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preposition
Adown  prep.  Down. (Archaic & Poetic) "Her hair adown her shoulders loosely lay displayed."






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Adown" Quotes from Famous Books



... to stray adown the slopes of that arid waste of rocks, to the River Metauro, winding its way to the sea, through fertile plains, and gleaming here silver and yonder gold in the evening light. Not quite so complacently ...
— Love-at-Arms • Raphael Sabatini

... and listen to me," said the boatman. "As you go up from the river you will find a road, worn deep and smooth, starting from the water's edge, and winding over the moor. It is the trail of Fafnir, adown which he comes at dawn of every day to slake his thirst at the river. Do you dig a pit in this roadway,—a pit narrow and deep,—and hide yourself within it. In the morning, when Fafnir passes over it, let him feel the ...
— The Story of Siegfried • James Baldwin

... rowels several inches in diameter, that glitter like great stars behind their heels. They have tight-fitting jackets of velveteen, closed in front, and over the bosom elaborately embroidered; scarfs of China crape round their waists, the ends dangling adown the left hip, terminating in a fringe of gold cord; on their heads sombreros with broad brim, and band of bullion—the toquilla. In addition, each has over his shoulders a manga—the most magnificent of outside garments, with ...
— The Flag of Distress - A Story of the South Sea • Mayne Reid

... feast spread wide before them; the horses wary of approach, just seen in compact bands upon the verge; the patriarchal windmills—at wide spaces—signalling to each other their peaceful task; the little groups of horsemen coming adown the winding road, or stopping to greet some good wife and her gossip—going abroad in a high-railed cart in quest of trade, or friendly call. And as the day wanes, the sleek cows, with considered careful walk and ...
— The Romantic Settlement of Lord Selkirk's Colonists - The Pioneers of Manitoba • George Bryce

... earth, and O ether! A butterfly breeze Floated up, flutter'd down, and poised blithe on the trees. Through the revelling woods, o'er the sharp-rippled stream, Up the vale slow uncoiling itself out of dream, Around the brown meadows, adown the hill-slope, The spirits of morning ...
— Lucile • Owen Meredith

... sigh loud, and often. And me sighing so, one came carolling like a bird adown t' other road. 'Ay, chirp and chirp,' cried I bitterly. 'Thou has not lost sweetheart, and friend, thy father's hearth, thy mother's smile, and every penny in the world.' And at last he did so carol, and carol, I jumped up in ire to get away from his ...
— The Cloister and the Hearth • Charles Reade

... Adown the Strand, Fleet Street, and in that part of the city adjoining the Exchange, coffee-houses abounded in great numbers. Coffee, which in this reign became a favourite beverage, was introduced into London a couple of years before the restoration. It had, however, been brought into ...
— Royalty Restored - or, London under Charles II. • J. Fitzgerald Molloy

... the glittering current In soft torrent Rains adown the gentle girl, As if, drop by drop, should fall, One and all From her ...
— Poems • Victor Hugo

... things should be, That cruel unkind separation, Adown in the depths of the sea Should follow the ...
— Modern Eloquence: Vol III, After-Dinner Speeches P-Z • Various

... on high, The rich to his rest; and aright the house warded Earls untold of number, as oft did they erewhile. The bench-boards they bar'd them, and there they spread over With beds and with bolsters. Of the beer-skinkers one 1240 Who fain was and fey bow'd adown to his floor-rest. At their heads then they rested their rounds of the battle, Their board-woods bright-shining. There on the bench was, Over the atheling, easy to look on The battle-steep war-helm, the byrny be-ringed, The wood of the onset, all-glorious. Their wont was That oft and oft ...
— The Tale of Beowulf - Sometime King of the Folk of the Weder Geats • Anonymous

... filled the air a sound of deep, heavenly melody, which swept solemnly adown the aisles, and filled with its melodious thunder every corner of the great building. I listened with my face upraised, my lips parted. It was the organ, and presently, after a wonderful melody, which set my heart beating—a melody full of the most witchingly sweet high notes, and a breadth and ...
— The First Violin - A Novel • Jessie Fothergill

... few but haggard brows had part Below that street's uneven crown, And there the murmurs of the mart Swarmed faint as hums of drowsy noon. With voices chiming in quaint tune From sun-soaked hulls long wharves adown, The singing sailors rough and brown Won far melodious renown, Here, listening children ceasing play, And mothers sad their well-a-way, In this ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 7, No. 43, May, 1861 • Various

... will go to Lettermore When white sea-trout are on the run, When purple glows between the rocks About Lord Dudley's fishing box Adown the road to Lettermore, And wide seas tarnish in ...
— Georgian Poetry 1918-19 • Various

... we poured into the wavy sea, The strength of our two founts in vain, For two opposing powers hold it concealed, Lest it go rolling aimlessly adown. The strength unmeasured of the burning heart, Withholds a passage to the lofty streams; Barring their twofold course unto the sea, Nature abhors the covered ground.[W] Now say, afflicted heart, what canst thou bring To oppose against us with an equal force? Oh, where is he, will boast himself ...
— The Heroic Enthusiast, Part II (Gli Eroici Furori) - An Ethical Poem • Giordano Bruno

