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Ail   Listen
verb
Ail  v. t.  (past & past part. ailed; pres. part. ailing)  To affect with pain or uneasiness, either physical or mental; to trouble; to be the matter with; used to express some uneasiness or affection, whose cause is unknown; as, what ails the man? I know not what ails him. "What aileth thee, Hagar?" Note: It is never used to express a specific disease. We do not say, a fever ails him; but, something ails him.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Ail" Quotes from Famous Books



... "'What does ail you, Samantha, lockin' arms with me all the time—it will make talk! he whispered in a mad, impatient whisper, but I would hang on as long as Mr. Pomper wuz ...
— Samantha at Coney Island - and a Thousand Other Islands • Marietta Holley

... Ail that night we stood on to the northward and westward, though Mr. Marble had ventured a remonstrance concerning a certain head-land that was just visible, a little on our weather-bow. The captain snapped his fingers at this, however; laying down a course of reasoning, which, ...
— Afloat And Ashore • James Fenimore Cooper

... with him when they saw his banner planted in that place. And from that day forth was the Cid possessed of all the Castles and fortresses which were in the kingdom of Valencia, and established in what God had given him, and lie and ail Ins people rejoiced. ...
— Chronicle Of The Cid • Various

... and singing; Young,—young;—and four thick walls and no more sun, No music, and no wandering, and no life! Think you, I would not steal ail things alive Out of such doom?—How can I breathe and laugh While there are things in cages?—You are free; And you shall never more go ...
— The Piper • Josephine Preston Peabody

... how can I But evermore remember well?) when first Our flame began, when scarce we knew what was The flame we felt; when as we sat and sigh'd And look'd upon each other, and conceived Not what we ail'd, yet something we did ail, And yet were well, and yet we were not well, And what was our disease we could not tell. Then would we kiss, then sigh, then look: and thus In that first garden of our simpleness We spent our childhood. But when ...
— Specimens with Memoirs of the Less-known British Poets, Complete • George Gilfillan

... Linneus, the celebrated Swedish naturalist, has demonstrated, that ail flowers contain families of males or females, or both; and on their marriages has constructed ...
— The Botanic Garden. Part II. - Containing The Loves of the Plants. A Poem. - With Philosophical Notes. • Erasmus Darwin

... the mastiff old Lay fast asleep, in moonshine cold. The mastiff old did not awake, Yet she an angry moan did make! And what can ail the mastiff bitch? Never till now she utter'd yell Beneath the eye of Christabel. Perhaps it is the owlet's scritch: For what ...
— Six Centuries of English Poetry - Tennyson to Chaucer • James Baldwin

... it—" and, trembling with eagerness, his hand pulled the trigger, but no report followed. "The deuce is in the gun," cried he, lowering it, and examining the lock; "What can ail it?" ...
— The Sketches of Seymour (Illustrated), Complete • Robert Seymour

... What can ail the Bergen Burghers That they leave their stoups of wine? Flinging up the hill like jagers, At the hour they're wont to dine! See, the shifting groups are fringing Rock and ridge with gay attire, Bright as Northern streamers tinging Peak ...
— Letters From High Latitudes • The Marquess of Dufferin (Lord Dufferin)

... observed she, of ail the group, was alone in a real pajama outfit, and consequently took herself off promptly to more secluded quarters, and was then not at hand to answer ...
— The Girl Scouts at Bellaire - Or Maid Mary's Awakening • Lilian C. McNamara Garis

... 'Clothe me in rice apparel, and I will eftsoons bring Uns el Wujoud to thee.' So they brought him a sumptuous dress, and he donned it and said, 'I am the Delight of the World[FN84] and the Mortification of the Envious.' So saying, he transfixed ail hearts with his glances and ...
— The Book Of The Thousand Nights And One Night, Volume IV • Anonymous

... have met for a parle on some plan To better ail-stricken mankind; I catch their cheepings, though thinner than The overhead creak of a passager's ...
— Moments of Vision • Thomas Hardy

... in this petition, as in a summary, that our heavenly Father would deliver us from ail manner of evil, whether it affect the body or the soul, property or character, and at last, when the hour of death shall arrive, grant us a happy end, and graciously take us from this world of sorrow to ...
— An Explanation of Luther's Small Catechism • Joseph Stump

... the czarina. I dare not advise the emperor, but let me advise you. You have often occasion to see the empress. Before you see her consult with me as to the topics of your discourse with her, and so we shall always be enabled to act in concert. Avoid ail dissimulation; let her perceive that you leave craft to the lovers of Prussia. Flatter as often as you see fit; flatter Catharine, however, not for what she is, but what she ought to be. [Footnote: ...
— Joseph II. and His Court • L. Muhlbach

... sweet to hear the merry lark, That bids a blithe good-morrow; But sweeter to hark in the twinkling dark To the soothing song of sorrow. Oh, nightingale! what doth she ail? And is she sad or jolly? For ne'er on earth was sound of mirth So like ...
— Chambers's Edinburgh Journal, No. 442 - Volume 17, New Series, June 19, 1852 • Various

... the sea, and had passed his childhood on board a lighter belonging to his father, and on which the whole family lived. Ail his life he had breathed the salt air of the English Channel, the Atlantic, or the Pacific. He never went ashore except for the needs of his service, whether of the State or of trade. If he had to leave one ship for another he merely shifted his canvas bag to ...
— An Antarctic Mystery • Jules Verne

... author is sufficiently just; he sees too much order in the effect to ascribe it to a cause merely fortuitous. But surely nothing in those appearances hinders the conclusion, that the strata now found in ail possible positions, had been originally horizontal when at the bottom of the sea, and that they had been afterwards regularly bent and broken, by the same cause which operated in placing them above the level of the ocean. The force of ...
— Theory of the Earth, Volume 2 (of 4) • James Hutton

