in the world. They've had a ...
— Gold • Stewart White

... continued the Captain. "In our line of life we ar'n't particular. It wouldn't take very dirty weather to make our Ensign look like a Black Flag. Piracy and Privateering—they both begin with a P. I thought you had something o' that sort on your mind, because you took it so ...
— The Strange Adventures of Captain Dangerous, Vol. 3 of 3 • George Augustus Sala

... the house and grounds in repair, and, after paying all expenses incidental to this duty, they were to divide, in fair proportions, the balance every three years among Antony's creditors. This arrangement gave perfect satisfaction, for, as Marmaduke Halcroft said, "If t' Whaleys ar'n't to be trusted, t' world might as well stand still, and let honest men ...
— The Hallam Succession • Amelia Edith Barr

... "B'ar!" shouted the three voices together. A huge bear, followed by its cubs, was seen stumbling awkwardly away to the right, making for the timber below. In an instant the boys had hurried into their jackets again, and the glory of fight was forgotten in the fever of the chase. ...
— Tales of Trail and Town • Bret Harte

... OAK.—The juice of the oak mixed with vitriol forms a black ink; the galls ar employed ...
— The Botanist's Companion, Vol. II • William Salisbury

... get mighty mad. Der never wuz a madder beas' dan he wuz des den. He rip, en he r'ar, en he cuss, en he swar, he snort, en ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 99., Dec. 20, 1890 • Various

... "That ar young Stetson ain't much like his dad," said one. "Young Jas has been a-darin' 'n' a-banterin' him, 'n' he won't take it up. They say he air turnin' out ...
— A Cumberland Vendetta • John Fox, Jr.

... only seed its hips. We were a-gwine too fast to get a good sight on the critter; but it wur a mustang—I seed that cl'ar ...
— The Rifle Rangers • Captain Mayne Reid

... look!—me ould fayther, wanst, waked me in the night sayin' as a gang o' burglars was downstairs lootin' the family silver. Well, lad, bein' but half awake I believed 'im, an' the goose flesh growed out on me ar-rms so that—'tis the truth I'm tellin' ye—I plucked enough for a parlor duster! But whin I got downstairs investigatin', the gang was no more'n a loose shutter flappin' in the wind. The burglars was just a noise—d'ye git me? No danger, but a noise—an' w'ot's a noise? Ye see, Jeb, ...
— Where the Souls of Men are Calling • Credo Harris

... Hall one ouel Pease of Painted Glass In Chakers of yoler & Green & blew 10 yong Hedge frougs Two Pikse of Armse on Each Side W.B. there was in this Rote on y' Glass Lyfford but there is only now ford y' 3 fust Leters ar Broken & Lost oute One Pecs of y' Painted Glass in y' frount Chamber window as foloweth In a Surkel 6 flours of Luse 6 Red Lyans Traveling 4 Rede Roses 2 Purpul Roses With a Croune a tope with 2 flours of Luse & A Crass and Beedse all Round ...
— Notes & Queries 1850.01.26 • Various

... school, he picked up a county newspaper containing two such specimens of provincial poetical talent as in those days might be read in the corner of any weekly journal. One piece was headed "Reflections of an Exile;" while the other was a trumpery parody on the Welsh ballad "Ar hyd y nos," referring to some local anecdote of an ostler whose nose had been bitten off by a filly. He looked them once through, and never gave them a thought for forty years, at the end of which time he repeated them ...
— Life and Letters of Lord Macaulay • George Otto Trevelyan

... dis is jist de truf; dem ar boys, dey ses to me dat ef I come foolin' around dere any more, dey'd jist chop me up, ole wrapper an' all, and haul me off fur kindlin' wood. Dey say I was dry enough. An' dey needn't a made sich a fuss about it, ...
— What Might Have Been Expected • Frank R. Stockton

... had aplenty," Tony had answered, readily enough; "an' now an' then a b'ar. Cats and coons c'n be run across any old time. Once in a long spell yuh see a painter. Turkeys lie on the sunny sides o' the swales an' ridges. Then in heaps o' places yuh c'n scare up flocks o' ...
— Chums in Dixie - or The Strange Cruise of a Motorboat • St. George Rathborne

... examples of incorporation and agglutination in the grammatical system of languages which are justly cited as models of an interior development by inflexion. In the grammatical system of the American tongues, for example in the Tamanac, tarecschi, I will carry, is equally composed of the radical ar (infin. jareri, to carry) and of the verb ecschi (Infin. nocschiri, to be). There hardly exists in the American languages a triple mode of aggregation, of which we cannot find a similar and analogous example in some other language that is supposed to develop itself only by inflexion.) an increase ...
— Equinoctial Regions of America • Alexander von Humboldt

... streets with Naomi by his side, he would be found in the thick of the throng perhaps at the heels of the mules and asses, with Naomi's hand locked in his hand, trying to push the great creatures of the crowd from before her, and crying in his brave little treble, "Arrah!" "Ar-rah!" "Ar-r-rah!" ...
— The Scapegoat • Hall Caine