... both did sweat, With swords of tempered steel, Till blood adown their cheeks, like rain, They trickling ...
— English Songs and Ballads • Various

... stream below. Seeing Claud securely seated in the bottom of the canoe, and the freight nicely balanced, the hunter took his paddle, instead of setting-pole, the better to restrain the speed of the boat at the most rapid and dangerous passes, and struck out into the current, adown which, under the quick and skilful strokes of its experienced oarsman, it was borne with almost the swiftness of a bird on the wing, till it reached the quiet waters of the pond; and, this being soon passed over, they entered and descended the next reach ...
— Gaut Gurley • D. P. Thompson

... with mickle joy. Even with the words that came upon the sea A short boat sailing, moving amid the waves And two women were therein wounderously clad. And they took Arthur anon and bare him quickly And softly him adown laid and to glide forth gan they. Then was it come what Merlin said whilom That unmeasured sorrow should be at Arthur's forth faring. Britons believe yet that he is still in life And dwelleth in Avelon with the fairest of all elves, And ...
— English Literature For Boys And Girls • H.E. Marshall

... the congregated Fall, And the angle oceanic Where the deepening thunders call— And the Gorge so grim, And the firmamental rim! Multitudinously thronging The waters all converge, Then they sweep adown in sloping Solidity ...
— Battle-Pieces and Aspects of the War • Herman Melville

... in his— You know how his God-troubled forehead awes— He looked into my eyes, and shook his head, As if he dared not speak of what he saw; Then muttered, sighed, and slowly turned away The weight of his intolerable brow. When I glanced back, I saw him, as before, Sailing adown the hall on out-spread wings. Indeed, my lord, he should not do these things; They strain the weakness of mortality A jot too far. As for poor Ritta, she Fled like ...
— Representative Plays by American Dramatists: 1856-1911: Francesca da Rimini • George Henry Boker

... * I rent the veil of modesty; And stints not Love to rend that veil * Garring disgrace on grace to alight; The robe of sickness then I donned * But rent to rags was secrecy: Wherefore my love and longing heart * Proclaim your high supremest might; The tear drop railing adown my cheek * Telleth my tale of ignomy: And all the hid was seen by all * And all ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 1 • Richard F. Burton

... alone, nothing was heard but the measured ticking of the old clock on the corner of the stairs. The lamp had been taken away by the departing Mona, and in the obscurity, the moonbeams fell in grey streaks adown the damask curtains; and after a brief meditation on the subject of her reading, Amanda rose, noiselessly ascended the carpeted stairs to her room, approached the window, drew aside the drapery, and gazed towards Mainville. Thus had she done each night since ...
— The Advocate • Charles Heavysege

... maiden, heir of kings, A king has left his place; The majesty of death has swept All other from his face; And thou upon thy mother's breast No longer lean adown, But take the glory for the rest, And rule the land that loves thee best. The maiden wept, She wept ...
— Life of Her Most Gracious Majesty the Queen V.1. • Sarah Tytler

... It led adown the sloping hill, and through the valley wound, And where the blooming clover shed its fragrance all around, And then between the maple trees, across the little brook, To where the old fence bars let down, a tortuous course it took; And often are the times I've heard the merry, ringing ...
— The Old Hanging Fork and Other Poems • George W. Doneghy

... alas within me 5 Every lost sense falleth away for anguish; When as I look'd on thee, upon my lips no Whisper abideth, Straight my tongue froze, Lesbia; soon a subtle Fire thro' each limb streameth adown; with inward 10 Sound the full ears tinkle, on either eye night's Canopy darkens. Ease alone, Catullus, alone afflicts thee; Ease alone breeds error of heady riot; Ease hath entomb'd princes of old renown ...
— The Poems and Fragments of Catullus • Catullus

... dim abodes to roam the primrose-hearted eve, Opening their glimmering lips to breathe some wondrous story. Hush, not a whisper! Let your heart alone go dreaming. Dream unto dream may pass: deep in the heart alone Murmurs the Mighty One his solemn undertone. Canst thou not see adown the silver cloudland streaming Rivers of faery light, dewdrop on dewdrop falling, Starfire of silver flames, lighting the dark beneath? And what enraptured hosts burn on the dusky heath! Come thou away with them for Heaven to Earth is calling. These are Earth's ...
— Imaginations and Reveries • (A.E.) George William Russell

... laughter seemed to set the air a-quivering. Ramiro was lying back in his chair a prey to such a passion of mirth that it swelled the veins of his throat and brow until I thought that they must burst—and, from my soul, I hoped they would. Adown his rugged cheeks two tears were slowly trickling. The Lord Filippo, as presently transpired, had been telling him of the epic I had written in praise of the Lord Giovanni's prowess. Naught would now satisfy that ...
— The Shame of Motley • Raphael Sabatini

... name before, But in due season it became To him who fondly brooded o'er Those pages a beloved name! Adown the centuries I walked Mid pastoral scenes and royal show; With seigneurs and their dames I talked— The ...
— The Love Affairs of a Bibliomaniac • Eugene Field

... With 'scutcheons of silver the coffin is shielded, And pages stand mute by the canopied pall: Through the courts at deep midnight the torches are gleaming, In the proudly arched chapel the banners are beaming, Far adown the long aisle sacred music is streaming, Lamenting a chief of the ...
— A History of English Romanticism in the Nineteenth Century • Henry A. Beers

