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contraction
Ain't  contract.  A contraction for are not and am not; also used for is not. (Colloq. or illiterate speech). See An't.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Ain't" Quotes from Famous Books



... moved my bed round to the other corner, so as I could see his window as I lay in it; and I have got myself into a habit of waking up at all hours and looking. Truth to say, I'm not easy: fire is sooner set alight than put out: and if there's the water-butt for me to drop into, there ain't water-butts for the ...
— The Channings • Mrs. Henry Wood

... the Captain, when he saw who was there. "Ain't you ashamed of yourselves to scare the old man that way?" and he joined the laugh that the children raised at his own expense,—enjoying it as much ...
— Cast Away in the Cold - An Old Man's Story of a Young Man's Adventures, as Related by Captain John Hardy, Mariner • Isaac I. Hayes

... When you think of a sweet thing like that dying and these Injun squaws living! I hope you'll watch her, DeWitt. If anything happens to her through you not watching her, I'll come back on you for it! I ain't got any rights except the rights that any living man has got to take care of any white thing like her. They get me hard when they're dainty like that. And she's ...
— The Heart of the Desert - Kut-Le of the Desert • Honore Willsie Morrow

... lots of them, ham sandwiches, together with spring water, ain't so bad, an' it's near noon," the girl observed, beginning to cut the loaf into meager slices with a practised hand. "I should've made them thicker, but ...
— Anything Once • Douglas Grant

... nowhere else. You been here now goin' on three months, and there ain't come a letter, nor nothin' by express, and no man, woman, or child has asked for you. Kinder queer, don't ...
— Felix O'Day • F. Hopkinson Smith

... you what I think—sweetmeats ain't good for such folks. You wait till afternoon, and you shall have a pail of nice broth and a bowl of arrowroot with wine and sugar in it; that'll hearten ...
— Melbourne House, Volume 1 • Susan Warner

... goal is a hack. For example, MacLISP had features for reading and printing Roman numerals, which were installed purely for hack value. See {display hack} for one method of computing hack value, but this cannot really be explained. As a great artist once said of jazz: "If you hafta ask, you ain't never goin' to ...
— THE JARGON FILE, VERSION 2.9.10

... mean. Lady C. ain't distangy exactly, but she is very good-natured." "O very," mamma said, who was herself one of the ...
— The History of Pendennis, Vol. 2 - His Fortunes and Misfortunes, His Friends and His Greatest Enemy • William Makepeace Thackeray

... rifle," said the old hunter, after a pause; "but I'm thinking you'll never stay here. You don't know what an Ingen's life is; it ain't fit for the like of you. No, there's not one of you, 'cept this boy," continued Malachi, putting his hand on John's head, "that's fit for the woods. Let him come to me. I'll make a hunter of him; won't ...
— The Settlers in Canada • Frederick Marryat

... said, fanning a tiny blaze among the shavings with his hat, which had been on his head until he remembered and removed it in deference to her presence. "But I ain't a very good neighbor, I guess; I never seem to have time to be sociable. It's lucky your horse fell close enough so yuh could walk in to camp; I've had that happen to me more than once, and it ain't never pleasant—but it's worse ...
— The Long Shadow • B. M. Bower

... for I wanted to tell you so badly Wilford has not forgotten me, as I used to think, and as I guess you thought, too, though you did not say so. He has written, and he is coming again, if I will let him; and, oh, Morris! I am so glad! Ain't you? Seeing you knew all about it, and never told Helen, I'll let you read ...
— Family Pride - Or, Purified by Suffering • Mary J. Holmes

... 'Starlight and he ain't in the same cell, you take your oath. I don't trust no man except him. I'll be off now, and if you'll take a fool's advice, though he is your father, you'll go too; we can ...
— Robbery Under Arms • Thomas Alexander Browne, AKA Rolf Boldrewood

... "It ain't me that's squabbling, it's Ern Merritt," growled the leader of the bullies, angrily. "If he don't want to go into this thing he needn't, but there's no use in doing ...
— The Hilltop Boys - A Story of School Life • Cyril Burleigh

... wid de church 'cause I wanted to go to Heben when I dies, and if folks lives right dey sho' is gwine to have a good restin' place in de next world. Yes Mam, I sho b'lieves in 'ligion, dat I does. Now, Miss, if you ain't got nothin' else to ax me, I'se gwine home and give dat ...
— Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves: Volume IV, Georgia Narratives, Part 1 • Works Projects Administration

... revolver held, swaying a little unsteadily, on Rhoda Gray. There was silence for a moment; then Gypsy Nan spoke again, evidently through dry lips, for she wet them again and again with her tongue: "Say, youse are de White Moll, ain't youse?" ...
— The White Moll • Frank L. Packard

... retorted George sharply. "You make me think of what Josh Billings said that 'it's a good deal better not to know so many things than it is to know so many things that ain't so!'" ...
— Go Ahead Boys and the Racing Motorboat • Ross Kay

... a-going! You need it bad enough. I know when a man's hard up. I know the signs. I've been as bad off as you; had to look all ways for five dollars; had to play second fiddle and say thanky. But what I offer you ain't a second fiddle. It's as good a chance as my own. Even divides. One half to you and one half to me. You know the people and I know the ropes. It's a fair bargain. ...
— Stories by American Authors (Volume 4) • Constance Fenimore Woolson

