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Agen   Listen
adverb
agen  adv., prep.  See Again. (Obs.)






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Agen" Quotes from Famous Books



... Marie's name departe!' (Soe saying, wold agen have passed me by); His hollow Voyce sank depe into my Harte: Yet I wold not let him goe, ...
— The Mysteries of All Nations • James Grant

... "Don't put that agen me," said Mrs. Miles, "for I wouldn't be nothing else if you was to pay me fifty pounds down. There, now, I ...
— Betty Vivian - A Story of Haddo Court School • L. T. Meade

... round agen, as ushal, we had our Crismus-Heve supper, as ushal, and henjoyed owrselves till a rayther latish hour, as ushal. Upon cumpareing notes, we didn't find as we had werry much to complane about, ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 104, January 7, 1893 • Various

... Mrs Harris, if you and me is to be continual friends, for sech is not the case. Mrs Mould," I says, making so free, I will confess, as use the name,' (she curtseyed here), '"is one of them that goes agen the obserwation straight; and never, Mrs Harris, whilst I've a drop of breath to draw, will I set by, and not stand up, don't think it."—"I ast your pardon, ma'am," says Mrs Harris, "and I humbly grant your grace; for if ever ...
— Life And Adventures Of Martin Chuzzlewit • Charles Dickens

... his Book; for the Heat of the Day came on, and an House or an Arbour began to be more agreeable than the open Fields. Sophy told the Swain he would meet him there agen in the Evening, and read him some more of the Minutes he had put down for his Direction, and withdrew; and the Shepherd drove his Lambs to the Covert of ...
— A Full Enquiry into the Nature of the Pastoral (1717) • Thomas Purney

... believing that on the farther side of Auch we ran little risk of attack, I dismissed the two dragoons, and an hour after sunrise we set out again. The day was dry and cold, the weather more promising. I proposed to go by way of Lectoure, crossing the Garonne at Agen; and I thought that, with roads continually improving as we moved northwards, we should be able to make good progress before night. My two men rode first, I came ...
— Under the Red Robe • Stanley Weyman

... Oke, you'll never make a sojer! Now I mind back in 'seventy-nine when the fleets of France an' Spain assembled and come together agen us—sixty-six sail of the line, my billies, besides frigates an' corvettes an' such-like small trade; an' the folks at Plymouth blowing off their alarm-guns, an' the signals flying from Maker Tower—a bloody flag at the masthead ...
— The Mayor of Troy • Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... You gave us the slip so cleverly that time you took it into your precious head to cut and run, that, hunt where we would, we were never able to find you. I gave it up for a bad job; and then things went agen me, and I got sent away. But I'm my own master again now; and I mean to make good use of my liberty, I can tell you, my lady. I little knew how you'd feathered your nest while I was on the other side of the water. I little thought how ...
— Run to Earth - A Novel • M. E. Braddon

... "but I forgot to say I a'n't goin' to do any more business on the Erie plan. It a'n't right. Come to think it over, I was sorry I done it; and so I told Mr. Fink; and he sed it wasn't exackly reg'lar either, and he shouldn't never ask me to do it agen." ...
— Round the Block • John Bell Bouton

... knave! cried she, it makes me laugh; What! take within her bed a pilgrim's staff! Were such a circumstance abroad to get, My lady would with ridicule be met; The dog and master, probably, were last Beneath a hedge, or on a dunghill cast; A house like this they'll never see agen;— But then the master is the pride of men, And that in love is ev'ry thing we find Much wealth and beauty ...
— The Tales and Novels, Complete • Jean de La Fontaine

... 23 of Aguste 1597 to Harey Porter to carye to | T. Nashe now at this tyme in the fflete for wrytinge of | s the eylle of Dogges ten shellinges to bee paide agen to | x me when he canne I say ...
— A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. VII (4th edition) • Various

... sailed for the West Indies, as he'd been trying hard for some time to turn gentleman. 'I shall give myself all the airs that ever I can,' he says, 'when once I get out there.' 'Why, you young ass!' says I, 'for it's agen my religion to call you a fool (let alone your mother wouldn't like it), arn't you awear that giving himself airs is exactly what no real gentleman ever does?' 'A good lot of things,' says he, 'father, goes to the making of ...
— Fated to Be Free • Jean Ingelow

... arter this, for the young 'oman was a screamin' and our chaps a cursin' about the decks, when all of a sudden I fell off into a faint like, and the same time a heavy gun came slamming into our very ears; and there was that infarnal corvette agen bowlin' down within five cables' length of the brig, her battery all alight and the whistles a callin' away the boats, in as violent a haste as any think I can remember," said Gibbs, as he ...
— Captain Brand of the "Centipede" • H. A. (Henry Augustus) Wise