... dragon! my darling, what should ail you? I'll make you strong enough by to-morrow morning. Just hang him up an hour to the mast head, salt him, take him down, pickle him, hoist him up in the main tops to season, then give him some flap-dragon and biscuit, and I'll be bound there's not a lubber ...
— Walladmor: - And Now Freely Translated from the German into English. - In Two Volumes. Vol. I. • Thomas De Quincey

... and I gets so, I don't care how much dey whips me, or anyting else, for I tinks I neber be mysef again, when one day massa takes me wid him down to de boats, to fotch de cotton, and I hears de captain ask, what ail dat fellow to look so blue, and massa tells him, I got a notion dat I hab a right to keep my wife and young uns, like I hab de feelin's ob white folks. Den de captain talk wid massa 'bout buyin' me, ...
— Natalie - A Gem Among the Sea-Weeds • Ferna Vale

... went their ways; but Ralph noted of Ursula that she was silent and shy with him, and it irked him so much, that at last he said to her: "My friend, doth aught ail me with thee? Wilt thou not tell me, so that I may amend it? For thou are grown of few words with me and turnest thee from me, and seemest as if thou heedest me little. Thou art as a fair spring morning gone ...
— The Well at the World's End • William Morris

... can ail thee, knight-at-arms, Alone and palely loitering? The sedge has wither'd from the lake, And no ...
— The Golden Treasury - Of the Best Songs and Lyrical Poems in the English Language • Various

... GUIDED. That is exactly what the modern business house does. It directs the work of its correspondents by means of general and specific rules as well as by instruction in the policies of the house until ail of its letters are uniform in quality and bear the stamp of a consistent personality—the personality ...
— Business Correspondence • Anonymous

... "what suld ail me to forget him?—a wapping weaver he was, and wrought my first pair o' hose. ...
— The Best of the World's Classics, Vol. V (of X) - Great Britain and Ireland III • Various

... half coldly, half soothingly. "What should ail me to harm this misbegotten and miserable babe? The medicine is potent for good, and were it my child—yea, mine own, as well as thine! I could do ...
— The Scarlet Letter • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... that when a healthy man don't feel hungry at dinner time, 'specially in the huckleberry season, his healthiness is pretty shaky. What does ail you, Mr. Ellery? Got somethin' on your mind? If you have, I'd heave it overboard. Or you might unload it onto me and let me prescribe. I've had consider'ble experience in ...
— Keziah Coffin • Joseph C. Lincoln

... "He's ail right—don't come, doctor," said Mr. Damon into the telephone. "Bless my keyring!" he exclaimed, "but that was a ...
— Tom Swift and his Giant Cannon - or, The Longest Shots on Record • Victor Appleton

... 'Ah! what can ail thee, wretched wight, Alone and palely loitering?' murmured Drayton. 'It's a bad job for me, Jerry's getting off-color like this. How's he going to train men for Firsts next June, when ...
— Cinderella in the South - Twenty-Five South African Tales • Arthur Shearly Cripps

... shall never forget—my nurse took me to see my uncle, Captain Victor, who had invited me to breakfast. I admired my uncle a great deal, as much because he had fired the last French cartridge at Waterloo as because he used to make with his own hands, at my mother's table, certain chapons-a-l'ail, which he afterwards put into the chicory-salad. I thought that was very fine! My Uncle Victor also inspired me with much respect by his frogged coat, and still more by his way of turning the whole house upside down from the moment he came into it. Even now I cannot tell just how he managed it, ...
— The Bed-Book of Happiness • Harold Begbie

... from the river, and making directly towards the steep bank below where I sat. They were hurrying a great log of timber, which they threw down close beside me, as if to rest ere they mounted. 'My friends,'—what should ail me to talk to 'em I cannot tell,—'My friends, but ye seem to have more work in your hands than wit in your noddles—ye might have spared yourselves the labour, I trow.' With that the whole rout turned upon me with a shout and a chattering that would have dumbfounded the shrillest tongue ...
— Traditions of Lancashire, Volume 1 (of 2) • John Roby

... to me: pray do. You did not use to be cruel. You used to say, you loved me. I am in calamity, my dear. I know I am miserable. At times I know I am; and then I am grieved at my heart, and think how happy every one is, but me: but then, again, I ail nothing, and am well. But do love me, Laurana: I am in calamity, my dear. I would love you, if you were in calamity: indeed I would.—Ah, Laurana! What is become of all your fine promises? But then every body loved me, and I was happy!—Yet ...
— The History of Sir Charles Grandison, Volume 4 (of 7) • Samuel Richardson

... "and you're dropping grease ail over the floor with that candle. You go back to bed, uncle. I'm all right. You go ...
— The Captives • Hugh Walpole

... ail her but the one thing?" said Janet, impatiently. "She'll be better the morn I hae ...
— Janet's Love and Service • Margaret M Robertson

... 'at laff be to-day, But for th' old ens they turn into fun? Who wor wearm thersen bent an grey, When their days had hardly begun. Ther own youth will quickly glide past; If they live they'll ail grow old thersel; An they'll long for a true friend at last, Tho' its nobbut ...
— Yorkshire Lyrics • John Hartley

... my mither has been, past the memory o' man, in a complaining condition, I ken nae odds o' her this many a year; her ail's like water to leather, it makes her life ...
— The Proverbs of Scotland • Alexander Hislop

... stride The fawning leopard gambolled at his side. So fell the first dark shadow of Earth's strife. With coming evil all the winds were rife. Lone lay the land with sense of dull loss paled. The days grew sick at heart; the sunshine failed; And falling waters breathed in silvery moan A hidden ail to starlit dells alone— As sometimes you have seen, 'neath household eaves, 'Mong scents of Springtime, in the budded leaves, The swallows circling blithe, with slant brown wing, Home-flying fleet, with tender ...
— Lilith - The Legend of the First Woman • Ada Langworthy Collier