... that ain't no news. You can't scace'ly get folks excited by a yarn about a shark's bitin' a cripple—but if you was to give in a yarn about a cripple bitin' a shark—well, there'd be some point to that. If you told where somebody had got a dollar away from Eben, now, we'd call you ...
— The Tyranny of Weakness • Charles Neville Buck

... to take a sight of interest in this matter, miss. I think you can look five dollars out of most of the young chaps here. I'll go around with you, and see that each one comes down as he or she ought. If anybody ain't got what they'd like to give, I'll lend it to 'em, and collect it, too," he added, ...
— From Jest to Earnest • E. P. Roe

... consumption, he had a right to fall away," said Asaph. "If what you are drivin' at, Thomas, is that Marietta isn't a good housekeeper and hasn't the right sort of notions of feedin', look at me. I've lived with Marietta just about a year, and in that time I have gained forty-two pounds. Now, of course, I ain't unreasonable, and don't mean to say that you would gain forty-two pounds in a year, 'cause you ain't got the frame and bone to put it on; but it wouldn't surprise me a bit if you was to gain twenty, or even twenty-five, pounds in eighteen months, ...
— A Chosen Few - Short Stories • Frank R. Stockton

... know," said she, "that you will find me here when you come back. The fact of it is I don't know nothin'. But one thing's certain, if she's here I ain't, and if she's too high and mighty to take toll in her honeymoon, the captain'll have to do it himself, or let 'em pass ...
— The Captain's Toll-Gate • Frank R. Stockton

... Markets, includin Ancient Billingsgate, and the Fruit and Wegeral Markets; and then, just to fill up sum of their lezzur time, they are a going to erbolish the Thames Conserwaters, and manage the River theirselves; and then, as they think as them little trifles ain't quite enuff for 'em, they are a going to arsk to be aloud to take charge of all the Docks and Wharfs on the River! And then, as they will naterally want plenty of emusement after their ard work, they arsks to be aloud to take over the control of All ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 104, January 7, 1893 • Various

... took up their pints, and nodded at each other. Mr. Gibbs, toying idly with the handle of his, eyed them carefully. "Mind, I'm not promising anything," he said, slowly. "Understand, I ain't a-committing of myself ...
— Ship's Company, The Entire Collection • W.W. Jacobs

... lights, boy," commanded their captor. "Youall don't see no lights. They ain't no ...
— Boy Scouts in Southern Waters • G. Harvey Ralphson

... know their way, and we ain't lively to meet anything in the road. They will stop at their stable. At any rate, it's no use trying to steer them. Here, Rhoda dear, get up; are you very ...
— The Young Buglers • G.A. Henty

... wind—'Then,' says he, 'they've got a damned sound seaman on the Jordan, and so help me! him that's good enough to row my girl from open sea, gales poundin' and breakers showin' teeth across the bar to Maita Point, is good enough for use where seas is still and reefs ain't fashionable.'" ...
— The Judgment House • Gilbert Parker

... description. I had made the acquaintance of the express agent, a gentleman connected with the baggage department of the train, and during the journey he had taken me somewhat into his confidence on the matter of the lodging and entertainment which were to be found in the shanties. "The food ain't bad," he said, "but that there shanty of Tom's licks creation for bugs." This terse and forcibly expressed opinion made me select the interior of a wagon, and some fresh hay, as a place of rest, where, in spite of vast numbers of mosquitoes, I slept ...
— The Great Lone Land - A Narrative of Travel and Adventure in the North-West of America • W. F. Butler

... Irish too alretty!" came from Hans Mueller. "Chust ven ve dink der sthars vos shinin' it begins to rain; eh, ain't dot so?" ...
— The Rover Boys in Southern Waters - or The Deserted Steam Yacht • Arthur M. Winfield

... said Mr. Hackley deliberately, "there's me. When I'm a-feelin' myself, there ain't a cammer, a more genteel nor lor-abidin' citizen in Hunston. As for fussin' and fightin', I'd no more think of it than a dyin' inverlid in the orspitle. But only throw a few drinks under my belt like last night, and I'm a altogether ...
— Captivating Mary Carstairs • Henry Sydnor Harrison

... panting, and adjusting his string of a cravat, "I will, Tom; here, I ain't able, weigh it yourself—I'm not—indeed I'm not able," said he, breathless; "an' I was thinkin when you came in of sendin' afther her, bekase, when I heard of the sickness among them, that I mayn't sin, but I found my ...
— The Black Prophet: A Tale Of Irish Famine • William Carleton

... wukked fo' Marse Ned long atter de war. When Ah wuz mos' grown mah fam'ly moved ter Logansville. No, Ma'am, I ain't nebber been so free en happy es when I diden' hev ter worry 'bout whar de vittles en close gwine cum fum, en all Ah had ter do wuz wuk evvy day lak ...
— Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves - Georgia Narratives, Part 3 • Works Projects Administration

... burst of laughter). What nonsense. None of us Hagberds belonged to the sea. All farmers for hundreds of years, (fraternal and cunning?) Don't alarm yourself, my dear. The sea can't get us. Look at me! I didn't get drowned. Moreover, Harry ain't a sailor at all. And if he isn't a sailor, ...
— One Day More - A Play In One Act • Joseph Conrad