... reminiscence of Mrs. H., to the huge delight of the audience.) I'll tell yer another thing—I've worked for a man down at South End, Healing, and this'll show yer the amount o' hinsult and hill-treatment we 'ave to stand, and never say nothing to. I've seed 'im, hover and hover agen, walkin' about among us in his shirtsleeves, with 'is braces 'angin' about is 'eels! (Cheers from the crowd; demonstration with scrubbing-brush by the old Lady in the drag.) I 'ave indeed, and I don't tell yer no lies. (Here a Lady in ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 100, June 27, 1891 • Various

... ordeyned with all his myght, For to amende that is amys, And that is all for Engelond ryght, To geten agen that scholde ben his; That is, al Normandie forsothe y wys, Be right of eritage he scholde it have, Therof he seith he wyll nought mys, Crist kepe his body sounde and save. ...
— A Chronicle of London from 1089 to 1483 • Anonymous

... King of Alexandria; Avitus, King of Bugia; Ospin, King of Algarve; Facin, King of Barbary; Ailis, King of Malclos; Manuo, King of Mecca; Ibrahim, King of Seville; and Almanzor, King of Cordova. Then, marching to the city of Agen, he took it, and sent word to Charles he would give him sixty horse-load of gold, silver, and jewels, if he would acknowledge his right to the sceptre. But Charles returned this answer, "that he would acknowledge him no otherwise than by slaying him ...
— Mediaeval Tales • Various

... give you your chance directly. Don't speak yet,—ain't through, if you please. Well, sir, it's agen nature,—you may talk agen it, and work agen it, and fight agen it till all's blue, and what good'll it do? You can't get an Irishman, and, what's more, a free-born American citizen, to put himself on a level with a nigger,—not by no manner of means. No, sir; you can ...
— What Answer? • Anna E. Dickinson

... gowd rings ye may buy, maidens, Green mantles ye may spin; But, gin ye lose your maidenheid, Ye'll ne'er get that agen. ...
— Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border, Vol. II (of 3) • Walter Scott

... from leading her to the halter, from makin her his adoarable wife. After this was a slight silence. "Dearest Frederic," mummered out miss, speakin as if she was chokin, "I am yours—yours for ever." And then silence agen, and one or two smax, as if there was kissin going on. Here I thought it best to give a rattle at the door-lock; for, as I live, there was old Mrs. ...
— Memoirs of Mr. Charles J. Yellowplush - The Yellowplush Papers • William Makepeace Thackeray

... arskin' them when I should get a settled young man, an' they told me that the fates are agen me in my present dwellin', so if you'll please take my ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 159, October 13, 1920 • Various

... crown enriched with precious stones and enamels on which may be distinguished Jupiter, Mars, Apollo and Diana, among the more respectable of the divinities; if it was originally intended to represent the virgin Fides, martyred at Agen, was certainly one of the most fantastic achievements of ecclesiastical art. But whether this was its origin or not, the style of its workmanship is considered by competent judges to be sufficient proof that it is at least nine hundred ...
— Wanderings by southern waters, eastern Aquitaine • Edward Harrison Barker

... consider it's prime butther. I'll back my girls for making up a bit o' butther agen any girls in Ireland; and my cows is good, and ...
— Handy Andy, Volume One - A Tale of Irish Life, in Two Volumes • Samuel Lover

... he's made his will," she said. "I've heard say as land canno' go to a woman if there's no will; and it'ud niver do for Upfold to go to a far-away stranger. May be he reckons on all he has goin' to you quite natural. But there's law agen' it; the agent told me so years ago. I niver heard of any relations thy father had, but they'll find what's called an heir-at-law, take my word for it, if he doesn't leave iver ...
— Cobwebs and Cables • Hesba Stretton

... laugh—you can laugh till yo' bust!" he cried, falling back into his Lancashire accent. "But yo'll never see me, here agen. Never, never, never, so ...
— The Fortunate Youth • William J. Locke

... is likely enough lookin' woman herself," observed Captain Smart; "it's kind of cur'ous she should be so set agen marryin,' ...
— A Christmas Accident and Other Stories • Annie Eliot Trumbull

... don't mean that," pleaded the old woman. "I haven't got anything agen' Rob. I don't suppose he's any more uncertain than—than ...
— The Wizard's Daughter and Other Stories • Margaret Collier Graham