... teams again won the championship honors of their respective associations, and they again entered the lists for the "world's championship," this series being best out of six games, three being played at Chicago, and three at St. Louis; the winner of the series taking ail the gate receipts. The result was the success of the St. Louis team, the scores being ...
— Spalding's Baseball Guide and Official League Book for 1889 • edited by Henry Chadwick

... requiring more surgical skill than my father or uncle were able to afford. In this we were especially fortunate, for we knew of no doctor nearer than Fort Hamilton, and we could scarcely expect him to come in any ordinary case of illness. At length our dear mother began to ail, and her pale cheek and sunken eye showed that she was suffering greatly. One evening, towards the end of the year, the trees being already stripped of their ...
— With Axe and Rifle • W.H.G. Kingston

... ail her?" replied Meehaul; "as long a' she's honest an' behaves herself, there's no fear of her. Had you nothing elsa ...
— The Dead Boxer - The Works of William Carleton, Volume Two • William Carleton

... What could ail the child? I went to her, and took her hands in mine—burning little hands. I said, "Minima! and she turned to me with a caressing gesture, raising her hot fingers to ...
— The Doctor's Dilemma • Hesba Stretton

... the truth of Thy doctrine and endue him with innocency of life, that he was enabled, both by word and deed, faithfully to serve Thee in this office, to the glory of Thy name, and the edifying and well-governing of Thy Church. For this so great mercy, and for ail the blessings which, in Thy good Providence, it brought to this portion of the flock of Christ, we offer unto Thee our unfeigned thanks, through Jesus Christ our Lord, to Whom, with Thee and the Holy Ghost, be all honour and glory, world ...
— Report Of Commemorative Services With The Sermons And Addresses At The Seabury Centenary, 1883-1885. • Diocese Of Connecticut

... scavenger at the palace-gate Who, his left heel being lame, Obtained as a most special grace, That his right should ail the same."[9] ...
— Biographies of Distinguished Scientific Men • Francois Arago

... when some of the persons recognising my companion, shouted aloud, "Vive le Comte d'Orsay! Vive le Comte d'Orsay!" and the cry being taken up by the mass, the reader was deserted, the fickle multitude directing ail their attention and enthusiasm to tho new comer. We had some difficulty in escaping from these troublesome and unexpected demonstrations of good will; and, while hurrying from the scene of this impromptu ovation to the unsought popularity of my companion, I made him smile by hinting at ...
— The Idler in France • Marguerite Gardiner

... la Pointe assassine, L'Esprit cruel et le Rire impur, Qui font pleurer les yeux de l'Azur, Et tout cet ail de basse cuisine! ...
— Suspended Judgments - Essays on Books and Sensations • John Cowper Powys

... little jerks and pullings, Sara jerked and pulled. Too well she knew that furrow between his eyes and wanted unspeakably to tuck him back into bed, lower the shades, and prepare him a vile mixture good for exactly everything that did not ail him. But Sara could be wise even with her son. So instead she flung up the shade, letting him wince at the clatter, dragged off the bedclothes into a tremendous heap on the chair, beat up the pillows, and turned the mattress with ...
— The Vertical City • Fannie Hurst

... who was watching the struggle with breathless suspense. "But we must not incur the disgrace of losing the first battle, for that would discourage our men for all time to come. Come, Ennemoser, run down to them and tell them to try a third time. If they do not, Andreas Hofer will rush ail alone upon the enemy and wait for a bullet to shatter ...
— Andreas Hofer • Lousia Muhlbach

... no rash matrimonial engagements; no penniless lovers selfishly and indissolubly linked together to propagate large families Of starving children. Ail the arrangements of the insect tribe, though prompted by sheer instinct are conducted with a degree of rationality that in some cases raises the mere instinct of the creeping thing above ...
— Eight Years' Wandering in Ceylon • Samuel White Baker

... is endangered where ail lean to one side; but is in safety, one leaning one way and another another way: so the dissensions of Poets among themselves, doth make them, that they less infect their readers. And for this purpose, our Satirists [JOSEPH] HALL [afterwards Bishop of NORWICH], ...
— An English Garner - Critical Essays & Literary Fragments • Edited by Professor Arber and Thomas Seccombe

... on the size of his lungs, and I believe mine are pretty big. But come now, if there's nobody you want to shoot, and you have a good balance at the banker's, what can ail you, except it's a girl you want to marry, and she ...
— Lord Kilgobbin • Charles Lever

... answered coldly, and got up to go. Everything in that moment seemed turned to stone. I owed Henry an immense debt of gratitude according to this account, but not an atom of it could I show or feel. On the contrary, ail the evil in my nature was stirred up, and I felt more than I had ever done before, as if I hated him. Perhaps it was that he had proved to me what I had hitherto never in reality believed, though I had often ...
— Ellen Middleton—A Tale • Georgiana Fullerton

... Only I heard you stopped in at ten houses up to the west end of the town yesterday, and talked three quarters of an hour steady at everyone. That would fit me for the scrap heap inside of a week, and you've been goin' it ever since September nearly. What does ail you—anything?" ...
— Cy Whittaker's Place • Joseph C. Lincoln

... return to Egypt. They said, 'Seize him; let no ship of his go unto the land of Egypt!' "Then," says Uenuamen in the papyrus, "I sat down and wept. The scribe of the prince came out unto me; he said unto me, 'What ail-eth thee?' I replied, 'Seest thou not the birds which fly, which fly back unto Egypt? Look at them, they go unto the cool canal, and how long do I remain abandoned here? Seest thou not those who would prevent my return?' He went away and spoke unto ...
— History Of Egypt, Chaldaea, Syria, Babylonia, And Assyria In The Light Of Recent Discovery • L.W. King and H.R. Hall

... the artist's impression of the ail-but universal indifference about Him who is yet declared to be the soul and centre of our Scriptures, our creeds, and our religious life, and how do we explain it? Or if we put the artist's impression aside, and on our own ...
— Men in the Making • Ambrose Shepherd