... was confronted by a negro, the biggest I ever saw in, my life. He looked me up and down for a moment, then opening his ebony features in a wide smile, he said, "Great snakes! why, here's a sailor man for sure! Guess thet's so, ain't it, Johnny?" I said "yes" very curtly, for I hardly liked his patronizing air; but he snapped me up short with "yes, SIR, when yew speak to me, yew blank lime-juicer. I'se de fourf mate ob dis yar ship, en my name's Mistah Jones, 'n yew, jest freeze on to dat ...
— The Cruise of the Cachalot - Round the World After Sperm Whales • Frank T. Bullen

... tripping of the light fantastic toe. My amazement reached its climax when, seeing me exchange signs of amicable familiarity with some one across the room, Mr. F. C—— said, "Who are you nodding and smiling to? Oh, your father. You are very fond of him, ain't you?" To my enthusiastic reply in the affirmative, he said, "Ah, yes; just so. I dare say you are." And then followed an expression of his filial disrespect for the highest personage in the realm, of such a robust significance ...
— Records of a Girlhood • Frances Anne Kemble

... t' gracious goodness!" Dinah exclaimed, "I suah will get thin ef dish yeah keeps up! I ain't set down a minute dis blessed day. My feet'll drop ...
— The Bobbsey Twins at School • Laura Lee Hope

... go 'bout three years back," Tom explained. "She got—shiftless and I been sort of batching it since. Clean, though, ain't it?" ...
— Flowing Gold • Rex Beach

... Clara is afeared herself. She won't go a step without a light. Ain't it true, Miss Clara, you're a little afeared too. ...
— The German Classics, v. 20 - Masterpieces of German Literature • Various

... now! that's vot I calls wery tidy vork! Bob and a tanner for seven doors ain't none so dusty, blow me! Summat better this 'ere than orkin' "'All the new and popilar songs of the day for a penny!" Vot miserable vork that vos to be sure! I vos allays a cryin' about the streets, "Here y' are—one 'undered and fifty on 'em pootily bound in ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 103, December 17, 1892 • Various

... over there? That's where the bears hole up in the winter. Network of caves, up there. King Solomon's the name the people that live here call it—but it's down on the map as Grizzly Peak. Ain't any grizzlies, though—black bear mostly. They're smaller and ...
— The Lookout Man • B. M. Bower

... suggested Little Stubbs, "that the skipper's opinion on that point will have to be found out first, Swinton, for it's of more importance than yours. You ain't ...
— The Crew of the Water Wagtail • R.M. Ballantyne

... There's another. Where'd I put that plug of Climax? Oh, I s'pose somebody swiped it. Gee, I never thought that Charlie... Glad I ain't out on the wire. This damn trench is dark—ouch! Damn it, Wait a minute.... Hell, I'm coming, I can't run in this equipment. What the hell's the ...
— "I was there" - with the Yanks in France. • C. LeRoy Baldridge

... matter was, and that he needn't fix up his peeking contrivances on my account,—anyhow she's a nice young woman as ever lived, and as industrious with that pen of hers as if she was at work with a sewing-machine,—and there ain't much difference, for that matter, between sewing on shirts and writing on stories,—one way you work with your foot, and the other way you work with your fingers, but I rather guess there's more headache in the stories than there is in the stitches, because you don't have to think quite ...
— The Poet at the Breakfast Table • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

... is, Strether—and it's a comfort to have you here at last to say it to; though I don't know, after all, that I've really waited; I've told it to people I've met in the cars—the fact is, such a country as this ain't my KIND of country anyway. There ain't a country I've seen over here that DOES seem my kind. Oh I don't say but what there are plenty of pretty places and remarkable old things; but the trouble is that I don't seem to feel anywhere in tune. That's one of the reasons why I suppose I've ...
— The Ambassadors • Henry James

... "I ain't going to touch her sheets, not for nobody!" Louisa proclaimed savagely. And by that single phrase, with its implications, she laid unconsciously bare the sordid baseness of her ageing heart; she exposed by her ...
— Hilda Lessways • Arnold Bennett

... justice of his cause. Suddenly he struck out a convincing line of argument, "Look at 'im, the bloomin' slacker—the pasty h'aristocrat. 'E didn't see no fightin'. Not 'im. But now the war's been won by poor blokes like meself, 'e ain't ashamed ter go ...
— The Kingdom Round the Corner - A Novel • Coningsby Dawson

... says I. "Twombley-Crane ain't a yachty person, at all. He's a punk sailor, to begin with. Besides, he's tried ownin' a yacht, and she almost rusted apart waitin' for him to use her. Nothing like ...
— Shorty McCabe on the Job • Sewell Ford

... won't! Won't do anything of the kind! We're your boys; ain't we, mother? You're not working ...
— Half a Century • Jane Grey Cannon Swisshelm

... "He ain't going to be back until just before night," the gypsy muttered. But she made no effort, at first, to ...
— Madge Morton's Secret • Amy D. V. Chalmers

... ain't tea, it's bullion!" Mrs. Terriberry's loud whisper was heard the length of the table as she tore the sugar bowl from his hand, but the warning came too late, for Mr. Rhodes already had sweetened ...
— The Lady Doc • Caroline Lockhart