... clear from that dear baby-lip, But low as they were, heard like trumpet By each true man aboard o' the ship. Every bit o' that pray'r then he goes through, To "for ever and ever. A-men!" An' for all the bright gold in the Indies, I wouldn't ha' heard him agen! Off his feet was the lad sudden lifted, And clasp'd to the mate's rugged breast, An' his husky voice muttered, "God bless you," As his lips to his forehead he press'd. "You believe me now?" then ...
— The Canadian Elocutionist • Anna Kelsey Howard

... Big-Mouth, 'I don't thenk a've got much to say, only to ask your Honor to deal mercifully with us. The captain at the police station didn't say he was to breng this prosecution agen us noo; he only told us he wud tak us out o' harum's way, ...
— Lights and Shadows of New York Life - or, the Sights and Sensations of the Great City • James D. McCabe

... But in a dream of friendship? To have his pomp, and all what state compounds But only painted, like his varnish'd friends? Poor honest lord! brought low by his own heart, Undone by goodness. Strange, unusual blood, When man's worst sin is he does too much good! Who then dares to be half so kind agen? For bounty, that makes gods, does still mar men. My dearest lord, bless'd, to be most accurs'd, Rich, only to be wretched, thy great fortunes Are made thy chief afflictions. Alas! kind lord, He's flung in rage from this ingrateful ...
— The Life of Timon of Athens • William Shakespeare [Craig edition]

... as cooms here as doan't, for all they cooms. Tha'll say it ill becooms mea as war man and boy in Sir Jarge's sarvice for fifty year, to say owt agen him, but I'm here to do it, or they couldn't foolfil their business. Tha wast to ax me questions about Sir Jarge and the Grange, and I wor to answer soa as to make tha think thar was suthing wrong wi' un. Howbut I may save tha time and ...
— Under the Redwoods • Bret Harte

... them whose faith an' truth On War's red techstone rang true metal, 130 Who ventered life an' love an' youth For the gret prize o' death in battle? To him who, deadly hurt, agen Flashed on afore the charge's thunder, Tippin' with fire the bolt of men 135 Thet rived the Rebel ...
— The Vision of Sir Launfal - And Other Poems • James Russell Lowell

... snowy taper waist, With my finger gently brac'd; And thy pretty swelling crest, With my little stopper prest, And the sweetest bliss of blisses, Breathing from thy balmy kisses. Happy thrice, and thrice agen, Happiest he of happy men; Who when agen the night returns, When agen the taper burns; When agen the cricket's gay, (Little cricket, full of play) Can afford his tube to feed With the fragrant Indian weed: Pleasure ...
— The Social History of Smoking • G. L. Apperson

... of Toussaint were first sent to Bayonne, and afterwards to Agen, where one of the sons died of a decline. The two elder ones, endeavouring to escape from the surveillance under which they lived, were embarked for Belle Isle, and imprisoned in the citadel, where they were seen in 1803. On the restoration of the Bourbons, not only were they released, but a pension ...
— The Hour and the Man - An Historical Romance • Harriet Martineau

... time, no time to squander e'er Have Norsemen bold, He came self-bidden 'mongst us here," Thus Carl was told; "If we can drive him back agen, We now must try!" And it was Peter Colbiornsen Made that reply. Thus for ...
— Tord of Hafsborough - and Other Ballads • Anonymous

... his seat, much relieved, and almost as chirpy as ever, to his neighbours, confidentially). I'm all right agen now. It was takin' a glass o' stout on top of black currant pudden done ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 103, August 13, 1892 • Various

... having lunch by himself, and I was waiting on him, he says, raising his glass to his lips, "Well, 'Enery, here's luck to yer! I won't be seeing you agen ...
— The Observations of Henry • Jerome K. Jerome

... there be of them I can tell you That will laugh themselues, to set on some Quantitie of barren spectators to laugh with them, Albeit there is some necessary point in the Play Then to be obserued: O t'is vile, and shewes A pittifull ambition in the foole that vseth it. And then you haue some agen, that keepes one sute Of ieasts, as a man is knowne by one sute of Apparell, and Gentlemen quotes his ieasts downe In their tables, before they come to the play, as thus: [F2v] Cannot you stay till I eate my porrige? and, you owe me A quarters wages: and, my coate wants a ...
— The Tragicall Historie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke - The First ('Bad') Quarto • William Shakespeare