... wasn't left to rot in the sun, as heaps and heaps on 'em is. Nobody knows you are here but Bab and me, and nobody must know if you want to git off with a whole hide. I could git a hundred dollars by givin' you up, but you don't s'pose Jack Jennin's is agwine to do that ar infernal trick? No, sir,' and he brought his brawny fist down upon his knee with a force which made me tremble, while I tried to express my thanks for his great kindness. He was a noble man, Helen, while Aunt Bab, the colored woman, who nursed me so tenderly, and whose ...
— Family Pride - Or, Purified by Suffering • Mary J. Holmes

... f'r thim that can't inj'ye thimsilves in anny other way. If ye're in good health, an ar-re atin' three squares a day, an' not ayether sad or very much in love with ye'er lot, but just lookin' on an' not carin' a rush, ye don't need ...
— More Toasts • Marion Dix Mosher

... that. Before him, [268] you know, there had been no theorising about the beautiful, its place in life, and the like; and as a matter of fact he is the earliest critic of the fine arts. He anticipates the modern notion that art as such has no end but its own perfection,—"art for art's sake." Ar' oun kai hekaste ton technon esti ti sympheron allo e hoti malista telean einai; We have seen again that not in theory only, by the large place he assigns to our experiences regarding visible beauty in the formation of his doctrine of ideas, but that in the practical sphere ...
— Plato and Platonism • Walter Horatio Pater

... is tretis dep{ar}tys is worde a nomb{ur} into 3 p{ar}tes. Some nomb{ur} is called digit{us} latine, adigit in englys. So{m}me nomb{ur} is called articul{us} latine. An Articul in englys. Some nomb{ur} is called a composyt in englys. Expone is v{er}se. know {o}u ...
— The Earliest Arithmetics in English • Anonymous

... brutes always complain of—ar'nt it, Jim?" observed another keeper, who had just entered. "Where be we ...
— Newton Forster - The Merchant Service • Captain Frederick Marryat

... scar. "I knows all 'bout that, but I don't like these goin's on, ez ef I wuz a nachel-bawn fool, en had ter bleve all folks sez. I've been taken in too often. When I wuz with the Johnnies they'd say ter me, 'Yankee Blank, see that ar critter? That's a elephant.' When I'd call it a elephant, they'd larf an' larf till I flattened out one feller's nose. I dunno nothin' 'bout elephants; but the critter they pinted at wuz a cow. Then ...
— Taken Alive • E. P. Roe

... official. "No!" Then, with a superhuman effort, as Emma McChesney stood up, her arms laden with Featherloom samples of rainbow hues, "PARE! Ar-r-r-rest!" ...
— Emma McChesney & Co. • Edna Ferber

... hine foot, honey, en' w'en de night time done come, you teck'n hide it unner a rock in de big road. W'en de devil goes a-cotin' at de full er de moon—en he been cotin' right stiddy roun' dese yer parts—he gwine tase dat ar frawg ...
— The Battle Ground • Ellen Glasgow

... He had once seen her at a silly sort of picnic where everybody was making a great deal of noise and playing rounders, and she had sat alone under a tree. And once, as he was walking along Princes Street on a cruel day when there was an easterly ha'ar blowing off the Firth, she had stepped towards him out of the drizzle, not seeing him but smiling sleepily. It was strange how he remembered all these things, for he had never ...
— The Judge • Rebecca West

... ar'n't Gibraltars"? I thought so; but immediately thereafter, in that other voice, out of that other self that revolved only in a long, ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 10, No. 58, August, 1862 • Various

... spede, & a thousand mine old acqueintance. xantippa. xan. As many agayn, my dere hert. Eulalia. me semets ye ar waren much faire now of late. Eula. Saye you so? gyue you me a mocke at the first dash. xan. Nay veryly but I take you so. Eula. Happely mi new gown maketh me to loke fayrer then I sholde doe. xan. Sothe you saye, I haue not sene ...
— A Merry Dialogue Declaringe the Properties of Shrowde Shrews and Honest Wives • Desiderius Erasmus

... light disclosed our formidable numbers. Ahead of us there was a camp in the nullah itself. An old man just in the act of gathering fuel walked straight into us. He threw himself on his knees at my feet and lifted his hands with a biblical gesture of supplication crying out, 'Ar-rab, Ar-rab,' an effective, though probably unmerited, shibboleth. As he knelt his women at the other end of the camp were driving off the village flock. Here I remembered that I was alone with the guide of a column in an event which ought to have been as historic as ...
— The Story of the Great War, Volume V (of 8) • Francis J. (Francis Joseph) Reynolds, Allen L. (Allen Leon)

... cl'ar from the start," cried Pop angrily, "thet I ain't a-goin' to be druv out? You-uns kin call me muley-headed or whatever you've a mind to. Sal's always stood by me, and by golly, I'm a-goin' to stand ...
— Miss Mink's Soldier and Other Stories • Alice Hegan Rice



Words linked to "Ar" :   air, Confederate States of America, America, south, Fort Smith, Little Rock, White River, Jonesboro, white, Ar Rimsal, noble gas, dixie, confederacy, Saint Francis River, argon, chemical element, the States, United States, Pine Bluff, Hot Springs, American state, Ouachita River, US, atomic number 18, U.S., Land of Opportunity, St. Francis, Dixieland



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