... got himself up, but only by curling himself round and taking off his snow-shoes. By degrees he got the snow-shoes put on again, and mounted out of the hole which he had made, with snow adhering to all his garments and snow melting adown his neck and wrists. He now realised that he had spent nearly half an hour in walking not a quarter of a mile. With this cheerless reflection as a companion he went doggedly on, choosing now the drifted ...
— A Dozen Ways Of Love • Lily Dougall

... As everywhere else, the woodwork was worm-eaten, and the timbers set up a dismal creaking under the weight of his body, but he had undertaken to investigate the meaning of this architectural eccentricity, and would not now turn back. On he crept, noiselessly as possible, adown the twisting stairs, carefully looking ahead for pitfalls and unsuspected developments. Once he paused, thinking he heard the distant tread of a foot, but the sound died away, and he resumed his course. Some of the steps were so broken and rotten that ...
— The Ghost of Guir House • Charles Willing Beale

... had ceased to chirp; the katydid no longer quarrelled in shrill tones with her neighbor; the wail of the sad whippoorwill was hushed; the rugged sides of old Crow Nest were rounded and softened in the silvery moonbeams, adown which the little brooklet sprang this night with a more lightsome ...
— The Fairy Nightcaps • Frances Elizabeth Barrow

... she stands to greet Me as I come adown the street, The sunlight falling on her hair Leaves warm caresses gently there— A picture with true ...
— A Williams Anthology - A Collection of the Verse and Prose of Williams College, 1798-1910 • Compiled by Edwin Partridge Lehman and Julian Park

... Spectators, with imagined terrors warm, Anxious expect the bursting of the storm: But, all unfit in such a pile to dwell, His voice comes forth, like Echo from her cell, To swell the tempest needful aid denies, And all adown the stage in feeble murmurs dies. 900 What man, like Barry, with such pains, can err In elocution, action, character? What man could give, if Barry was not here, Such well applauded tenderness to Lear? Who else can speak so very, very fine, That ...
— Poetical Works • Charles Churchill

... since he died." The Maghrabi,[FN68] the Magician, hearing these words threw himself upon Alaeddin and wound his arms around his neck and fell to bussing him, weeping the while with tears trickling adown his cheeks. But when the lad saw the Moorman's case he was seized with surprise thereat and questioned him, saying, "What causeth thee weep, O my lord: and how camest thou to know my father?" "How canst thou, O my son," replied the Moorman, in a soft voice saddened by emotion, "question ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 3 • Richard F. Burton

... full-throated people of the air, Harmonious preachers of the sweets of love, That midway range, as half at home with heaven, Are quiring, with a heartiness of joy That the high tide of song o'erbrims the grove, And far adown the meadow runs to waste; How would the soul, there floating, loathe to mark Sudden contention; sharp, discordant screams, From throats whose single duty is ...
— The Knickerbocker, or New-York Monthly Magazine, May 1844 - Volume 23, Number 5 • Various

... the opposite extremity—and behold! there came swiftly, from the gloom above, similar shadows, which swept hurriedly along the gallery to the right, as if borne involuntarily adown the sides of some invisible stream; and the faces of these spectres were more distinct than those that emerged from the opposite passage; and on some was joy, and on others sorrow—some were vivid with expectation and hope, some unutterably dejected by awe and horror. And so they passed, ...
— The Last Days of Pompeii • Edward George Bulwer-Lytton

... Earls were the wrights that wrought it, and silver nailed its doors; Earls' wives were the weaving-women, queens' daughters strewed its floors, And the masters of its song-craft were the mightiest men that cast The sails of the storm of battle adown the bickering blast. ...
— The Influence of Old Norse Literature on English Literature • Conrad Hjalmar Nordby

... the royal pair. Here, too, are dishes of chinaware fit to be the dining-set of those same princely personages when they make a regal banquet in the stateliest hall of their palace—full five feet high—and behold their nobles feasting adown the long perspective of the table. Betwixt the king and queen should sit my little Annie, the prettiest fairy of them all. Here stands a turbaned Turk threatening us with his sabre, like an ugly heathen ...
— Twice Told Tales • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... climb along to the foot of the "Silver Cascade," farther and higher still, till we call see the little brook murmuring on its mountain way in the cliff above, and look over against it, and down upon it, as it streams through the rock, leaps adown the height, widening and thinning, spreading out over the face of the declivity, transmuting it into crystal, and veiling it with foam, leaping over in a hundred little arcs, lightly bounding to its basin below, then sweeping finely around the base of ...
— Gala-days • Gail Hamilton

... fifty-four,—a day long to be remembered, both in the Eastern and Western world, for in it was the sundering of many mortal ties. Many a family circle wept as they looked upon the familiar places, which would know their lost ones no more; but ah, chide me not, kind reader, in thus leading you adown to the coldness of death, in setting before you that which causes your tender heart to shudder. Mourn not for these departed; for would we not wish to meet them there, when, ere long, this mortal ...
— Natalie - A Gem Among the Sea-Weeds • Ferna Vale