... was a bit tiddlywinky last Michaelmas, when the Young Susannah came ashore, that I must own. Folks blamed the Pa'son for preachin' agen it the Sunday after. 'A disreppitable scene,' says he, ''specially seein' you had nowt to be thankful for but a cargo o' sugar that the sea melted afore you could get it.' (Lift the pore chap aisy, Sim.) By crum! Sim, I mind your huggin' ...
— I Saw Three Ships and Other Winter Tales • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... when the ladies came to see about me," she continued, "she told me ef I dast tell 'em, she'd do worse by me, an' she told the ladies I was a lyin' thievin' critter, an' purtended I was ill tret, when she was a mother to me an' never laid the flat of her hand agen me, 'ceptin' ...
— A Dear Little Girl • Amy E. Blanchard

... away to Ingoldsby Hall I flew! Dame Alice I found,—She sank on the ground,— I twisted her neck till I twisted it round! With jibe and jeer and mock and scoff, I twisted it on—till I twisted it off!— All the King's Doctors and all the King's Men Can't put fair Alice's head on agen!" ...
— The Haunted Hour - An Anthology • Various

... deadly wreath, Where the darkest batteries frowned Death in the air all round, And the black torpedoes beneath! And now, as we looked ahead, All for'ard, the long white deck Was growing a strange dull red; But soon, as once and agen Fore and aft we sped (The firing to guide or check,) You could hardly choose but tread On the ghastly human wreck, (Dreadful gobbet and shred That ...
— Poems of American Patriotism • Brander Matthews (Editor)

... this about?" says Jimmy, gettin' excited agen. "Why, two fellers that belonged to your party come along to my place an' put up half-a-dozen drinks, an' borrered a sovereign, an' got a can o' beer on the strength of their cheques. They ...
— Joe Wilson and His Mates • Henry Lawson

... Poyteers, in that bloudy Field, The sudaine turne in that great Battell then, Shall euer teach me, whilest I Armes can weeld, Neuer to trust to multitudes of men; Twas the first day that ere I wore a Sheeld, Oh let me neuer see the like agen! Where their Blacke Edward such a Battell wonne As to behold it ...
— The Battaile of Agincourt • Michael Drayton

... much ado, his Book before him laid, And Parchment with the smoother side display'd; He takes the Papers, lays 'em down agen, And with unwilling fingers tries his Pen; Some peevish quarrel straight he tries to pick, His Quill writes double, or his Ink's too thick; Infuse more Water; now 'tis grown too thin, It sinks, nor can the characters be seen." ...
— Forty Centuries of Ink • David N. Carvalho

... oop there, long o' t' Vicar. Mind yo"—Mrs. Gale lowered her voice and looked up and down the street for possible eavesdroppers—"ef 'e was to 'ear on it, thot yoong Rawcliffe wouldn't be 'lowed t' putt 's nawse in at door agen. But theer—there's nawbody'd be thot crool an' spittiful fer to goa an' tall 'im. Our Assy wouldn't. She'd coot 'er toong out ...
— The Three Sisters • May Sinclair

... evening service now, though I won't deny as the rheumatics are very pinching at times. But, dear Lord! I never come up to the stalls near the chancel, so you ain't likely to see me. To see them Harrises always a-goin' up to the very top, it does go agen me. I don't say as it's everybody as ought to take the lowest place. The Lord knows I'm not proud, but I won't go into them chairs down by the font myself; but to see them Harrises, that to my certain knowledge hasn't a bite of butcher's meat in their heads but ...
— The Danvers Jewels, and Sir Charles Danvers • Mary Cholmondeley

... I tried to pull 'im out, but there was a couple of 'undred of 'em there, and 'e 'ad no chance. 'E gave just one yelp and then was pulled under, and the groupers jolly well ate him clear down to the bones. We never saw 'ide nor 'air of 'im agen!" ...
— The Boy With the U. S. Fisheries • Francis Rolt-Wheeler

... in Guienne a force sufficiently imposing to allow of it there awaiting in security the successful results he was about to seek. In possessing himself of Agen, Bergerac, Perigueux, Cognac, and even for a moment of Saintes, and by pushing his conquests into Haute Guienne, on the side of Mont-de-Marsan, Dax, and Pau, he had made Bordeaux the capital of a small but rich and populous kingdom, surrounded on all sides ...
— Political Women (Vol. 1 of 2) • Sutherland Menzies

... go bitin' somebody, for sure! But when I come to it with my hammer, the dog it got up—an' you know how it is when there's somethin' you've 'alf killed, and you feel sorry, and yet you feel you must finish it, an' you hit at it blind, you hit at it agen an' agen. The poor thing, it wriggled and snapped, an' I was terrified it'd bite me, an' some'ow it got away."' Again our friend paused, and this time we dared not ...
— Forsyte Saga • John Galsworthy