... at sight of him now all Rotherby's spleen was moved. He stood and stared, his dark eyes narrowing, his cheeks flushing slightly under their tan. Wharton, who had approached him, observing his sudden halt, his sudden look of concentration, asked him shortly what might ail him. ...
— The Lion's Skin • Rafael Sabatini

... "while John scorns ale." I could not think what this sudden teetotalism on the part of John had to do with the affair, but I forgot to ask at the time and it was only years afterwards that, looking at the book, I found it was "John's corns ail," a very Browningesque way of saying he winced. Most of Browning's obscurity is of that sort—the mistakes are almost as quaint as misprints—and the Browning student, in that sense, is more a proof reader ...
— The Victorian Age in Literature • G. K. Chesterton

... ail kinds for the hero and his friends, whose pluck and ingenuity in extricating themselves from awkward fixes are always equal to the occasion. It is an excellent story full of honest, manly, patriotic efforts on the part of the hero. A very vivid description of the battle ...
— Robert Coverdale's Struggle - Or, On The Wave Of Success • Horatio, Jr. Alger

... ail the child," she said to herself, "to be walking about barefoot this time of night? She'll get her death of cold;" and she put down her work and went up stairs, intending to administer a sisterly lecture. To her surprise, Faithful was fast asleep in bed, and no other living ...
— Not Pretty, But Precious • John Hay, et al.

... think o' taking these motherless bairns to yon savage place! What could ail him at Mr Ross's offer? My patience! but folk whiles stand in their ...
— Janet's Love and Service • Margaret M Robertson

... you'll be let come to my marriage—will you not? I do so want you to come. I was making up the party just now with mother and his sister Marie. Father brought Marie home with him. And we have put you down for one. But, Linda, what ails you? Does anything ail you?" Fanny might well ask, for the tears were running ...
— Linda Tressel • Anthony Trollope

... but no Injin is lost—the medicine-priest is mistaken. He has looked so often in his book, that he sees nothing but what is there. He does not see what is before his eyes, at his side, behind his back, ail around him. I have known such Injins. They see but one thing; even the deer jump across their paths, and ...
— Oak Openings • James Fenimore Cooper

... child seemed to wear a load of care and anxiety, and as the young fisherman gazed a tear started from her eye, and slid down her cheek. Tommy's heart melted as he saw this exhibition of sorrow. He wondered what could ail her. ...
— Poor and Proud - or The Fortunes of Katy Redburn • Oliver Optic

... to be going astray on him, what would ail any tramp or neuk that would be passing the road, not to rob him and to lay him ...
— New Irish Comedies • Lady Augusta Gregory

... planets that forbid Acceptance of it wholly. Some of these Are moving round the sun, if we can trust Our years of watching. There are stranger dreams. This radical, Copernicus, the priest, Of whom I often talked with you, declares Ail of these movements can be reconciled, If—a hypothesis only—we should take The sun itself for centre, and assume That this huge earth, so 'stablished, so secure In its foundations, is a planet also, And moves around the sun. I cannot think it. ...
— Watchers of the Sky • Alfred Noyes

... have been told by one that knows—to have an attack of typhoid fever a few weeks or months after their arrival. I have not been long enough at this table to get well acclimated; perhaps that is it. Boarding-House Fever. Something like horse-ail, very likely,—horses get it, you know, when they are brought to city stables. A little "off my feed," as Hiram Woodruff would say. A queer discoloration about my forehead. Query, a bump? Cannot remember any. Might ...
— The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (The Physician and Poet not the Jurist)

... a noble woman had reposed; and his vanity was appeased by the conviction that though Leo had cast him out of her life, she went abroad because she loved him supremely. Putting the ring in his pocket, he turned away as from a grave that had closed forever over that which once held ail the promise ...
— At the Mercy of Tiberius • August Evans Wilson

... somewhat different from the real thing, but it rapidly changes. The changes are in many cases clearly due to a suggestiveness in the article of something else, but not always so, as in some cases hereafter described. It is not at ail necessary to think of any particular object at first, as something is sure to come spontaneously within a minute or two. Some object having once appeared, the automatism of the brain will rapidly induce the series of changes. The images are sometimes very numerous, and very rapid ...
— Inquiries into Human Faculty and Its Development • Francis Galton

... enough. But apart from this, that you are talking of sculpture to me who do but paint, you should know very well that your Greek copied no single boil, no, nor no probable boil, but, as it were, the summary and perfect conclusion of ail ...
— Earthwork Out Of Tuscany • Maurice Hewlett

... works her mammie's wark, And aye she sighs wi' care and pain; Yet wist na what her ail might be, Or what ...
— Poems And Songs Of Robert Burns • Robert Burns

... child, so am I," declared Mr. Fein. Then, apparently addressing his mixed grill, he considered: "It's nonsense to say that it's just the capitalists that ail the world. It's the slackers. Show me a man that we can depend on to do the necessary thing at the necessary moment without being nudged, and we'll keep raising him before he has a chance to ...
— The Job - An American Novel • Sinclair Lewis

... what can ail you? You grow pale, and then you grow red; your bosom heaves, the tears come in your eyes, you clasp your hands tightly together as in prayer, then you smile and raise your eyes as in thanksgiving! Now, I do wonder what it ...
— The Missing Bride • Mrs. E. D. E. N. Southworth

... the Attention of many a great Mind, from what might otherwise procure very great Reputation and Regard. Their Genius no sooner begins a little to exert itself, but the Spirits flag, and one unhappy Ail or other, enfeebles and ...
— 'Of Genius', in The Occasional Paper, and Preface to The Creation • Aaron Hill