... be for her carpet, And her curtains of Roses so fair; And a Rosy crown, while far adown Floats ...
— Marigold Garden • Kate Greenaway

... sphere-descended be— Hence away!— Thou mightier Goddess, thou demand'st my lay, 5 Born when earth was seiz'd with cholic; Or as more sapient sages say, What time the Legion diabolic Compell'd their beings to enshrine In bodies vile of herded swine, 10 Precipitate adown the steep With hideous rout were plunging in the deep, And hog and devil mingling grunt and yell Seiz'd on the ear with horrible obtrusion;— Then if aright old legendaries tell, 15 Wert thou begot by ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Vol I and II • Samuel Taylor Coleridge

... wind, from the open casement, fanned My brow and Helen's, as we, hand in hand, Sat looking out upon the twilight scene, In dreamy silence. Helen's dark blue eyes, Like two lost stars that wandered from the skies Some night adown the meteor's shining track, And always had been grieving to go back, Now gazed up, wistfully, at heaven's dome, And seemed to recognize and long for home. Her sweet voice broke the silence: "Wish, Maurine, Before you speak! you know the ...
— Maurine and Other Poems • Ella Wheeler Wilcox

... a heath, through many a woodland dun, Through buried paths, where sleepy twilight dreams The summer time away. One track unseams A wooded cleft, and, far away, the blue Of ocean fades upon him; then, anew, He sinks adown a solitary glen, Where there was never sound of mortal men, Saving, perhaps, some snow-light cadences 80 Melting to silence, when upon the breeze Some holy bark let forth an anthem sweet, To cheer itself to Delphi. Still his feet Went swift beneath the ...
— Endymion - A Poetic Romance • John Keats

... of his recitation, he found himself walking adown in Zayn al-Mawasif's street and smelt the sweet savour of the pastiles wherewithal she had incensed the house; wherefore his vitals fluttered and his heart was like to leave his breast and desire flamed up in him and distraction redoubled upon him; when lo, and behold! ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 8 • Richard F. Burton

... suns, the stars above us Gaze adown with burning glow; Fill the lilies' cups gigantic ...
— The German Classics of The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Vol. VI. • Editor-in-Chief: Kuno Francke

... alas! the dreadful work is done; Fresh legions pour adown the Pyrenees: It deepens still, the work is scarce begun, Nor mortal eye the distant end foresees. Fall'n nations gaze on Spain; if freed, she frees More than her fell Pizarros once enchained: Strange retribution! now Columbia's ease Repairs the wrongs that Quito's ...
— The Works of Lord Byron, Volume 2 • George Gordon Byron

... sands that may sometimes be gathered (always, perhaps, if we know how to seek for them) along the dry bed of a torrent adown which passion and feeling have foamed, and passed away. It is good, therefore, in mature life, to trace back such torrents ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 18, No. 110, December, 1866 - A Magazine of Literature, Science, Art, and Politics • Various

... Adown the torturing mile of street I mark him come and go, Thread in and out with tireless feet The crossings to and fro; A soul that treads without ...
— Green Bays. Verses and Parodies • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... bring a doctor to Seagate Hall; the most commonplace burglary, without any question of jewels, would summon the police inspector thither. After formal salutations, Mr. St. John Raven looked doubtfully adown the corridor. ...
— The Dictator • Justin McCarthy

... an hour the storm raged, and all the while we remained upon our knees beside the dead anchorite. Then the thunder receded and gradually died away in the distance; the rain ceased; and the dawn crept pale as a moon-stone adown the valley. ...
— The Strolling Saint • Raphael Sabatini

... stood within a hall of blackest marble, so lofty that even in the rosy light scarce could my vision reach the great groins of the roof. Music wailed about its spaces, and all adown its length stood winged Spirits fashioned in living fire, and such was the brightness of their forms that I could not look on them. In its centre was an altar, small and square, and I stood before the empty altar. Then ...
— Cleopatra • H. Rider Haggard

... creep on Adown the sands of Time, Give back the loving tones of yore, That haunt us here forever more As echoing ...
— Love or Fame; and Other Poems • Fannie Isabelle Sherrick

... limbs adown Flows subtle flame; with sound its own Rings either ear, and o'er are strown ...
— The Satyricon, Complete • Petronius Arbiter

... figures largely. To enumerate instances would be to inflict good folks with triteness and truism. I do not wish to rob my reader of his rights—think it out for yourself, beginning with Concord and Cambridge, working backward adown ...
— Little Journeys to the Homes of the Great, Volume 6 - Subtitle: Little Journeys to the Homes of Eminent Artists • Elbert Hubbard

... repay thee for a song so rare? For not the whispering south-wind on its way So much delights me, nor wave-smitten beach, Nor streams that race adown their ...
— The Bucolics and Eclogues • Virgil

... Blake, and waved the hand that still held his hat riverwards, adown the sloping lawn. They moved away together, Sir Rowland pacing between his love of yesterday and his love of to-day, pressed with questions from both. He shaded his eyes to look at the river, dazzling in the morning sunlight that came over Polden Hill, and, standing thus, ...
— Mistress Wilding • Rafael Sabatini