... and, sure enough, he died afore three months wor out. Dick and I couldn't tell what it wor we see creepin' out o' th' shadder o' th' wood, an' to tell yow th' trewth, ma'aster, we didn't care to look agen. I asked Dick if he didn't think it wor Black Shuck. 'Naw daywt,' says Dick, 'if it ain't somefin' worse.' 'What do'st a' mean, bor?' says I. 'Well,' says Dick slowly like, 'it might be the sperrit from th' pit, for 'twas in no ...
— The Shrieking Pit • Arthur J. Rees

... said, and his wife saw that he was beginning to tremble. "I dessay they do—I don't say nothink agen it—though theer's none of it cooms my way. But that isn't all the rights on it nayther—no, that it ain't. The labourin' man ee's glad enough to get a hare or a rabbit for 'is eatin'—but there's more in it nor that, miss. Ee's allus in the ...
— Marcella • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... of urged horses, and the oaths of hot men, "Gerr on, you," "Come on, now," agen and agen; They spattered the mud on the willow tree's bole And they charged at the danger; and the danger ...
— Right Royal • John Masefield

... Nabs, venturing to pluck the abbot's sleeve. "Every minute's precious. Dunna be feert. Ebil Croft, t' miller, is below. Poor Cuthbert Ashbead would ha' been here i'stead o' meh if he couldn; boh that accursed wizard, Nick Demdike, turned my hont agen him, an' drove t' poike head intended for himself into poor Cuthbert's side. They clapt meh i' a dungeon, boh Ebil monaged to get me out, an' ey then swore to do whot poor Cuthbert would ha' done, if he'd been livin'—so here ey am, lort abbut, cum to set yo free. An' neaw yo knoan ...
— The Lancashire Witches - A Romance of Pendle Forest • William Harrison Ainsworth

... leddy? He's the quaietest, kin'liest auld man I that is, providit ye say naething for a Cawmill, or agen ony ither hielanman. Ye see he comes o' Glenco, an' the Cawmills are jist a hate till him—specially Cawmill o' Glenlyon, wha was the warst o' them a'. Ye sud hear him tell the story till 's pipes, my leddy! It's gran' to hear him! An' the ...
— Malcolm • George MacDonald

... waiting one day upon the young swell I have before spoken of, at the "Grand 'Otel," he was jined by another swell, who told him what a glorius day's skating he had been avin in Hide Park! and how he ment to go agen to-morrer, "if the luvly frost ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 100., Jan. 31, 1891 • Various

... "There's trouble agen, up at Kit's," remarked Eli, finishing his stroke with a jerk, and speaking for the general benefit, though the words were particularly addressed ...
— Noughts and Crosses • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... did go All on the ragen mane, With other males, All for to ketch wales, & nere come back agen. The wind bloo high, The billers tost, All hands were lost, And he was one, ...
— The Complete Works of Artemus Ward, Part 7 • Charles Farrar Browne

... raise The hymn to Phoebus, Leto, Artemis, In triune praise, Then slide your song back upon ancient days And men whose very name forgotten is., And women who have lived and gone their ways: And make them live agen, Charming the tribes of men, Whose speech ye mock with pretty mimicries So true They almost woo The hearer to believe he's singing too! Speed me, Apollo: speed me, Artemis! And you, my dears, farewell! ...
— On The Art of Reading • Arthur Quiller-Couch

... har! and the wonder is, that a pleeseman an't 'ad in now, and we took off agen. You can't open your lips ...
— The Uncommercial Traveller • Charles Dickens

... Honor; but becos yer got me onto the perlice yerself. Don't yer 'member, on 'lection day, I smashed two ticket booths of t'other can'date, in the Sixth Ward, lickt as much as a dozen men who was workin' agen ye, an' din was put into the Tumes over night—bad luck to the Tumes, I say! Well, yer Honor, ye was 'lected coroner by a small vote; an', in turn for me services, ye got ...
— Round the Block • John Bell Bouton

... the tongue out wantonly, and draw it in agen, Betokens mocking of thy selfe, in all ...
— Early English Meals and Manners • Various

... bad-lookin' chap. He is na short-legged or turn-up- nosed, an' that's summat. He con stride along, an' he looks healthy enow for aw he's thin. A thin chap nivver looks as common as a fat un. If he wur pudgy, it ud be a lot more agen him." ...
— T. Tembarom • Frances Hodgson Burnett