... the physician, half coldly, half soothingly. "What should ail me, to harm this misbegotten and miserable babe? The medicine is potent for good; and were it my child,—yea, mine own, as well as thine!—I could do no better ...
— The Scarlet Letter • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... child die?" I asked, trembling so that I had to put the little fellow down lest he should fall from my startled arms. "Did something really ail him that night ...
— The Gates Between • Elizabeth Stuart Phelps

... were for 'ailing the ship in the night. ''Ail 'ell!' I says. 'D'y' think I want to be took into that rotten 'ole of a Port Said, or maybe Alexandria, and that end of the Mediterranean fair lousy with U-boats. Besides, we'll get 'ome quicker this way,' I says, and allows her to pass on. In the mornin' ...
— The U-boat hunters • James B. Connolly

... a bier to man, Coughing a coffin brings, And too much ale will make us ail, As well as ...
— English as She is Wrote - Showing Curious Ways in which the English Language may be - made to Convey Ideas or obscure them. • Anonymous

... "What does ail Miriam Nesbit? She used to be such a nice child!" exclaimed Mrs. Gray. "Really, Grace, I feel that I ought to go straight ...
— Grace Harlowe's Sophomore Year at High School • Jessie Graham Flower

... and feat, Aucassin and Nicolette,— What great sorrows suffered he, And what deeds did valiantly For his love, so bright of blee? Sweet the song, and fair the say, Dainty and of deft array. So astonied wight is none, Nor so doleful nor undone, None that doth so sorely ail, If he hear, shall not be hale, And made glad again for ...
— Song and Legend From the Middle Ages • William D. McClintock and Porter Lander McClintock

... "But I have always wished to see a storm at sea, and if I only had Valmai with me, I should be joyous and exultant; but instead of that, I am alone, and have a strange foreboding of some evil to come. I can't be well, though I'm sure I don't know where I ail, for I feel alright, and I ...
— By Berwen Banks • Allen Raine

... the repeated creations found in later literature. On the contrary, it is expressly said in the Rig Veda, vi. 48. 22, that heaven and earth are created but once: "Only once was heaven created, only once was earth created," Zimmer, AIL. 408.] ...
— The Religions of India - Handbooks On The History Of Religions, Volume 1, Edited By Morris Jastrow • Edward Washburn Hopkins

... is pretty nearly the ordinary course of measles, for we do not meet with that extreme variation in its severity which is observed in scarlatina, where one child will seem scarcely to ail at all, while its brother or sister may be in a state of extreme peril. It is not wise, however, to trust a case even of apparently mild measles to domestic management, for while the cough is troublesome in almost every case, the ear of the experienced doctor is needed to ascertain whether ...
— The Mother's Manual of Children's Diseases • Charles West, M.D.

... ail i hwnw yn y Mwythig, y dydd arall, ar ganol interlud Doctor Ffaustus; a rhai . . . pan oeddynt brysuraf, ymddangosodd y diawl ei hun i chwareu ei bart ac wrth hynny gyrodd bawb o'i bleser ...
— Welsh Folk-Lore - a Collection of the Folk-Tales and Legends of North Wales • Elias Owen

... relatives, particularly if they manifested any little aberration of mind (as is common in advanced age), have consigned them to these receptacles, from which, through the supposed kindness of their friends, and the management of the proprietors, they have never returned. If the parties ail nothing, they are soon driven to insanity by ill usage, association with unfortunates confined like themselves, vexation at the treatment, and absolute despair of escape; or if partially or slightly afflicted, the lucid intervals are prevented, and the disorder by these means is increased and confirmed ...
— Real Life In London, Volumes I. and II. • Pierce Egan

... our smooth-turned phrase relate The little suffering outcast's ail? Not Lazarus at the rich man's gate So turned the ...
— The Atlantic Monthly , Volume 2, No. 14, December 1858 • Various

... and Probus tell the same tale, the Archbishop of Tuam, in his excellent "Life of St. Patrick," states "that the Scholiast on St. Fiacc whilst expressly declaring that Nemthur, St. Patrick's birthplace, was in North Britain, namely, Ail Cluade, adds that young Patrick, with his parents, brother and sisters, went from the Britons of Ail Cluade over the Ictian Sea, southwards, to visit his relatives in Armorica, and that it was from Latevian Armorica that ...
— Bolougne-Sur-Mer - St. Patrick's Native Town • Reverend William Canon Fleming

... make you ail, your aunt an ant may kill, You in a vale may buy a veil and Bill may pay the bill. Or if to France your bark you steer, at Dover it may be A peer appears upon the pier, who blind, still goes ...
— The Book of Humorous Verse • Various

... "Oh, it's ail right. Old woman talk to you about Jeff's going to college? I thought so. Wants to make another Dan'el Webster of him. Guess she can's far forth as Dan'el's graduatin' went." Westover tried to remember how this had been with the statesman, but could not. Whitwell ...
— Henry James, Jr. • William Dean Howells

... lovely neat-herdess? Why so lonely on the hill? Why thy pipe by thee so still, That erewhile was heard so shrill? Tell me, do thy kine now fail To full fill the milking-pail? Say, what is't that thou dost ail? ...
— The Hesperides & Noble Numbers: Vol. 1 and 2 • Robert Herrick

... could walk two or three miles without weariness. He had no colour in his cheeks, and showed the nervous tendencies which were to be expected in a child of such parentage, but on the whole his health gave no cause for uneasiness. If anything chanced to ail him, Harvey suffered an excessive disquiet; for the young life seemed to him so delicate a thing that any touch of pain might wither it away. Because of the unutterable anguish in the thought, he had often forced himself to front the possibility ...
— The Whirlpool • George Gissing

... Nouka and his wife and daughter—a handsome girl, his only child—and Miaki's principal wife and her two sons, and nine Chiefs attended Worship regularly at the Mission House, on Sabbaths and on the afternoon of every Wednesday. In ail, about sixty persons somewhat regularly waited on our ministrations at this time; and amidst all perils I was encouraged, and my heart was full of hope. Yet one evening when feeling more consoled and hopeful than ever before, a musket was discharged at my very door, and I ...
— The Story of John G. Paton - Or Thirty Years Among South Sea Cannibals • James Paton