... cried the tall man, holding the can aloft. "Bored it in five places!" He stood erect, facing the crowd. "I reckon that's some shootin'!" He now threw a glance of challenge and defiance about him. "I've got a hundred dollars to say that there ain't another man in this here ...
— The Two-Gun Man • Charles Alden Seltzer

... "Ain't no hotel here," answered the storekeeper. "Used to be one some years ago, but it didn't pay, so the feller that run it gave it up. But Mrs. Whittle serves lunch to travelers if ...
— Dave Porter At Bear Camp - The Wild Man of Mirror Lake • Edward Stratemeyer

... Dick, we ain't made no terms. I paid Toby twenty a month, and his board. Would a dollar and a quarter a day satisfy you, son? A special job like this always commands higher wages, you know," he inquired, eagerly, for he had been wondering how he ...
— Dick the Bank Boy - Or, A Missing Fortune • Frank V. Webster

... two very critical gray eyes. "Tell ye what, old man!—if you don't quit this dog-goned foolin' of yours in that God-forsaken tunnel you'll get loony! Times you get so tangled up in follerin' that blind lead o' yours you ain't sensible!" ...
— A Millionaire of Rough-and-Ready • Bret Harte

... by way o' Cuby, 'T wun't seem no staler now than then, by th' time it gits where you be. You know up North, though sees an' things air plenty ez you please, Ther' warn't nut one on 'em thet come jes' square with my idees: I dessay they suit workin'-folks thet ain't noways pertic'lar, But nut your Southun gen'leman thet keeps his perpendic'lar; I don't blame nary man thet casts his lot along o' his folks, But ef you cal'late to save me, 't must be with folks thet is folks; ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. IX., March, 1862., No. LIII. - A Magazine Of Literature, Art, And Politics, • Various

... exactly what you are driving at," said William. "I don't wear an alpaca coat with blue trousers and a seersucker vest on dress occasions, like I used to do at home. You talk about being cut to a pattern—well, ain't the pattern all right? When you're in Rome you've got to do as the Dagoes do. This town seems to me to have other alleged metropolises skinned to flag stations. According to the railroad schedule ...
— Strictly Business • O. Henry

... for that matter. Even if you ain't a sailor man I'd like to see him as could handle a little craft any better. With me at the helm she'd have gone ...
— The Search for the Silver City - A Tale of Adventure in Yucatan • James Otis

... something, the widow lifted her eyes and said, "Ef it's the bucket, I reckon ye'll find it at the spring, where one of them foolish Filgee boys left it. I've been that tuckered out sens sundown, I ain't had the ambition to go and tote it back." Without a word Gideon repaired to the spring, filled the missing bucket, replaced the hoop on the loosened staves of another he found lying useless beside it, and again returned to the ...
— By Shore and Sedge • Bret Harte

... ain't he, Sylvia? I thought I'd touch up his envy a little. That man," continued Mrs. Owen, "really knows a horse from an elephant. He's been trying to buy this team; but he hasn't bid up high enough yet. It tickles me to think that some of those rich fellows ...
— A Hoosier Chronicle • Meredith Nicholson

... been firin' over there all night," answered one of the men. "I guess it's been kinder warm over that way. But I ain't heard ...
— Betty Zane • Zane Grey

... this, sir, yer see. My daughter, she's a lidy as keeps 'erself TO 'erself, as the sayin' is, an' 'olds 'er 'ead up. She keeps up a proper pride, an' minds 'er 'ouse an' 'er little uns. She ain't no gadabaht. But she 'AVE a tongue, she 'ave"; the mother lowered her voice cautiously, lest the "lidy" should hear. "I don't deny it that she 'AVE a tongue, at times, through myself 'avin' suffered from it. And when she DO go on, Lord bless you, why, there ...
— Hilda Wade - A Woman With Tenacity Of Purpose • Grant Allen

... "Ain't he too good?" whispered Marcel as he pounced on his prey, and nodded towards Blancheron. "If you could only keep a piece ...
— Bohemians of the Latin Quarter • Henry Murger

... o' horrible, that catches at the breath, To visualize some two score babes most foully done to death; To see their fright, their struggles—to watch their lips turn blue— There ain't no use denyin', it will raise the deuce with you. O yes, God bless the President—he's an awful row to hoe, An' God grant, too, that peace with honor hand in hand may go, But let's not call men "rotters," 'cause, while ...
— New York Times Current History; The European War, Vol 2, No. 3, June, 1915 - April-September, 1915 • Various

... exquisite tinkle of melody that makes an old farmer—for there was here and there an old farmer even in that modern church—murmur as he shook hands with a friend, "Kind of a dancing jig that is, ain't it?" ...
— Divers Women • Pansy and Mrs. C.M. Livingston

... the same. I have loved you so long now that I don't know how to quit. People say that I am industrious, and they compliment me for keeping up my place so well, and for not going to town and loafing about of a Sunday and at night, but the truth is there ain't a dog in this county that's lazier than I am. During all these years my mind has been on you so strong that I ...
— An Arkansas Planter • Opie Percival Read