... for fearin' Dawn is on for a swell. I seen me sisters' lives. I call them unwholesome marriages when girls marries these fellers, an' their narrer-minded people sits on her an' is that depraved they turn him agen ...
— Some Everyday Folk and Dawn • Miles Franklin

... were deceivin, I just want to tell you the boy you give me was a girl so you wood not make that mistake agen. It is the limit when you have told the fellers you had a boy, to go and get a girl, and when I shod the letter to dad he sed by jove youre in a fine posishun you are and I sed how is that, and he sed fust thing you no you will get yourself talkt about, ritin to a girl in France and that ...
— Deer Godchild • Marguerite Bernard and Edith Serrell

... be off by light. I 'edn' gwaine to stop no more. Faither sez I ban't no cheel o' his an' he doan't want to see my faace agen. Then he shaan't. I'll gaw to them as won't be 'shamed o' me: ...
— Lying Prophets • Eden Phillpotts

... certain physical afflictions. It may be amusing for you also to notice that Don Quixote's niece and Pope were of the same mind. She called poetry "a catching and incurable disease," and Pope's unfortunate Poet "lives and writes agen." ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 4, No. 21, July, 1859 • Various

... might—and then he come in—as a Brickmaker might—and he wagged his tail at the pots, and he giv' a sniff round, and conveyed to me as he was used to beer. So I draw'd him a drop, and he drunk it up. Next morning he come agen by the clock and I drawed him a pint, and ever since he has took ...
— The Life of Charles Dickens, Vol. I-III, Complete • John Forster

... nuffin 'bout that," said old Zebedee, huffily. "How so be if 'tis so, when he's got clane off 'twill be all right agen." ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Vol. 26, October, 1880 • Various

... election—the cow election—the candidates were Brown, Conservative, and Stiggins, Liberal. The day after the polling a farm labourer was asked how he filled up his voting paper. 'Oh,' said he full of the promised cow, 'I doan't care for that there Brown chap, he bean't no good; zo I jest put a cross agen he, and voted for Stiggins.' The dream of life was accomplished, the labourer had a vote, and—irony—he voted ...
— Field and Hedgerow • Richard Jefferies

... the man that would!" growled old John. "It was never in them French to act cowardly. Didn't they beat all the world, and even stand up many's the day agen ourselves and the Duke? They didn't beat,—it wouldn't be in reason,—but they tried brave enough, and what more'd you ask ...
— Old Man Savarin and Other Stories • Edward William Thomson

... yee fops, yo'r idoll's come agen To pick yo'r pocketts, and to slay yo'r men; Give him yo'r millions, and his Dutch yo'r lands: Don't ring yo'r bells, yee ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 48, Saturday, September 28, 1850 • Various

... first to last was just a bit of bad luck, and luck's the queerest thing in life. I have thought over luck all my long years, and am not far from seventy, thank the Lord for his goodness, and I can't understand it yet. Luck's agen yer, and nothing you can do will make it for yer, jest for a spell. Then, for no rhyme or reason, it 'll turn round, and it's for yer, and everything prospers as yer touches, and you're jest as fort'nate as you ...
— Good Luck • L. T. Meade

... with 'baytes that fortune flings And fed with th'empty husks of things: Shadowes, not friends we entertaine; W'are pleas'd with the deceitfull traine Of words, and thinke them deeds. But when Th'unconstant wheele shall turne agen To th' parting Goddesse, wee shall see Those friends the selfe-same words deny. Things Humane under false names please. Our gifts match not our promises; Religion, lesse to be doth use, Then the large language ...
— The Odes of Casimire, Translated by G. Hils • Mathias Casimire Sarbiewski

... my name, and a good one it is; and what have you to say agen it? and one-and-sixpence's the price of the stick. Troth, it's chape as dirt—so ...
— Irish Wit and Humor - Anecdote Biography of Swift, Curran, O'Leary and O'Connell • Anonymous

... and Injuns jumped on him. They said he was criss-cross all through, same as his eyes. But he warn't. Never seed a half-breed that had less gall and more grit, except when the hanker for whiskey would creep up in him, and boss him. He could no more stand agen it, and the things it made ...
— Camp and Trail - A Story of the Maine Woods • Isabel Hornibrook

... few relics of tar as a comparative suffix; I E uk increase whence Old Sax agen our again; Mand age, Dak ake again, Dak ...
— The Dakotan Languages, and Their Relations to Other Languages • Andrew Woods Williamson