... These cups, including the covers and pedestals, are very large and weighty, although the bowl-part would hardly contain more than half a pint of wine, which, when the custom was first established, each guest was probably expected to drink off at a draught. In passing them from hand to hand adown a long table of compotators, there is a peculiar ceremony which I may hereafter have occasion to describe. Meanwhile, if I might assume such a liberty, I should be glad to invite the reader to the official dinner-table of his Worship, the Mayor, at a large English ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 12, August, 1863, No. 70 - A Magazine of Literature, Art, and Politics • Various

... making every one around them uncomfortable, and in the happy faculty which they possessed in an eminent degree, of imparting injurious doubts and covert insinuations as to the manners and habits of their neighbors, who else might have journeyed peacefully adown the vale of life in perfect good faith with all the world; moreover, they hated a mystery, did these two sister-spinsters, from their own innate frankness and openness of disposition, they said, and considered themselves so much in duty bound ...
— Graham's Magazine Vol XXXIII No. 3 September 1848 • Various

... broken. The pen falls powerless from my shivering hand. With thy dear name as text, though bidden by thee, I can not write-I can not speak or think— Alas, I can not feel; for 'tis not feeling, This standing motionless upon the golden Threshold of the wide-open gate of dreams, Gazing, entranced, adown the gorgeous vista, And thrilling as I see, upon the right, Upon the left, and all the way along, Amid empurpled vapors, far away To where ...
— The Works of Edgar Allan Poe - Volume 5 (of 5) of the Raven Edition • Edgar Allan Poe

... the grief That Duart's lady bore; His boat with sail half-raised flies down The sound by green Lismore. Ahaladah, Ahaladah! Why speeds your boat so fast? No scene of joy shall light your track Adown the spray-strewn blast. ...
— Memories of Canada and Scotland - Speeches and Verses • John Douglas Sutherland Campbell

... low-breathed prayer when the sunset glow'd crimson in the West, And the sweet "Good-night," and the tender kiss, ere I sank to tranquil rest; Mother! that prayer still haunts me, adown the dreary years, And the earnest tones of thy gentle voice, can steep ...
— Lays from the West • M. A. Nicholl

... nation requires a somewhat rare combination of gifts and experiences. Dowered with the poet's heart, he must yet have passed his 'wander-jaehre' amid the stern solitude of the Austral waste — must have ridden the race in the back-block township, guided the reckless stock-horse adown the mountain spur, and followed the night-long moving, spectral-seeming herd 'in the droving days'. Amid such scarce congenial surroundings comes oft that finer sense which renders visible bright gleams of humour, pathos, and romance, which, like undiscovered gold, await the fortunate adventurer. ...
— The Man from Snowy River • Andrew Barton 'Banjo' Paterson

... affections which came to him so naturally, in the fields and at the fireside, and wherever he communed with himself, were of a higher tone than those which all men shared with him. A simple soul—simple as when his mother first taught him the old prophecy—he beheld the marvellous features beaming adown the valley, and still wondered that their human counterpart was so long ...
— The Great Stone Face - And Other Tales Of The White Mountains • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... the sky, the mists are gone, And overhead the lilting bird of dawn Has spread, adoring-wise, as for a prayer, Those wondrous wings of his, Which never yet were symbols of despair! It is the feathery foeman of the night Who shakes adown the air Song-scented trills and sunlit ecstasies. Aye! 'tis the lark, the chorister in gray, Who sings hosannas to the lord of light, And will not stint the measure of his lay As hour to hour, and joy to joy, succeeds; For he's the morning-mirth ...
— The Song of the Flag - A National Ode • Eric Mackay

... the Track of Stars coming towards the right along the edge of it till thou comest to Ingazi. There the soul of the beggar Yeb sat long, then, breathing deep, set off on his great journey earthward adown the crystal steps. Straight through the spaces where no stars are found to rest at, following the dull gleam of earth and her fields till he come at last ...
— Time and the Gods • Lord Dunsany [Edward J. M. D. Plunkett]

... that the gliding rivers erst had seen Adown their verdant channels gently rolled, Or falling streams which to the valleys green Distilled from tops of Alpine mountains cold, Those he desired in vain, new torments been, Augmented thus with wish of comforts old, Those waters ...
— Jerusalem Delivered • Torquato Tasso

... their steady pace Along the level track, Three when they climbed—but six when they Came swiftly striding back Adown the hill; and little skill It needs, methinks, to show, Up hill and down together told, Four miles ...
— A Tangled Tale • Lewis Carroll

... twisted root I loosed a pebble with my foot That leaped the precipice, And like an arrow seemed to shoot Adown the deep abyss. ...
— Poems - Vol. IV • Hattie Howard

... that men doth save Mighty spurn with foot I gave. Snoekoll's throat it smote aright, The fierce follower of the fight, And by mighty dint of it Were the tofts of tooth-hedge split; The strong spear-walk's iron rim, Tore adown the jaws of him." ...
— The Story of Grettir The Strong • Translated by Eirikr Magnusson and William Morris

... very different from the dust-stained cavalier who the day before passed over the desert plain. Now he appears in a gorgeous laced uniform, with lancer cap and plume, gold cords and aiguillettes dangling adown his breast; for he has this morning made his toilet with care, in consideration of the company ...
— The Lone Ranche • Captain Mayne Reid