... surprise of hearing it, she started and fixed her eyes in astonishment on Sharon's face. The old vagabond chuckled to himself. "Did you see that?" he whispered to Moody. "I beg your pardon, miss," he went on; "I won't interrupt you again. Lord! how interesting it is!—ain't it, Mr. Moody? ...
— My Lady's Money • Wilkie Collins

... privation equalled only among seafarers. Drenched by rain or bitten by snow, scorched by heat or stiffened by cold, he passed it all off with a jest. Of a bitterly cold night he might casually remark about the quilts that composed his bed: "These here durned huldys ain't much thicker 'n hen skin!" Or of a hot night: "Reckon ole mammy must 'a stuffed a hull bale of cotton inter this yere ole huldy." Or in a pouring rain: "'Pears like ole Mahster's got a durned fool idee we'uns is web-footed." Or in a driving snow storm: ...
— The Red-Blooded Heroes of the Frontier • Edgar Beecher Bronson

... Blighty and a free-an' easy life, But I grant it ain't the Blighty of me pals: They takes the Tube to Putney, to the kiddies and the wife, Or takes the air on 'Ampstead with their gals; My little bit o' Blighty is the 'ighway, With the sweet gorse smellin' in the sun; And the 'eather 'ot and dry, where a tired man may ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 153, July 25, 1917 • Various

... as thick in this country as blackberries in the Fall, after the robins have left to go to sleep for the winter. Who on earth would have thought there was so many here? Oh, children of Israel! What a lot there is, ain't there? Why, the father of this island couldn't ...
— Nature and Human Nature • Thomas Chandler Haliburton

... tell you who I was so you wouldn't try any high and mighty business," he said coarsely, and eying her fiercely. "That ain't the sort o' thing that goes with me, an' yer ain't the first one I've taken down a peg or two. However, I don't mean you no harm, only you'd better behave yourself. Yer know that man ...
— My Lady of Doubt • Randall Parrish

... but was not aware of it. It made me tug and pant and perspire; and still, labor as I might, the machine came almost to a standstill every little while. At such times the boy would say: "That's it! take a rest—there ain't no hurry. They can't hold the ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... "Ain't she an angel?" she said to herself, knowing nothing, guessing less, of the storm which raged within her companion's soul; "and won't my ...
— How It All Came Round • L. T. Meade

... "What do you do with your prisoners?" The grizzled old tar dropped his voice to a confidential whisper, and, with a look of the utmost frankness, replied, "We biles 'em, mum. We tried a roast, but there ain't a hounce of meat on one o' them Yankee carkages. Yes, mum, we biles 'em." The startled old lady gasped out, "Good lordy," ...
— The Naval History of the United States - Volume 2 (of 2) • Willis J. Abbot

... it goin' to be? Am I to get that there money you owes me, or am I not? You ain't got much time for shilly-shallyin', I can tell you, young gentlemen. An' paid I'm agoin' to ...
— Stories of the Border Marches • John Lang and Jean Lang

... threw a foot up on the desk and smiled at us, with his inevitable cigarette in his mouth—his ridiculously inadequate cigarette. (When he puffed it, he looked like a fat boy blowing bubbles.) "Wearing yourselves out, eh? Working night and day? Ain't you getting about tired ...
— Stories of Achievement, Volume III (of 6) - Orators and Reformers • Various

... you think first of strangers," he grumbled, "when you have your own blood, to stand by you—blood is thicker than water, ain't it? Am I too old, or is he too young, to ...
— The Light of Scarthey • Egerton Castle

... roared. "Shunsuwere!" We gave two convulsive jerks. "Smarten up there, smarten HUP! Get a move on! This ain't a waxwork. Shunsuwere!... Shun!! ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 153, Oct. 3, 1917 • Various

... they reached her and held out the lovely presents—the first was an enchanting wax doll, the biggest beauty in the whole garden—instead of reaching out her hands for them, she just drew back, and said in her little sweet, piping voice: "Please, I ain't a millacle, I'm only Peter's ...
— Our Boys - Entertaining Stories by Popular Authors • Various

... watch after the Fortuna had been made snug. He took the boatswain aside (an ancient sea-dog like himself), and he said in a gruff whisper: "My lad, this here ain't the island laid down in our sailing orders. See if mischief don't come of disobeying orders before we ...
— Little Novels • Wilkie Collins

... the warnin' this week past," rejoined Nick solemnly, as he affectionately polished the butt of his rifle with a rag greased with bear's fat. "Them 'patch' winds at sunrise an' sunset ain't sent fer nothin'. I 'lows Hell's hard on the heels o' this breeze. When the wind quits there'll be snow, an' snow means us bein' banked in. Say, she's boomin'. Hark to her. You can hear her tearin' herself loose from ...
— In the Brooding Wild • Ridgwell Cullum

... does it. Miss Burton is always a begging for him to be allowed to stay up at nights and to lunch in the dining-room, and to come down of a morning, and to have a half-holiday in an afternoon; and, saving your better knowledge, sir, it's a bad thing to break into the regular ways of children. It ain't for their happiness, nor for ...
— A Flat Iron for a Farthing - or Some Passages in the Life of an only Son • Juliana Horatia Ewing

... 'ave, I ain't the on'y one wot 'as," said Eliza darkly. Her wizened little face suddenly flushed. "Lor, Miss," she said confidentially, "you doan't know wot a success that 'at you trimmed for me is. It's a fair scream. I wore it ...
— Back To Billabong • Mary Grant Bruce