... man, too, could not but notice the different effects of the two items of intelligence he had that evening communicated. "What could ail Julia when I told her that George was going to sea again without coming home? the poor girl was ready to cry: he's a fine young fellow, that's certain, and they've been brought up together like brother and sister; so I suppose it is ...
— An Old Sailor's Yarns • Nathaniel Ames

... "What ail's you, Bet?" whispered Will, tenderly. "I'm here, and the hour ha' come. In a minute or two now ...
— A Girl of the People • L. T. Meade

... shaded by an awning and prettily fitted up with flower-boxes and Indian matting and delightful lounging-chairs. "She says we must call this our town house, but that the Wood House must be our country house. She wants us to be there ail the summer and autumn;" and here Elizabeth looked ...
— Herb of Grace • Rosa Nouchette Carey

... and sigh, And look upon each other, and conceive Not what they ail'd; yet something they did ail, And yet were well—and yet they were not well; And what was their ...
— The Works of Charles Lamb in Four Volumes, Volume 4 • Charles Lamb

... have undone all, they are both gone, flown I protest; why, what a Devil ail'd em? Now have I been dumb all this while to no purpose, you too never told her my meaning right; as I hope to breathe, had any but yourself done this, I should have sworn by Helicon and all the rest of the Devils, you had had a design ...
— The Works of Aphra Behn - Volume IV. • Aphra Behn

... his room kaze he tole me fer ter come back en see 'im. Name er God, Marse Jack, w'at ail' ...
— Free Joe and Other Georgian Sketches • Joel Chandler Harris

... is signified by the letters J. A. I. N.? A. They are the initials of the four Hebrew words, Jad, Ail, Jotsare, and Nogah, which are expressive of four attributes of the Deity; power, omnipresence, creation ...
— The Mysteries of Free Masonry - Containing All the Degrees of the Order Conferred in a Master's Lodge • William Morgan

... ail'd ma, lads, I felt so fearful prahd; Mi ears pricked up, mi collar rahse, T'ards a hawf-a-yard; Mi chest stood aght, mi charley in, Like horns stuck aght mi tie; Fer I dined wi' a gentleman O' gooise ...
— Revised Edition of Poems • William Wright

... small chunks, soon after the meat is put on to boil, and potatoes, onions, or other tender vegetables when the meat is about half done. Amount of vegetables to be added, about the same as meat, depending upon supply and taste. Salt and pepper to taste. Applies to ail fresh meats and fowls. The proportion of meat and vegetables used varies with their abundance, and fixed quantities can not be adhered to. Fresh fish can be handled as above, except that it is cooked much quicker, ...
— Manual for Noncommissioned Officers and Privates of Infantry • War Department

... seen Maggie Black any more? She been right sick, but she better now. Yes, she been right puny. Don' know what ail her." ...
— Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves • Works Projects Administration

... is one of the beauties of a Republican form of gov'ment that a Cabnet offisser can pack up his trunk and go home whenever he's sick. Sure nothin don't ail your liver?" sed I, pokin him putty vilent in ...
— The Complete Works of Artemus Ward, Part 7 • Charles Farrar Browne

... some two months after, Young Philip Fairford suddenly fell sick, And none could tell what ail'd him; for he lay, And pined, and pined, till all his hair fell off, And he, that was full-flesh'd, became as thin As a two-months' babe that has been starved in the nursing. And sure I think He bore his death-wound like a little child; With such rare sweetness ...
— The Works of Charles Lamb in Four Volumes, Volume 4 • Charles Lamb

... The oldest active editor in the country—and the most famous—called upon the body of which he was a member to impeach him for acts of disloyalty, tending to give aid and comfort to the common enemy. The great president of a great university suggested as a proper remedy for what seemed to ail this man Mallard that he be shot against a brick wall some fine morning at sunrise. At a monstrous mass meeting held in the chief city of Mallard's home state, a mass meeting presided over by the governor ...
— The Thunders of Silence • Irvin Shrewsbury Cobb

... writs in council. The titles used are 'Jonkheer' (Baronet) and 'Jonkvrouw,' Baron and Baroness, 'Graaf' (Earl) and 'Gravin.' Marquess and Duke are not used as titles by Dutch noblemen. If any man is ennobled, ail his children, sons as well as daughters, share the privilege, so there is no 'courtesy title;' officially they are indicated by the father's rank from the moment of their birth, but as long as they are young ...
— Dutch Life in Town and Country • P. M. Hough

... ahead! sa-ail!" came suddenly from forward. There was a scraping of boot-heels at the wheel. "What d'y'make of it?—all right, I see her!" In the shadow we saw the skipper pulling the wheel down. Ahead I imagined I saw a dark patch, but to make sure I squirmed up to the fore-rigging. Whoever ...
— The Seiners • James B. (James Brendan) Connolly

... brown bird strutted with ail important air to where it had a better view of Dot and her companion, and eyed them both in the same perky manner. "Friend Kangaroo's in a bad way," it said; "why don't you do something sensible, instead of ...
— Dot and the Kangaroo • Ethel C. Pedley

... o'erthrown; The Mede, that sought our overturn, Now seeks his own; A servant now, our ancient foe, The Spaniard, wears at last our chain; The Scythian half unbends his bow And quits the plain. Then fret not lest the state should ail; A private man such thoughts may spare; Enjoy the present hour's ...
— Odes and Carmen Saeculare of Horace • Horace