... dips Adown Commercial Road, Till you may see the masts of ships, With all their canvas stowed, Stand o'er the house-tops, high Against blue sky; And thus Romance doth ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 147, September 16, 1914 • Various

... Leo, undismayed, With fiery footstep tracks the Sun, To plunge adown the western blaze, Sublimely ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 09, No. 51, January, 1862 • Various

... my friend, to mark If his new joys were quelled by the weird strains: He heard it not—he only saw the face, Blushing and girlish, 'neath its bridal veil; Saw not the stronger spirit standing by, With immortelles upon its massive front, And drooping wings adown its snowy shroud, And sense of wrong dewing its starry eye; Nor heard the chant of agony, reproach, Chilling the naive joy of ...
— The Continental Monthly, Vol. 4, No. 2, August, 1863 - Devoted to Literature and National Policy • Various

... Nations unborn, adown the tides of time Shall keep thy name and fame and thought sublime, And o'er the rolling world from age to age Thy characters shall thrill ...
— Shakspere, Personal Recollections • John A. Joyce

... pang shot through the young mothers heart, and her arms tightened their clasp about the little form, while the hot tears chased each other adown her cheeks. One fell on ...
— Elsie's Womanhood • Martha Finley

... heard the whisperings low To modest Daffodil That won her smile ere yet the snow Had melted and begun its flow Adown the little rill. ...
— The Loom of Life • Cotton Noe

... this I turned away, Feeling adown the small-o'-the back That gentle warmth that waits upon us, when WE KNOW We have said a good thing; Knowing it better than the vain world Ever can or ever will Reader, I have sung my song! The BOA AND THE B——, like ...
— The Humourous Poetry of the English Language • James Parton

... long axes beside Ambresbury, with miserable death! But if I might of the earl win to me the country; then might I say my sooth words, that God himself had granted good to me, if I might fell my foes to ground anon, and avenge my dear kindred, whom they have laid adown!" ...
— Brut • Layamon

... back in the midst of the household goods and the wagons, Like to a gypsy camp, or a leaguer after a battle, All escape cut off by the sea, and the sentinels near them, Lay encamped for the night the houseless Acadian farmers. Back to its nethermost caves retreated the bellowing ocean, Dragging adown the beach the rattling pebbles, and leaving Inland and far up the shore the stranded boats of the sailors. Then, as the night descended, the herds returned from their pastures; Sweet was the moist still ...
— The Children's Own Longfellow • Henry W. Longfellow

... pyramids without thee have I seen, My brother sweet, and yet, as tribute sad, The bitter tears have poured adown my cheek, And sadly mindful of thy absence now I chisel here this ...
— The Common People of Ancient Rome - Studies of Roman Life and Literature • Frank Frost Abbott

... look adown her apron!" floated the words through his brain. Ah! Here at last was the Gila he had been seeking! ...
— The Witness • Grace Livingston Hill Lutz

... never knew till now, A sense of want, yea of an infinite need, Cried out within him—rather moaned than cried. And he would sit a silent hour and gaze Upon the distant hills with dazzling snow Upon their peaks, and thence, adown their sides, Streaked vaporous, or starred in solid blue. And then a shadowy sense arose in him, As if behind those world-inclosing hills, There sat a mighty woman, with a face As calm as life, when its intensity ...
— A Hidden Life and Other Poems • George MacDonald

... I shall go where there is peace, And where joy wakes for ever: There I shall meet my hunter; He shall build our lodge beside the murmuring stream, And thatch it with the vine, whose ripe, black grapes Shall hang adown in clusters; Our little babes shall pluck them. Warrior, I shall not be your wife— Father, you have no daughter— Brothers, your sister lies upon the earth, Cold, bleeding, lifeless, and ...
— Traditions of the North American Indians, Vol. 2 (of 3) • James Athearn Jones

... Adown the rock small runlets wept, And reckless ivies leaned and crept, And little spots of sunshine slept On its brown steeps and made them fair; And broader beams athwart it shot, Where martins cheeped in ...
— Poems by Jean Ingelow, In Two Volumes, Volume I. • Jean Ingelow

... possess the advantage of lying oversea, from the beaten track—over the hills and far away. 'Here,' he may be supposed to feel, as he gazes about him in his familiar, Old World environment, 'there is nothing but what has been tried and exploited, sifted through and through time and again, all adown the centuries. What chance is there for me among the crowd, where there is nothing new, nothing untried? Whereas, out there—' Ah, the magic of those words, 'Out there!' and 'Over there!' for home-bred youth! It is good, wholesome magic, too, and it will be a bad day ...
— The Record of Nicholas Freydon - An Autobiography • A. J. (Alec John) Dawson

... sound is on the midnight deep— The voice of waters vast; And onward, with resistless sweep, The torrent rushes past, In frantic chase, wave after wave, The crowding surges press, and rave Their mingled might to cast Adown Niagara's giant steep; The fretted billows foaming leap With wild tumultuous roar; The clashing din ascends on high, In deaf'ning thunders to the sky, And shakes ...
— Roughing it in the Bush • Susanna Moodie