... "And ain't there a chance of hearing how you are getting on, Dick? I shall think of you and your mother, often and often, when I am on deck keeping my watch at night; and it will seem hard that I mayn't be able to hear, for years, as to what ...
— The Tiger of Mysore - A Story of the War with Tippoo Saib • G. A. Henty

... you're just as good as me, better, because you've got more brains and can learn. That's the way to get on, the harder it is the more it teaches you. And then when you're together, like us here, and things are rocky, it's not a pleasure, exactly, but it ain't all pain. The worst is to be off by yourself; and you're not lonesome, are you, boy?" Maxime looked him in ...
— Clerambault - The Story Of An Independent Spirit During The War • Rolland, Romain

... note from Wilbraham, day before yesterday, when your teamsters stopped here on their way to Caraquet. They doubled up their teams with Billy's and took him and his wife along, and all their stuff. And I guess they'd been fired too, for they ain't come back. Mr. Macartney sent me over to see. Anything ...
— The La Chance Mine Mystery • Susan Carleton Jones

... I came back. A man can't help himself, you know, when he gets in with a woman, especially a Frenchwoman. Things did n't go very well, and never have. I can't make much out of it, but I reckon a man 's got to live his life. Ain't that ...
— Baddeck and That Sort of Thing • Charles Dudley Warner

... been put in the gun, meanwhile, and it was ready for business again. A number of good shots were made by different gunners. Enough to show that, amateur tars that we were, there was the making of good gunners in us. As the "Kid," in his overweening confidence, said, "Ain't we peaches? When we get down south we will have a little target practise, and the 'dagos' will be so scared that they will haul down ...
— A Gunner Aboard the "Yankee" • Russell Doubleday

... be worth much. Why, Alexandra, you don't know what you're talking about. Our place wouldn't bring now what it would six years ago. The fellows that settled up here just made a mistake. Now they're beginning to see this high land wasn't never meant to grow nothing on, and everybody who ain't fixed to graze cattle is trying to crawl out. It's too high to farm up here. All the Americans are skinning out. That man Percy Adams, north of town, told me that he was going to let Fuller take his land and stuff for four hundred dollars and ...
— O Pioneers! • Willa Cather

... a moment and then said, "That ain't a bad idea; I'm satisfied if the other party is. I'm going to drive over this afternoon and tell the old gentleman that matters are all fixed up, and I'll find out if there's any objection to the plan. Guess I'll go now, as I've got ...
— Quincy Adams Sawyer and Mason's Corner Folks - A Picture of New England Home Life • Charles Felton Pidgin

... story to tell you, Judge Maxwell," said he, again casting his quick, almost fearful look around, "that will sound to you, maybe, like a wild-eyed dream. But I want to tell you right now, it ain't no dream—not by a million miles! I wish it was," he added, with a ...
— The Bondboy • George W. (George Washington) Ogden

... "Ain't they splendid?" said she. "Tell the truth, now, Ellen Montgomery, wouldn't you give a great deal if somebody would send ...
— The Wide, Wide World • Elizabeth Wetherell

... needn't try to keep it from me any longer! I know there ain't any—" One tensely tragic second he paused to gather himself—"It's all over town!" There being nothing further to live for, he delivered himself to grief—to be ...
— The Seeker • Harry Leon Wilson

... continued, "I ain't got nothink to say against the Americans. They may be the most liberal-'earted gentlemen in the world for all I know. But it's the principle of the thing I'm objectin' to. It's a case of kill me quick or cure ...
— Punch, Volume 156, 26 March 1919 • Various

... master, and "Gently then!" says I, But an engine wont 'eed coaxin' an' it ain't no use to try; So first 'e pulled a lever, an' then 'e turned a screw, But the thing kept crawlin' forrard spite of all that 'e ...
— Successful Recitations • Various

... liked fires, too. Liked 'em so much I jest couldn't git him past 'em lots ob times I But run 'long, Massa Tom. Yo' ain't got no time to waste on an ole culled man whut's seen his best days. Yas-sir, I reckon I'se seen mah best days," and the smile died ...
— Tom Swift among the Fire Fighters - or, Battling with Flames from the Air • Victor Appleton

... Uncle Obed. "I reckon she and Philip ain't very glad to see me. It's different with the colonel. He's a nice man, but he seems to be under ...
— The Tin Box - and What it Contained • Horatio Alger

... Blake replied. "In fact, there don't seem the shadder of a doubt. He was comin' straight from the hut when the Bowens met 'im—an' he'd cleared out the whole place, gold an' all. Oh, there ain't any doubt about Mr. Harris bein' the guilty party. The only thing doubtful is ...
— A Little Bush Maid • Mary Grant Bruce

... know so well about that," said another; "it's Long-Hair, you must remember, and Long-Hair is no common buck that just anybody can find asleep. You know what Long-Hair is. Nobody's ever got even with 'im yet. That's so, ain't it? Just ask Oncle Jazon, if ...
— Alice of Old Vincennes • Maurice Thompson