... folks ud sartingly say ez I hed call tew hev hard feelin's agin' ye. But gosh, I hain't, an wy hain't I? Gaze ye hev been yer own wust enemies; ye've hurt yerselves more ner ye hev me, though ye didn't go fer ter dew it. Pooty nigh all on ye, as fit agen the King, is beggars naow, or next door tew it. Everybudy hez a kick fer a soldier. Ye'll fine em mosly in the jails an the poorhaouses. Look at you fellers as wuz a huntin me. Ther's Meshech on the floor, a drunken, worthless cuss. Thar ye be, Abner, 'thout a shillin in the world, nor a ...
— The Duke of Stockbridge • Edward Bellamy

... GIRL [much distressed] It's because I called him Captain. I meant no harm. [To the gentleman] Oh, sir, don't let him lay a charge agen me for a word ...
— Pygmalion • George Bernard Shaw

... What's to come o' the buiks forbye, wantin' you or me to luik efter them? An' the senawtus'll be sayin' that I got my heid clured wi' fa'in' agen the curbstane." ...
— Alec Forbes of Howglen • George MacDonald

... it goes agen mother to be shakin hands wi' yan that's livin wi' Papists—and Misther Helbeck by the bargain. So wheniver mother talks aboot Amorites or Jesubites, or any o' thattens, she nobbut means Papist—Romanists as our minister coes 'em. He's every bit as bad as her. He would ...
— Helbeck of Bannisdale, Vol. I. • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... she knows all and i daresunt tell miss Bowes but you are the camp fire lady and i feel i must say goodbye to ease your mind dear Mrs Arnold wen you get this letter I shall be Far Away as it says in the song you tort us by the stream and you will never see me agen but i shall think of you alwus and the camp fire and i wish i hadn't dun it only I was skared to deth for she said she wuld half kill me and she alwus keeps her wurd your obedient servant Susannah ...
— For the Sake of the School • Angela Brazil

... was the reply. "I ain't such a juggins as to go agen a toff as makes it worf while to do as I'm bid an' 'old ...
— A Thief in the Night • E. W. Hornung

... and I'll 'ave to 'ave they bo-oots on agen, too. (He gets into his things in a great flurry, and hastens outside.) 'Tis enough to take th' 'art out ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 103, December 3, 1892 • Various

... 'One little job agen before supper,' said Chippy, 'but it'll only be a short un. I want two or three minnows, an' I saw a place wheer ...
— The Wolf Patrol - A Tale of Baden-Powell's Boy Scouts • John Finnemore

... the Soudan longeth not to the Lond of Egypt. And when I say this, I do jape with words, and may hap ye understond me not. Now Englishmen went in shippes to Alessandrie, and brent it, and over ran the Lond, and their soudyours warred agen the Bedoynes, and all to hold the way to Ynde. For it is not long past since Frenchmen let dig a dyke, through the narrow spit of lond, from the Midland sea to the Red sea, wherein was Pharaoh drowned. So this is the shortest way to Ynde there may be, to sail through ...
— Letters to Dead Authors • Andrew Lang

... from Agen," said the merchant; "and I know that when the king was there he made love ...
— The Forty-Five Guardsmen • Alexandre Dumas

... to bring into each, or to find there, some line Of the never completely out-trampled divine; If her heart at high floods swamps her brain now and then, 'Tis but richer for that when the tide ebbs agen, As, after old Nile has subsided, his plain Overflows with a second broad deluge of grain; What a wealth would it tiring to the narrow and sour Could they be as a Child but ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of James Russell Lowell • James Lowell

... an' all—It don't seem right, some'ow, To say such things; but wot I'm feelin' now 'As come at times, I s'pose, to uvver men When you 'ave 'ad a reel ole ding-dong row, Say, ain't it bonzer makin' up agen? Straight wire, it's almost worth...Ar, ...
— The Songs of a Sentimental Bloke • C. J. Dennis

... took him to her father's harbour, And guv to him a ship of fame, Saying, "Farevell, Farevell to you, Lord Bateman, I fear I ne-e-ever shall see you agen." ...
— The Loving Ballad of Lord Bateman • Charles Dickens and William Makepeace Thackeray

... win ower a hantle nor her giein' you the slip that gait, sir. It was sae dooble o' her! It's naething wrang in itsel' 'at a yoong lass sud be taen wi' the attentions o' a bonny lad like lord Forgue! That's na agen the natur 'at God made! But to preten' an' tak in!—to be cunnin' an' sly! that's evil. An' syne for the ither lad—eh, I doobt that's warst o' 'a! Only I kenna hoo far she had committit hersel' wi' him, for she was never open-hertit. Eh, sir! it's a fine thing to hae nae sacrets but sic as ...
— Donal Grant • George MacDonald