... countries, three-year-olds, and of the prize, one hundred thousand francs, half is given by the city of Paris and half by the five great railway companies. It was the late duc de Morny who first persuaded the municipal council and the administrations of the railways to make this annual appropriation; ail of which, together with the entries, a thousand francs each, goes to the winner, after deducting ten thousand francs given to the second horse and five thousand to the third. Last year the amount won by Nubienne, carrying fifty-three and a half kilogrammes, was one ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Vol. 26, September 1880 • Various

... lamentable construction, and now on the sudden transported under another climate to be tossed and turmoiled with their unballasted wits in fathomless and unquiet deeps of controversy, do for the most part grow into hatred and contempt of Learning, mocked and deluded ail the while with ragged notions and babblements, while they expected worthy and delightful knowledge; till poverty or youthful years call them importunately their several ways, and hasten them, with the sway of friends, either to an ambitious and mercenary or ignorantly zealous Divinity: some ...
— The Life of John Milton Vol. 3 1643-1649 • David Masson

... what ail I, that I have no mind to fight now? I find my constitution mightily alter'd Since I came home: I hate all noises too, Especially the noise of Drums; I am now as well As any living man; why not as valiant? To fight now, is a kind of vomit to me, It goes ...
— Beaumont & Fletcher's Works (2 of 10) - The Humourous Lieutenant • Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher

... O, what can ail thee, knight at arms, Alone and palely loitering? The sedge is withered from the lake, And ...
— Mitch Miller • Edgar Lee Masters

... the suffering and persecuted of ail classes, Messrs. Quibble and Quirk, attorneys-at-law, beg to offer their professional services at the following fixed and equitable rate,—they, Messrs. Q. and Q., pledging themselves that on no occasion shall the charge exceed the sum opposite the particular ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 1, Complete • Various

... mediaeval Bards, who not unfrequently compare their patrons to him. Thus Risserdyn (1290, 1340) says that Hywel ap Gruffydd had "vreich Moryen," the arm of Morien; and his contemporary Madawg Dwygraig eulogises Gruffydd ap Madawg as being "ail ...
— Y Gododin - A Poem on the Battle of Cattraeth • Aneurin

... putting on such speed as would leave Andy behind could not be carried out. It was tried, but something went wrong with the main motor, and only half power could be developed. Tom and Ned labored over it nearly ail night, to no effect, and through the hours of darkness they could see the lights from the cabin of the ANTHONY gleaming just ahead of them. Evidently the bully's airship could not make enough speed to run away from ...
— Tom Swift in the Caves of Ice • Victor Appleton

... ail the nurses?" they whispered in terrified tones. They could not go near enough to the basket to see what the trouble was, and still it seemed very necessary ...
— The Pot of Gold - And Other Stories • Mary E. Wilkins

... our day Mustafa bin Ism'ail who succeeded "General Khayru 'l-Din" as Prime Minister to "His Highness Mohammed al-Sadik, Bey of Tunis," began life as apprentice to a barber, became the varlet of an officer, rose to high dignity and received decorations from most of the ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 5 • Richard F. Burton

... rang the bells and they were wed. But never merrily beat Annie's heart. A footstep seem'd to fall beside her path, She knew not whence; a whisper in her ear, She knew not what; nor loved she to be left Alone at home, nor ventured out alone. What ail'd her then, that ere she enter'd, often Her hand dwelt lingeringly on the latch, Fearing to enter: Philip thought he knew: Such doubts and fears were common to her state, Being with child: but when her child was born, ...
— Enoch Arden, &c. • Alfred Tennyson

... One very prevalent ail that our ancestors had to endure (if we can judge from the number of prescriptions for its relief) was a "cold stomack;" literally cold, one might think, since most of the cures were by external application. Lady Spencer used a plebeian "greene turfe of grasse" to warm ...
— Customs and Fashions in Old New England • Alice Morse Earle

... have mentioned Leipzig, no one should consider an affront to the honorable city and University. I was forced to it by the vaunted, arrogant, fictitious title of this Romanist, who boasts that he is a public teacher of ail the Holy Scriptures at Leipzig,[82] which titles have never before been used in Christendom, and by his dedication[83] to the city and its Council. If the jackanapes had not issued his book in German, in order ...
— Works of Martin Luther - With Introductions and Notes (Volume I) • Martin Luther

... not appear to resent anything. " Oh, I don't think it was Mr. Coleman's fault at ail," she an- swered calmly. "I think it was more the fault of Peter Tounley, ...
— Active Service • Stephen Crane

... they were called) did a roaring trade. Every morning hundreds of natives, mounted on wiry ponies and clad in nothing but trousers and red blanket, would gallop into the town by every road. In the afternoon they would gallop back again, nearly ail more or less tipsy. The ponies were excellent animals; in breed they were identical with the famed "Basuto pony," for which long prices are given today. It is a great pity that these ponies have been allowed to become practically extinct in the Cape ...
— Reminiscences of a South African Pioneer • W. C. Scully

... of the Christian "God is love" converted into "Love is God". It is not entirely fanciful to suggest that Plato, in saying farewell to the definitely Socratic type of philosophy, gave his master as his parting gift the greatest of ail tributes, a dialogue which is really the ...
— Authors of Greece • T. W. Lumb

... Mrs. Younker, so soon as she could collect breath enough after laughing to go on; "I do raley believe as how the boy's ayther crazy, or in love, for sartin. What does ail ye, Isaac?—do tell!" ...
— Ella Barnwell - A Historical Romance of Border Life • Emerson Bennett

... who talks of fear? It is only fools who fear! Dost think I am scared by this bogey talk of plague? A colic, child—a colic; that is all I ail. I have always suffered thus in hot weather all my life. Plague, forsooth! I could wish I had had it, that I might have given it as a parting benediction to those knaves and hussies who thought to rob me ...
— The Sign Of The Red Cross • Evelyn Everett-Green