... the brief beloved span Of this our glad earth-travelling, Of beauty's bloom and ordered plan, Of love and love's compassioning, Of all the dear delights that spring From man's communion with man; We cherish every hour that strays Adown the cataract of the days.' 'We see the dear untroubled skies, We see the glory of the rose, And, laugh, nor grieve that clouds will rise And wax with every wind that blows, Nor that the blossoming time will close, ...
— Georgian Poetry 1911-12 • Various

... devil bounding and casting darts against the Wicket Gate; the scroll of flying horrors that hang over Christian by the Mouth of Hell; the horned shade that comes behind him whispering blasphemies; the daylight breaking through that rent cave-mouth of the mountains and falling chill adown the haunted tunnel; Christian's further progress along the causeway, between the two black pools, where, at every yard or two, a gin, a pitfall, or a snare awaits the passer-by—loathsome white devilkins harbouring close under the bank to work the springes, Christian ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. XXII (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... dead, And overthrew the next that follow'd him, And blindly rush'd on all the rout behind. But at the flash and motion of the man They vanish'd panic-stricken, like a shoal Of darting fish, that on a summer morn Adown the crystal dykes at Camelot Come slipping o'er their shadows on the sand, But if a man who stands upon the brink But lift a shining hand against the sun, There is not left the twinkle of a fin Betwixt the cressy islets white in flower; So, scared but at the motion of the man, Fled ...
— Journeys Through Bookland, Vol. 5 • Charles Sylvester

... gilded morn when south winds blow, And gently shake the hawthorn's silver crown, Wafting its scent the forest-glade adown, The dewy shelter of the bounding Doe, Then, under trees, soft tufts of primrose show Their palely-yellowing flowers;—to the moist Sun Blue harebells peep, while cowslips stand unblown, Plighted to riper May;—and lavish ...
— Original sonnets on various subjects; and odes paraphrased from Horace • Anna Seward

... beard like saffron shone, And to his girdle fell adown; His shoes of leather bright; Of Bruges were his hose so brown, His robe it was of ciclatoun - He was ...
— Playful Poems • Henry Morley

... of sublunar things Oblivion spreads her unrelenting wings, And sweeps adown her dark unebbing tide Man, and his mightiest monuments of pride— Alone, aloft, immutable, sublime, Star-like, ensphered above the track of time, Great SHAKSPEARE beams with undiminish'd ray. His bright ...
— Poems (1828) • Thomas Gent

... behold The slim-leaved trees against the evening sky Golden and calm, still moving languidly. So for a time upon the brink she sat, Debating in her mind of this and that, And then arose and slowly from her cast Her raiment, and adown the steps she passed Into the water, and therein she played, Till of herself at last she grew afraid, And of the broken image of her face, And the loud splashing in that lonely place. So from the bath she gat her quietly, And clad herself in whatso haste might be; And when at last she was apparelled ...
— The Earthly Paradise - A Poem • William Morris

... morn in weaker plight with hopes e'er fewer few: "Be not" (I say) "so hard of heart!" for did you only deign * In phantom guise to visit me 'twere joy enough to view. But when ye saw my writ ye grudged to me the smallest boon * And cast adown the flag of faith though well my troth ye knew; Nor aught of answer you vouchsafe, albe you wot full well * The words therein address the heart and pierce the spirit through. You deemed yourself all too ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 2 • Richard F. Burton

... fathers, By river, lake, and shore, When far adown the steep of Time The vision rose once more I saw along the winter snow A spectral column pour, And high above their broken ranks ...
— The Poetical Works of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Complete • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

... notes of praise the joyful shepherds had quickly sped Past rock and shadow, adown the hill, to kneel at the Saviour's lowly bed; While, like the spirits of phantom night, Followed ...
— Christmas in Legend and Story - A Book for Boys and Girls • Elva S. Smith

... that the other likewise up arose, And her fair locks, which formerly were bound Up in one knot, she low adown did loose, Which, flowing long and thick, her cloth'd around, And th' ivory in golden mantle gown'd: So that fair spectacle from him was reft; Yet that which reft it, no less fair was found. So hid in locks and waves from looker's theft, ...
— Stories from the Italian Poets: With Lives of the Writers, Vol. 2 • Leigh Hunt

... mother looked out, so kind and so true, Adown where the rushes and lily-pads grew; They looked very gay, As they paddled away, With their bright, yellow backs, on the water ...
— Our Young Folks at Home and Abroad • Various

... founded by colonies of Negroes. Through its open gates long and ceaseless caravans, laden with gold, silver, ivory, frankincense, and palm-oil, poured the riches of Africa into the capacious lap of the city. The learning of this people, embalmed in the immortal hieroglyphic, flowed adown the Nile, and, like spray, spread over the delta of that time-honored stream, on by the beautiful and venerable city of Thebes,—the city of a hundred gates, another monument to Negro genius and civilization, ...
— History of the Negro Race in America From 1619 to 1880. Vol 1 - Negroes as Slaves, as Soldiers, and as Citizens • George W. Williams

... to life the faded tapestries of yesterday side by side with the vivid multi-coloured bas-reliefs of to-day! The frou-frou of brocade and lavender adown bygone corridors, and the sharp toned clarion call of Twentieth Century ...
— Terribly Intimate Portraits • Noel Coward