... voice from the biggest of the neighboring tents, and a close-cropped head was thrust out between the front tent flaps. "That you, Billy? Who wants the colonel? He and the 'brig' rode over to the Presidio an hour ago—ain't got back. Come in; I've started a fire in our oil stove." A puff of warm air blew from the interior and confirmed the statement. It was well along in summer and, not a dozen miles away to the east, men were strolling about with palm-leaf ...
— Found in the Philippines - The Story of a Woman's Letters • Charles King

... to satisfy them fellows," one City Father observed, in an indignant and unstilted speech to his colleagues. "They want the earth, and nothing else will satisfy them. What if they ain't got no artist on the committee; everybody knows that Peter Calvin's a man who's published a lot of books about art, and it stands to reason he's a bigger gun than a ...
— The Philistines • Arlo Bates

... Yankee, shaking his head, "your friendships are soon made. Friends, indeed! We ain't that yet; but if you be minded to come with ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine—Vol. 54, No. 333, July 1843 • Various

... "Well, we ain't," said Dad in a relieved voice; "and as for those plans of hers, I reckon she'll have to outgrow them. Buck up, my boy! One look at Elizabeth will show her ...
— Cupid's Understudy • Edward Salisbury Field

... dumned!" said the Yankee, "twenty on 'em ain't worth one white man. They never was meant to work any, them chaps; and they knows it, too, for dumned little work any on ...
— Omoo: Adventures in the South Seas • Herman Melville

... de South thinks dey is free, but dey ain't. 'Fore it's all ober, all dat ain't dead will be glad to git back to deir masters," he ...
— California Sketches, Second Series • O. P. Fitzgerald

... cannot possibly-tell you of all its antics: it pretended to have a violent toothache, and nursed its beak in its claw, rocking itself backwards and forwards as if in the greatest agony, and in answer to all the remedies which were proposed, croaking out, "Oh, it ain't a bit of good," and finally sidling up, to the edge of its perch, and saying in hoarse but confidential whisper, "Give us a drop of whisky, do." Its voice was extraordinarily distinct, and when it sang several snatches of songs ...
— Station Life in New Zealand • Lady Barker

... not me, to judge. But if the public, or any other man, be he male or female, thinks that by ribaldry and derision I can be induced to publish the whole of this work before it's copyrighted, they're mistaken. The salt that's going on the tail of this particular fowl ain't ...
— Punchinello, Vol. 2, No. 29, October 15, 1870 • Various

... feel as if I was runnin' for President or hog-reeve or somethin', or goin' to speak in meetin'. But I ain't. I'm goin' to auction off Letty Lamson's things, an' I ain't been to an auction myself sence I was seventeen an' set on the fence an' chewed gum an' played 'twas tobacker while old Dan'el Cummings's farm was auctioned off down to the last stick o' timber. ...
— Country Neighbors • Alice Brown

... battle between Christian—or was it Faithful?—I used to know, but trouble has played old Hookey with my memory. It's all here, you know"—and he tapped the bald table-land of his head—"but somehow it ain't handy as it used! In the morning it flourisheth and groweth up: in the evening it is cut down and withereth. Man that is in honor and abideth not, is like the beast that perisheth—but there's Christian and Apollyon, right afore you, ...
— Weighed and Wanting • George MacDonald

... brain with thinkin' The way life goes in the world above, But lessons here there ain't no blinkin' Make me guess that the Umpire's Love! God knows I've muffed some easy chances Of doing good, like a silly lout; But because He's fairer nor any fancies I'm not in a funk ...
— More Cricket Songs • Norman Gale

... what I heard down in the kitchen is more than enough to help me to it. I'll expose her somehow—I don't quite know how; but that will come with time. You will keep the secret, dear, I'm sure. We are soon to have all our secrets in common, when we are man and wife, ain't we? Why, you're not listening to me! What ...
— The Fallen Leaves • Wilkie Collins

... "But ain't you a-going to sleep some?" asked Sneak, half unconsciously, the final utterance smothered in a guttural rumble as he again sank back ...
— Wild Western Scenes • John Beauchamp Jones

... he continued, as soon as the latter had somewhat recovered himself, "beastly hole this . . . ain't it now? La! you don't mind?" he added, apologetically, as he sat down on a chair close to the table and drew the soup tureen towards him. "That fool Brogard seems ...
— The Scarlet Pimpernel • Baroness Orczy

... porter, "it sut'nly am mighty cooler, jes' now, suh." He cocked his head at the young officer. "You 's in de navy, suh, ain't you, suh? I knowed," he added, as Armitage nodded a bored affirmative, "dat you was 'cause I seen de 'U. S. N.' on yo' grip. So when dat man a minute ago asked me was dere a navy gen'lman on ...
— Prince or Chauffeur? - A Story of Newport • Lawrence Perry

... me curiously from head to foot as if I was some strange animal, and then burst into a loud laugh. "You learn to be a sailor?—you make yourself useful?—you chaw-bacon. Why, the hay-seed is still sticking in your hair, and the dust ain't off your shoes yet. What can ...
— Peter the Whaler • W.H.G. Kingston

... he's ill," says a tender-hearted lady in the crowd. "Ill!" retorts a male bystander indignantly, "Ill! 'E's 'ad too much of what I ain't ...
— Idle Ideas in 1905 • Jerome K. Jerome