... to say that I do not regard as a science the incoherent ensemble of theories to which the name POLITICAL ECONOMY has been officially given for almost a hundred years, and which, in spite of the etymology of the name, is after ail but the code, or immemorial routine, of property. These theories offer us only the rudiments, or first section, of economic science; and that is why, like property, they are all contradictory of each other, and half the time inapplicable. The proof of this assertion, which is, ...
— The Philosophy of Misery • Joseph-Pierre Proudhon

... two, and such a yell of delight when he finds a 'bow-wow,' as he calls the dog, all to himself, would astonish a Piute Indian. I don't have to keep any 'cramp drops,' 'baby jumpers' or 'patent food,'(?) for the children. I find they never have an ail or grievance, but 'The Nursery' acts as a specific. I wish every mother in the land would give it to her children on trial. And really it makes old people feel ...
— The Nursery, Volume 17, No. 100, April, 1875 • Various

... am delighted to see yez, though see yez I can't. Oh, then, I hope that it's a long life and plenty you'll have before you, my sweet, dear, illigant young lady—a good bed to lie on, and plenty to eat and drink. If you has them, what else could ail yez? Good-by to yez; good-by ...
— Light O' The Morning • L. T. Meade

... a little boy that went up close to her, and took her by the hand, without speaking, and led her along. He was her own son; but still she moved not her solemn heavenward eye, though a universal sobbing burst from ail the multitude; and my grandfather, at the piteous pageantry, was no longer able to remain master of his feelings. Seeing, however, that the mournful actors therein were going on towards Bailie Kilspinnie's, and not intending to stop, as he expected they would, at Widow Ruet's door, ...
— Ringan Gilhaize - or The Covenanters • John Galt

... kestril!" said she, angrily; "and what should ail thee to shy at the quarry? Give me the weapon." And with that she seized the hammer as though rendered furious by the pusillanimity of her attendants. The whole group were paralysed with terror. Not a word ...
— Traditions of Lancashire, Volume 2 (of 2) • John Roby

... possession of my peaceable town of Quiquendone? Are we about to go mad, and must we make the town one vast asylum? For yesterday we were all there, notables, counsellors, judges, advocates, physicians, schoolmasters; and ail, if my memory serves me,—all of us were assailed by this excess of furious folly! But what was there in that infernal music? It is inexplicable! Yet I certainly ate or drank nothing which could put me into such a state. No; yesterday I had for dinner a slice of overdone veal, ...
— A Winter Amid the Ice - and Other Thrilling Stories • Jules Verne

... inconsequent moment in the gloom. He came among them, none knew whence he was going, none knew whither. He was conscious of being a creature of mystery. He pitied the fettered youth of these begrimed and joyless towns—slaves, Men with Muckrakes (he had fished up ail old "Pilgrim's Progress" from the lower depths of the van), who obstinately refused to raise their eyes to the glorious sun in heaven. In his childish arrogance he would ask Barney Bill, "Why don't they go away and leave it, like me?" And the wizened little man ...
— The Fortunate Youth • William J. Locke

... is to impress the fact that there are necessary and eternal differences of ail things, and implied or consequent relations (proportions or disproportions) existing amongst them; and to bring under this general head the special case of differences of Persons (e.g., God and Man, Man and Fellow-man), for the sake of the implication that ...
— Moral Science; A Compendium of Ethics • Alexander Bain

... mistress's shoulder, or in her lap; and though she sometimes ran away and hid herself, out of fun, she would not have gone far from the tent of the good Indians, on any account. Sometimes she saw the red squirrels running about in the forest, but they never came very near her; but she used to watch ail day long for her brother Nimble-foot, or sister Velvet; but they were now far away from her, and no doubt thought that she had been killed by the red squirrel, or eaten up ...
— Lady Mary and her Nurse • Catharine Parr Traill

... the eightieth year of his life, and spent them all in the service of God—many of his good works being unknown—an angel brought him this message: "Rejoice, Torello, for the time is come when thou shalt receive the crown of glory thou hast so long desired, and the reward in paradise of ail thy labour in the service of God; for thirty days from this time, on the sixteenth of March, thou shalt be delivered from the prison of ...
— Legends That Every Child Should Know • Hamilton Wright Mabie

... of God! So men say when, after denying God's existence ail their lives, the seeming solid earth heaves up like a ship on a storm-billow, dragging down in its deep recoil their lives and habitations. An earthquake! Its irresistible rise and fall makes human beings ...
— The Secret Power • Marie Corelli

... betrayed bias of almost all we spoke with, toward palliation of this dark act. "Didn't she die in a fit; or of fright; or something?" was a frequent question, even from those near the scene of this tragedy. "What did ail the old creture to go near 'em? Name of goodness! didn't they order her not?" Even from her own sex, a disgusting lack of warm-hearted pity and indignation was most palpable. Truly, morality and the meeting-house have a deep gulf between them, if these are the morals ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine - Volume 54, No. 338, December 1843 • Various

... a declaration of war, which would put ail the citizens of each country in hostility with those of the other, were, nevertheless, actual war, partial in its application, maritime in its character, but which required the expenditure of much of our public treasure and much ...
— A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents - Section 3 (of 4) of Volume 5: Franklin Pierce • James D. Richardson

... unto us, that in all nations throughout the world there was scattered a certain malicious people, that had laws contrary to ail nations, and continually despised the commandments of kings, so as the uniting of our kingdoms, honourably intended by ...
— Deuteronomical Books of the Bible - Apocrypha • Anonymous

... not the man you once were, John," she answered. "Oh, can't you see that we're just reaping what has been sown—the crop we're been raising through ail these years? Beulah's very life has been crying out for action, for scope, for room, for something that would give her a reason for existence, that would put a purpose into her life, and we've not tried ...
— The Homesteaders - A Novel of the Canadian West • Robert J. C. Stead



Words linked to "Ail" :   break out, pain, garlic clove, seasoner, suffer, Allium sativum, garlic, flavouring, seasoning, ailment, erupt, flavourer, clove



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