... o' mutton o' purpose; got in a lobster, and two crabs; all spoilt by keeping; stink already; weather quite muggy, forced to souse 'em in vinegar; one expense brings on another; never begin the like agen." ...
— Cecilia vol. 2 - Memoirs of an Heiress • Frances (Fanny) Burney (Madame d'Arblay)

... that," said Handy, "we none of us never wanted to do Mr Harding no harm; if he's going now, it's not along of us; and I don't see for what Mr Bunce speaks up agen us that way." ...
— The Warden • Anthony Trollope

... Susan sed arterwards that 'twarn't what she had to dew, but the runnin' up-stairs; that's what killt her. There was one owd gentleman, who lived at the top of the house. He'd ring his bell, and if she din't go di-reckly, he'd ring and ring agen, fit to bring the house down. One daa he rung three times, but Susan was set fast, and coon't go; and when she did, he spook so sharp, that it wholly upset her, and she dropt down o' the floor all in a faint. He ...
— Two Suffolk Friends • Francis Hindes Groome

... see—bit o' Sving, eh?' and his one eye wandered round the room, as if in quest of a dark lantern and phosphorus-box. 'But, I say!' he continued, recalling the eye from its search, and bringing it to bear on Mr. Trott. 'I say, he's a lawyer, our mayor, and insured in the County. If you've a spite agen him, you'd better not burn his house down—blessed if I don't think it would be the greatest favour you could do him.' And he ...
— Sketches by Boz - illustrative of everyday life and every-day people • Charles Dickens

... how manny week, How manny day, dat he ees seeck; How manny night I seet an' hold Da leetla hand dat was so cold. He was so patience, oh, so sweet! Eet hurts my throat for theenk of eet; An' all he evra ask ees w'en Ees gona com' da spreeng agen. Wan day, wan brighta sunny day, He see, across da alleyway, Da leetla girl dat's livin' dere Ees raise her window for da air, An' put outside a leetla pot Of — w'at-you-call? — forgat-me-not. So smalla flower, so leetla theeng! But steell eet mak' hees hearta seeng: "Oh, now, at las', ...
— The Little Book of Modern Verse • Jessie B. Rittenhouse

... as knows best says as it's her only chance, and I'm noan goin' agen it. I shall go daan ...
— Lancashire Idylls (1898) • Marshall Mather

... lettin' another six years go by without comin' home agen, will ye, sir?" said the groom, who was really ...
— Stories of Modern French Novels • Julian Hawthorne

... morning, at three, I left my party, and took a very light gig, determined (as the news were getting daily worse, and the road full of English hurrying to Bourdeaux), to post it from Agen. I was attended by a friend. By paying the post-boys double hires, we got on very fast, and although, from their advanced age and infirmities, the generality of French conveyances will not suffer themselves to be hurried beyond their ordinary pace, this was no time to make any ...
— Travels in France during the years 1814-1815 • Archibald Alison

... Juan. But heavy Rains coming on, we were obliged to beat back and come to Gorgona again, building a Tent ashore for our Armour and Sick Men. We spent till the 25th in Careening; on the 28th we got all aboard agen, rigged and stowed all ready for sea; the Spaniards who were our Prisoners, and who are very Dilatory Sailors (for they hearken more to their Saints than to the Boatswain's Pipe), were much amazed at our Despatch; telling ...
— The Strange Adventures of Captain Dangerous, Vol. 3 of 3 • George Augustus Sala

... Agen, there was presented to him a brave fellow named Printemps, over a hundred years old, who had served under Louis XIV., XV., and XVI., and who, although bending beneath the weight of many years and burdens, finding himself in the presence ...
— The Memoirs of Napoleon Bonaparte • Bourrienne, Constant, and Stewarton

... "Then, agen, there's that professor as comes fishin' in summer. 'Mr. Dellanow,' he sez to me one day, 'I take a great interest in yer.' 'That's a darned sight more'n I take in you,' I sez, for if there's one thing as puts my bristles up it's bein' told as folks takes a' ...
— Mad Shepherds - and Other Human Studies • L. P. Jacks

... against it held his head for a moment between his hands, and regarded the floor. "It does not much matter to me," he went on, "if I only get through my work and have done with it. No man shall say I shirked what I'd got to do. And then when it's over there won't be a word to say agen ...
— The Seaboard Parish Vol. 2 • George MacDonald



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