... That comes of not doing a thing yourself. I trusted to the women folks to set that basket in the wagon, and it ain't there." ...
— The Gilded Age, Complete • Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner

... wailed aloud: "'Caze I ain't gwine do it no mo'." And throwing his arms against the door-frame he buried his face in them, and he sobbed as if his ...
— Solomon Crow's Christmas Pockets and Other Tales • Ruth McEnery Stuart

... same as they all does. Thank 'eaven she haven't got that drawl, though, that 'er old aunt 'as—always makes me feel to want to say, 'Buck up, old dear, you ain't 'alf so ...
— Forsyte Saga • John Galsworthy

... went out to bring him in. They hunted high an' low, but he wa'n't there. Then a dozen people set out to search the woods. Just now they come back to say Willie ain't to be found high nor low. That stirs the big chief some. He 'low he knows how the thing's to be did; and so he's agoin' to organize a hunt for the lost child. That's all. Now, let me get back to ...
— The Banner Boy Scouts - Or, The Struggle for Leadership • George A. Warren

... don't, if you please. It ain't this here fire in the hearth, but,' striking his breast passionately, ...
— The Knickerbocker, or New-York Monthly Magazine, January 1844 - Volume 23, Number 1 • Various

... "I'm glad I ain't on her," said Ned. "Will she ever come back? If she does, I don't want to ride her. Didn't she just fly, though? Do you believe I shall ever be able ...
— The Young Trail Hunters • Samuel Woodworth Cozzens

... Joe Crouch as stole the pears," answered the soldier, smiling. "I never expected to find you 'listin' in the army, sir. I suppose Miss Fenleigh ain't aware ...
— Soldiers of the Queen • Harold Avery

... we ain't going to be very long, before we get on board again," the midshipman said, as he munched the small piece of bread James served out to him for his dinner. "The grub won't last more than two days, even at this starvation rate, and that one bottle of water ...
— With Wolfe in Canada - The Winning of a Continent • G. A. Henty

... exercise. Let's walk back to town. Now, this is a little unexpected, but what have I got you boy's for, if you can't help a friend in trouble. There's one good thing—I've got my board paid three weeks in advance; paid it this morning out of yesterday's winnings. Lucky, ain't I?" ...
— Cattle Brands - A Collection of Western Camp-fire Stories • Andy Adams

... get him home as soon as we can," said one of the men. "He's stopping over to the Judge's, and is his nephew. Here, you, Wilbert, just git in, and hold his head up, while I manage these little scamps. Things ain't much broken, ...
— Harper's Young People, October 26, 1880 - An Illustrated Weekly • Various

... "There ain't nothing the matter with you, boy, I reckon," said Tomaso, scratching him affectionately behind the ears. "Andy must have wheels in his head if he thinks I've got to keep my eyes peeled on ...
— Kings in Exile • Sir Charles George Douglas Roberts

... Mrs. Braile. I on'y just meant how nice it smelt. I got me somepin at home before I left, and I ain't a bit hungry." ...
— The Leatherwood God • William Dean Howells

... "She just thinks you ain't. The official log will show, though, that after only one day out I discovered that we should all be officers—one captain and three commanders—with pay and perquisites of rank. I'll think up good and sufficient reasons for it between now and when I ...
— The Galaxy Primes • Edward Elmer Smith

... "but when she was here nussin' I never noticed her, more I would any on you; for who'd of thought that Mr. Hamilton would marry her, when he knows, or or'to know, that nusses ain't fust cut, nohow; and you may depend on't, things ain't a-goin' to be here as ...
— Homestead on the Hillside • Mary Jane Holmes

... Mr. Jonathan knockin' Archie down an' settin' on him, Abel?" he inquired. "Ain't you got yo' hand in yet, seein' as you've been spilin' for a ...
— The Miller Of Old Church • Ellen Glasgow

... a-goin' to cry no more, no more! I'm got ear-ache, an' ma can't make It quit a-tall; An' Carlo bite my rubber-ball An' puncture it; an' Sis she take An' poke my knife down through the stable-floor An' loozed it—blame it all! But I ain't goin' to cry no more, ...
— Standard Selections • Various

... "I—I ain't got the heart to swat you while you keep lookin' that way at me," he muttered half-aloud, as if to a human companion. "Jes' you turn your head the other way, pup! It'll be ...
— His Dog • Albert Payson Terhune

... at length taking his departure, "I know Father John 'll be very mad, but any way it ain't my fault." ...
— The Macdermots of Ballycloran • Anthony Trollope

... "That ain't a perlite way to treat three gen'lemen as come a long ways to call on you," said the tramp. "We'll just have to help ourselves, and we'll begin by looking into your tent. P'r'aps you've got a crust of bread there what'll save a ...
— Harper's Young People, August 10, 1880 - An Illustrated Weekly • Various

... knowed I said anything about snakes. He'd send me right away, and some strange woman would come, and maybe she'd whip Emmy. Emmy want Becky to go?" Sobs, and little arms clinging wildly to Becky's aproned skirts. "No, no! Well, she ain't goin'. But Emmy mustn't tell tales or she might have to. Tattlers are wicked anyway. 'Telltale tit! Your tongue shall be slit, and all the little dogs'—There! run now! There's ...
— The Desert and The Sown • Mary Hallock Foote



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