... of our autumnal foliage is unknown in Europe, and how it lights up with brilliant smiles the dark, stern face of the mountains! Even when the sun is clouded, the beeches that skirt the evergreens look like a golden fringe, radiant in the sun; and wherever they are seemingly rippling adown the mountain's side, they make 'sunshine in a shady place.' The maples are flame-colored, and in masses so bright that you can scarcely look steadily on them; and where they are small, and stand singly, they resemble (to compare the greater ...
— The Continental Monthly, Vol. 2 No 4, October, 1862 - Devoted To Literature And National Policy • Various

... away the bars and blocks, And set the good ship free! Why lingers on these dusty rocks The young bride of the sea? Look! how she moves adown the grooves, In graceful beauty now! How lowly on the breast she loves ...
— The Complete Works of Whittier - The Standard Library Edition with a linked Index • John Greenleaf Whittier

... devils' mere. Bloody the billows were boiling there, turbid the tide of tumbling waves horribly seething, with sword-blood hot, by that doomed one dyed, who in den of the moor laid forlorn his life adown, his heathen soul, and hell received it. Home then rode the hoary clansmen from that merry journey, and many a youth, on horses white, the hardy warriors, back from the mere. Then Beowulf's glory eager ...
— Beowulf • Anonymous

... of enchantment—a long, moonlit colonnade adown which beguiling wood nymphs might have footed it featly. The moonshine fell through the arching boughs and made a mosaic of silver light and clear-cut shadow for the unfriendly lovers to walk in. On either side was the hovering gloom of the woods, and around them was a great ...
— Chronicles of Avonlea • Lucy Maud Montgomery

... the Sun adown the Western Sky! Each cherish'd hope had prov'd its vanity! Now neither Earth, nor Heaven was mine. Rejected, sad, abandon'd, and forlorn; Of God it seem'd not lov'd; of Hell, the scorn! No ...
— The Knickerbocker, or New-York Monthly Magazine, June 1844 - Volume 23, Number 6 • Various

... blankly by forlorn and hungering eyes! And when the night is deep, Come visions, sweet and sad, and bearing pain Of hopings vain— Void, void and vain, for scarce the sleeping sight Has seen its old delight, When thro' the grasps of love that bid it stay It vanishes away On silent wings that roam adown the ways ...
— The House of Atreus • AEschylus

... the marble trough, there seems O, last of my pale, mistresses, Sweetness! A twylipped scarlet pansie. My caress Tinges thy steelgray eyes to violet. Adown thy body skips the pit-a-pat Of treatment once heard in a hospital For plagues ...
— Silverpoints • John Gray

... sets free the rills, And melts the Winter's hoards of snow, How fast they leap adown the hills, How wildly ...
— Chatterbox Stories of Natural History • Anonymous

... of license repress the life of the spirit, and the soul never blossoms; and this is what it is to lose one's soul. All adown the centuries thinking men have noted these truths, and again and again we find individuals forsaking, in horror, the life of the senses and devoting themselves to the ...
— Little Journeys to the Homes of the Great, Volume 5 (of 14) • Elbert Hubbard

... curst be the day, and unchancy the hour, When I sat me adown to the spinnin' o't! Then some evil spirit or warlock had power, And made sic an ill beginnin' o't. May Spunkie my feet to the boggie betray, The lunzie folk steal my new kirtle away, And Robin forsake me for ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel , Volume I. - The Songs of Scotland of the past half century • Various

... a cottage adown in the West When I was a boy, a boy; But I knew no peace and I took no rest Though the roses nigh smothered my snug little nest; For the smell of the sea Was much rarer to me, And the life of a sailor was all ...
— Collected Poems - Volume One (of 2) • Alfred Noyes

... French parish priest is subjected. At home he lives like a peasant—a fact which, in itself, is not particularly cruel, inasmuch as he is usually a peasant born. But his fellow peasants don't breakfast at the chateau and gaze adown the savory vistas opened by cutlets a la Soubise. They have not the acute pain of being turned back into the stale atmosphere of bread and beans. Of course it is by no means every day or every week even that M. le Cure breakfasts at the chateau; but there must nevertheless be a certain uncomfortable ...
— The Galaxy - Vol. 23, No. 1 • Various

... five miles of woodland and late fall meadow between himself and the distractions of city life, when looking adown a path that sloped gently to a brook he saw, sitting on a tree that lay athwart the stream and paddling her white feet in the sunny water, Nannie Branscome. His surprise robbed him of his reserve ...
— The Gentle Art of Cooking Wives • Elizabeth Strong Worthington

... royally, Adown the bank with merry mien, Came the maiden, fresh as fleur-de-lys. Her surcoat linen must have been Shining in whitest purity, Slashed at the sides and caught between With the fairest pearls, it seemed to me, ...
— The Pearl • Sophie Jewett

... feel athwart my cheek the lash Of whipping wind, but hear the torrent dash Adown the mountain steep, 'twere more my choice Than touch of human ...
— Flint and Feather • E. Pauline Johnson

... gently, Time! Let us glide adown thy stream Gently, as we sometimes glide Through a quiet dream. Humble voyagers are we, Husband, wife, and children three. (One is lost, an angel, fled To the ...
— Yesterdays with Authors • James T. Fields



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